Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Program by Continuing Education Events: Friday, May 28, 2021


 

Workshop #W16
CE Offered: BACB
Augmentative and Alternative Communication Intervention Considerations for Individuals With Autism
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joseph Novak, Ed.D.
JOSEPH NOVAK (REED Academy; Kean University; Endicott College)
Description: AAC is reviewed for its benefits for expressive and receptive language. Research-based information is provided as it relates to how vocal speech development is affected by AAC. Communication modes, the range of communication systems, and brief information related to assessment is given. Research on the efficacy of SGDs for supporting communication needs of individuals with autism will be highlighted. Information regarding recommended prompts/prompt-fading procedures will be shared. AAC modeling techniques are reviewed in detail. Navigating AAC needs and vocal speech is discussed and a sample protocol is shared. Specific skill acquisition programs to target skills such as communicative repair will be shared. Common challenges faced when trying to develop more advanced language for AAC users are explored. The tendency for AAC devices to becoming “manding machines” is discussed and several possible explanations are provided. Recommendations for how to develop advanced language skills are provided and sample SGD layouts are given. Ethical considerations regarding authenticity of the communicative message are discussed. Potential areas of challenge related to collaboration between behavior analysts and SLPs will be reviewed with implications and possible resolutions given. The importance of collaboration between the two disciplines in order to ensure effective AAC intervention practice will be emphasized.
Learning Objectives: 1) Participants will be able to describe the research to date on the use of speech-generating devices for individuals with autism. 2) Participants will be able to accurately describe various instructional strategies including language modeling and direct prompting. 3) Identify ethical challenges related to AAC implementation including issues regarding authenticity when using phrase-based icons on AAC devices 4) Identify strategies for AAC implementation when effective collaboration is unavailable, ineffective, or a work-in-progress. 5) Discuss several possible reasons why devices may become manding machines
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion - Workshop objectives will be met through a presentation of lecture and group discussion. - Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided as appropriate. - Supplemental materials for will be provided in order to support participant learning. - The format combines lecture and group discussion.
Audience: The target audience consists of BCBAs who may only have entry-level competence in the area of augmentative and alternative communication. It is important that BCBAs has a better understanding of evidence-based intervention strategies for individuals with autism who use AAC and also have the tools to collaborate effectively with SLPs on AAC interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): AAC, aided modeling, augmentative, SGD
 
Workshop #W16A
CE Offered: BACB
ABA Parent Training: Essential Tools for ABA Providers
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lilyan Willemijn Johanna Campbell, M.S.
LILYAN WILLEMIJN JOHANNA CAMPBELL (ABA Works; ABA Courses; ABA Center International)
Description: In this workshop, you will learn the Essential Tools for ABA Parent Training. You can dramatically increase the impact on many individuals by using these super-duper essential tools for ABA Parent training. Behavior Technicians and Behavior Analysts can benefit from this workshop. Developing and implementing a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) is crucial for the success of the learner’s progress. Many studies have shown, that if caregivers and parents are well-trained in the steps of the BIP, generalization takes place and the opportunities for progress are more readily available. In addition, research shows when parents and caregivers are trained in the essential basics of ABA, such as prompting and reinforcement procedures, learners can have much more opportunities for growth. This can have a major effect on their progress. In many countries and states, there is not enough funding and/or opportunities for ABA services. By teaching ABA-providers the most essential tools to make ABA Parent Training work, you can make a significant change.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the effects of parent training (2) Explain why parent training is important (3) Describe and demonstrate how to motivate parents/caregivers to engage in parent training (4) Identify and apply the essential tools for ABA parent training related to the Behavior Intervention Plan and related to the ABA basic strategies
Activities: Lecture through PPT • Group Discussion • Questions (testing, interaction) • Polls • Chat • Video clips/Demonstrations • Small group breakout: Case Studies • Behavior Skills Training (BST) and role-play
Audience: Prerequisite skills and competencies are the basics in ABA (prompting, reinforcement)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): caregiver training, challenging behaviors, parent training, teaching parents, tools parents
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: BACB
Writing Programs for the Advanced Learner: Programming Beyond Assessments
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Shayna Gaunt, M.A.
SHAYNA GAUNT (How to ABA), SHIRA KARPEL (How to ABA)
Description: The advanced learner has a nearly full assessment, but still struggles with language and comprehension. In practice, we see learners who talk in sentences, but still do not answer wh-questions fluently or carry a conversation. Has your learner outgrown the boxes of your usual assessments? How do you program for someone who is more complex than what you were taught during your BCBA supervision? In this workshop, we will provide you with a road map for the advanced learner, including assessment, practical programs, data sheets, and materials. We will share our tips and tricks for advanced programming (gained from 20+ years of experience) and show you how to teach across operants so that your students’ skills are fluent and dynamic. Program individualization will be also be discussed. Instead of programming to an assessment, watch your learner soar! Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by 20+ years of involvement in the practice and application of ABA within the autism community. At How to ABA, we provide practical support and resources for ABA professionals. We help BCBA’s create dynamic, individualized programs by providing easy to access programs, materials and CEUs so that you can feel confident and master what you love.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the 3 areas of need for an advanced learner after completing an assessment; (2) Demonstrate knowledge of program planning based on the profile of an advanced learner; (3) Write at least 3 dynamic skill acquisition programs for the advanced learner with ease and efficiency; (4) Develop corresponding data sheets tailored towards advanced learners that teach across operants.
Activities: The format combines lecture and small group activities. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, discussion, small group break out, and guided practice. Supplemental materials for will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop is intended for newly-minted behavior analysts providing language and social skills interventions for individuals diagnosed with ASD. Standardized competencies (e.g., BCBA) are suggested but not required.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): advanced learner, curriculum development, HowtoABA, program writing
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysis of Seizures
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: BPN/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. Individuals with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be better controlled, and important new skills could be acquired, if the behavior analyst understands epilepsy. A brief review of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be provided. The etiology, genetics, and classification of common seizure disorders will be briefly reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be covered. Clients with developmental disabilitesare often improperly monitored and over-medicated for seizures. These issues can be avoided with EEG (electroencephalography), which is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy. Workshop participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with the EEGwithout sedation or anesthesia. Participants will learn how epileptic seizures change an individual's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about how to describe, measure, and control these relationships in an ethical manner.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, each participant will be able to: 1. Define an epileptic seizure. 2. Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures. 3. Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior. 4. Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions. 5. Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress. 6. Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures. 7. Know how to prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia. 8. Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures. 8. Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy. 9. Explain some recent research on epilepsy and behavior analysis. 10. Explain how the environment can decrease abnormal brain activity and seizures.
Activities: The workshop activities will include lecture, group discussion, video observation, and interactive activities to test knowledge (using Kahoot). Students will have access to videos, peer reviewed articles and chapters on Research Gate before the conference. Research Gate link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Neill
Audience: Clinical behavior analysts and experimental analysts with an interest in learning effective methods for analyzing seizures and their immediate and long term effects on intellectual functioning, everyday behavior and behavior disorders.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: BACB
Empirically Supported Behavioral Parent Training and Functional-Based Assessment and Treatment: Behavior Analysts Collaborating With Medical and Mental Health Professionals
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Andrew W. Gardner, Ph.D.
ANDREW W. GARDNER (University of Arizona - College of Medicine - Department of Psychiatry), CHELSEA E. CARR (The University of Arizona - Disability and Psychoeducational Studies )
Description: Parent and care provider training has been an integral part of Behavior Analysis for diverse reasons (e.g. training, maintenance, and generalization of skills). Many Behavior Analysts are not aware of the Parent Training Programs: Insight for Practitioners (2009) study published by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention identifying empirically supported training programs and effective components for parent training. These empirically supported training programs can go hand in hand with function-based assessment and treatment to address family accommodation to challenging behavior, as well as secondary gains (i.e. function of behavior). There are a number of empirically supported Behavioral Parent Training programs (e.g. PMT, PCIT, etc.) acknowledged by diverse medical and mental health professionals (e.g. psychiatry, pediatrics, etc.). Behavior Analysis has 30+ years of research on function-based assessment and treatment. The merging of these two areas to collaborate with other professionals and build bridges is the focus of the current workshop.
Learning Objectives: • At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: o Identify empirically supported Behavioral Parent Training programs o Learn specific skills related to Parent Management Training (PMT) and Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) o Identify the differences between indirect and direct function-based assessment tools for challenging behavior (e.g. screening tools, functional analyses, etc.) o Learn how these tools can be used in practice to collaborate with medical and mental health professionals
Activities: The workshop format will include lecture, video observation, modeling, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: identification of function of challenging behavior; functional-based treatment; parent training; collaboration with medical/mental health professionals
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Challenging Behavior, FBA Treatment, Interprofessional Collaboration, Parent/Family Training
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: BACB
Do No Harm: Sex Ed You Can Implement Right Now
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara Gross, M.Ed.
BARBARA GROSS (Missouri Behavior Consulting; Special School District of St Louis County), WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates)
Description:

Behavior Analysts who work with people may often be called upon to provide support in the area or sex education and sexual behavior analysis, however for many this work is outside their scope of experience. Additionally, because sexual behavior, and interlocking contingencies of sexual behavior, are complex, there is potential to do harm to a client by attempting to work outside of one’s scope. There are, however, many behavior supports within the scope of behavior analysts which can empower clients to build prerequisite skills for healthy relationships and healthy sexual self expression. This workshop will empower practitioners to implement supports which have minimal risk and high levels of beneficence, and which center client dignity, autonomy, and self-determination. This workshop will additionally empower practitioners to better write related treatment plan goals which demonstrate meeting medically necessary criteria for behavior analytic intervention. Empirically supported research will be shared as applicable and content limitations and risks of practice will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Analyze the "Extended Permission" and "Limited Information" components of the Ex-PLISSIT model (Taylor, 2006) for sex therapy as it pertains to behavior analytic practice 2. Describe at least 4 program areas across at least 8 learning channels for prerequisite skills for healthy relationship behavior and sexual behavior 3. Select an appropriate learning channel and program slice for implementation in each program area when given a client scenario 4. Demonstrate implementation of at least 1 specific support program for prerequisite skills for healthy relationship behavior and sexual behavior in group practice 5. Identify example program goals which do and do not likely meet criteria for a medically necessary treatment plan.
Activities: Workshop activities will utilize a BST model and include brief lecture covering potential harms in sexual behavior analysis, program areas with low risk for harm and high beneficence, and learning channels for teaching. Following this, the workshop will include practice scenarios for assessment, modeling of program implementation, breakout practice for implementation, feedback, and opportunity to implement feedback.
Audience: BCBAs and BCaBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): consent, sex education, sexual behavior, Sexuality
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: BACB
Environmental Barriers in the Classroom Setting Impacting Effective ABA Treatment and Solutions for Success
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melinda Docter, Ed.D.
MELINDA DOCTER (Northcentral University)
Description: Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) requires that states provide a free and appropriate public education (FAPE) to all students whose disabilities impact access to their education programs. The Individualized Educational Program (IEP) is the vehicle for providing FAPE. Parents of children with autism spectrum disorders are encouraged by scientific literature supporting the use of Applied Behavior Analysis and will often request this treatment more frequently than other models of teaching used by many school districts. However, IDEA does not identify specific treatment/methodology; it permits the school district to choose the intervention. Parents often resort to the legal process for access to ABA therapy; and they often have to prove that not only is ABA therapy more effective for their child, but other methodologies are less effective for their child. Therefore, it is imperative that when ABA treatment is provided in the school setting, it is effective. There are often environmental barriers that impede the effectiveness of ABA in a classroom setting (e.g., staff turnover, lack of training, inconsistent data collection, lack of knowledge and lack of teacher/administrative support). This workshop will identify barriers to ABA treatment in the classroom setting, resolutions for those barriers, and strategies for effective treatment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Identify environmental variables in a classroom setting that may impede effective ABA treatment for the client. (2) Identify specific strategies that can be used to either bypass environmental barriers or coexist with environmental barriers to ensure the most effective treatment for the client. (3) Choose and apply the most appropriate strategy to either bypass environmental barriers or coexist with environmental barriers to ensure the most effective treatment for the client.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include: *Lecture to present information *Analysis of scenarios for environmental barriers *Small group discussion to review environmental barriers *Small group activities to include the following: -Identification of environmental barriers through scenario analysis -Identification of solutions to address environmental barriers to ensure effective treatment implementation in the classroom setting -Data collection with environmental barriers in the classroom setting -Treatment implementation with environmental variables in the classroom setting -IEP review for information relevant to ABA treatment in the classroom setting -Small group guided practice for behavior analytic intervention within the classroom setting
Audience: Basic Intermediate - No prerequisites necessary as this workshop will identify and describe familiar classroom settings and scenarios regarding environmental barriers impacting effective ABA treatment.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA Implementation, BTP, School-based ABA, Treatment Integrity
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: BACB
Designing and Measuring Organizational Clinical Outcome Data
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christina Barosky, M.A.
CHRISTINA BAROSKY (Bierman ABA; Simmons University), ASHLEY E. BENNETT (Bierman ABA ), ASHLEY AHLERS (Bierman ABA )
Description: Organizational outcomes have become a topic of increased interest for providers and insurance companies. This increased push for more data often leaves organizations struggling to determine what data to analyze, how to gather that information and how it can be best represented. The ability to analyze client outcome data can improve current and future client outcomes as well as help your organization develop trainings to improve both the behavior analysts and client performance. This is especially true for early intervention providers who need to maximize client outcomes in that highly crucial time of their development. This workshop will walk you through some examples of client outcome data at both the micro and macro level, methods for collecting and storing the data, and take the opportunity to brainstorm outcomes data that would work well for your agency and client demographic. This workshop is designed for key stakeholders and leaders of ABA agencies.
Learning Objectives: Participants will identify preliminary key measures of client success in their organization. Participants will identify preliminary key measures of staff performance related to client success. Participants will brainstorm data collection methods for key measures that are feasible for their organization. Participants will formulate an action plan for piloting data collection and analysis of key outcomes.
Activities: Lecture regarding the importance of measuring client outcome data at micro and macro levels. Lecture and model of examples of what can be measured and how the data can be displayed for analysis. Small group activities to brainstorm current ways the participants organizations collect data on outcomes, then guided practice as small groups to develop methods to measure new outcomes data. Guided practice exercises on how to analyze outcomes data and how to create interventions to increase staff performance and client success.
Audience: Leaders or clinical directors of ABA companies. Members of the audience should have knowledge of how staff and client success is currently measured in their agency.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Data analysis, Outcomes
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: BACB
Putting the SUPER in Supervision: Evidence Based Strategies
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: TBA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeremy H. Greenberg, Ph.D.
JEREMY H. GREENBERG (The Children's Institute of Hong Kong)
Description: This three-hour intensive workshop will include evidence-based teaching, learning, and supervision strategies ad tactics from the Applied Behavior Analysis research literature. The content is aimed at behavior analysts and supervisors who are charged with the supervision of RBTs, Board Certified Assisitant Behavior Analysis, and BCBAs working with students having various special education needs.
Learning Objectives: Introduction to Supervision [Strategies & Tactics for Supervisors] The Learn Unit Data-Based Decision Making The TPRA (Ingham & Greer, 1992)
Activities: Participants will become literate in the The Learn Unit and supporting literature through Active Student Responding (ASR). Participants will learn the rules included in the Data Decision Protocol (Keohane, 1997; Greer, 2002; Greenberg, 2007) through hands-on presentation and exercises Participants will learn about the TPRA procedure, supporting research, and practice data collection and IOA using video models.
Audience: Supervisors of RBT, Board Certified Assisitant Behavior Analysts, and Board Certified Behavior Analysts, or other practitioners or therapists working with students with special education needs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Severe Problem Behavior: From Research to Evidence-Based Practice
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Queens College, City University of New York), PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: Severe problem behavior is a debilitating and chronic repertoire that can significantly impact an individual’s quality of life. Although a multitude of different behavioral interventions have been developed to reduce problem behavior, there is rarely a comprehensive demonstration of a successful program from beginning (intake of client) to end (reintegration into classroom and home) of clinical services. In this workshop we will start with an introduction to a practical functional assessment and skill-based treatment model. We will describe the research that has led to the development of the model and how it has been applied to school, home, and outpatient settings. In addition, we will provide a guide to conducting the practical functional assessment and how to use those results to build caregiver-informed communication skills, tolerance skills, and cooperation skills. Considering that the goal of the entire assessment and treatment process is to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires of individuals who exhibit problem behavior, we will spend the second half of the workshop describing how to maintain treatment effects once the individual is returned to the home or school environment by training staff members and caregivers and programming for generalization of outcomes.
Learning Objectives: Participants will describe evidence-based approaches to 1. conducting a safe and practical functional assessment of problem behavior 2. teaching function-based skills to replace problem behavior 3. training caregivers using behavior skills training 4. programming generalization of caregiver training 5. managing restraint and restrictive behavior management practices 6. managing treatment integrity and relapse.
Activities: The workshop will include lectures, case presentations, and problem solving exercises.
Audience: Participants should have an understanding of common behavioral concepts as described in Cooper et al. (2020) and some experience and basic knowledge of ABA applied to severe problem behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Caregiver Training, Functional Analysis, Problem Behavior
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: BACB
Preparing Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder for Kindergarten
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sonja R. de Boer, Ph.D.
SONJA R. DE BOER (Spring Harbor Hospital-Maine Behavior Health; North Haven Community School)
Description: A common goal for educators and behavior analysts is for young children to enter Kindergarten with the skills that allow them to LEARN NEW SKILLS and CONCEPTS IN A LARGE GROUP with other children of the same age. Children also need to enter Kindergarten being able to INDEPENDENTLY demonstrate and use the skills they need to learn and participate in academic, social, play, adaptive behavior, and self-help activities. This means that educators and behavior analysts working with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder ages 0-5 need to focus on teaching these children LEARNING TO LEARN SKILLS. The proactive and preventative early intervention ABA teaching methods utilized with young children with autism have been proven over and over to improve academic, behavior, adaptive and social skills. In spite of drastic improvements in these skill areas, many children with autism enter Kindergarten unable to successfully participate and learn in a typical Kindergarten. This workshop will provide educators and behavior analysts with information on and teaching strategies for the specific areas of learning to learn skills (early, intermediate and advanced learners) that need to be developed for children with autism to enter and be successful in a general education Kindergarten.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) list and explain four overall proactive and preventative early intervention ABA teaching and behavior intervention methods to utilize with with young children with autism to increase the quality and quantity of their academic, behavior, adaptive and social skills; (2) list and explain specific learning to learn skills that need to be developed for young children with autism to enter and be successful in a general education Kindergarten classes; (3) explain how to set up an early childhood environment that has clear routines and boundaries which motivates child with autism to learn and behave appropriately.
Activities: The workshop objectives will be met through the use of lecture, group discussions, question and answer, video demonstrations and practice using forms and data sheets.
Audience: In order for this workshop to benefit participants, they need a basic understanding of ABA early intervention strategies with young children with autism, as well as experience working in early childhood and Kindergarten settings with children with autism (mild, moderate and/or severe).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, early childhood, early intervention, inclusion
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: BACB
Trauma-Informed ABA
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Saundra Bishop, M.S.
SAUNDRA BISHOP (BASICS ABA Therapy, LLC)
Description: Best practices around Trauma Informed Care have been difficult for our field to adopt and, as a result, have made it difficult to fully support our clients who have experienced trauma events. By looking at trauma events as a setting event, we can create interventions that are Trauma Informed and can better support our clients who may be in foster care, in family preservation programs, or who have experienced other trauma situations. By doing so, we meet our ethical obligations to ensure we are treating the true function of the client's behavior when trauma events are involved. We will also explore how this can be applied to our clients in the COVID-19 world. BASICS ABA Therapy, LLC has been using this model for 7 years and has been giving trainings on it for 5. In this advanced workshop, we will learn to recognize what a trauma event is, how trauma events can function as a setting event, and what interventions can be put in place to address these events.
Learning Objectives: Objectives At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Attendees will be able to recognize and define a trauma event (2) Attendees will be able to define how trauma events can function as a setting event (3) Attendees will be able to apply interventions to create Trauma Informed antecedent and consequence interventions (4) Attendees will be able to teach replacement behaviors that target the unique functions that maintain behavior for people who have experienced trauma events. (5) Attendees will apply the knowledge in the workshop to real cases to develop an intervention for one behavior
Activities: This workshop is a combination of lecture, small group "pair and shares", videos, handouts, guided practice, and case studies.
Audience: Who is this for? -BCBAs working or interested in working with populations that have had exposure to trauma events (example: co-morbid diagnosis of PTSD, children in foster care or family preservation programs, children who have experienced medical trauma) Prerequisite skills: Firm grasp on setting events and antecedent interventions addressing setting events. Firm grasp on replacement and alternative behaviors addressing setting events
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): abuse, foster care, PTSD, trauma informed
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
BITES®: A Behavioral InTEgrated With Speech Approach to Feeding Therapy
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura J. Seiverling, Ph.D.
LAURA J. SEIVERLING (Ball State University), ELISE JUSKO (Bites Feeding Therapy, LLC)
Description: Pediatric feeding problems are complex and often require a multi-disciplinary approach to assessment and treatment. The Behavioral InTEgrated with Speech approach, known as BITES®, focuses specifically on how speech-language pathologists (SLPS) and Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) can work together to assess feeding problems and develop interventions for them. With over 30 years of combined experience in the field of pediatric feeding disorders, Laura Seiverling, Psychologist and BCBA-D, and Elise Jusko, CCC-SLP, will draw from their own experiences working on a multidisciplinary feeding team together and will provide an overview of how cross-discipline collaboration between SLPs and BCBAs can look when it comes to both assessment and treatment of food selectivity, chewing, packing, rapid eating, tongue thrusts, dysphagia, food overstuffing, choking phobias, and self-feeding difficulties. Case examples will be provided for each of the feeding problems discussed. In addition, the presenters will review the various factors that may lead to a feeding problem and will provide an overview of typical feeding development. Content has peer reviewed, published support beyond those publications and other types of communications devoted primarily to the promotion of the approach.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Describe typical feeding development 2. Identify the role of various disciplines involved in multidisciplinary feeding evaluations. 3. Identify common medical and environmental factors that may lead to a feeding problem. 4. Understand the role of both SLPs and BCBAs in the assessment and intervention of pediatric feeding disorders. 5. Collect baseline data and determine a starting point for feeding interventions. They will also learn how to collect data on various mealtime behaviors, graph child mealtime behavior, and how to write task-analyzed feeding protocols. 6. Use behavioral skills training to teach caregivers and others to implement feeding interventions.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: Lecture, video, small group activities, case examples, discussion, and role-play.
Audience: Attendees should have a basic understanding of pediatric feeding problems and some experience implementing feeding interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): feeding disorders, interdisciplinary collaboration
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: BACB/NASP
Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This day long workshop will focus on the U.S. Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the many ethical issues that practicing behavior analyst should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal legal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments, writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term positive behavior supports as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations including FBAs. Participants will learn how state law applies at the local level. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify the major components of US special education law, IDEIA, which protects the majority of clients served by a behavior analyst. 2. Identify the procedural areas of IDEIA that could result in ethical dilemmas for the practicing behavior analyst. 3. Identify the legal and ethical requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation completed by a behavior analyst. 4. Identify when a behavior analyst must complete an FBA vs when they should complete one under the IDEIA. 5. Identify when a BIP must be developed by a behavior analysts under the IDEIA 6. Identify what type of data must be collected under the IDEIA 7. Describe the difference between a procedural and substantive error and how ethical blunders could create these types of errors.
Activities: The format combines: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study Analysis, Online Responding, & Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts School Administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Engineering Schools and Clinics for Student and Client Success: Part 2
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as a program designer, staff trainer, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide you with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: attendees must register for both part 1 and part 2 of this workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results, performance, and progress, using measures of frequency, celeration and celeration efficiency; (2) Define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) Perform a data based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) Design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: Do you work as a program designer, staff trainer, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? This workshop will teach you how to improve the performance of your organization so that every client will make efficient progress.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Outcome-Based Management of Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Through Dynamic Programming at the Lovaas Institute Midwest
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest; University of Minnesota)
Description: The Lovaas Institute Midwest has delivered all of its EIBI services utilizing a comprehensive dynamic programming model for 18 years. The main goals of the model are: to ensure that each family is receiving the most appropriate level of individualized intervention at any given point in time; and to monitor each clinician's daily performance in a manner that contributes to continuous quality improvement. In dynamic programming, the interventions are continuously adjusted to produce accelerating progress, rather than to maintain static performance. The workshop will present the methods of managing the performance of all team members, parents, and supervisors through daily, weekly, six-month, and overall outcome measures. Dynamic measures focus on generative responding, acceleration toward single-trial mastery, recombinative generalization in matrix training, contingency management, and naturalization. Cost-effective staff training and management is also a fundamental concern, and so the system utilizes a data collection system that enables timely decision making, to both increase effectiveness when individual acquisition is challenging, and reduce the use of artificial training parameters as quickly as possible without impairing generalization or maintenance. Comprehensive program evaluation data will be presented on a substantial body of accumulated measures for 246 children served over 18 years.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to describe: 1) the specific system for evaluating child response to treatment. 2) the specific clinical management system. 3) the results of the comprehensive research program.
Activities: The main format will be didactic presentation of the model, using actual programming materials and data, with frequent pauses to engage in questions and commentary by the participants. Various programming materials will be distributed to the attendees.
Audience: The attendees will be best able to attain the workshop objectives if they have working knowledge and experience with any EIBI program.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): curriculum management, individualization, outcomes, short-term objectives
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Providing Internet-Based Consultation Services to Teach Parents of Children With Autism to Effectively Assess Skills and Implement Evidence-Based Teaching Interventions
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed to help consultants to remotely provide effective assessment, program development, and consultation services. This workshop will focus on the many factors that must be considered both when initiating and conducting internet-based consultation including: clearly establishing the expectations and roles of both the parent and the consultant, determining the parents’ knowledge of critical distinctions in the various types of language skills, their motivation and ability to participate in and follow through with specific teaching activities. In order to obtain and maintain the parents’ active participation, it is necessary to select the initial teaching activities that will help the parent quickly develop instructional control. Once the parents have obtained reinforcement from the observing the child’s performance, parents are more likely to maintain their motivation participation to extend the child’s existing skills, and develop new skills and repertoires. Therefore, consultants need to know and be able to teach parents about the peer-reviewed research involving patterns of typical child development so as to determine appropriate learning objectives that will allow the child to more readily learn from their everyday interactions with others (Partington, Bailey & Partington, 2018).
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1. state four strategies that will increase successful parent participation in teaching skills to their child when provided with internet-based consultation services; 2. state steps to ensure that parents establish instructional control during their initial teaching interactions with their child; 3. state the steps to effectively teach parents how to teach skills to their child; 4. compare the existing skill levels of a child with an autism spectrum disorder to the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children; 5. state at least two strategies to maintain a parent’s motivation to teach when provided with remote consultation services; 6. state internet-based resources that are available to parents and consultants to facilitate the documentation of skill development and increase data-based communications when delivering remote consultation services.
Activities: Instructional activities will mainly be in a lecture and demonstration format due to the workshop being conducted remotely. However, extensive efforts will be made to have interaction with the participants through frequent question and answer periods.
Audience: Participants should be BACB level consultants who have obtained training in criterion-referenced assessments and have had direct experience implementing educational programs with children with autism or other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Curriculum planning, Parent training, Skills assessment, Telehealth
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: BACB
Working With Adults With Severe Problem Behavior: Ethical Considerations and Strategies
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Naomi Spence, M.A.
NAOMI SPENCE (Pyles and Associates), SHAI MAOR (Pyles and Associates)
Description: Severe problem behaviors can manifest into a variety of topographical behaviors but typically consists of aggression, self-injury, and/or property destruction. Unfortunately, this also means a decrease in opportunities for individuals who engage in this type of severe problem behavior because of the damage that these individuals can inflict. As legislature continues to push for community placements and the imminent closure of non-community-based placement opportunities for adults who display the aforementioned behaviors, the need for community supports that can safely, ethically, and successfully manage these individuals has significantly increased. Due to biological factors (e.g. height and weight) of these individuals, intervention strategies that are/were effective with children are not typically effective with these types of adults. Being an adult comes with an increase in freedom of choice (depending on conservatorship) that can make navigating support for these types of individuals extremely complex. Furthermore, at times an increased number of support services can provide a challenge in collaborating how to best support the individual. These support services include, but are not limited to psychiatrists, medical doctor’s, mental health therapy services, behavioral services, day programs and regional centers.
Learning Objectives: After attending this workshop, attendees will be able to (1) describe programmatic, ethical, and collaborative considerations for working with adults with severe problem behavior, (2) identify clinical situations that necessitate different approaches and (3) demonstrate understanding of information provided by creating a preliminary plan for an individual they serve.
Activities: This workshop includes presentation of information through lecture, presentation of evidenced based interventions, and guided group activities.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is anyone working with adults.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Children With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Home and at School: Broadening the Lens
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Traditional counselors view aberrant behaviors as symptoms of underlying constructs that are the reason for these behaviors, while behaviorists view these behaviors as serving an environmental function. FBA identifies the function of aberrant behaviors and acceptable replacement behaviors that serve the same function. Components that are often missing in the analysis of aberrant behaviors include: 1) motivating operations in the form of private events (thoughts and feelings); and 2) learning history with specific Sds for reinforcement or punishment. This workshop will deal with the following: disturbed attachment, callousness and lack of emotionality, oppositional and defiant behaviors, and anxiety and depression.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the symptoms of emotional/behavioral disorders as behaviors serving an environmental function 2. Describe the process of conducting FBAs with children with emotional/behavioral disorders 3. Describe the role of learning history in treating with children with emotional/behavioral disorders 4. Describe the role of motivating operations and discriminative stimuli in treating children with emotional/behavioral disorders 5. Describe how to develop and implement function-based treatments for children with emotional/behavioral disorders
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using lecture, role-play, case presentations, discussion and small-group interaction.
Audience: Participants can include BCBAs, teachers, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, counselors, and social workers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral problems, diversity issues, emotional problems
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Dealing With Uncertainty: An Ethical Decision-Making Model and Its Application to Providing Telehealth-Based Behavioral Services
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: DDA/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Weihe Huang, Ph.D.
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum; Florida Institute of Technology ), KARRE WILLIAMS (CBEM)
Description: Ethical dilemmas always challenge practitioners of applied behavior analysis (ABA) because ABA service delivery is a complicated process and behavior analysts may encounter clinical and moral uncertainties. During the COVID-19 pandemic, behavior analysts move rapidly into the telehealth model of delivering ABA services. As a result, ABA providers are more likely than before to find themselves in uncertain situations where an ethical dilemma could arise. This workshop is designed to increase participants’ ability to deal with ethical uncertainties by defining ethical principles valued by behavior analysts, describing the characteristics of ethical dilemmas, introducing an ethical decision-making model, and demonstrating how this model can be applied to solve ethical dilemmas in providing ABA service via telehealth. This approach incorporates codes of ethics for behavior analysts and ethical reasoning strategies. In so doing, the instructors provide participants with a framework that emphasizes teaching the process of making ethical decisions rather than just offering simple answers. These principles and strategies are based on the clinical and teaching experiences of the instructors, their relevant publications, and the available literature in the field of ABA and other disciplines. The instructors will discuss the limitations of this model and offer various examples of applying the model.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe at least five core ethical principles valued in the field of applied behavior analysis; (2) identify most common ethical dilemmas by discriminating among ethical dilemmas, clinical problems, and administrative issues; (3) explain six steps in the decision-making model; and (4) apply the decision-making model to solve ethical dilemmas stemming from telehealth-based ABA services by completing relevant case scenarios provided by the instructors.
Activities: Core content will be taught through lecture and case illustrations. In group discussions, participants will be encouraged to (1) recognize ethical dilemmas based on personal experience in the field of ABA; and (2) apply standards in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and six steps specified in the decision-making model to address ethical uncertainties in general and to solve ethical dilemmas in providing telehealth-based ABA service in particular. Supplemental materials will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: Participants in this workshop should have some working knowledge of common ethical standards such as those specified in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Designing Instruction That Honors Client Assent Withdrawal, Promotes Self-Advocacy, and Minimizes Harm
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Worner Leland, M.S.
WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates; Sex Ed Continuing Ed)
Description: Unpublished Justice Department data suggest that individuals with intellectual and learning disabilities are at least seven times more likely to experience sexual assault than their neurotypical peers, and that 86% of these assaults are committed by a non-stranger (Shapiro, Anderson, Benincasa, & Van Woerkom, 2018). Because of this, behavior analysts and other helping professionals have a crucial role in supporting client development of self-advocacy skills, which involve giving and removing of assent. Behavior analysts also have a responsibility to help create environments in which client autonomy, self-determination, and preferences are centered and consistently respected. This workshop reviews the BACB ethical codes relevant to client autonomy and assent and outlines ways to address these skills from an instructional design perspective. This workshop also addresses writing assent withdrawal program goals which demonstrate medical necessity of behavioral intervention. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the training. Practice activities will be provided to encourage application of the content, presenters will facilitate a discussion of several clinical scenarios, and attendees will have the opportunity to explore how these strategies can best be implemented with the client populations they serve.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1) Select examples of both vocal and non-vocal responses indicating assent and removal of assent across multiple clients. 2) Identify the ways in which training over-compliance can be harmful for clients. 3) Select the key elements of writing assent withdrawal instructional program. 4) Identify assent withdrawal goals that meet the criteria for a medically necessary treatment plan. 5) Given a scenario, select a response in line with BACB ethical codes and promotes client autonomy and choice.
Activities: This workshop will utilize lecture, whole group sharing, and active practice opportunities for crafting assent withdrawal program exemplars, graphing assent withdrawal data exemplars, and writing assent withdrawal treatment goal exemplars which meet criteria for medically necessary intervention.
Audience: BCBAs and BCaBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): assent withdrawal, harm reduction, self advocacy
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Improving Classwide Behavior Support Through the Application of Applied Behavior Analytical Practices
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert F. Putnam, Ph.D.
ROBERT F. PUTNAM (May Institute), ERIK MAKI (May Institute ), SACHA KG SHAW (Endicott College )
Description: This workshop will provide behavior analysts with an evidence-based approach to designing effective classroom interventions. It includes a functional assessment to systematically evaluate the classroom environment to design, implement, and assess effective classroom-wide behavioral support practices. Once the environment is assessed, the model incorporates indirect (i.e., lecture, written training materials) and direct (i.e., modeling, performance feedback) instruction. Finally, participants will learn how teachers participate in a data-based decision-making process to establish more effective practices, procedures, and interactions with students. Data will be presented, supporting the need for a comprehensive training method that includes both indirect and direct instruction for teachers to adequately implement classroom-wide behavior support practices.
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn how to: 1) apply functional assessment strategies to the selection and implementation of effective classroom-wide practices; 2) use evidence-based methods used to train teachers in classroom-wide behavior support practices; 3) use a data-based decision process used with teachers to modify classroom behavior support practices, and; 4) use instructional and behavior support practices that establish more effective interactions between teachers and students and increase on-task behavior.
Activities: Participants will have an opportunity to engage in discussions with other behavior analysts, analyze sample data, draw conclusions about relevant classroom-wide interventions and role play providing effective performance feedback to educational staff
Audience: The necessary prerequisite skills and competencies the audience should have should be 1) knowledge of the ecology of general and special education classroom, and 2) the ability to use data to make data-based decisions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: BACB/NASP — 
Ethics
Effective, Ethical, and Expanded Practices for BCBAs in Schools: Essential Skills and Overcoming School Barriers
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Noor Syed, Ph.D.
IMAD ZAHEER (St. John's University; Nurturing Environments Institute), NOOR SYED (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
Description: Schools are a primary context in which many BCBAs currently provide services and where, arguably, their skill sets are most needed. Even if the BCBA is not working in schools, if they are working with children, they are likely to have some interactions with schools and school systems. Despite this central position that schools play in the work of many BCBAs, there is little training provided to successfully navigate the school context and systems that are essential to navigate for success for our clients. Moreover, BCBAs are faced with many challenges from ethical dilemmas to systems level barriers that prevent them from practicing effectively. This workshop will cover how to successfully navigate effective and ethical practices, and discuss how BCBAs can evolve and expand their roles in schools using Multi-tiered Systems of Support (MTSS). Focus will be placed on the application of behavior analysis to schooling, understanding and navigating common ethical challenges, importance of contextual fit of interventions, and ways to gain social influence and stakeholder buy-in to increase sustainability. This session will consist of a brief review of relevant literature with a strong focus on behavior analytic strategies that are essential for working in schools, review of ethical challenges, and how to overcome common barriers to gain buy-in towards systems change.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) identify key barriers and challenges faced by BCBAs in schools; 2) describe appropriate ethical practice for BCBAs in schools; 3) identify strategies for individual cases as well as systems level practice to enhance school-based ABA practice.
Activities: The workshop will include brief didactics for introduction and overview, followed by small group breakouts. Practical activities will include exploration of the application of behavior analysis to schooling via practice of adapting academic and behavioral interventions to a school-based context. Attendees will review ethical scenarios and case studies. Supplemental material will be provided for in-session activities as well as resources for future application.
Audience: Participants should have a working knowledge of the practical application of behavior analysis with clients and should have at least minimal experiences working with school systems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, schools, social influence, sustainability
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Efficient and Effective Training and Supervision for RBTs In-Person or Virtually: Challenges and Strategies
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: RBT’s are in high demand to provide needed ABA services in person or virtual therapy to individuals with developmental disabilities, Unfortunately, BCBAs who train and supervise RBTs are time-challenged to assist the RBT to acquire and maintain the essential skills to be successful implementing data-based practices. In addition, RBTs working in non-clinical settings require additional support and training, as current ABA terminology and technology may not be supported in those environments. Participants will receivea study guide for the RBT exam and a detailed step-by-step curriculum download for BCBAs or RBT supervisors to use to teach required vocabulary and skills for the Competency Assessment.
Learning Objectives: The participants will be able to individualize additional instruction for the RBTs. The participants will be able to collect data and evaluate success using data-based strategies. The participants will be able to monitor the client’s progress and treatment integrity. The participants will be able to use self-management strategies. The participants will be able to use data-based decisions to determine the need for additional training and support.
Activities: The format combines lecture, video examples, small group hands on activities and guided practice.
Audience: BCBAs who train and supervise RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: BACB
Discriminative and Motivational and Multiple Control, Oh My!
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Pyles, M.A.
MEGAN PYLES (Pyles & Associates), BRITTANY MACIAS (Pyles & Associates)
Description: To be a fly on the head of any student in a Verbal Behavior class, you’d likely hear bickering about which verbal operant is occurring in a given situation. While charting verbal operants within the ABC contingency is helpful at rudimentary levels, this rarely accounts for the variables that evoke and maintain most verbal behavior in the natural setting. In most instances, verbal behavior is multiply controlled by both motivational and discriminative variables. Each skill taught requires that a unique set of variables be considered. Further, the unique structuring of teaching sets can make or break a learner’s success when contacting complex stimuli, as is often found in the natural environment. This workshop seeks to provide an overview of procedures to account for the multiple control of verbal behavior. Attendees will be provided flow charts on which to map functional relations of different types of verbal behavior, from mands and tacts to intraverbals, all the way up to humorous exchanges (i.e., jokes). As a group, we will outline and develop webs to visually depict the multiple control of verbal behavior and practice translating these into lessons for clients.
Learning Objectives: Learning Objective 1: Outline and chart the controlling variables of complex mands (e.g., mands for information) Learning Objective 2: Outline and develop treatment plans based on methods to teach conditional discriminations Learning Objective 3: Outline stimulus control of jokes and develop teaching procedures to teach joke comprehension.
Activities: Information related to the topics addressed will be provided via lecture, and active participation will be encouraged. Throughout the training we will break out into groups to practice mapping out functional relations of verbal operants, develop teaching procedures, and practice teaching skills.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is for intermediate to advanced behavior analysts. Attendees should be familiar with verbal operants and have a basic knowledge of stimulus control.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Humor, Mands, Stimulus control
 
Special Event #3
CE Offered: BACB
SABA Awards and Opening Event
Friday, May 28, 2021
5:00 PM–6:30 PM EDT
Online
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Peter R. Killeen (Arizona State University)
CE Instructor: Peter R. Killeen, Ph.D.
 

SABA Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis

Abstract:

If this tiny talk could have a theme it would be connections. My checkered academic career has largely been driven by opportunities for making connections between several domains, as well as people—colleagues and students. As with most anyone who lives long enough, the course of my career is marked by many turns into new avenues, some quite unanticipated. I sketch some of these turns—the pivotal role of Georgia Tech, UNC Chapel Hill where I first become a behavior analyst, Harvard Medical School—behavior pharmacology and the big time, Georgia Tech again, running a behavior pharmacology lab and forays into electromagnetics, EAB and Zoo Atlanta, behavior dynamics, conceptual/philosophical concerns, instructional design and engineering education, and my roles and adventures in ABAI where I have repeatedly emphasized that, as a field, we should look outward, not inward.

 
M. JACKSON MARR (Georgia Tech)
M. Jackson (Jack) Marr received the B.S. degree in 1961 from Georgia Tech where he studied mathematics, physics, engineering, and psychology. He received a Ph.D. in experimental psychology with a minor in physiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1966. He is Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Georgia Tech. He is one of five founding Fellows of the Association for Behavior Analysis, a Fellow of Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) and Division 3 (Experimental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association (APA), a Fellow of the Psychonomic Society, and a Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences Honoree. He was elected twice (the last in 2015) to President of the Association for Behavior Analysis (ABAI), and was President of Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of APA and the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis (SEABA). He was also APA Council member representing Division 25. He is the past Editor of Behavior and Philosophy and continues to serve on its editorial board. He also serves as Review Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, a position he has held since 1998. He served as the Co-Editor of Revista Mexicana de Análisis de la Conducta and was an Associate Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and The Behavior Analyst. He was Experimental Representative to the Executive Council of the Association for Behavior Analysis, served on the Board of Directors of The Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior (SQAB), and currently serves on the Board of Trustees the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. He has been particularly active in the international support and development of behavior analysis in Great Britain, Europe, Mexico, Brazil, China, and the Middle East. He was a Research Fellow in Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School, a visiting professor at the Universidad National Autonoma de Mexico, and was invited to Jacksonville State University with an Eminent Scholar award. He was a Navy contractor for Project Sanguine and an AIEE Senior Fellow at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory. For over 20 years (1991-2012) he was involved through NSF grants and other support in the assessment and improvement of engineering education. This work included design of instructional systems to teach calculus-based engineering physics. Current scholarly interests include dynamical systems theory, the quantitative analysis of behavior, creativity, and theoretical/conceptual issues in behavioral analysis.
 

SABA Award for Scientific Translation

Abstract:

The emergence of a new species, according to Darwin's theory of natural selection, depends on a baseline of variable attributes (or phenotypes). A parallel exists for learned behaviors: the shaping of operant responses depends on variations in ongoing behavior. Darwin described many examples of selection from variations. He also described selection of variation, i.e., variability that was maintained because a variable species was more likely to survive than one with limited attributes. Here, too, a behavioral parallel exists: the variability of operant responses is itself sensitive to reinforcing consequences. Thus, as shown by both evolutionary biology and behavioral psychology, successful selection-by-consequences depends on baseline variations and successful variation depends (in part) on selection-by-consequences. In support, I will show that levels of response variability -- from repetitions to random-like responding -- can be reinforced. I will also briefly indicate that reinforcement of variability facilitates acquisition of difficult-to-learn behaviors; that "varied practice" enhances skilled performance; that reinforcement of variable interactions increases the enriching effects of novel objects; and that reinforcement of variability can contribute to therapies for abnormally shy, inhibited, or stereotypy-generating individuals, as in those with autism spectrum disorder.

 
ALLEN NEURINGER (Reed College)
Allen Neuringer graduated from Far Rockaway High School in 1958, received a B.A., summa cum laude, from Columbia College in1962, and Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1967. His thesis advisor was Richard Herrnstein; most important were fellow students Howie Rachlin, Billy Baum, Bruce Schneider, Phil Hineline, Peter Killeen, Ed Fantino, Richard Schuster, and Martha DiNardo Neuringer. He was a professor at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, from 1970 until his retirement as MacArthur Professor of Psychology in 2008, but continued to guide research and teach an upper-division course, "Functional Variability," until this year. Allen and his students have shown that response variability can be reinforced, much like response topography, force, and speed. Together with his student, Neal Miller, he published the first demonstration that response variability in individuals with autism can be increased and maintained by reinforcers contingent upon that variability. He also published articles on self-control, responding for food when food is otherwise freely available, music discrimination in pigeons and self-experimentation. He recently gave the plenary address at the International Quantified Self Conference. Allen lives in a forest in a house he built (from the ground up) with Martha, his partner in love, and Reed students.
 

SABA Award for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis

Abstract:

Teaching verbal behavior to children with disabilities was the first functional aim on my trip as a behavior analyst. It produced a horizon of light. Then, the combination of application along with teaching and researching, looking for the conditions responsible for generating behavior, were all very inspiring experiences. Then, jumping in other areas of research that were starting in the field focused on the analysis of complex behaviors as problems solving, rule governed behavior and self-knowledge. In this track, equivalence and derived relational responding emerged and enlightened even more the functional horizon. It was the onset for understanding and generating the emergence of novel behavior, of novel and untrained functions based on stimuli relations. It was as if the tree of the functional perspective was growing up and growing up. And more research continued in areas still obscure as the formation of the self as those rules about oneself whose function dominates and controls other behaviors. In a nutshell, it has been, and still is, an exciting and creative experience for me to navigate and extend with many others along the functional tree either when teaching, doing research, or in the huge application the latter has permitted.

 
CARMEN LUCIANO (University of Almería; Madrid Institute Contextual Psychology, MICPSY)
Carmen Luciano received her Ph. D. from the Complutense University of Madrid in 1984. She was professor of psychology at the University of Granada from 1979 to 1993 and been professor of psychology at the University of Almeria since 1994. Her research dedication began on the experimental analysis of language. Her post-doc Fulbright research stay in Boston University and the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies was centered in studying problem-solving behavior with Skinner’s supervision. This was a critical point in her career as basic researcher. She was involved in equivalence research, rule-governed behavior and, shortly after, in RFT and ACT research. Her research lab conducts basic creative experimental-applied RFT designs for the analysis of: analogies; coherence; deictic and hierarchical framing in the context of identifying core components of metaphors; false memories; experiential avoidance; values; defusion; self and responding to one’s own behavior. Additionally, the lab designs brief ACT protocols and teaches ACT-focused analysis of the conditions under which emotions, thoughts, and valued motivation are brought to the present to build flexibility responding.   Dr. Luciano has been the Director of the Experimental and Applied Analysis of Behavior Research Group since 1986, where she has supervised over thirty doctoral theses--some of her students are running their own labs nowadays. She is also Director of the Functional Analysis in Clinical Contexts Doctoral Program at the University of Almeria and Director of the Master Program in Contextual Therapies at the Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology. Her research has been funded by international, national, and regional public funds. She has collaborated with research groups from different countries and she has spread the functional analysis perspective with meetings, courses, research presentations, and publications. She is known for her vibrating and creative style while teaching, working with clients, and doing research.
 

SABA Award for Effective Presentation of Behavior Analysis in the Mass Media

Abstract:

Prof. Hart will discuss some of the lessons he’s learned from studying psychoactive substances in people for more than 20 years. He will briefly describe the neurobiological, socio-environmental, and political forces that influence substance use and experiences. Particular attention will be paid to racial biases ingrained in today’s communities. As such, he will urge attendees to stand up on behalf of those who may use psychoactive substances in their pursuit of happiness.

 
CARL HART (Columbia University)
Carl Hart is the Dirk Ziff Professor of Psychology in the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry at Columbia University. Prof. Hart has published extensively in the area of neuropsychopharmacology. He is an award-winning author. His most recent book is entitled Drug Use for Grown-ups: Chasing Liberty in the Land of Fear. Prof. Hart has lectured around the world and has appeared on multiple national television and radio shows, as well as podcasts. In 2016, the city of Miami issued a proclamation declaring February 1 “Dr. Carl Hart Day.”
 

SABA Award for Enduring Programmatic Contributions in Behavior Analysis

Abstract:

The Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) was founded in 1990 by Doreen Granpeesheh, Ph.D., BCBA-D, at the suggestion of O. Ivar Lovaas, Ph.D., who wanted the participants in his groundbreaking study to have an ABA program to attend when they aged out of his UCLA research. What began as a one-woman practice in Westwood, California, grew into the largest ABA provider in the world with more than 260 clinic locations in 33 states. Having practiced, researched, and advocated for ABA for over 40 years, Dr. Granpeesheh provides a view of the earliest years of behavioral applications to the treatment of autism, and speaks of the ways in which access to ABA has grown, largely as a result of the onset of health insurance funding. Dr. Granpeesheh shares the lessons learned in the field, describes how data-driven decisions continue to shape behavior analysis, and shares her insights on future directions.

 
DOREEN GRANPEESHEH (Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD))
Dr. Doreen Granpeesheh is the Founder and CEO of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) and the Founder and President of the Board of Autism Care and Treatment Today (ACT Today). Dr. Granpeesheh received her Ph.D. in Psychology from UCLA under the mentorship of Professor Ivar Lovaas. She is licensed by the Medical Board of California and the Colorado, Texas, Arizona, Virginia, Michigan and Oregon State Boards of Psychologists. Dr. Granpeesheh holds a Certificate of Professional Qualification in Psychology from the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards, is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, doctoral level, and has been providing behavioral therapy for individuals with autism since 1979. She has been a member of numerous scientific and advisory boards including the US Autism and Asperger's Association, the Autism File journal, Autism 360/medigenesis, the 4-A Healing Foundation, and the Defeat Autism Now coalition. In addition, Dr. Granpeesheh has served on the National Board of Directors of the Autism Society of America, the practice board of ABAI, as well as the Autism Human Rights and Discrimination Initiative Steering Committee, the Early Intervention Taskforce of the Senate Select Committee on Autism and Related Disorders, and the Oversight Committee of the Department of Developmental Disabilities.   Dr. Granpeesheh has co-authored the book Evidence-Based Treatment for Children with Autism and numerous peer reviewed publications on issues concerning the diagnosis and treatment of Autism. She was awarded the George Winoker Clinical Research Award from the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists for her publication titled: Retrospective analysis of clinical records in 38 cases of recovery from autism. Together with her colleagues at CARD, Dr. Granpeesheh created Skills® for Autism, a web-based software tool that creates comprehensive treatment plans for children and adults with autism spectrum disorder, and founded the Institute for Behavioral Training, an online platform for training professionals and families on the principles of ABA.
 
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

 
 
 
Special Event #4
CE Offered: BACB
Presidential Scholar Address: Science Communication and Sensemaking Amidst Crisis
Friday, May 28, 2021
6:30 PM–7:20 PM EDT
Online
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Erin B. Rasmussen (Idaho State University)
CE Instructor: Erin B. Rasmussen, Ph.D.
 

Presidential Scholar Address: Science Communication and Sensemaking Amidst Crisis

Abstract:

The attendees of the 2021 ABAI share a professional identity as behavioral analysts. Yet we simultaneously inhabit a diversity of overlapping identities and social roles. Partners and parents, patients and caregivers, we are all community-members and survivors of an ongoing global pandemic. COVID-19 continues to raise deeply personal challenges in interpreting, navigating, and guiding our communities through what has been titled an "omni-crisis." In short, how do we make sense of this past year? Where do we go from here? How do we cope with the profound inequities exacerbated by this particular event, much less those to come? This keynote will draw from literatures on uncertainty and risk communication, misinformation, psychology, narrative identity, and sensemaking to explore the communication challenges and responsibilities of experts and educators.

 
LIZ NEELEY (Liminal Creations)
Liz Neeley is the founder of Liminal Creations, a design and consulting firm focused on sense-making and science engagement. She is also a lecturer at Yale, where she collaborates with the National Neuroscience Curriculum Initiative. Her career began in ocean conservation and is inspired by more than a decade of work in storytelling and science communication. Neeley currently sits on the AAAS Committee on Science and Technology Engagement with the Public (CoSTEP) and the advisory board for the Aspen Institute Science & Society Program. From 2015 to 2020, she was the executive director of The Story Collider. She has an ongoing fascination with personal knowledge management systems and would love to hear about your favorite tools and practices. Find her on twitter at @LizNeeley.
 
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation participants will be able to: (1) discuss the limitations of the information deficit model of science communication; (2) identify the components of a sensemaking approach to crisis communications; (3) develop an initial formulation of how to apply a sensemaking perspective in their own work.
 
 

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