Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Event Details


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Symposium #440
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Language and Culture Matter: Considerations for Service Delivery and Treatment Planning for the Spanish-Speaking Community
Monday, May 31, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Mariela Hostetler (University of Nevada, Reno)
Discussant: Marlesha Bell (University of the Pacific)
CE Instructor: Mariela Hostetler, M.S.
Abstract:

First, Karla Zabala will present on research related to assessing language preference among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or other developmental disorders who have been exposed to more than one language. The research study consisted of two parts: Study 1 evaluated language preference during play contexts and Study 2 evaluated language preference within instructional contexts. Next, Mariela Hostetler will provide a description of challenges faced by Latinx communities in need of behavioral health services. In particular, two general types of barriers faced by Latinx consumers of behavioral health services are discussed: those related to language and those related to cultural issues. Then, Marlesha Bell will provide a discussion on future research in areas to consider when providing services and treatment to Spanish speaking communities.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Diversity, Language Preference, Service Delivery, Spanish
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: 1: Ability to identify language preferences using concurrent operant and concurrent chains assessments 2: Consider strategies for promoting diversity in an organizational setting 3: Ability to identify the ethical responsibilities behavior analysts have to provide services to Latinx consumers
 
Diversity submission 

The Importance of Diversity and Cultural Competency of Behavior Analysts in Service Delivery to the Latinx Population

(Service Delivery)
MARIELA HOSTETLER (University of Nevada, Reno), Ashley Eden Greenwald (University of Nevada, Reno), Matthew Lewon (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

Latinxs constitute the largest minority group in the United States, currently making up approximately 18% of the total US population (US Census Bureau, 2018). While there is a critical need for the behavioral healthcare system, including behavior analysts, to be prepared and organized to support the Latinx community, research indicates that the quality of and access to behavioral and mental health services are often lacking for Latinxs and other minorities (Cabassa, Molina, & Baron, 2012; Dahne et al., 2019). This presentation provides a description of challenges faced by Latinx communities in need of behavioral health services. In particular, two general types of barriers faced by Latinx consumers of behavioral health services are examined: those related to language and those related to cultural issues. They also represent substantial challenges to behavior analytic providers who have a responsibility to make behavior analytic services accessible to all. Specific recommendations such as behavioral organizations and universities contributing to increase diversity among behavior analysts are discussed. Future research and the development of culturally sensitive treatments are further discussed.

 
Diversity submission 

The Effects of Language Preference Among Bilingual Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder or Other Developmental Disorders

(Applied Research)
KARLA ZABALA (University of Georgia), Kara L. Wunderlich (Rollins College), Lauren Best (University of Georgia), Joel Eric Ringdahl (University of Georgia)
Abstract:

Previous research has demonstrated that individuals with ASD who have been exposed to more than one language do not experience any additional language delays compared to their monolingual peers (Hambly and Fombonne, 2011). In addition, research has not noted any indication of negative outcomes associated with language abilities among bilingual/multilingual children with ASD (Drysdale et al., 2015). The majority of the research surrounding bilingual or multilingual individuals diagnosed with autism or other developmental disabilities has focused on conducting communication assessments to assess participants’ psychometric performance. Research related to language preferences exhibited by these individuals is scarce. The purpose of the current study was to assess language preference among individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or other developmental disorders who have been exposed to more than one language. The research study consisted of two parts: Study 1 evaluated language preference during play contexts and Study 2 evaluated language preference within instructional contexts.

 

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