Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Event Details


Previous Page

 

Symposium #242
CE Offered: BACB
Informing ABA on Trauma-Informed Care: Crisis Evaluations, Ethical Implications, and Practice Applications
Sunday, May 30, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Online
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kristin J. Korinko (APD-Agency for Persons with Disabilities)
CE Instructor: Kristin J. Korinko, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The need for expanded and applicable trauma-informed services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities is paramount. This symposium will approach this need from three vantage points while reinforcing the concept of trauma-informed behavior analysis. First, trauma as “crisis” for people with intellectual/developmental disabilities will be presented due to the apparent high risk of experiencing traumatic events throughout the lifespan. Our second presentation will focus on the reinforcement of collaboration between trauma-informed care and applied behavior analysis. It is important that behavior analysts continue to improve their treatments for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) by considering the effects of past traumatic events. This paper describes behavior changes frequently reported in people with ID following exposure to trauma and proposes ways that these changes may be understood from a behavior analytic framework. When providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities, it is becoming more common to discuss those services with an approach to understanding the role of trauma in the lives of those being served. Yet, often, the role of the parents/guardians/caregivers, as well as the role of the provider are often overlooked. This talk will discuss the role of stakeholders and providers in enhancing the way we provide trauma-informed care.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Intellectual/developmental disabilities, trauma-informed care
Target Audience:

Intermediate

Learning Objectives: (1) Participants will describe how past traumatic events can present as setting events or triggers, and strategies to decrease the likelihood of a trauma response when providing crisis response. (2) Participants will identify the role of stakeholders in ensuring services for those with developmental disabilities have a trauma-informed focus (3) Participants will identify the role of providers in ensuring services for those with developmental disabilities have a trauma-informed focus (4) Participants will demonstrate an understanding of the collaborative process between clinicians, clients, providers, and stakeholders in a trauma-informed approach to service provision
 
A Trauma-Informed Approach to Crisis Intervention
KAREN WEIGLE (Associate Director, Center for START Services, University of New Hampshire, Institute on Disability; Chattanooga Autism Center )
Abstract: People with intellectual/developmental disabilities are at high risk of experiencing traumatic events throughout the lifespan. Crisis events in themselves can be considered traumatic for all involved. In providing crisis response we must consider the impact of these past experiences on the current crisis as a setting event or trigger, as well as on our own behavior in an effort to decrease the potential for re-traumatization.
 

Behavior Changes Associated With Exposure to Trauma and Learned Helplessness: Implications for Assessment and Treatment

ELIZABETH JOY HOUCK (University of North Texas), Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

It is important that behavior analysts continue to improve their treatments for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) by considering the effects of past traumatic events. People with ID experience high rates of exposure to traumatic events and therefore face increased risks of developing stress-related disorders (e.g., post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD]). Exposure to trauma often leads to behavior changes such as increases in problem behavior. However, current assessment and treatment strategies for stress-related disorders rely heavily on verbal communication, limiting their utility for most people with ID. Consequently, this population may receive treatment from behavior analysts without a way to assess the impact of stress-related disorders. Learned helplessness (LH) has been studied extensively in animals and may provide insights into a behavioral understanding of stress-related disorders in humans. These insights could lead to improvements in the treatment of these disorders in people with limited communication repertoires. This paper describes behavior changes frequently reported in people with ID following exposure to trauma and proposes ways that these changes may be understood from a behavior analytic framework. We will also suggest ways that the LH literature may improve assessment and treatment of stress-related disorders in people with ID.

 
“Whose Line Is It Anyway?” The Active Roles of Providers and Stakeholders in Trauma-Informed Care
KEN WINN (Firefly Autism)
Abstract: When providing services to individuals with developmental disabilities, it is becoming more common to discuss those services with an approach to understanding the role of trauma in the lives of those being served. Yet, often, the role of the parents/guardians/caregivers, as well as the role of the provider are often overlooked. This talk will discuss the role of stakeholders and providers in enhancing the way we provide trauma-informed care.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE