Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Program by Continuing Education Events: Thursday, May 27, 2021


 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: BACB
Motivating Learner Participation Without the Use of Traditional Escape Extinction With the Seven Steps to Earning Instructional Control
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert Schramm, M.A.
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Knospe-ABA; Meridian Rehab; Robert Schramm Consulting)
Description: Through the principles and considerations of the Verbal Behavior approach to ABA, learn an invaluable seven step procedure for earning motivated learning from even the most unwilling participants without the use of forced physical prompts or escape extinction. Although this seven step format was originally developed for use by parents and therapists involved with "in-Home" interventions for non-verbal children with autism, the "Seven Steps to Earning Instructional Control" can be remarkably functional in all forms of school, clinic, and public settings for intermediate and advanced learners as well. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, or theoretical concepts and has been a very popular workshop at ABAI for several years.
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn to: (1) value the importance of learner assent in home, clinic and education settings. (2) use creative and practical methods for controlling the access to reinforcement in the environment as a tool for earning Instructional Control. (3) prioritize the value and process of Pairing oneself with reinforcement in the eyes of the learner as a tool for Instructional Control. (4) prioritize the value and process of being meticulously contingent with words and actions as a tool for earning Instructional Control. (5) value the differences between positive and negative reinforcement and why one is desired over the other in earning instructional control with an unmotivated or unwilling learner. (6) effectively use a Variable Ratio of Reinforcement and how to increase that ratio over time as a tool for earning Instructional Control. (7) prioritize learning objectives "on the fly" and use differential reinforcment effectively as a tool for earning Instructional Control. (8) best use Extinction and Negative Punishment procedures as a tool for earning instructional control while preparing for and protecting against the extinction burst.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Question and Answer, Video demonstration
Audience: Pre-requisite skills would be an understanding of the basic principles of behavior and some experience implementing instructional control or compliance training techniques with an unmotivated or otherwise challenging learner.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): 7 Steps, Compliance Training, Cooperation, Instructional Control
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Enhancing School-Based Behavior Analytic Services Through Collaboration With Mental Health Professionals In-Person and via Telehealth
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Whitney L. Kleinert, Ph.D.
WHITNEY L. KLEINERT (May Institute), SARAH LEVINE (May Institute)
Description: As school-based clinicians, many of our students require services that are outside our competence. For instance, these students have or need mental health supports while concurrently engaging in challenging behaviors requiring support from behavioral staff (e.g., staff providing services rooted in Applied Behavior Analysis; ABA). These private events contributing to challenges in school may not be within our purview, but still necessitate services in the school setting. For example, students may have a developmental disability in conjunction with anxiety or depression. Additionally, students may have significant trauma histories that impact how they respond to different features of treatments grounded in applied behavior analysis (e.g., full-physical prompting). The purpose of this presentation is to explore different evidence-based strategies that behavioral staff and mental health clinicians (e.g., School Psychologists, Counselors) can collaborate to meet students’ needs effectively and efficiently and operate within their respective areas of expertise.
Learning Objectives: 1. Following this presentation, participants will be able to DESCRIBE how Mental Health and behavioral needs may be intertwined and the implications of solely addressing one or the other. 2. Following this presentation, participants will IDENTIFY ways to collaborate with staff providing Mental Health services and staff providing services rooted in Applied Behavior Analysis. 3. Following this presentation, participants will DESCRIBE specific ways to incorporate Mental Health and ABA components into each of these service areas to increase the likelihood of better outcomes for students.
Activities: The instructional strategies are adaptable based on the online platform used for the conference. Instructional strategies will include a combination of: lecture/presentation with supporting visuals (e.g., PowerPoint slides), video clips, case illustrations / examples, polling questions, multiple ways to provide responses (e.g., thumbs up/down, chat box), Behavioral Skills Training (BST; instructions, model, role-plays, feedback), and break-out room activities for small groups with subsequent whole-group discussion.
Audience: Experience working within school settings and/or collaborating with service providers within school settings preferred (e.g., Psychologists, Counselors, SLPs, OTs, PTs).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Consultation, Mental Health, School-based, Telehealth
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: BACB
Skills, Teaching Procedures, and Measurement Practices for Children and Adults With Moderate-to-Severe Disabilities
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates), TROY ANTHONY FRY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates)
Description: For the past few decades, selecting skills for instruction with children with mild-to-severe disabilities, has been based on either milestones of typical child development or national academic standards. These selection criteria may be appropriate for a small number of young children with autism or language delays for whom ‘catching up to their typically-developing peers’ is a reasonable expectation. For most children with moderate-to-severe disabilities and limited skill repertoires, including many with autism, this is not a reasonable expectation. The authors propose a new paradigm of skill selection for these children and adults referenced to B. F. Skinner’s analysis of verbal behavior and a high quality of life, along with an array of behavior analytic teaching procedures and measurement practices, the goal of which is simply stated: to teach functional skills, in required contexts, to fluency.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to describe five examples of functional skills for learners with moderate-to-severe disabilities 2. Participants will be able to describe the importance of context for learners with moderate-to-severe disabilities 3. Participants will be able to describe the importance of fluency for learners with moderate-to-severe disabilities
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, video observation, and group discussion.
Audience: Participants should be well-grounded in basic behavioral principles, including but not limited to those impacting skill acquisition, fluency, generalization, and maintenance over time.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: BACB/NASP
Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Katharine M. Croce, Ed.D.
KATHARINE M. CROCE (Felician University), JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (Self & Match Educational Consultation)
Description: This INTERACTIVE and HANDS-ON workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match System, a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically-supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. Participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. Additionally, participants gain an understanding of implementing Self & Match in a General Education classroom. The Self & Match System has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional behavior disorders, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. Self & Match can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems, class-wide, and school-wide management procedures as a part of SWPBIS and has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings; including (but not limited to): public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings. Great workshop for individuals and/or teams! Participants will receive mailed hard copy materials as well as access to digital materials.
Learning Objectives: *Identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring *Effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system *Identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system *Identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention *Identify the basic components of the Self & Match System *Understand the implementation Self & Match System in a variety of settings including a General Education Setting, Home Setting, and Special Education Setting *Systematically individualize an intervention based on collaborative and critical thinking *Create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace *Systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own Self & Match System. The format combines lecture, small group collaboration, whole group responding utilizing interactive digital polling software, and discussion. Core content will be taught through a combination of lecture, video examples, data analysis, and guided practice.
Audience: Participants will engage in active learning to increase their knowledge of implementing self-monitoring as a behavioral intervention. Workshop attendees will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, Self & Match manual with substantial training materials, and access to Self & Match Maker, an online Self & Match form creator. This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, and/or others who support individuals from pre-K to 21 in school, home, or clinic settings as well as adults that are interested in increasing appropriate behaviors. Great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, behavior intervention, Self-monitoring, SelfandMatch
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: BACB
Functional Assessment Consultation Support in Schools
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Edward J. Daly, Ph.D.
EDWARD J. DALY (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Description: This workshop will present a model for conducting school-based consultation which embeds functional assessment into the process. The consultation model incorporates innovations not commonly used in functional assessment (direct academic assessment, observations of active responding, reinforcer validation, performance-deficit analysis, brief experimental analysis). The model follows a sequence of problem validation, treatment validation, and treatment evaluation. Protocols for the consultative interviews and the assessments will be shared with participants. The assessments involve curriculum-based measures, classroom observations of active responding, preference assessment, reinforcer validation, and brief experimental analysis. Guidance will be given in terms of how to conceptualize, structure, and interpret the results to present the consultee with evidence-based treatment options for classroom application. Research and case examples will be presented to illustrate each step of the process.
Learning Objectives: This session will help participants (1) integrate interview, observational data, basic skill assessment data, work samples, preference assessments, performance-deficit analyses, and brief functional analyses into the consultation process; (2) guide consultees in a strategic and structured decision-making process that prioritizes improving academic performance; (3) support teacher implementation of empirically derived treatments through antecedent control strategies and performance feedback; and (4) evaluate the results within cases to produce recommendations for future programming and across cases to examine the effectiveness of their own consultative services.
Activities: The format combines lecture, guided practice with skill objectives, and group discussion.
Audience: This workshop is intended for an intermediate-level audience; that is, individuals who have skills in identifying principles of behavior, functional assessment (including descriptive assessment, preference assessment, and functional analysis), and who wish to learn how to apply them efficiently in the schools in a way that meets the typical concerns and priorities of school-based professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Engineering Schools and Clinics for Student and Client Success: Part 1
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as a program designer, staff trainer, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide you with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: attendees must register for both part 1 and part 2 of this workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results, performance, and progress, using measures of frequency, celeration and celeration efficiency; (2) Define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) Perform a data based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) Design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: Do you work as a program designer, staff trainer, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? This workshop will teach you how to improve the performance of your organization so that every client will make efficient progress.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Conversations: The Only OBM Intervention You Will Ever Need
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nicole Gravina, Ph.D.
NICOLE GRAVINA (University of Florida), JOHN AUSTIN (Reaching Results)
Description: In this interactive workshop, attendees will learn how to effectively lead and manage employees through regular conversations. In short conversations, leaders have the opportunity to develop rapport, agree on expectations, sample work, assess, and deliver feedback and reinforcement. Getting better at having effective and strategic conversations can reduce the need for add-on intervention plans. During the workshop, attendees will explore the facets of effective conversations and how they enable behavior change and employee development. Research and case study data will be shared to support each facet. Attendees should bring one business result they wish to change. Attendees will leave with an action plan for having better conversations with employees and for improving their selected business result.
Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to describe the facets of effective conversations Attendees will be able to describe the OBM intervention elements that can be embedded into short conversations Attendees will develop an action plan for improving their conversations with employees Attendees will develop an action plan for influencing a business result
Activities: Lecture, activities, chat box
Audience: This workshop would be most appropriate for leaders in organizations who want to improve their leadership skills.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Leadership, OBM, Supervision
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: BACB
On Behavior Technician Turnover: Current Research, Practical Solutions, and Focused Sustainability
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jana M. Sarno, M.A.
SYDNEY NICOLE LAFLEUR (Autism in Motion Clinics), JANA M. SARNO (Autism in Motion Clinics), GEORGE BOGHOS (Autism in Motion Clinics)
Description: Turnover is defined as permanent separation of an employee, voluntary or involuntary, from an organization. Over the years, turnover has been extensively studied in helping professions with nurses (De Simone, Planta, & Cicotto, 2018), teachers (Gilmour & Wehby, 2020), and mental health professionals (Yanchus, Periard, & Osatuke, 2016), among others. To date, only a few studies that have sought to better understand predictors of turnover, prevalence, and direct/indirect impacts of turnover in applied behavior analytic (ABA) service delivery organizations. High turnover can have significant impacts on the organization, staff, and clients. Specifically, turnover may hinder effective and efficient service delivery to consumers, constrict financial resources, negatively impact morale of fellow team members, and erode trust with stakeholders (Kazemi, Shapiro, & Kavner, 2015). The workshop will begin with a detailed review of the literature on behavior technician turnover. Specific attention will be focused on predictors of turnover and organizational efforts to guard against turnover. Time will be spent on the delivery of supervisory support, comprehensive competency-based training, a defined career path and trajectory, work schedule, and employee benefits. To illustrate key concepts, the workshop presenters will share case examples, metrics, and initiatives to maintain low turnover and high-quality services at their organization.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participations will be able to: (1) describe three findings from research on turnover and predictors of turnover, (2) state at least two impacts of high turnover for clients, organizations, or staff members, (3) identify compassionate, data-driven, and antecdent strategies to decrease turnover, and (4) operationally describe steps to implement these strategies in their own work/organization.
Activities: Instructional strategies for this workshop will include lecture, small group breakout discussion, whole group discussion, and active participant responding. Supplemental material will also be provided to further learning outside of the context of this workshop as participants return to their own organizations to affect meaningful change.
Audience: Intermediate. Prerequisite skills include (1) experience in service delivery organizations such as in clinics, homes, and/or community settings and (2) experience/interest with advocacy, organizational change, and supervisory relationships.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Burnout, Technician, Training, Turnover
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: BACB
Creating Professional Graphs in Microsoft Excel
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Erick M. Dubuque, Ph.D.
ERICK M. DUBUQUE (University of Louisville)
Description: Behavior analysts rely on visual displays of graphic data to make treatment decisions. It is therefore critical that behavior analysts know how to create graphical displays that are flexible and easy to interpret. During this workshop, attendees will learn how to generate multiple types of professional graphs using the latest versions of Microsoft Excel for PC and Mac. This will be accomplished by reviewing graphing conventions that produce sharp looking graphs fit for publication, professional reports, and presentations. To get the most out of this training, attendees are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptops loaded with the most recent version of Microsoft Excel for PC or Mac. At the conclusion of the workshop, attendees should be able to do the following:
Learning Objectives: 1. Generate multiple professional-looking visual displays, including; withdrawal, alternative treatment, changing criterion, and multiple-baseline design graphs. 2. Incorporate phase change lines and labels directly into graphic displays. 3. Create graphing templates to support consistency and efficiency when generating visual displays. 4. Transfer visual displays into other applications for reports or professional presentations.
Activities: The workshop presenter will use behavioral skills training by (a) instructing the attendees on the conventions used to generate professional looking graphical displays in the Microsoft Excel, (b) modeling those conventions by demonstrating the steps involved in creating various graphical displays, (c) asking attendees to practice the skills being modeled on their own laptops, and (d) providing feedback on attendee performance by checking their work during rehearsal.
Audience: This intermediate workshop is appropriate for pre-professionals, students, or behavior analysts who are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with generating their own graphical displays in Microsoft Excel for PC or Mac. The content is especially useful for any attendee interested in generating graphical displays for publication, professional reports, or presentations.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Help for BCBAs With Challenging Ethical Dilemmas: Avoiding Multiple Relationships, Confidentiality, and Limits to Confidentiality
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Similar to psychologists and other helping professionals, BCBAs have several ethical responsibilities including: avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others. Although BCBAs may be aware of what these ethical responsibilities are, they may not have had the training to deal with these complicated and sometimes threatening situations. The workshop presenter is a licensed psychologist in addition to a BCBA-D and has had much experience supervising professionals, including BCBAs, who are faced with these daunting situations. This workshop will provide BCBAs and other professionals knowledge of and practice with handling these situations. Workshop participants can bring real or hypothetical ethical dilemmas to process, as well as hear about case scenarios and participate in roleplay situations. Participants will be provided with specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, safety assessment form) and given information on how to use these tools.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the reasons why ethical dilemmas of avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others are so challenging 2. Describe the problem-solving process for dealing with challenging ethical dilemmas and how it was used in specific case scenarios 4. Describe the use of specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, safety assessment form)
Activities: Role-play, modeling, rehearsal and feedback will aid participants in becoming more skilled and confident in handling specific challenging ethical dilemmas.
Audience: Participants can include BCBAs, teachers, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, counselors, and social workers. Participants should be familiar with terms including: discriminative stimuli, establishing and abolishing operations, positive reinforcement and negative reinforcement, and have experience and examples dealing with those terms.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Confidentiality, Ethical Dilemmas, Muliple Relationships
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: BACB
How to Stop Talking and Start Communicating With Motivational Interviewing
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monica Gilbert, Psy.D.
MONICA GILBERT (Crystal Minds New Beginning )
Description: We walk the walk, but do we talk the talk? As clinicians, do we speak with parents or to them? Is it effective in motivating them to adhere to interventions or do you find that sometimes they inhale and exhale at the sight/sound of parent training sessions? Although Behavior Analysts offer empirically validated strategies and successfully change behaviors, it can be difficult for parents to adhere to treatment. Resistance is evoked by an antecedent stimulus (clinician's confrontational language), which is reinforced by escape of the aversive stimuli. Motivating Operations have a behavior/value altering effect in that they make "escaping" the stimuli (clinician) by engaging in resistant behaviors more or less reinforcing. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically proven intervention that has shown substantial success in the literature in changing addictive behaviors in substance abusers, medication adherence and developmental disabilities. In this workshop, we will present the proven strategies of MI to decrease resistance and increase cooperation between parents and clinicians. The Transtheoretical model (stages of readiness) which helps identify parent’s level of resistance will also be introduced. Attendees will build skills in assessing parents’ level of resistance and learn to use change talk procedures to successfully decrease their resistance.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Assess parent's motivation based on the trans-theoretical model and using different proven measures; (2) Provide examples of effective change talk strategies to develop and build collaborative relationships with parents; (3) Describe motivation using private events; (4) Identify traps that can harm clinician-parental relationships; (5) Describe key features of effective MI strategies; (6) Measure change talk vs. counter-change talk; (7) Identify key features necessary for cooperative relationships between caregivers and clinicians.
Activities: Workshop activities will include didactic instruction, active student responses, and video/audio role play discussion.
Audience: BCaBA, BCBA, graduate students, and licensed psychologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Multiply Controlled Verbal Behavior: Theory and Application
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Judah B. Axe, Ph.D.
OLGA MELESHKEVICH (ABA Consulting; Simmons University), JUDAH B. AXE (Simmons University)
Description: With early learners, behavior analysts often teach the basic verbal behavior operants, such as mands, tacts, echoics, and simple intraverbals. Once these repertoires are developed, programming should incorporate multiply controlled verbal behavior where more than one antecedent evokes a response. In this workshop, we will define concepts related to multiply controlled verbal behavior, including “verbal conditional discrimination,” joint control, and autoclitic frames. We will describe and illustrate research-based strategies to overcome restricted stimulus control when teaching three types of multiply controlled verbal behavior: (1) listener responding in which a selection response is evoked by a verbal stimulus and a nonverbal stimulus, (2) “intraverbal-tacts” in which a verbal response is evoked by a question about a picture, and (3) multiply controlled intraverbals in which a verbal response is evoked by a multi-part question (e.g., “What do you eat that is yellow?”). Throughout the workshop, we will discuss the roles of echoic behavior and autoclitic frames on shaping generalized verbal behavior repertoires.
Learning Objectives: • Define multiple control in verbal behavior and “verbal conditional discrimination.” • Explain the concepts of “restricted stimulus control” and “overselectivity.” • Describe research-based strategies for teaching verbal conditional discriminations. • Explain how procedures based on analysis of multiple control facilitate generalization within verbal operants.
Activities: lecture, video demonstrations, small-group activities
Audience: behavior analysts, speech-language pathologists, researchers, graduate students, special education teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate

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