Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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41st Annual Convention; San Antonio, TX; 2015

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Symposium #125
Generalization Assessment and Tactics to Promote New Repertoires: An examination of peer mediated differential reinforcement and peer tutors in the classroom.
Sunday, May 24, 2015
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Grand Ballroom C2 (CC)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Ginette Wilson-Bishop (Advances Learning Center)
Abstract: The Effects of Peer-mediated Momentary Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior on the On-task Behavior of Elementary Students with Autism Authors: ERIN C. MCLOUGHLIN, Ronald F. Allen, Judah B. Axe, Robert Volpe This study examined the effects of peer-mediated momentary DRO on the on-task behavior of students with autism. A reversal design was used across two dyads of first- and second-grade students, each consisting of one target child with autism and one trained peer who did not have autism. The training process included direct instruction, modeling, and role-play with feedback to achieve the peers mastery of the m-DRO procedure. The results of the study show that peer-implemented m-DRO is an effective strategy to improve on-task behavior of young students with autism. Manding for Play with Peer Tutors and Planning for Generalization Authors: JAMIE REED Children with autism typically display noticeable deficits in social and language skills. Most treatment for improving language skills involves an adult therapist and the target child. While this method is effective, seldom do the skills generalize to novel peers or adults. Research has demonstrated successful generalization through the use of peer tutors, in such cases where a peer is trained to implement the teaching program. The current study investigates the use of peer tutors in improving social behavior by manding for play in a social skills groups setting. The Role of Assessment: Generalization beyond the training environment Authors: ASHLEY RODMAN, Katherine Corey A review of generalization assessments conducted with students participating in a social skills group at ALC has demonstrated that skills learned in the instructional setting can generalize to the natural environment. Schedules of reinforcement in both the social skills group and natural settings, and the potential implications for generalization are discussed. Results suggest that after participating in social skills groups, students social responses are maintained by peer-mediated schedules of reinforcement in the natural environment. Methods for effectively programming for generalizastion and recommendations regarding motivational factors, environmental manipulations, and increased opportunities for social skill responses are also reviewed.
Keyword(s): Generalization, Assessment
 
The Effects of Peer-mediated Momentary Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior on the On-task Behavior of Elementary Students with Autism
ERIN MCLOUGHLIN (Advances Learning Center), Ronald F. Allen (Simmons College), Judah B. Axe (Simmons College), Robert Volpe (Northeastern University)
Abstract: This study examined the effects of peer-mediated momentary differential reinforcement of other behavior (m-DRO) on the on-task behavior of students with autism. A reversal design was used across two dyads of first- and second-grade students, each consisting of one target child with autism and one trained peer who did not have autism. The independent variable was the trained peers' implementation of the m-DRO procedure. The training process included direct instruction, modeling, and role-play with feedback to achieve the peers' mastery of the m-DRO procedure. The dependent variable was the on-task academic behavior of an elementary-aged student with autism, measured as percentage of intervals of on-task behavior. Baseline levels of on-task behavior were low for the target children, and levels increased with the introduction of the peer's use of m-DRO. A reversal to baseline conditions for both target children showed that on-task behavior decreased to levels similar to baseline. Subsequent implementation of the intervention resulted in a return to high levels of on-task behavior. The on-task behavior and treatment integrity data for the trained peers remained high across all phases. The results of the study show that peer-implemented m-DRO is an effective strategy to improve on-task behavior of young students with autism.
 
Manding for Play with Peer Tutors and Planning for Generalization
JAMIE REED (Advances Learning Center), Ginette Wilson-Bishop (Advances Learning Center)
Abstract: Children with autism typically display noticeable deficits in social and language skills. Most treatment for improving language skills involves an adult therapist and the target child. While this method is effective, seldom do the skills generalize to novel peers or adults. Research has demonstrated successful generalization through the use of peer tutors, in such cases where a peer is trained to implement the teaching program. The current study investigates the use of peer tutors in improving social behavior by manding for play in a social skills groups setting.
 
The Role of Assessment: Generalization beyond the training environment
ASHLEY RODMAN (Advances Learning Center), Katherine Frances Corey (Advances Learning Center), Katherine A. Johnson (Advances Learning Center)
Abstract: A review of generalization assessments conducted with students participating in a social skills group at ALC has demonstrated that skills learned in the instructional setting can generalize to the natural environment. Schedules of reinforcement in both the social skills group and natural settings, and the potential implications for generalization are discussed. Results suggest that after participating in social skills groups, students’ social responses are maintained by peer-mediated schedules of reinforcement in the natural environment. Methods for effectively programming for generalizastion and recommendations regarding motivational factors, environmental manipulations, and increased opportunities for social skill responses are also reviewed.
 

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