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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Event Details

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Symposium #529
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
An Experimental Analysis of Effective Supervision: How to Increase Instructional Accuracy and Feedback During Teacher Training and Supervision
Monday, May 28, 2018
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom G
Area: EDC
CE Instructor: Len Levin, Ph.D.
Chair: Lynn Yuan (Verbal Behavior Associates)
Discussant: Len Levin (Coyne & Associates)
Abstract: As behavior analysts, we have the responsibility of training other individuals (parents, educators, or Registered Behavior Technicians) to deliver service or accurate instruction directly to our clients. Much research has demonstrated that instructor accuracy (i.e., errorless instructional delivery) is critical for learner outcomes. There is a significant quantity of behavior analytic literature that discusses evidenced-based methods for improving teacher training and supervision. In this symposium, we present an experimental analysis of the necessary components that constitute effective and efficient supervision and identify tactics to increase supervision by clinical management. In summary, this experimental study established the following: 1) supervisor accuracy in presentation of instructional trials across student programming is a required prerequisite for training and supervising others, 2) observing others deliver instruction via video training, Powerpoint presentations, or role playing are ineffective methods of increasing teacher accuracy, 3) the controlling variable for how teacher accuracy is achieved is through the use of direct, objective measurement of instruction using the Teacher Performance Rate Accuracy Scale (TPRAS) provided during in situ supervision, and 4) self-monitoring ones own instructional delivery through conducting TPRAS on oneself is another effective way to increase teacher accuracy.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, and any individuals who are responsible for training and supervising RBTs, paraprofessionals, and/or school aides in direct instruction with learners.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to 1) Identify ineffective methods for RBT/teacher training 2) Identify effective components of RBT/teacher training 3) Identify prerequisite supervisor repertoires necessary to be effective as supervisors 4) List tactics to increase the amount of direct/objective feedback during supervision by clinical supervisors.
 
The Effects of Observing Others Versus Self-Observation on Teacher Accuracy in Presenting Learn Unit Instruction
(Applied Research)
ELIZABETH HOWARTH (Verbal Behavior Associates), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: In Experiment I, I tested the effects of learning by observing others on teacher learn unit accuracy. I measured learn unit accuracy prior to and following a training where the teachers measured the accuracy of other individual’s learn unit instruction, via TPRA observations on a set of standardized training videos. Additionally, I measured the numbers of post-intervention in-situ TPRA’s with feedback required by each teacher to achieve mastery criteria for presenting learn units. Results showed that all teachers still required in-situ TPRA’s with feedback in order to achieve mastery criteria for delivering instruction. In Experiment II, I tested the effects of learning by observing oneself on teacher learn unit accuracy. I measured learn unit accuracy prior to and following a training where the teachers measured the accuracy of their own learn unit instruction, via TPRA observations on a set of pre-recorded videos of themselves delivering learn units. Additionally, I measured the numbers of post-intervention in-situ TPRA’s with feedback required by each teacher to achieve mastery criteria for presenting instruction. Results showed that all three teachers demonstrated mastery criteria for delivering learn units following the self-observation intervention (the skill was in repertoire, none of the teachers required in-situ TPRA’s with feedback).
 
The Effects of a Group Yoked-Contingency Intervention on Increasing the Amount of Teacher Performance Rate and Accuracy Scale Feedback From Clinical Managers During Direct Supervision Sessions
(Applied Research)
Matthew C. Howarth (Verbal Behavior Associates), Crystal Lo (Verbal Behavior Associates), CATHERINE E. POPE (Verbal Behavior Associates)
Abstract: Supervision of Registered Behavior Technicians (RBT) in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis is a key quality indicator to providing the best outcomes for consumers. Previous research has demonstrated that the Teacher Performance Rate and Accuracy Scale (TPRA) measure is the most effective tool used to increase instructional accuracy of instructors in the field by providing immediate and objective feedback. In contrast, the frequency of which a Clinical BCBA Managers implement the TPRA measure with RBTs is to be considered. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effects of a yoked-contingency tactic to increase the implementation of TPRAs with a group of 3 BCBA managers who delivered very few TPRAs during RBT supervision sessions, using a delayed multiple probe design across groups of participants. The dependent variable is the number of TPRAs each BCBA manager completed per day. The independent variable is the implementation of a yoked- contingency tactic, in which individuals in a group must work together to access reinforcement (Greer & Ross, 2008). This study is on-going, however, current results indicate that a yoked-contingency intervention is overall an effective tactic to increase TPRAs delivered by current BCBA manager participants during sessions.
 

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