Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Event Details


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Symposium #44
CE Offered: BACB
Function as a Critical Educational Objective
Saturday, May 29, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Online
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Jennifer Weber (Teachers College, Columbia University & Nicholls St. University )
CE Instructor: Jennifer Weber, Ph.D.
Abstract: The Comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) classrooms create independent learners driven by the “need to know” and a love of learning. This symposium will present three papers focused on the pedagogy and curriculum utilized in our CABAS® AIL classrooms. We will discuss instruction that focuses on teaching functional objectives for reading, writing, and math within inclusion and general education settings. In the first paper, we provide an overview of how we arrange instruction that focuses on critical prerequisites for students to be successful in inclusion and general education, such as establishing critical verbal developmental cusps and conditioned reinforcement for academics. The second paper will describe more recent research-based protocols and curricular objectives to teach the function of reading and writing (i.e., writing to affect the behavior of a reader). The third paper will discuss recent scientific procedures and curricular objectives to teach functional math and problem-solving repertoires. Collectively these papers emphasize the importance of designing instruction that teaches the function, which results in better academic outcomes.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): functional objectives, verbal development
Target Audience: N/A- Basic Instruction Level
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the verbal development prerequisites for students to acquire academic repertoires (2) identify reading and writing functional curricular objectives and (3) identify how to arrange math instruction to focus on the function and math as a verbal repertoire.
 
Prerequisite Verbal Developmental Cusps and Capabilities for the Accelerated Independent Learner
TANYA BAJWA (Teachers College, Columbia University ), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), Jennifer Weber (Teachers College, Columbia University & Nicholls St. University )
Abstract: Within our Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS) classrooms, we arrange instruction based on the students' verbal development. How we teach (pedagogy) is based on the students' verbal development. This arrangement of instruction is critical for students to acquire foundational repertoires and master instructional objectives. The students' verbal development also plays a crucial role in ensuring students have the prerequisite repertoires to learn in inclusion and general education settings. While verbal development informs us how to arrange instruction, research has also identified the significance of the acquisition of conditioned reinforcement for academic stimuli as a prerequisite for students to acquire more advance academic repertoires. The CABAS® model has found scientifically-based protocols used to establish missing verbal development cusps and conditioned reinforcers when data demonstrate that these cusps are missing from a students' repertoire. This paper aims to explain the verbal development cusps that are prerequisites for students to transition into general education or inclusion settings and the role of conditioned reinforcement for student academic learning.
 

Reading and Writing as a Functional Educational Objective

Ruby Gibson (Teachers College, Columbia University ), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), Jennifer Weber (Teachers College, Columbia University & Nicholls St. University ), MARY-GENEVIEVE WHITE (PENDING)
Abstract:

One of the biggest challenges in education is the shift from learning to read (foundational reading) to reading to learn (reading for function). Students learn to read to understand information, read to follow instructions, and read to access reinforcement. How we arrange instruction is crucial for students to acquire the function of reading. This is most effectively taught through the arrangement of reading instruction that focuses on functional reading objectives. Writing instruction is also arranged to teach the functional effects of writing or writing to affect the behavior of a reader or a targeted audience. Teaching the function of reading and writing allows this to become a verbal repertoire, which in turn, creates a social exchange between the reader and writer. Research out of the Comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) classrooms have identified teaching procedures and how to arrange instruction to focus on teaching the function to students as educational objectives. In this paper, we will describe scientifically based procedures to teach the function of reading and writing within public schools.

 
Teaching Math as a Verbal Repertoire
MARY-GENEVIEVE WHITE (Teachers College, Columbia University), Jennifer Weber (Teachers College, Columbia University & Nicholls St. University ), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: When teaching the functional application of mathematics, we want the students not only to understand how to solve a complex equation, but why they complete each step and its function. Furthermore, we want the students to become their own teachers in that they are able to explain step by step how to solve a problem so that another student could follow their directions. We arrange math instruction where we are teaching functional math repertoires where the speaker or writer affects the problem solving of a reader or listener. We also teach functional math repertoires within building classroom contingencies as it relates to various academic and performance contingencies within the classroom. When teaching national and state standards, the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS) Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) model makes math a verbal repertoire by setting up curricular objectives that teach the function of math by writing math algorithms to affect the behavior of a reader. In this paper, we will discuss scientifically based procedures that have been translated into functional curricular math objectives utilized within our AIL inclusion classrooms.
 

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