Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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11th International Conference; Dublin, Ireland; 2022

CE by Type: QABA


 

Invited Paper Session #1
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Invited Workshop: Process-Based Behavior Therapy (PBBT): Why a New Behavior Therapy was Needed
Thursday, September 1, 2022
1:00 PM–2:50 PM
Meeting Level 1: Liffey B
Area: CBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Deisy das Graças De Souza (Universidade Federal de São Carlos)
CE Instructor: Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: YVONNE BARNES-HOLMES (Ghent University)
Abstract: It is not easy for any form of psychotherapeutic intervention or regime to stay close to laboratory-generated processes. Indeed, there are few, if any, examples of where this is genuinely the case. Clinicians struggle daily with the fact that basic psychological research has not clearly identified the processes they should be targeting for lasting change of complex human behavior. However, recent developments in Relational Frame Theory (RFT) have now provided us with a sound account and evidence of a core complex behavioral process that clinicians can work with in a precise and effective way. This process of arbitrarily applicable relational responding, and the ROE (relating, orienting, and evoking) as its basic unit, have fundamentally changed what can be achieved through behavior therapy. Finally, a legitimate form of process-based behavior therapy is available to clinical behavior analysts who wish to work with complex clients. This talk will explore how Process-Based Behaviour Therapy (PBBT) does exactly that.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Any member with Masters-level training in behavioral science.

Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will be able to describe RFT’s concept of the ROE (relating, orienting, and evoking) as the basic unit of the core process of arbitrarily applicable relational responding. 2. Attendees will be able to integrate the ROE with PBBT, in terms of how the therapy uses the basic unit to understand complex clinical behavior. 3. Attendees will be able to understand how PBBT interventions change obstructive behavioral patterns.
 
YVONNE BARNES-HOLMES (Ghent University)
Dr. Yvonne Barnes-Holmes has been a highly successful academic and clinician with a strong track record in teaching, training, publishing and presenting for the last 20 years. She has published over 150 scientific articles and book chapters and given over 500 presentations and workshops internationally. She was an Associate Professor in Behavior Analysis and a Senior Research Fellow at Ghent University before establishing Perspectives Ireland Consulting Psychologists Ltd. She is the Co-Developer of Process-Based behavior Therapy (PBBT).
 
 
Invited Paper Session #3
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
How Applied Behaviour Analysis May Benefit From a Taxonomy of Science Communication Aims
Friday, September 2, 2022
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Auditorium
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Julian C. Leslie (Ulster University)
CE Instructor: Olive Healy, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: OLIVE HEALY (Trinity College Dublin)
Abstract:

For many years authority figures in the science of behaviour analysis have attempted to place a spotlight on the conspicuous factors that have acted as impediments to the dissemination and utility of the strategies and interventions drawn from basic and applied science findings in this field. A number of these impediments have been empirically investigated and some have been described in relation to a misrepresentation of the science to the general public. Ongoing research shows that these impediments continue to present a significant challenge to researchers and practitioners specifically in the application of behaviour change procedures to those with developmental and intellectual disabilities. More importantly, ongoing impediments to dissemination and implementation of effective practices may prevent numerous individuals who may truly benefit from science-based behavioural methods to improve in many areas of their lives. This presentation addresses why behaviour analysis may still be considered a generic science and provides an analytical framework of science communication to bridge the gap between behaviour analysis findings and the public including education, health and social care sectors as well as stakeholders themselves. It will be argued that one of the most important elements of such a framework should ensure that a diversity of perspectives about the applications of behaviour analysis held by different groups are considered when solutions to the dissemination of behaviour analytic strategies are pursued.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Students of Behaviour Analysis, practitioners in the field of Behaviour Analysis, professionals interested in behavior change, researchers within the field of developmental disabilities and behavior change.

Learning Objectives: The audience will be able to (1) describe the characteristics of science communication; (2) identify the aspects of applied behavior analysis that could benefit from reframing within a science communication framework; (3) understand a framework of science communication for the dissemination of behavior change strategies; (4) describe ways in which the applications of behavior analysis could become a mainstream strength in relevant sectors.
 
OLIVE HEALY (Trinity College Dublin)
Dr. Olive Healy is a Behavioural Psychologist and Doctoral Board Certified Behaviour Analyst® with over 20 years of clinical expertise in neurodevelopmental disorders including Autism. She is Director of the Masters programme in Applied Behaviour Analysis at the School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin. After serving for seven years as Lecturer in Psychology (2006-2013) at NUI Galway, Olive joined the School of Psychology, Trinity College Dublin and is now an Associate Professor in Psychology. Olive negotiated with government to establish the first state-funded evidence-based school in Ireland under the auspices of the Comprehensive Application of Behaviour Analysis to Schooling® in 1998. She spent 10 years engaged in knowledge transfer from leading scholars at Columbia University NY to expert schooling established to educate children with autism and complex needs in Ireland. Olive lead the establishment of five further evidence-based educational centres for Autism and disseminated knowledge and skills through ongoing collaboration with US experts. She was a founding director of the first research centre for neurodevelopmental disorders in Ireland at NUI Galway in 2012. Her research focuses on the treatment of challenging behaviour and co-morbid conditions in Autism and related developmental disorders. She now acts as Principal Investigator of an Enterprise Ireland funded project InterAcT (Accomplish & Thrive) within Trinity College Dublin. She is Associate Editor of four leading international journals contributing to peer review and research dissemination in the field of behavioural psychology. She has authored over 80 academic papers and book chapters published in both behaviour-analytic and mainstream psychology journals.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #18
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
How to Use "Implicit Tests" in Behavior Analysis Without the Smoke and Mirrors
Friday, September 2, 2022
10:30 AM–11:20 AM
Auditorium
Area: EAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Julian C. Leslie (Ulster University)
CE Instructor: Bryan Roche, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: BRYAN ROCHE (National University of Ireland, Maynooth)
Abstract:

Implicit testing within behavior analysis has been a rather radical development over the past 15 years. Much of the early work was theoretically informed by Relational Frame Theory and progressed using a mixture of top-down and hypothetico-deductive approaches. Many test features and behavioral quantification methods were borrowed directly from the eponymous Implicit Association Test, and involved questionable social cognitive stimulus presentation and scoring methods. The Function Acquisition Speed Test (FAST), in contrast, was designed from the ground up in a painstaking research programme intended to expunge all mentalism from implicit testing, draw on well understood behavioral phenomena such as resistance to change, and use learning rates, rather than response time measures as a key dependent measure. It aims to enhance stimulus control in implicit testing, and clarify behavioral process. The FAST has uses in the analysis of stimulus relatedness in both social research and education settings, and might be used as a proxy for social attitudes, if attitudes are understood fully in functional terms. This talk will outline the behavior-analytic development of the FAST method for quantifying the relatedness of stimuli and “class strength,” and illustrate how the method can be used in a variety of novel social research contexts.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Postgraduate students and early career researchers

Learning Objectives: Following this presentation, participants should be able to: (1) Describe the core methodology of most “implicit tests”; (2) Critique the main barriers to providing high quality behavioral data using popular implicit tests; (3) Outline some features of the FAST method that make it a functional approach to “implicit testing”.
 
BRYAN ROCHE (National University of Ireland, Maynooth)
Dr. Bryan Roche is Associate Professor at Maynooth University Ireland, where he has held tenure since 2001. His early research work was on the development of Relational Frame Theory (RFT) and its application to the functional understanding of a wide variety of complex human behaviors, such as sexual, social and clinically relevant behaviors (e.g., avoidance and anxiety). In recent years he has co-developed an online RFT-based intervention called SMART (Strengthening Mental Abilities with Relational Training), designed to enhance general cognitive ability, usually in educational settings. However, he has also maintained a keen interest in the development of “implicit test” style class assessment methodologies, such as the FAST (function acquisition speed test) for indexing stimulus class “strength” in social and educational contexts. He is author of over 100 peer reviewed papers and book chapters.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #33
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Using Behaviour Analysis and Behavioural Economics to Frame Messages Effectively
Friday, September 2, 2022
11:30 AM–12:20 PM
Auditorium
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Deisy das Graças De Souza (Universidade Federal de São Carlos)
CE Instructor: Louise A McHugh, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LOUISE A MCHUGH (University College Dublin)
Abstract:

We face many societal challenges that require a group level response. Education and insight alone do not motivate behaviour change for individuals to support the group. Integrating techniques from Behaviour Analysis and Behavioural Economics has a lot to offer in terms of enhancing motivation towards behaviour for societal good. Behavioural Economics tells us that messages framed in terms of losses are more motivationally impactful than the equivalent messages framed in terms of gains. Adherence to guidelines that would be beneficial at the individual level (e.g., medication adherence) or societal level (e.g., climate change) can be low when people perceive the messaging as coercive, irrelevant or unfair resulting in counterproductive resistance. This is a common response to warning messages framed in terms of potential risks and costs. Fortunately, a wide range of evidence-based behavioural techniques are specifically designed to reduce counterproductive resistance. These techniques are designed to help individuals clarify their own motivators for behavioural change; and to teach psychological skills that can motivationally enhance messages. The current talk will provide insight into how to adopt behaviour analytic principles to support the development of more effective messaging to motivate effective behaviour change that will support individuals and groups.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Academics and practitioners interested in effective messaging to change behavior at individual or group levels.

Learning Objectives: 1. At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the latest message reframing advancements in RFT research; (2) Discuss the implications of RFT for behaviour change in public messaging and beyond; (3) Identify the needs for future research in Behavior Analysis and public messaging.
 
LOUISE A MCHUGH (University College Dublin)
Louise McHugh is a Professor of Psychology at University College Dublin. She is a world leading expert in Contextual Behavioural Science (CBS) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). She has published over 100 papers and her H index is 40. Her work has been funded by national and international funding bodies such as the Irish Research Council, the Health Research Board, FP7, the British Academy, the ESRC and the Leverhulme Trust. Louise has been a Fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioural Science since 2014. Prof. McHugh is the Director of the UCD CBS lab. Ongoing research projects in the CBS lab involve behavioural interventions for people experiencing homelessness (funded by the IRC), smoking cessation (funded by the IRC and the HRB) and interventions for patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (in Collaboration with St Vincent’s University Hospital Dublin). Prof McHugh 2015 I have been an Associate Editor for the Journal of Contextual Behavioural Science.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #36
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
On the Ethics of Treating Automatically Reinforced Behavior: Self-Injurious Behavior and Stereotypy
Friday, September 2, 2022
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Auditorium
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: William Ahearn, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: WILLIAM AHEARN (New England Center for Children)
Abstract:

Automatically reinforced behavior presents substantial challenges to clinicians when developing behavioral interventions. This presentation will examine that questions of how, when, and whether automatically reinforced behavior should be treated. Self-injury is problem behavior that is sometimes maintained by automatic reinforcement and can pose the risk of significant and, in some cases, life threatening harm. On the other hand, stereotypy is nearly always automatically maintained but rarely leads to injury. Ethical considerations for clinicians will be discussed and the risks and benefits of both treating and not treating self-injury and stereotypy be explored. Some applied research on evaluating and treating stereotypic behavior will be reviewed with a focus on effective interventions for building core adaptive living and social skills.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Applied Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Attendees will be able to discuss why automatically reinforced behavior is difficult to treat; (2) Attendees will be able to discuss why it is sometimes necessary and sometimes not necessary to treatment automatically reinforced behavior; (3) Attendees will be able to discuss why self-injury is a more pressing concern for intervention and which treatment strategies are likely to be effective; (4) Attendees will be able to discuss why stereotypy is a less pressing concern for intervention and why treatment strategies should first attempt to foster appropriate behavior.
 
WILLIAM AHEARN (New England Center for Children)
Bill Ahearn, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LABA, is Director of Research at the New England Center for Children. Dr. Ahearn is currently the chair of the board that licenses behavior analysts in Massachusetts and serves as Editor-in-Chief for Behavioral Interventions. He also serves on the Editorial Board for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and previously served on the Editorial Board for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis for about 20 years. Bill has published extensively, including on the treatment of repetitive behavior, treating pediatric feeding disorders, and examining predictions of the Behavioral Momentum metaphor. He was named the 2009 American Psychological Association - Division 25 awardee for Enduring Contributions to Applied Behavioral Research (Nate Azrin award) and as CalABA’s 2020 Outstanding Contributor. Bill is also a past-President of APBA and BABAT.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #80
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
How to Develop Basic Knowledge About Behavior-Based Safety Through its Application at a National and International Level
Saturday, September 3, 2022
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Auditorium
Area: CSS/CBM; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Fabio Tosolin, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: FABIO TOSOLIN (Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis)
Abstract:

The presentation will focus on the importance of the application and divulgation of Behavior Based Safety processes, underlining the essential elements of the science of Behavior Analysis. There are various barriers in such divulgation for a number of reasons. Through the use of detailed examples, these will be presented and exposed, demonstrating the gaps that must filled in order to move on to the following steps. One of the common difficulties all behavior analysts encounter, is illustrating, to individuals and society how B-BS is used and the efficiency of such process. Nationally, one of the main challenges that all behavior analysts are needing to face, in relation to the divulgation of such science, are individuals’ beliefs, spanning credential, cultural and religious points of view. When specifically talking about B-BS, we are explaining a scientific method that involves making significant changes in the usual activities and routines of all the individuals that are adopting it. Such change is of great impact, requiring dedication and will, needing to be adopted and viewed as a new ‘lifestyle’ inside the firm, hospital, school and etc. Laws are another aspect that nations should widely take into consideration. Laws have the aim to clearly state and describe what behaviors should be adopted by all individuals, in a specific situation. Analyzing it under a behavioral perspective, laws should describe, under the three-contingency models (Antecedents, Behavior, Consequences) what are the behaviors that society needs to follow or base themselves on. However, when reading laws (in Italy in particular), everything is defined under the use of punishment, a consequence that has clearly demonstrated its inefficiency in relation to the adoption or changing of behaviors.

The points discussed above expose the main aspects that need to be addressed when developing, at a national and international level, the B-BS process, specifically when adopting the scientific application of Behavior Analysis. In order to continue with the divulgation of the use of B-BS process it's essential to make use of marketing tools. A possible technique that could be adopted, to convince individuals to adopt a B-BS process, is the use of negative reinforcement. Demonstrating, through clear evidence the effectiveness and efficiency of B-BS, through the support of higher hierarchy levels, can definitely be a strong method for individuals to start identifying the importance of the use of such process.

Various solutions and developments in the field of behavior analysis can be adopted, in order to promote and continue with the growth of such field and science. The change and modification of laws could be one, focusing on determining and describing how behaviors can be obtained, rather than just saying what the behaviors are that individuals should follow. All behavior analysists should work in collaboration to continue with the growth and divulgation of the science of behavior analysis, not only through a national point of view but rather under an international one. The help and support through the different International Chapters, should be the starting point.

Throughout the presentation, a clear example of the application of a B-BS process, in the industrial or social field, will be presented and described. This will allow the audience to have a better understanding on how such a method is applied and the change it can bring in relation to individuals behaviors and lives.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

The primary audience consists of OBM’ers, Behavior Analysts, Chapter Leaders and individuals signed at the ABAI special interest groups (for example: Behavior Development, Dissemination of Behavior Analysis, Ethics and Behavior Analysis, Organizational Behavioral Network, Practitioner Issues in Behavior Analysis).

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Acquire the basic knowledge in the field of behavior analysis, in relation to its divulgation, in specific under a national perfective; (2) Develop the knowledge of the importance of the creation and building up of relations, in the field of Behavior Analysis, in specific in the OBM field; (3) Know the basic and minimal elements to proceed and complete a Behavior Based Safety process.
 
FABIO TOSOLIN (Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis)
Fabio Tosolin is the Behavior Analyst and consultant that since the 1980s has been introducing, spreading and applying Behavior Analysis and Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) principles both in Italy and Europe. In 1985, he founded his own consulting company, FT&A, that is specialized in Performance Management, Learning Technologies and Behavior-Based Safety for the last of which he’s also a referent of European level. His company implemented hundreds of PM and B-BS processes in plants and construction sites in Italy and around the world. He is currently Professor of Human Factor in HSEQ Management (BBS) at the Polytechnic of Milano (Safety Engineering Master’s Degree Course, Faculty of Industrial Processes), and President of the Italy Associate Chapter of ABAI, these two being the oldest and largest Italian Behavior Analysis Scientific Societies (AARBA and AIAMC). Since 2003 he has been the Chair of the European Scientific Conference on OBM, PM & B-BS, held by AARBA. He got the Outstanding Contribution Award in 2014 by OBMN and in 2019 he received the SABA Award for his contribution to the international dissemination/development of Behavior Analysis.
 
 
Invited Panel #108
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Issues, Practices, and Tips for Publishing in Behavior Analytic Journals
Saturday, September 3, 2022
11:30 AM–12:20 PM
Auditorium
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Chris E. Hughes (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Stephanie Peterson, Ph.D.
Panelists: TRACI CIHON (University of North Texas), MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington), STEPHANIE PETERSON (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

This presentation will include a short introduction to each of the journals edited by the panelists (Behavior and Social Issues, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and Behavior Analysis in Practice). Following this introduction, the panelists will respond to questions from the chair and audience regarding journal-specific details (e.g., submission and acceptance statistics, downloads, top citing sources), issues facing the journals (e.g., self-citations, impact factors, open access, participant descriptions, diversity and inclusion), and current issues in the field’s verbal behavior and the variety of audiences for behavior analytic publications. Finally, panelists will describe strategies researchers and practitioners in behavior analysis can use to become more involved with behavior analytic journals related to their work.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analytic researchers and practitioners

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Participants will state the missions of the following journals: Behavior and Social Issues, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and Behavior Analysis in Practice; (2) Participants will describe at least one issue facing behavior analytic journals and how this issue impacts the field; (3) Participants will describe at least one issue related to diversity and inclusion in behavior analytic publications; (4) Participants will describe at least one strategy they can use to become involved with a behavior analytic journal as an author or reviewer; (5) Participants will describe issues that face the field, particularly in behavior analytic journals, surrounding our own verbal behavior when describing our work.
TRACI CIHON (University of North Texas)
Dr. Traci Cihon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Behavior Analysis at The University of North Texas where she teaches graduate and undergraduate courses behavioral systems analysis and the graduate-level ethics course. Her current scholarship focuses on culturo-behavior systems science, building systems to support behavior scientific work on social and cultural issues, developing international and interdisciplinary collaborations, and behavioral education. Dr. Cihon serves on editorial boards for several peer-reviewed journals including The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Perspectives on Behavior Science, and the American Annals of the Deaf, and is the current editor-in-chief for Behavior and Social Issues. She recently co-edited the first book in the ABAI book series, Behavior Science Perspectives on Culture and Community, and is a co-editor for another book in the ABAI book series Women in Behavior Science: Observations of Life Inside and Outside of the Academy. In addition to serving as a member of the Board of Planners for both the ABAI Behaviorists for Social Responsibility Special Interest Group and for the BFSR SIG of Texas ABA, she was awarded the APA Division 25 Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education Award in 2021.
MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Dr. Galizio received his BA from Kent State University and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee where he worked with Dr. Alan Baron. In 1976, he joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where he is currently Professor of Psychology. His research interests include behavioral pharmacology, stimulus control/concept learning, aversive control, and human operant behavior. He has published two books, more than 100 articles and his research has been supported by NIDA, NSF and NICHD. He is a Fellow of ABAI and four APA divisions and is a past-president of APA Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) and of the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis and served as an At-Large member of the ABAI Executive Council. He has served on numerous NIH study sections and chaired two of them. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
STEPHANIE PETERSON (Western Michigan University)
Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D., is Professor Psychology and Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Western Michigan University, previously serving as the Chair of the Department of Psychology for 8 years. She earned her doctorate in Special Education at The University of Iowa in 1994. Previously, she taught at Gonzaga University, Utah State University, The Ohio State University, and Idaho State University. Her primary research interests are helping to decrease chronic severe behavior problems in children with developmental disabilities. Specifically, she studies choice making in the treatment of problem behavior, functional communication training, reinforcement-based interventions for children with problem behavior, concurrent schedules of reinforcement in the treatment of severe problem behavior, functional analysis of problem behavior, and teleconsultation. She also has interests in applications of behavior analysis to educational interventions and teacher/behavior analyst training. She has served on a variety of editorial boards, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice and is currently the editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice. She also served as a Senior Editor for Education and Treatment of Children for many years. She served two 3-year terms on the Board of Directors for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board and was been appointed by the Governor of Michigan to the Michigan Board of Behavior Analysts, Michigan’s licensing board for behavior analysts. She served as the President of the Board for two years.
 
 
Panel #133
CE Offered: QABA — 
Supervision
Technological Benefits of Applied Behavior Analysis for Developing Countries
Saturday, September 3, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Liffey Hall 2
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Claire Norris, QBA, M.S.
Chair: Hollie Benincosa (QABA Credentialing Board)
CLAIRE NORRIS, QBA (QABA Credentialing Board)
SHEENA M PIEHOTA (QABA Credentialing Board)
Abstract:

Telehealth provides an alternative modality of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) service which can be tailored to meet the unique and individual needs of clients across the globe. With rates of Autism on the rise, a steep increase in the need and desire of ABA has been noted in ample communities throughout the world. The lack of access to care, particularly in underserved communities, has always existed but has become more prevalent during the COVID-19 pandemic. Individuals affected by Autism, whether it be children or adults, in developing countries have limited access to resources and qualified practitioners capable of providing services to those in need. QABA holds its certificants to the highest standards while advocating for ethical and efficient use of telehealth services for those with limited access to service. Telehealth can provide an advantage to individuals who reside in isolated and/or rural areas. The numerous benefits of telehealth services can offer to those in need include parent training, program modification, and access to care amongst many others. Telehealth is an innovative means of service delivery which can have a positive impact on individuals, families, and their communities.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Professionals in the field of applied behavior analysis, especially those residing in developing countries and those in need of more information on telehealth.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to 1. Identify key components of Telehealth 2. Identify benefits of Telehealth for international participants 3. Complete robust and effective supervision via telehealth
Keyword(s): Autism, Service Delivery, Supervision, Telehealth
 
 
Invited Panel #142
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Behavior Analysts Playing Well With Others: Challenges and Successes in Extending Bridges to Other Disciplines
Saturday, September 3, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Auditorium
Area: EAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Carol Pilgrim, Ph.D.
Panelists: PAULINE HORNE (Bangor University), SUZANNE MITCHELL (Oregon Health & Science University), RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

Since its earliest days, behavior analysis has been envisioned as a science uniquely well suited to the study and enhancement of the broadest possible range of human endeavors and behavioral phenomena, all with a consistent conceptualization and a common methodological approach. It is arguably still the case, however, that the lion’s share of work within our field falls within a limited number of spheres. The three panelists here each provide exemplary exceptions to this pattern. All three have braved the challenges of working outside the typical boundaries of our field, translating our approach to those who speak different scientific languages, and in doing so have fostered increased recognition and appreciation for behavior-analytic approaches from other disciplines. Dr. Pauline Horne is known for her pioneering work in synthesizing behavior analysis and more traditional approaches from human development, with attendant benefits to targets ranging from imitation to early verbal behavior to children’s diet and health. Dr. Suzanne Mitchell’s influential work on impulsivity, discounting, and behavioral pharmacology spans multiple disciplines and has been tremendously impactful in representing to them the strengths of a behavior-analytic approach. Dr. Ramona Houmanfar represents an internationally recognized and prize-winning career in guiding improvements at the group level in businesses and organizations with respect tobehavioral systems analysis, leadership, communication networks, and instructional design, among other critical operational targets.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe projects illustrating an extension of behavior-analytic approaches to nontraditional arenas; (2) Describe some common obstacles that may be encountered in such work; (3) Describe the potential reinforcers to be gained from taking a behavior-analytic approach to new disciplines.
PAULINE HORNE (Bangor University)
Pauline Horne is Professor of Child Psychology at the School of Health and Behavioural Sciences at Bangor University, Wales, UK. In 1996, Horne & Lowe formulated a new account of early language development in which "Naming" is defined as a bi-directional speaker-listener relation which can produce behaviours not overtly trained. With the late Professor Fergus Lowe, Pauline has also led the development and evaluation of Food Dudes, a healthy eating programme for 2-12 year old children at home and school. The program incentivises children's repeated tasting of target fruit and vegetables using role-modelling videos that show each Food Dudes character gaining "special energy" when they eat their signature fruit/vegetable. Children receive Food Dudes-customised reinforcers initially for tasting each target fruit and vegetable, and thereafter for eating whole portions of those foods. The program also trains both the specific and category name for each target fruit and vegetable to promote name-based generalisation of the intervention to other "fruits" and "vegetables". Food Dudes was first developed and delivered regionally in UK main stream primary and special education schools. From 2007, using the same inclusive model, Food Dudes was next rolled out to all schools in the Republic of Ireland. To date 1.7 million children worldwide have benefitted from taking part. The positive and lasting impact of Food Dudes on children's diets has been recognised by awards including the World Health Organisation and UK Chief Medical Officers, UK. More recently, Pauline has developed "Dynamic Dudes" a complementary program in which the Food Dudes characters harness the "special energy" they acquire from eating fruit and vegetables to perfect their favourite activity skills (football; dance; martial arts; football). Dynamic Dudes targets children's cardiorespiratory fitness and mental wellbeing by increasing their daily moderate-high intensity activity at school. The combination of Food Dudes and Dynamic Dudes is termed "Super Dynamic Food Dudes".
SUZANNE MITCHELL (Oregon Health & Science University)
Suzanne H. Mitchell, Ph.D., is a Professor at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in the Behavioral Neuroscience and Psychiatry departments, and in the Oregon Institute for Occupational Health Sciences. She obtained her undergraduate degree at the University of Hull, England and her Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Her thesis examined the economics of foraging behavior of rats, examining the role of the energetic costs and benefits in feeding. Her committee was chaired by Howard Rachlin, whose influence made her sensitive to the role of temporal costs as well as energetic costs in determining the value of food rewards. During a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago, Dr. Mitchell worked with Harriet de Wit focusing on using behavioral economics as an explanation for use of alcohol, cigarettes, and amphetamine in humans. Dr. Mitchell moved her lab to OHSU in 2001 from the University of New Hampshire to devote more time to research examining why drug users tend to be more impulsive than non-drug users using human and animal models. Most recently she has returned to her earlier interests in energetic costs and her research has increased its scope to include effort-related decision-making in clinical populations and understanding the genetic bases of choice. She has been continuously funded through NIH since 2003, has served on numerous NIH study sections as a member and as an ad hoc participant, and has received awards for education and for mentorship. She is currently the Science Board coordinator for the Association of Behavior Analysis International, President-Elect of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, and an Associate Editor for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno)
Dr. Ramona A. Houmanfar is Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Behavior Analysis Program at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). She currently serves as the trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, Chair of the Organizational Behavior Management Section of Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, editorial board members of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and Behavior & Social Issues, and Co-Coordinator of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Board at the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI). Dr. Houmanfar has served as the editor of Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, senior co-chair of the ABAI convention, Director of the Organizational Behavior Management Network and President of the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis. Dr. Houmanfar has published over seventy peer reviewed articles and chapters, delivered more than 100 presentations at regional, national, and international conferences in the areas of behavioral systems analysis, cultural behavior analysis, leadership in organizations, rule governance, communication networks, instructional design, and bilingual repertoire analysis and learning. Her expertise in behavioral systems analysis and cultural behavior analysis have also guided her research associated with implicit bias, cooperation, situational awareness, decision making, and value based governance. Dr. Houmanfar has published three co-edited books titled “Organizational Change” (Context Press), "Understanding Complexity in Organizations", and “Leadership & Cultural Change (Taylor & Francis Group). Some recent accomplishments include being awarded ABAI Fellow designation, and publication of a co-edited book titled “Applied Behavior Science in Organization” (Taylor & Francis Group) sponsored by ABAI.
 

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