Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

CE by Type: PSY


 

Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Enhancing School-Based Behavior Analytic Services Through Collaboration With Mental Health Professionals In-Person and via Telehealth
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Whitney L. Kleinert, Ph.D.
WHITNEY L. KLEINERT (May Institute), SARAH LEVINE (May Institute)
Description: As school-based clinicians, many of our students require services that are outside our competence. For instance, these students have or need mental health supports while concurrently engaging in challenging behaviors requiring support from behavioral staff (e.g., staff providing services rooted in Applied Behavior Analysis; ABA). These private events contributing to challenges in school may not be within our purview, but still necessitate services in the school setting. For example, students may have a developmental disability in conjunction with anxiety or depression. Additionally, students may have significant trauma histories that impact how they respond to different features of treatments grounded in applied behavior analysis (e.g., full-physical prompting). The purpose of this presentation is to explore different evidence-based strategies that behavioral staff and mental health clinicians (e.g., School Psychologists, Counselors) can collaborate to meet students’ needs effectively and efficiently and operate within their respective areas of expertise.
Learning Objectives: 1. Following this presentation, participants will be able to DESCRIBE how Mental Health and behavioral needs may be intertwined and the implications of solely addressing one or the other. 2. Following this presentation, participants will IDENTIFY ways to collaborate with staff providing Mental Health services and staff providing services rooted in Applied Behavior Analysis. 3. Following this presentation, participants will DESCRIBE specific ways to incorporate Mental Health and ABA components into each of these service areas to increase the likelihood of better outcomes for students.
Activities: The instructional strategies are adaptable based on the online platform used for the conference. Instructional strategies will include a combination of: lecture/presentation with supporting visuals (e.g., PowerPoint slides), video clips, case illustrations / examples, polling questions, multiple ways to provide responses (e.g., thumbs up/down, chat box), Behavioral Skills Training (BST; instructions, model, role-plays, feedback), and break-out room activities for small groups with subsequent whole-group discussion.
Audience: Experience working within school settings and/or collaborating with service providers within school settings preferred (e.g., Psychologists, Counselors, SLPs, OTs, PTs).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Consultation, Mental Health, School-based, Telehealth
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Engineering Schools and Clinics for Student and Client Success: Part 1
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as a program designer, staff trainer, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide you with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: attendees must register for both part 1 and part 2 of this workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results, performance, and progress, using measures of frequency, celeration and celeration efficiency; (2) Define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) Perform a data based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) Design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: Do you work as a program designer, staff trainer, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? This workshop will teach you how to improve the performance of your organization so that every client will make efficient progress.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Help for BCBAs With Challenging Ethical Dilemmas: Avoiding Multiple Relationships, Confidentiality, and Limits to Confidentiality
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Similar to psychologists and other helping professionals, BCBAs have several ethical responsibilities including: avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others. Although BCBAs may be aware of what these ethical responsibilities are, they may not have had the training to deal with these complicated and sometimes threatening situations. The workshop presenter is a licensed psychologist in addition to a BCBA-D and has had much experience supervising professionals, including BCBAs, who are faced with these daunting situations. This workshop will provide BCBAs and other professionals knowledge of and practice with handling these situations. Workshop participants can bring real or hypothetical ethical dilemmas to process, as well as hear about case scenarios and participate in roleplay situations. Participants will be provided with specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, safety assessment form) and given information on how to use these tools.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the reasons why ethical dilemmas of avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others are so challenging 2. Describe the problem-solving process for dealing with challenging ethical dilemmas and how it was used in specific case scenarios 4. Describe the use of specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, safety assessment form)
Activities: Role-play, modeling, rehearsal and feedback will aid participants in becoming more skilled and confident in handling specific challenging ethical dilemmas.
Audience: Participants can include BCBAs, teachers, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, counselors, and social workers. Participants should be familiar with terms including: discriminative stimuli, establishing and abolishing operations, positive reinforcement and negative reinforcement, and have experience and examples dealing with those terms.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Confidentiality, Ethical Dilemmas, Muliple Relationships
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Multiply Controlled Verbal Behavior: Theory and Application
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Judah B. Axe, Ph.D.
OLGA MELESHKEVICH (ABA Consulting; Simmons University), JUDAH B. AXE (Simmons University)
Description: With early learners, behavior analysts often teach the basic verbal behavior operants, such as mands, tacts, echoics, and simple intraverbals. Once these repertoires are developed, programming should incorporate multiply controlled verbal behavior where more than one antecedent evokes a response. In this workshop, we will define concepts related to multiply controlled verbal behavior, including “verbal conditional discrimination,” joint control, and autoclitic frames. We will describe and illustrate research-based strategies to overcome restricted stimulus control when teaching three types of multiply controlled verbal behavior: (1) listener responding in which a selection response is evoked by a verbal stimulus and a nonverbal stimulus, (2) “intraverbal-tacts” in which a verbal response is evoked by a question about a picture, and (3) multiply controlled intraverbals in which a verbal response is evoked by a multi-part question (e.g., “What do you eat that is yellow?”). Throughout the workshop, we will discuss the roles of echoic behavior and autoclitic frames on shaping generalized verbal behavior repertoires.
Learning Objectives: • Define multiple control in verbal behavior and “verbal conditional discrimination.” • Explain the concepts of “restricted stimulus control” and “overselectivity.” • Describe research-based strategies for teaching verbal conditional discriminations. • Explain how procedures based on analysis of multiple control facilitate generalization within verbal operants.
Activities: lecture, video demonstrations, small-group activities
Audience: behavior analysts, speech-language pathologists, researchers, graduate students, special education teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysis of Seizures
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–12:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: BPN/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. Individuals with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be better controlled, and important new skills could be acquired, if the behavior analyst understands epilepsy. A brief review of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be provided. The etiology, genetics, and classification of common seizure disorders will be briefly reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be covered. Clients with developmental disabilitesare often improperly monitored and over-medicated for seizures. These issues can be avoided with EEG (electroencephalography), which is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy. Workshop participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with the EEGwithout sedation or anesthesia. Participants will learn how epileptic seizures change an individual's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about how to describe, measure, and control these relationships in an ethical manner.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, each participant will be able to: 1. Define an epileptic seizure. 2. Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures. 3. Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior. 4. Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions. 5. Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress. 6. Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures. 7. Know how to prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia. 8. Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures. 8. Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy. 9. Explain some recent research on epilepsy and behavior analysis. 10. Explain how the environment can decrease abnormal brain activity and seizures.
Activities: The workshop activities will include lecture, group discussion, video observation, and interactive activities to test knowledge (using Kahoot). Students will have access to videos, peer reviewed articles and chapters on Research Gate before the conference. Research Gate link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Neill
Audience: Clinical behavior analysts and experimental analysts with an interest in learning effective methods for analyzing seizures and their immediate and long term effects on intellectual functioning, everyday behavior and behavior disorders.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Severe Problem Behavior: From Research to Evidence-Based Practice
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Queens College, City University of New York), PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: Severe problem behavior is a debilitating and chronic repertoire that can significantly impact an individual’s quality of life. Although a multitude of different behavioral interventions have been developed to reduce problem behavior, there is rarely a comprehensive demonstration of a successful program from beginning (intake of client) to end (reintegration into classroom and home) of clinical services. In this workshop we will start with an introduction to a practical functional assessment and skill-based treatment model. We will describe the research that has led to the development of the model and how it has been applied to school, home, and outpatient settings. In addition, we will provide a guide to conducting the practical functional assessment and how to use those results to build caregiver-informed communication skills, tolerance skills, and cooperation skills. Considering that the goal of the entire assessment and treatment process is to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires of individuals who exhibit problem behavior, we will spend the second half of the workshop describing how to maintain treatment effects once the individual is returned to the home or school environment by training staff members and caregivers and programming for generalization of outcomes.
Learning Objectives: Participants will describe evidence-based approaches to 1. conducting a safe and practical functional assessment of problem behavior 2. teaching function-based skills to replace problem behavior 3. training caregivers using behavior skills training 4. programming generalization of caregiver training 5. managing restraint and restrictive behavior management practices 6. managing treatment integrity and relapse.
Activities: The workshop will include lectures, case presentations, and problem solving exercises.
Audience: Participants should have an understanding of common behavioral concepts as described in Cooper et al. (2020) and some experience and basic knowledge of ABA applied to severe problem behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Caregiver Training, Functional Analysis, Problem Behavior
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
BITES®: A Behavioral InTEgrated With Speech Approach to Feeding Therapy
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura J. Seiverling, Ph.D.
LAURA J. SEIVERLING (Ball State University), ELISE JUSKO (Bites Feeding Therapy, LLC)
Description: Pediatric feeding problems are complex and often require a multi-disciplinary approach to assessment and treatment. The Behavioral InTEgrated with Speech approach, known as BITES®, focuses specifically on how speech-language pathologists (SLPS) and Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) can work together to assess feeding problems and develop interventions for them. With over 30 years of combined experience in the field of pediatric feeding disorders, Laura Seiverling, Psychologist and BCBA-D, and Elise Jusko, CCC-SLP, will draw from their own experiences working on a multidisciplinary feeding team together and will provide an overview of how cross-discipline collaboration between SLPs and BCBAs can look when it comes to both assessment and treatment of food selectivity, chewing, packing, rapid eating, tongue thrusts, dysphagia, food overstuffing, choking phobias, and self-feeding difficulties. Case examples will be provided for each of the feeding problems discussed. In addition, the presenters will review the various factors that may lead to a feeding problem and will provide an overview of typical feeding development. Content has peer reviewed, published support beyond those publications and other types of communications devoted primarily to the promotion of the approach.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Describe typical feeding development 2. Identify the role of various disciplines involved in multidisciplinary feeding evaluations. 3. Identify common medical and environmental factors that may lead to a feeding problem. 4. Understand the role of both SLPs and BCBAs in the assessment and intervention of pediatric feeding disorders. 5. Collect baseline data and determine a starting point for feeding interventions. They will also learn how to collect data on various mealtime behaviors, graph child mealtime behavior, and how to write task-analyzed feeding protocols. 6. Use behavioral skills training to teach caregivers and others to implement feeding interventions.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: Lecture, video, small group activities, case examples, discussion, and role-play.
Audience: Attendees should have a basic understanding of pediatric feeding problems and some experience implementing feeding interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): feeding disorders, interdisciplinary collaboration
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Engineering Schools and Clinics for Student and Client Success: Part 2
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as a program designer, staff trainer, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide you with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: attendees must register for both part 1 and part 2 of this workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results, performance, and progress, using measures of frequency, celeration and celeration efficiency; (2) Define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) Perform a data based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) Design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: Do you work as a program designer, staff trainer, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? This workshop will teach you how to improve the performance of your organization so that every client will make efficient progress.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Outcome-Based Management of Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Through Dynamic Programming at the Lovaas Institute Midwest
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest; University of Minnesota)
Description: The Lovaas Institute Midwest has delivered all of its EIBI services utilizing a comprehensive dynamic programming model for 18 years. The main goals of the model are: to ensure that each family is receiving the most appropriate level of individualized intervention at any given point in time; and to monitor each clinician's daily performance in a manner that contributes to continuous quality improvement. In dynamic programming, the interventions are continuously adjusted to produce accelerating progress, rather than to maintain static performance. The workshop will present the methods of managing the performance of all team members, parents, and supervisors through daily, weekly, six-month, and overall outcome measures. Dynamic measures focus on generative responding, acceleration toward single-trial mastery, recombinative generalization in matrix training, contingency management, and naturalization. Cost-effective staff training and management is also a fundamental concern, and so the system utilizes a data collection system that enables timely decision making, to both increase effectiveness when individual acquisition is challenging, and reduce the use of artificial training parameters as quickly as possible without impairing generalization or maintenance. Comprehensive program evaluation data will be presented on a substantial body of accumulated measures for 246 children served over 18 years.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to describe: 1) the specific system for evaluating child response to treatment. 2) the specific clinical management system. 3) the results of the comprehensive research program.
Activities: The main format will be didactic presentation of the model, using actual programming materials and data, with frequent pauses to engage in questions and commentary by the participants. Various programming materials will be distributed to the attendees.
Audience: The attendees will be best able to attain the workshop objectives if they have working knowledge and experience with any EIBI program.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): curriculum management, individualization, outcomes, short-term objectives
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Providing Internet-Based Consultation Services to Teach Parents of Children With Autism to Effectively Assess Skills and Implement Evidence-Based Teaching Interventions
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed to help consultants to remotely provide effective assessment, program development, and consultation services. This workshop will focus on the many factors that must be considered both when initiating and conducting internet-based consultation including: clearly establishing the expectations and roles of both the parent and the consultant, determining the parents’ knowledge of critical distinctions in the various types of language skills, their motivation and ability to participate in and follow through with specific teaching activities. In order to obtain and maintain the parents’ active participation, it is necessary to select the initial teaching activities that will help the parent quickly develop instructional control. Once the parents have obtained reinforcement from the observing the child’s performance, parents are more likely to maintain their motivation participation to extend the child’s existing skills, and develop new skills and repertoires. Therefore, consultants need to know and be able to teach parents about the peer-reviewed research involving patterns of typical child development so as to determine appropriate learning objectives that will allow the child to more readily learn from their everyday interactions with others (Partington, Bailey & Partington, 2018).
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1. state four strategies that will increase successful parent participation in teaching skills to their child when provided with internet-based consultation services; 2. state steps to ensure that parents establish instructional control during their initial teaching interactions with their child; 3. state the steps to effectively teach parents how to teach skills to their child; 4. compare the existing skill levels of a child with an autism spectrum disorder to the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children; 5. state at least two strategies to maintain a parent’s motivation to teach when provided with remote consultation services; 6. state internet-based resources that are available to parents and consultants to facilitate the documentation of skill development and increase data-based communications when delivering remote consultation services.
Activities: Instructional activities will mainly be in a lecture and demonstration format due to the workshop being conducted remotely. However, extensive efforts will be made to have interaction with the participants through frequent question and answer periods.
Audience: Participants should be BACB level consultants who have obtained training in criterion-referenced assessments and have had direct experience implementing educational programs with children with autism or other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Curriculum planning, Parent training, Skills assessment, Telehealth
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Children With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Home and at School: Broadening the Lens
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Traditional counselors view aberrant behaviors as symptoms of underlying constructs that are the reason for these behaviors, while behaviorists view these behaviors as serving an environmental function. FBA identifies the function of aberrant behaviors and acceptable replacement behaviors that serve the same function. Components that are often missing in the analysis of aberrant behaviors include: 1) motivating operations in the form of private events (thoughts and feelings); and 2) learning history with specific Sds for reinforcement or punishment. This workshop will deal with the following: disturbed attachment, callousness and lack of emotionality, oppositional and defiant behaviors, and anxiety and depression.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the symptoms of emotional/behavioral disorders as behaviors serving an environmental function 2. Describe the process of conducting FBAs with children with emotional/behavioral disorders 3. Describe the role of learning history in treating with children with emotional/behavioral disorders 4. Describe the role of motivating operations and discriminative stimuli in treating children with emotional/behavioral disorders 5. Describe how to develop and implement function-based treatments for children with emotional/behavioral disorders
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using lecture, role-play, case presentations, discussion and small-group interaction.
Audience: Participants can include BCBAs, teachers, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, counselors, and social workers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral problems, diversity issues, emotional problems
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Dealing With Uncertainty: An Ethical Decision-Making Model and Its Application to Providing Telehealth-Based Behavioral Services
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: DDA/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Weihe Huang, Ph.D.
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum; Florida Institute of Technology ), KARRE WILLIAMS (CBEM)
Description: Ethical dilemmas always challenge practitioners of applied behavior analysis (ABA) because ABA service delivery is a complicated process and behavior analysts may encounter clinical and moral uncertainties. During the COVID-19 pandemic, behavior analysts move rapidly into the telehealth model of delivering ABA services. As a result, ABA providers are more likely than before to find themselves in uncertain situations where an ethical dilemma could arise. This workshop is designed to increase participants’ ability to deal with ethical uncertainties by defining ethical principles valued by behavior analysts, describing the characteristics of ethical dilemmas, introducing an ethical decision-making model, and demonstrating how this model can be applied to solve ethical dilemmas in providing ABA service via telehealth. This approach incorporates codes of ethics for behavior analysts and ethical reasoning strategies. In so doing, the instructors provide participants with a framework that emphasizes teaching the process of making ethical decisions rather than just offering simple answers. These principles and strategies are based on the clinical and teaching experiences of the instructors, their relevant publications, and the available literature in the field of ABA and other disciplines. The instructors will discuss the limitations of this model and offer various examples of applying the model.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe at least five core ethical principles valued in the field of applied behavior analysis; (2) identify most common ethical dilemmas by discriminating among ethical dilemmas, clinical problems, and administrative issues; (3) explain six steps in the decision-making model; and (4) apply the decision-making model to solve ethical dilemmas stemming from telehealth-based ABA services by completing relevant case scenarios provided by the instructors.
Activities: Core content will be taught through lecture and case illustrations. In group discussions, participants will be encouraged to (1) recognize ethical dilemmas based on personal experience in the field of ABA; and (2) apply standards in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and six steps specified in the decision-making model to address ethical uncertainties in general and to solve ethical dilemmas in providing telehealth-based ABA service in particular. Supplemental materials will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: Participants in this workshop should have some working knowledge of common ethical standards such as those specified in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Improving Classwide Behavior Support Through the Application of Applied Behavior Analytical Practices
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert F. Putnam, Ph.D.
ROBERT F. PUTNAM (May Institute), ERIK MAKI (May Institute ), SACHA KG SHAW (Endicott College )
Description: This workshop will provide behavior analysts with an evidence-based approach to designing effective classroom interventions. It includes a functional assessment to systematically evaluate the classroom environment to design, implement, and assess effective classroom-wide behavioral support practices. Once the environment is assessed, the model incorporates indirect (i.e., lecture, written training materials) and direct (i.e., modeling, performance feedback) instruction. Finally, participants will learn how teachers participate in a data-based decision-making process to establish more effective practices, procedures, and interactions with students. Data will be presented, supporting the need for a comprehensive training method that includes both indirect and direct instruction for teachers to adequately implement classroom-wide behavior support practices.
Learning Objectives: Participants will learn how to: 1) apply functional assessment strategies to the selection and implementation of effective classroom-wide practices; 2) use evidence-based methods used to train teachers in classroom-wide behavior support practices; 3) use a data-based decision process used with teachers to modify classroom behavior support practices, and; 4) use instructional and behavior support practices that establish more effective interactions between teachers and students and increase on-task behavior.
Activities: Participants will have an opportunity to engage in discussions with other behavior analysts, analyze sample data, draw conclusions about relevant classroom-wide interventions and role play providing effective performance feedback to educational staff
Audience: The necessary prerequisite skills and competencies the audience should have should be 1) knowledge of the ecology of general and special education classroom, and 2) the ability to use data to make data-based decisions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Marrying ABA and the Medical System: Multi-Disciplinary Treatment Systems and Novel Approaches for Challenging Behaviors in Youth With Autism
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau (Seattle Children's Hospital)
CE Instructor: Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MATTHEW SIEGEL (Maine Behavioral Healthcare)
Abstract:

Up to two-thirds of youth with autism spectrum disorder develop challenging behaviors, which are the most common cause for referral to behavioral health services in this population. While progress in treatment in this area has been made, many youth remain treatment refractory or unresponsive to the work of a single discipline. Specialized acute inpatient psychiatry units can be utilized to bring together the strengths of applied behavior analysis and other disciplines to assess and treat complex challenging behaviors. The service landscape, approach, and treatment evidence for these settings will be reviewed, and emerging novel approaches utilizing detection of physiologic signals in relation to challenging behaviors will be presented.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Practicing behavior analysts, administrators of ABA programs, clinical researchers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the frequency and topography of challenging behaviors in youth with ASD; (2) identify the program elements and evidence for specialized acute psychiatry units targeting this population; (3) articulate the proposed relationship between physiological arousal and challenging behaviors.
 
MATTHEW SIEGEL (Maine Behavioral Healthcare)

Dr. Siegel is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics of Tufts University School of Medicine, Vice President of Medical Affairs, Developmental Disorders Service of Maine Behavioral Healthcare, and Faculty Scientist II at Maine Medical Center Research Institute. He has developed a nationally recognized continuum of treatment and research for individuals with autism, intellectual disability and co-occurring mental illness and challenging behaviors.

 

Dr. Siegel attended Amherst College, Stanford Medical School and trained at Brown University in child psychiatry, psychiatry, and pediatrics. He is the Principal Investigator of the Autism and Developmental Disorders Inpatient Research Collaborative (ADDIRC), a network of specialized child psychiatry units performing studies of children severely affected by autism and intellectual disability. Dr. Siegel is nationally recognized for his expertise in inpatient care and the treatment of serious challenging behaviors. He served on the Autism and Intellectual Disability Committee of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry for a decade and is a co-author of the Academy’s Practice Parameter on the Assessment and Treatment of Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder and the Parameter for the Assessment and Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disability.

 
 
Invited Tutorial #21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
0 to 60: Establishing Conditioned Reinforcers and Inducing Observing Responses
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
PSY/BACB/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Lin Du, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenting Author: LIN DU (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

This talk will discuss how to induce observing responses for children who are pre-observers. These children typically don’t orient to other’s faces, listen to other’s voices, or attend to educational materials presented in pictures or objects. Without these foundational observing responses, everything else will fall short. It would be extremely challenging to teach them visual match-to-sample, conditional discrimination, let alone derived relations. Traditionally, these students rely heavily on prompts from their teachers and caregivers. They also require substantially more trials to reach their learning objectives. Our CABAS® research labs, which are affiliated with Teachers College Columbia University, have identified a sequence of verbal behavior cusps and developed the intervention protocols for those who are missing any of these cusps. This talk will focus on the recent advances in the study of observing responses and intervention protocols. These protocols are shown to be effective in establishing the conditioned reinforcement and increasing the children’s general awareness of their surroundings. In particular, children learn to select out people’s faces and voices as well as pictures and objects as discriminative stimuli from their environment. In consequence, they require fewer prompts during instruction and their learning rates also increase dramatically. Once these foundational cusps for verbal behavior are established, children will be ready to learn things they are not able to before (e.g., see-do, hear-do, bidirectional naming).

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board-certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe observing responses and why are they important; (2) name three intervention protocols that are effective in inducing observing responses; (3) discuss what children learn to do after they have acquired observing responses.
 
LIN DU (Teachers College, Columbia University)

Dr. Lin Du received her first MA in sociology from Nanjing University, China. She then earned her MA and Ph.D. in applied behavior analysis from Teachers College, Columbia University. She is a CABAS® senior behavior analyst, associate research scientist, New York State Licensed behavior analyst, and BCBA-D. Dr Du is a research scientist and program supervisor at the Fred S. Keller school (a R&D lab for master and doctoral candidates in ABA and school psychology programs at Teachers College, Columbia University). She is also an adjunct assistant professor of behavior analysis at Teachers College, Columbia University. Her primary research interests are verbal behavior development of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). She has published two books, several book chapters and many peer-reviewed papers in the behavior analytic journals, including the Psychological Record, Journal of Béhavioral and Brain Science, Behavior Development Bulletin, Behavior Analysis in Practice, European Journal of Behavior Analysis, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, and International Journal of Behavior Analysis and Autism Disorder

 
 
Invited Paper Session #25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Systemic Behavior Analysis: A Therapeutic Approach for Optimizing Best Practices for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Families
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: PRA
Chair: Paula Ribeiro Braga-Kenyon (Kadiant)
CE Instructor: Angeliki Gena, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANGELIKI GENA (University of Athens, Greece)
Abstract:

This presentation will address the question of effective practices for the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, from both an epistemological and a therapeutic perspective, and suggest the importance of a synthesis of two paradigms—behavior analysis and general systems theory—as a means of optimizing our assessment of the needs and the services provided to people with disabilities. Despite the development and the use of a wide array of behavior analytic practices that help all children with ASD to reach their full potential, a question that remains under-researched has to do with the effort expected from the child and his/her family and whether this effort can be somehow lessened without compromising the benefits. The answer to that question led to investigating the properties of another epistemological paradigm—general systems theory—its merits, its compatibility, and its complementarity to the discipline of behavior analysis. This presentation aims to demonstrate that the two paradigms are compatible and complementary and that their combination may lead to optimizing the therapeutic and pedagogical outcomes of behavior analytic practices. If we are to adapt a systemic perspective, according to which the joining of two or more systems leads to an outcome that exceeds by far the additive effects of those systems, it will be interesting to assess the potential emergent benefits of the synthesis of two compatible and complementary epistemological paradigms and how those translate into therapeutic outcomes.

Target Audience:

Researchers and therapists in the field of autism spectrum disorder.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation the participants will be able to: (1) utilize the main principles of Systemic Behavior Analysis to evaluate a treatment program for people with ASD; (2) assess whether the breath of a Systemic Behavior Analytic treatment program is feasible and appropriate for the population of people with ASD of his/her interest; (3) plan for changes in the development of a behavior analytic intervention that incorporate systemic elements.
 
ANGELIKI GENA (University of Athens, Greece)
Angeliki Gena is Professor at the School of Philosophy, Department of Philosopsy-Pedagogy-Psychology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece (EKPA). She received her BA in Psychology and Sociology, her Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology and her Ph.D. from the “Learning Processes” program of the Psychology Department of the City University of New York. She conducted her Doctoral Dissertation at the Princeton Child Development Institute, in Princeton, New Jersey. She worked in various institutes in the USA and became the director of the Alpine Learning Group, a prominent center for children with autism in Alpine, New Jersey. She also taught as an adjunct professor at the City University of New York. In Greece she started her teaching career at the University of Thessaly, was elected at the University of the Aegean, and since 1998 teaches at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Her research is predominantly in the area of Behavior Analysis and its applications for early intervention in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Was general secretary of the Association of Behavioral Research for 11 years, is an associate of the Institute of Behavioral Research and Therapy, and a founding member and current president of the Institute of Systemic Behavior Analysis. She has served as an elected member of the Senate of EKPA, since 2016 she is a member of the board of trustees of IKY – National Organization of Scholarships, Greece – has been appointed to national committees of the Greek Ministry of Education, and has served on the board of various non-for-profit organizations. She has received several scholarships and awards for distinguished research and clinical practices addressing children with autism and grands from the European Commission and various Greek organizations. She has published numerous books, empirical and theoretical articles in peer-reviewed journals, as well as book chapters. The main focus of her research is in systemic behavior analysis and its applications for children with ASD and their families.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
SQAB Tutorial: Using Quantitative Theories of Relapse to Improve Functional Communication Training
Saturday, May 29, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Brian Greer, Ph.D.
Chair: Timothy A. Shahan (Utah State University)
Presenting Author: BRIAN GREER (Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Abstract:

Functional communication training (FCT) has strong empirical support for its use when treating socially reinforced problem behavior. However, treatment effects often deteriorate when FCT procedures are challenged, leading to the recurrence of problem behavior, decreased use of the functional communication response, or both. Recent prevalence estimates suggest that treatment relapse is common in the clinic. Researchers have accordingly described a number of strategies for improving the long-term effectiveness of differential-reinforcement-based procedures (e.g., FCT), and quantitative theories of relapse (i.e., Behavioral Momentum Theory, Resurgence as Choice) provide falsifiable predications regarding modifications for mitigating treatment relapse. In this presentation, I share recent research on the prevalence of treatment relapse during routine, clinical service delivery and discuss our work on applying quantitative models of relapse to improve treatment durability. Future steps for advancing promising relapse-mitigations strategies will also be discussed, as will clinical considerations that limit the practicality of otherwise effective mitigation procedures.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs, applied and basic researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain FCT and describe its efficacy; (2) describe at least one common challenge to FCT treatment effects; (3) describe at least two specific strategies for mitigating relapse of problem behavior following FCT.
 
BRIAN GREER (Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Brian D. Greer is the founding director of the Severe Behavior Program within the Rutgers University Center for Autism Research, Education, and Services. He is an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics and a core member of the Brain Health Institute. He received a Bachelor of Science in psychology from the University of Florida in 2008, a Master of Arts in applied behavioral science in 2011 and a Ph.D. in behavioral psychology in 2013, both from the University of Kansas. He later completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He has served on the board of editors and as a guest associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He is the 2013 recipient of the Baer, Wolf, and Risley Outstanding Graduate Student Award and the 2019 recipient of the B. F. Skinner Foundation New Researcher Award in the area of applied research. Dr. Greer is the Executive Director of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, and he currently supervises three R01 grants from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development on preventing relapse of destructive behavior using Behavioral Momentum Theory and Resurgence as Choice. He has helped to acquire and carry out over $10 million in federal grant funding.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Treatments for Epilepsy in Developing Nations
Saturday, May 29, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Sarah M. Richling (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Sarah M. Richling, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JOANNE DAHL (University of Uppsala, Sweden)
Abstract:

Access to low-cost, easily implemented behavioral treatments for a range of socially important health issues is severely limited in developing nations. As a case in point, most citizens in developing countries have no access to behavioral treatments for epilepsy. In behavior medicine, epilepsy is defined as the combination of a tendency to seize together with internal and external factors which increase the probability of reacting with a seizure reaction. In this model, epileptic seizures, like any behavior, is amenable to respondent and operant conditioning; thus, it is possible to effect and change the outcome of the seizure process using a behavior analysis and subsequent interventions. This paper aims to present a summary of the main points of clinical research in the behavioral treatment of epilepsy during the past 50 years and show the author's own recent studies done in South Africa and India. A presentation of two such RCT studies of behavioral treatment in the form of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy show promising results.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: PENDING
 
JOANNE DAHL (University of Uppsala, Sweden)

JoAnne is a native North American who has lived her whole adult life in Sweden. She has her clinical psychology degree, psychotherapy degree, Ph.D. och Docent from Uppsala University in Sweden where she also held a position of full professor of psychology prior to her retirement last year. JoAnne has specialized in behavior medicine and has focused on applying learning theory in practice for many chronic illnesses such as epilepsy, constipation, asthma, obesity, and chronic pain. She is the author and or coauthor of five professional books applying ACT and RFT to both chronic illness as well as Love relationships as well as publishing over 60 scientific studies in these areas. JoAnne is a peer reviewed ACT trainer and an ACBS fellow.

 
 
Invited Panel #47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Quantitative Theories of Relapse to Improve Functional Communication Training: A Panel With Discussion
Saturday, May 29, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Christopher A. Podlesnik (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Christopher A. Podlesnik, Ph.D.
Panelists: ANDREW CRAIG (State University of New York Upstate Medical University), JOEL RINGDAHL (University of Georgia), TIMOTHY SHAHAN (Utah State University)
Abstract:

This panel will be a discussion of Dr. Brian Greer’s SQAB Tutorial on using quantitative theories of relapse to improve FCT.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe contemporary applications of computer technologies in behavior analysis; (2) describe the research questions to be addressed by computer technologies; (3) describe resources to leverage computer technologies in behavior analysis.
ANDREW CRAIG (State University of New York Upstate Medical University)
Dr. Andrew Craig earned his Ph.D. in Psychology with an emphasis in experimental analyses of behavior from Utah State University. He completed postdoctoral training at the University of Nebraska Medical Center’s Munroe-Meyer Institute, where he gained experience applying behavior-analytic principles to the assessment and treatment of severe behavior disorders in children and adolescents with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Dr. Craig currently is a postdoctoral research associate in the Family Behavior Analysis program at Upstate Medical University and coordinator of the Behavior Analysis Murine laboratory. Dr. Craig’s research focuses on understanding why behavior persists when faced with challenges that deter it and why behavior comes back (or “relapses”) after it has been eliminated. He is particularly interested in bi-directional translational research, wherein novel approaches to intervention are developed in controlled laboratory settings, assessed in clinical applications, and further refined in the laboratory to maximize treatment efficacy and minimize barriers to treatment. Dr. Craig has published over 20 articles and book chapters on these and other topics, with several other manuscripts under review or in development. He currently serves on the board of editors for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behaviorand has served as an ad hoc reviewer for The American Journal of Additions Behavioral Neuroscience, Behavioural Processes, the European Journal of Behavior Analysis, the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and Perspectives of Behavioral Science.
JOEL RINGDAHL (University of Georgia)
Joel Ringdahl is an associate professor in the department of communication sciences and special education at the University of Georgia. His research interests include functional analysis and treatment of severe behavior problems, stimulus preference assessments, functional communication training and translational research in the areas of behavioral momentum theory and behavioral economics. He is the editor of Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice.
TIMOTHY SHAHAN (Utah State University)
Dr. Shahan received his Ph.D. in psychology from West Virginia University in 1998. He was a post-doctoral research fellow at the University of Vermont, and then a Research Assistant Professor at the University of New Hampshire until 2003. Dr. Shahan was the 2006 recipient of the B.F. Skinner Young Researcher Award from Division 25 of APA. He is presently a Professor in the Psychology Department at Utah State. Dr. Shahan's research focuses on resurgence, behavioral momentum, choice, conditioned reinforcement, and drug self-administration. Since 2000, his research has been funded by a variety of NIH Institutes including the National Institute on Drug Abuse, National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institute of Mental Health, and the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. He is a Fellow of ABAI and has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior, president of the Society of the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, and chair of the Biobehavioral Regulation, Learning and Ethology study section at NIH.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
SQAB Tutorial: How Advanced Computer Technology can Advance Research and Practice in Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Ellie Kazemi, Ph.D.
Chair: David Roth (B. F. Skinner Foundation; Tuscarora Intermediate Unit 11 (TIU-11) )
Presenting Author: ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

The rapid growth in computer technology means that nearly anything imaginable is either possible or will soon become possible. Behavior analysts, as specialists in learning and behavior, are uniquely trained to become strong collaborators on multidisciplinary teams focusing on projects to advance machine learning, simulation-based experiences, and much more. In this tutorial, I will discuss how we currently leverage such technology in my lab and integrate robotics, virtual reality (VR), and artificial intelligence (AI) in our behavior analytic research. I will share the outcomes of some of our current research projects as well as my collaborative efforts on the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) grants.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how advanced computer-technology can be utilized in experimental analysis of human behavior; (2) discuss how computer-technology can be utilized to increase accessibility and efficiency of behavior skills training through simulation-based trainings; (3) explain how integration of computer-technology in behavior analytic research and practice can help extend the reach of behavior analysis.
 
ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Dr. Kazemi is a Professor at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she has developed and teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in behavior analysis for the past 10 years. She founded the Masters of Science Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in 2010 and has collaborated with the CSUN community to provide graduate students high quality supervision experiences. She currently has two different lines of research. Her applied research interests involve identification of efficient, effective strategies for practical training, supervision, and leadership. Her laboratory research involves leveraging technology (e.g., robotics, virtual or augmented reality) for efficient training and feedback using simulations. She is currently working on several nationwide large projects (e.g., with FEMA and NASA) with a focus on effective training and behavioral outcomes. She has received several mentorship awards including the ABAI Best Mentor Award, the Outstanding Faculty Award, the Outstanding Teaching Award, and the Outstanding Service Award. She has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, staff turnover, and the use of technology in behavior analysis. She is the leading author of a handbook written for both supervisors and supervisees that is titled, Supervision and Practicum in Behavior Analysis: A Handbook for Supervisees.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #58
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Designing Skill Acquisition Programs: Considerations and Recommendations
Saturday, May 29, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Jason C. Vladescu (Caldwell University)
CE Instructor: Tiffany Kodak, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: TIFFANY KODAK (Marquette University)
Abstract:

Designing skill acquisition programs requires careful consideration of variables that can affect the speed of learning. For example, the number and type of stimuli to include in an instructional set, sequencing of stimuli during instruction, the number of practice opportunities to arrange, and the selection of mastery criteria are important considerations when designing programs for learners. In this presentation, Dr. Kodak will synthesize research on these topics and provide recommendations for practitioners who are responsible for designing instructional programs. In addition, areas of additional research that can help improve the design and outcomes of skill-acquisition programs will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: This presentation is designed for an audience of RBTs with several years of experience in early intervention, BCBAs who have at least some familiarity with skill-acquisition programming, and students and faculty members who conduct research on skill acquisition.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) differentiate between stimuli included in early versus later skill-acquisition programs; (2) consider how different stimulus set sizes can affect acquisition; (3) identify different ways to structure practice opportunities for learners; (4) select mastery criteria based on the goals of intervention.
 
TIFFANY KODAK (Marquette University)

Dr. Kodak is an Associate Professor in the Behavior Analysis program at Marquette University. She is a licensed psychologist, licensed behavior analyst, and Board Certified Behavior Analyst. She has worked with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder more than 25 years. Dr. Kodak obtained her Ph.D. in School Psychology from Louisiana State University. She formerly served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Learning and Motivation. She currently serves on several editorial boards including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Behavior Analysis in Practice, and Learning and Motivation. Her research interests in the area of early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder include increasing the efficiency of skill acquisition, treatment integrity, assessment-based instruction, verbal behavior, conditional discriminations, parent training, and computer-assisted instruction.

 
 
Invited Tutorial #107
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
SQAB Tutorial: Back to the Lab: Human Behavioral Pharmacology Methods, Outcomes and Meanings
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
BACB/PSY/QABA CE Offered. CE Instructor: William Stoops, Ph.D.
Chair: Derek D. Reed (University of Kansas)
Presenting Author: WILLIAM STOOPS (University of Kentucky)
Abstract:

Human behavioral pharmacology methods have been used to rigorously evaluate the effects of a range of centrally acting drugs in human beings under controlled conditions. Methods like drug self-administration and drug-discrimination have been adapted from non-human laboratory animal models. Because humans have the capacity to communicate verbally, self-report methods are also commonly used to understand drug effects. This presentation will provide an overview of these traditional human behavioral pharmacology methods, as well as more novel measures that have been introduced to the field. Representative data will be shared and the benefits, challenges and translational relevance of each method will be discussed. This session will cover guiding principles in the design of human behavioral pharmacology studies (e.g., using placebo controls, testing multiple doses) along with ethical (e.g., avoiding enrollment of individuals seeking treatment, determining capacity to consent) and safety (e.g., dose selection, pre-screening of participants for exclusionary health problems) that must be addressed when conducting these types of studies.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) understand basic methods used in human behavioral pharmacology research; (2) know how ethical and safety issues are addressed in human behavioral pharmacology studies; (3) appreciate the clinical relevance of human behavioral pharmacology findings.
 
WILLIAM STOOPS (University of Kentucky)
Dr. William W. Stoops, a Professor in the Departments of Behavioral Science, Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Kentucky, earned his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Davidson College in Davidson, NC and his Master’s degree and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Kentucky. His research evaluates the behavioral and pharmacological factors that contribute to drug use disorders, focusing primarily on stimulant drugs. Dr. Stoops’ research contributions resulted in receipt of the 2016 Psychologist of the Year Award from the Kentucky Psychological Association, the 2013 Joseph Cochin Young Investigator Award from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and the 2008 Wyeth Young Psychopharmacologist Award from Division 28 (Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse) of the American Psychological Association (APA). Dr. Stoops currently serves on the College on Problems of Drug Dependence Board of Directors and is Editor of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #110
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessment Beyond Diagnosis: Meaningful Measurement of Behavior to Advance Clinical Practice and Research in Neurodevelopmental Disorders
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Lin Du (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Lin Du, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SOMER BISHOP (University of California, San Francisco)
Abstract:

Researchers in the field of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have made significant progress in assessment of social-communication and other ASD-related impairments. However, there is still a great deal to be learned about profiles of ability and disability characteristic of individuals with different neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs), and about the ways in which particular abnormalities manifest at different points in development. Dr. Bishop will present information about behavioral dimensions that are most relevant to assessment and differential diagnosis of ASD and other NDDs. She will also discuss the importance of considering individual factors such as age, sex, IQ, and language level when interpreting scores from standardized measures for diagnostic or other purposes. Integrated assessment across multiple behavioral domains is not only needed to ensure valid diagnostic practices, but more importantly, to generate individualized and meaningful treatment plans. Improved coordination between diagnostic and treatment providers is essential for increasing efficiency and utility of current assessment practices. Additionally, there is a need for increased coordination of measurement strategies across disciplines, in order to ensure appropriate selection of short-and long-term goals and corresponding measures of change. Ultimately, we must toward more coordinated and goal-directed assessment practices that do not place such a premium on diagnostic labels, but instead focus on generating information that directly facilitates treatment for a given individual at a particular moment in time.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Clinicians and researchers.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss individual-level factors that affect manifestation and measurement of social-communication deficits and restricted and repetitive behaviors; (2) identify subtypes of social-communication deficits; (3) identify range of domains relevant for assessment and treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders across the lifespan; (4) discuss how to apply assessment results across domains to develop individualized treatment plans and optimize strategies for measuring change in response to treatment.
 
SOMER BISHOP (University of California, San Francisco)
Somer Bishop is a clinical psychologist and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health and the Weill Institute for Neurosciences at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Bishop’s research and clinical interests focus on the assessment of social-communication and restricted and repetitive behaviors characteristic of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and how these symptom dimensions are affected by individual and contextual factors across the lifespan. At UCSF, Dr. Bishop’s lab is focused on identifying and refining dimensional measures of ASD-related behavior that can be used to delineate phenotypic and etiologic similarities and differences between ASD and other developmental disorders, taking into account individual factors such as age, sex, IQ, and language level. She is interested in developing trans-diagnostic tools that can be used in both clinical and research settings to assess profiles of social-communicative and other behavioral strengths and challenges across development in varied clinical populations (e.g., ASD, intellectual disability, ADHD). Her work has been funded by NICHD, HRSA, DoD, and the Autism Science Foundation. She has co-authored more than 70 peer-reviewed publications and serves on multiple journal editorial boards. At the UCSF Center for ASDs and NDDs, Dr. Bishop participates in comprehensive, multi-disciplinary assessment and treatment of children and adults with ASD and related disorders. She directs the diagnostic training program, conducting multiple-day trainings on widely used autism diagnostic tools and best diagnostic practices for professionals from all over the world.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #111
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Bidirectional Naming and Problem Solving
Saturday, May 29, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: VRB
Chair: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
CE Instructor: Caio Miguel, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CAIO MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract:

We often solve problems by engaging in mediating strategies such as talking to ourselves. In order to accurately use and respond to these strategies, we must understand what we are saying. The term bidirectional naming (BiN) has been used to describe the integration of both listener and speaker behaviors that leads to speaking with understanding. In this talk, I will describe a series of studies showing that in the absence of either speaker or listener behaviors, participants often fail to solve problems in the form of matching-to-sample and categorization tasks. These results suggest that to solve complex tasks participants must be verbal. Thus, I will propose that the BiN repertoire is one of the most important skills learned during language development and must be prioritized in early intensive behavioral intervention.

Target Audience:

Basic and applied researchers, clinicians.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) distinguish between tasting and naming; (2) explain how bidirectional naming is developed through typical child-caregiver interaction; (3) discuss how derived stimulus relations research conducted with adults may be influenced by BiN.
 
CAIO MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Dr. Caio Miguel is a professor of psychology and director of the Verbal Behavior Research Laboratory at California State University, Sacramento. He holds adjunct appointments at Endicott College, MA., and at the University of São Paulo, Brazil. He is the past-editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and past-Associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis Dr. Miguel's research focuses on the study of verbal and verbally-mediated behaviors. He has given hundreds of professional presentations in North America, South America and Europe, and has had over 70 manuscripts published in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. He is the recipient of the 2013-2014 award for outstanding scholarly work by the College of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Studies at Sacramento State, the 2014 Outstanding Mentor Award by the Student Committee of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), the 2019 Award for Excellence in Teaching Verbal Behavior from the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group of ABAI, and the 2019 Alumni Achievement Award from the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #137
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Diversity submission Beyond Translation: Ethnic Disparities on Early Identification and Access to Services of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 29, 2021
5:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
CE Instructor: Regina A. Carroll, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CECILIA MONTIEL-NAVA (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley)
Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a lifelong disorder that affects children and families in several ways. A growing body of research has documented the ways in which racial disparities affect the rate of identification, access and use of services, and relationship with professionals making the diagnoses. In general, Latino children are diagnosed with ASD later in life; usually with more severe symptoms, lower IQs, and more health conditions, compared with non-Latino children. Furthermore, cultural factors can shape how the signs of ASD are conceptualized and how families accept a positive diagnosis, especially how they are affected by stigma. Diminished access to diagnostic services as well as having a caregiver with a non-English primary language can act as barriers to identifying children with ASD, in particular Latino children. This lecture will review current research in health disparities in both early identification and access to services of Latino children with ASD. Research with this underserved population contributes to enhancing diagnosis and identification methods for Latino children with ASD and assessing the unidentified risk factors and barriers to accessing services, hence improving their outcomes.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

researchers, allied health professionals, educators

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss health disparities in children with ASD with race, ethnicity, culture, socioeconomic status, environment, and geography; (2) discuss under-identification of ASD in Hispanic children can result in families not receiving the services they need to improve health outcomes; (3) explain the importance of developing a culturally sensitive model as a way to increase the identification, diagnosis and referral to available services of ASD in Hispanic children.
 
CECILIA MONTIEL-NAVA (University of Texas Rio Grande Valley)
Dr. Cecilia Montiel-Nava, a bilingual child clinical psychologist, holds a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the Universidad Central de Venezuela (UCV), an M.S. in Clinical Psychology from Loyola University Maryland, and a B.A. in Psychology from the Universidad Rafael Urdaneta (Venezuela). Dr. Montiel-Nava’s research focuses on three topics: 1) Understanding ethnic disparities among children with autism spectrum and neurodevelopmental disorders, 2) Evidence-based interventions that can be carried out by parents of children with developmental delays in underserved populations, and 3) Validity and acculturation of diagnostic instruments. Since 2015, she has been involved with Red Espectro Autista Latinoamerica (Latin American Autism Spectrum Network [REAL]), that aims to foster international collaboration for research in Latin American countries. She is also a member of the WHO/AS team for the implementation and evaluation of WHO Caregivers Skills Training (CST) pilot projects in various countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, India, Peru, Trinidad & Tobago, and Uruguay). Her longer-term goals include developing a package for early identification and early intervention that could be broadly and freely administered in underserved populations in the valley. As a clinician, researcher, and human being, she wants parents to feel that their socio-economic status, ethnicity, or location are not another hurdle to overcome in the road to gain a better outcome for their child. She is an author of two books and more than 45 research reports, articles, and book chapters.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #183
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond Intervention: How Behaviour Analysis Can Contribute to an Understanding of Autism Spectrum Disorder
Sunday, May 30, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Tiffany Kodak (Marquette University)
CE Instructor: Francesca Degli Espinosa, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: FRANCESCA DEGLI ESPINOSA (ABA Clinic)
Abstract:

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most researched conditions within the field of psychology and education. While ABA-based early intervention is considered the most effective evidence-based comprehensive approach to increase skills and reduce problem behaviour in young children affected by ASD, behaviour analysis has yet to provide an analysis of the unique repertoires of children with autism. Instead, the most widely accepted explanations of learning deficits associated with ASD are almost exclusively non-behavioural. In this talk I will discuss the importance of a behavioural account for understanding the unique challenges associated with ASD. At minimum, such an account must be able to address three areas of cognition, widely understood to be compromised in ASD: joint attention, theory of mind, and executive functioning. Developing a comprehensive behavioural conceptual framework that addresses these areas would give behaviour analysis a seat at a table traditionally occupied by other disciplines. Behaviour analysis may then be seen not merely as a collection of techniques to decrease problem behavior or to produce isolated skills.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

behaviour analysts, speech and language therapists, education professionals

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss mainstream autism theories; (2) discuss syndrome-specific ASD deficits; (3) analyze impairments characteristic of ASD.
 
FRANCESCA DEGLI ESPINOSA (ABA Clinic)
Francesca Degli Espinosa, Ph.D, BCBA-D, is director and consultant at ABA Clinic Ltd., adjunct professor at the University of Salerno, and a guest lecturer at Queen's College, Belfast, and Pennsylvania State University. 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #212
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Problematic Mobile Phone Use as Impulsive Choice: A Behavioral Economic Approach
Sunday, May 30, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: EAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Erik Arntzen (Oslo Metropolitan University)
CE Instructor: Yusuke Hayashi, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: YUSUKE HAYASHI (Pennsylvania State University, Hazleton)
Abstract:

Mobile phone use is ubiquitous in our society. While some people use it in a reasonable manner, others use it excessively and/or in a problematic manner (e.g., while driving). In this presentation, I will discuss what behavior analysis can do with the societal issue of problematic mobile phone use. From a behavioral economic perspective, problematic mobile phone use is fundamentally a choice controlled by competing reinforcement and/or punishment contingencies that involve a trade-off between multiple consequences (e.g., a smaller-sooner reinforcer vs. a larger-later reinforcer). Based on this conceptualization, I will illustrate how some behavioral economics principles, such as delay/probability discounting and demand analysis, can be utilized to understand, predict, and potentially control some forms of problematic mobile phone use, such as texting while driving, media multitasking, and excessive social media use. I will also argue that this conceptualization of problematic mobile phone use as choice can direct our attention to identifying the environmental/contextual variables that affect the choice, and that this conceptual/philosophical framework, along with strong data, is what behavior analysis can offer to other disciplines in an effort to combat the societal issue of problematic mobile phone use.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

basic and applied behavior analysts; graduate students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define problematic mobile phone use as an impulsive choice; (2) describe how delay/probability/social discounting and demand analysis can be applied to problematic mobile phone use; (3) describe how behavior analysis can contribute to predicting and controlling problematic mobile phone use.
 
YUSUKE HAYASHI (Pennsylvania State University, Hazleton)

Yusuke Hayashi is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the Pennsylvania State University, Hazleton. His current research interests lie in understanding basic behavioral processes, such as sensitivity to delayed/probabilistic reinforcers and valuation of reinforcers, as well as translating basic principles to solve societal problems, such as problematic mobile phone use. He completed a pre-doctoral fellowship at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health as well as a post-doctoral training at the University of Kansas. He earned his Ph.D. in psychology from West Virginia University, his M.S. in behavior analysis from the University of North Texas, and his B.A. in history from Keio University in Tokyo, Japan (his unofficial minor was behavior analysis, though). He also enjoyed his carrier as an IT engineer before he crossed the ocean and headed toward Texas. Dr. Hayashi is currently an associate editor of European Journal of Behavior Analysis and an editorial board member of Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He is active in publishing his work outside of behavior analysis, hoping to maximize the impact that behavior analysis can make on our society.

 
 
Invited Tutorial #283
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Building Independence and Complex Social Play in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Photographic Activity Schedules and Social Scripts
Sunday, May 30, 2021
3:00 PM–4:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Thomas Higbee, Ph.D.
Chair: Sarah Frampton (May Institute, Inc. )
Presenting Author: THOMAS HIGBEE (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Many students with autism and other developmental disabilities have difficulty sequencing their own behavior during free-choice situations. Rather, they rely on adults to prompt them to engage in particular activities. Many do not interact appropriately with play materials or may select one activity and engage in it for an extended period of time. Photographic activity schedules have been shown to be an effective tool to teach children to sequence their own behavior and transition smoothly between multiple activities. Children learn to follow the visual cues in the activity schedule to make transitions instead of relying on adult-provided prompts. Activity schedules also provide a context for teaching basic and complex choice-making behavior. As children develop verbal behavior, social scripts can also be added and then later faded to promote social interaction. Activity schedules have been used successfully in a variety of settings with both children and adults with various disabilities. They are easy to use and can be adapted to most environments. In the present tutorial, participants will learn how to use activity schedules with clients/students as well as learn about recent research on using these techniques to promote complex social play.

Target Audience:

Practitioners and applied researchers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the prerequisite skills for using photographic activity schedules; (2) describe how to use photographic activity schedules to promote independent behavior; (3) describe how to use photographic activity schedules to promote choice making; (4) describe how to use social scripting and script fading to promote spontaneous language; (5) describe how to use photographic activity schedules and script fading to promote complex social play.
 
THOMAS HIGBEE (Utah State University)
Dr. Thomas S. Higbee is a Professor and Interim Department Head in the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University and Executive Director of the Autism Support Services: Education, Research, and Training (ASSERT) program, an early intensive behavioral intervention program for children with autism that he founded in 2003. He is a doctoral-level Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D) and a Licensed Behavior Analyst in the state of Utah. He is also chair of the Disability Disciplines doctoral program at Utah State University. His research focuses on the development of effective educational and behavioral interventions for children with autism spectrum disorders and related disabilities as well as the development of effective training strategies for teaching parents and professionals to implement effective interventions. He is a former associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) and the European Journal of Behavior Analysis. Dr. Higbee is committed to the dissemination of effective behavioral interventions and has helped to create intensive behavior analytic preschool and school programs for children with autism and related disorders in Brazil, Russia, Portugal, and throughout his home state of Utah. He is the past president of the Utah Association for Behavior Analysis (UtABA) and has served as a member of the Practice Board of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) and the Psychologist Licensing Board of the state of Utah.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #292
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Alternating Treatments Designs: Interpretation Errors and Solutions
Sunday, May 30, 2021
4:00 PM–4:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
CE Instructor: Robin Codding, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CHRISTOPHER SKINNER (The Univesity of Tennessee)
Abstract:

Alternating treatments designs can be used to evaluate multiple interventions and compare interventions. This presentation will address common interpretation errors that are associated with standard alternating treatments designs and propose solutions for each type of error. First, the presentation will focus on how researchers frequently conclude that an intervention or multiple interventions were effective, when changes may have been caused by uncontrolled threats to internal validity. A design solution to this problem, including a no-treatments series during the alternating treatments phase, will be described and analyzed. Next, the presentation will focus on misinterpretation associated with cumulative learning data. A proposed solution to this problem focus on supplementing repeated measures cumulative learning figures with figures that plot learning per session data. Discussion focuses on applied strengths of alternating treatments designs, effect size analysis, and how interpretation errors can adversely affect consumers of applied science.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

researchers, graduate students, consumers of research

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify similarities between A-B phase designs and standard alternating treatments design where both interventions are similarly effective; (2) employ a no-treatment control series during an alternating treatments phase can allow one to better control for threat to internal validity; (3) identify interpretation error associate with alternating treatment designs when cumulative learning is depicted on repeated measures graphs; (4) enhance their visual and effect size analysis by supplementing cumulative learning graphs with learning per sessions graphs.
 
CHRISTOPHER SKINNER (The Univesity of Tennessee)

Christopher H. Skinner received his Ph.D. in School Psychology program from Lehigh University in 1989. While at Lehigh, he served as a special education teaching assistant for elementary students with Autism and as a teacher for 10th grade students with emotional/behavioral disorders. After finishing his Ph.D., Skinner was an assistant professor at The University of Alabama (3 years) and coordinator of School Psychology Programs at Mississippi State University (7 years) and The University of Tennessee (15 years). Currently, he is Professor at The University of Tennessee and teaches graduate courses in the School Psychology and Behavior Analysis programs. Skinner has co-authored over 200 peer-refereed journal articles and earned three national research awards including the Fred S. Keller Award for empirically validating interventions. Skinner’s accomplishments can be directly traced to his work with exceptional graduate students and practitioners. He is happiest when he is partnering with his students to work with educational professional to remedy presenting behavior or academic problems, while also conducting applied research. To simultaneously accomplish these goals, Skinner and his collaborators have relied single-subject design procedures.

 

 
 
Invited Paper Session #366
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
The Interaction Between Development and Instruction
Monday, May 31, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: DEV
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Kieva Hranchuk, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: KIEVA HRANCHUK (St. Lawrence College)
Abstract:

The difference between curricula and pedagogy is highlighted best when we consider what we teach versus how we teach it. There exists an interaction between development and instruction such that instruction can only be effective if the educator considers the learner’s level of verbal development. The ways in which we teach must cater to the current verbal developmental cusps found within the learner’s repertoire. While the progression of instructional objectives targeted within a curriculum will change as the learner acquires the necessary prerequisite skills to move forward, attention should be placed on modifying the ways in which we teach those subsequent objectives. Research in the field of verbal behavior development has proven time and time again that the acquisition of skills can be accelerated if the method of teaching is consistent with the capabilities that the learner exhibits, i.e. the presence of verbal developmental cusps within their repertoire.

Target Audience:

Educators, Practitioners, and Researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss verbal developmental cusps; (2) identify how verbal development relates to pedagogy; (3) modify instruction to better suit the learner.
 
KIEVA HRANCHUK (St. Lawrence College)
Kieva is both a certified special education teacher and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst. She specializes in teacher training as well as in supervision of evidence-based service delivery to students with and without disabilities. Her interests include effective delivery of instruction, analyzing rates of learning in young children, inclusion/integration, kindergarten readiness, verbal behavior development, and the CABAS® model. Her research focuses on how teaching procedures can be effectively modified to accelerate student learning. Kieva received her undergraduate degree in Psychology from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, and a Behavioural Science Technician post-graduate certificate from George Brown College in Toronto, Ontario. She then worked at both Surrey Place Centre in Toronto and at the CHEO Autism Program in Ottawa before making the big move to New York City. There, she earned her M.A. in Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis and her Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis at Columbia University. She has taught at both Columbia University and Arizona State University as an Adjunct Assistant Professor. Additionally, Kieva helped to pioneer the Scottsdale Children’s Institute, an integrated kindergarten readiness program in Arizona where she then served as the Clinical Director for two years before moving back to Canada to begin her career as a full-time Professor at St. Lawrence College.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #380A
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How Do Similarly Raised Wolves and Dogs Relate to Their Human Companions? Looking at Dog Domestication From a Behavioural and Hormonal Perspective
Monday, May 31, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Erica N. Feuerbacher (Virginia Tech)
CE Instructor: Nathaniel Hall, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SARAH MARSHALL-PESCINI (Domestication Lab, Wolf Science Centre, Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, Veterinary Medicine University of Vienna, Austria)
Abstract:

Basic differences in dogs’ and wolves’ propensity to bond with humans were already detected by early researcher such as Zimen and Klinghammer, especially in relation to the early human exposure needed as puppies to establish stable intraspecific social bonds. Building on this early work, the Wolf Science Centre (Austria) raises wolves and dogs from puppyhood providing intensive human socialization, thereby allowing animals to build strong bonds with their human companions, which last their entire life. Here I will present results investigating wolf-dog similarities and differences in their preferences, contact-seeking behaviours and cooperative inclination with humans. Results will include both behavioural and hormonal aspects, with a particular focus on oxytocin and cortisol, which have been hypothesized to play an important role in the domestication process.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

dog research scientists, dog trainers, educators, general interested public

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the importance of keeping environmental and ontogenetic aspects constant in wolf-dog behavioural comparisons and consider this factor when evaluating scientific studies; (2) discuss the scientific approach of the Wolf Science Centre; (3) expand their view of "dogs" to include free-ranging dogs, as a highly in interesting study population and one worthy of protection.
 
SARAH MARSHALL-PESCINI (Domestication Lab, Wolf Science Centre, Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, Veterinary Medicine University of Vienna, Austria)

Sarah Marshall-Pescini graduated in Psychology from St. Andrews University and then went on to do her Ph.D. at the same university working with Andy Whiten on social learning in children and chimpanzees. Most of the work was carried out in Uganda, with both sanctuary and wild chimps. After the Ph.D. she returned to Italy, her home country, and worked at Milan University for 8 years, setting up, together with Emanuela Prato-Previde, a small (but lively) dog cognition lab. Since 2013 she has joined the team at Wolf Science Centre and the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology (Veterinary University of Vienna) as a senior scientist. Her research focuses on the social behaviour of wolves and dogs. Since 2016 she co-supervises a fieldsite studying free-ranging dogs in Morocco and another studying wild wolves in the Italian Apennines. She has published over 50 scientific papers in top journals in her field, and co-edited a volume for Elsevier (Kaminski, J, Marshall-Pescini, S. The Social Dog: cognition and behavior).

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #383
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Diversity submission Trauma Informed Classrooms: Helping Every Child Succeed
Monday, May 31, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Robin Codding (Northeastern University)
CE Instructor: Robin Codding, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANTOINETTE MIRANDA (The Ohio State University)
Abstract:

Increasing attention has been focused on students who have adverse childhood experiences (ACES) and the impact on academic achievement. To address students’ intense emotional and learning needs, trauma informed practices are being implemented in hopes of changing the trajectory of their lives. This presentation will provide an overview of ACES and trauma informed practices that are also culturally responsive that can be implemented in a classroom setting. Special attention will be given to students living in poverty in which ACEs are more prevalent.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Teachers, administrators, school psychologists, school counselors
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss why children exposed to ACEs are more likely to have learning or behavioral challenges; (2) implement trauma informed strategies in a classroom setting; (3) identify how trauma informed practices can positively impact the school environment; (4) incorporate Social and Emotional Learning into their trauma-informed practices.
 
ANTOINETTE MIRANDA (The Ohio State University)
Antoinette Miranda is professor of School Psychology in the Department of Educational Studies. She was the first recipient (2014) of the William H. and Laceryjette V. Casto Professorship in Interprofessional Education in honor of Henry and Ruth Leuchter and Van Bogard and Geraldine Dunn. Her research interests include developing effective interventions with at-risk children in urban settings, consultation services in urban settings and the development of racial identity and its relationship to academic achievement. She is a past president of the Ohio School Psychologist Association and Trainers of School Psychologists. She also was the secretary for the Council of Directors of School Psychology Programs. She was the 2014 recipient of the TSP Outstanding Trainer of the Year Award.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #402
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Realizing the Potential of Applied Behavior Analysis to Improve Outcomes in Adolescents and Young Adults With Autism
Monday, May 31, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: PRA; Domain: Theory
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Peter Gerhardt, Ed.D.
Chair: Bobby Newman (Proud Moments)
Presenting Author: PETER GERHARDT (The EPIC School)
Abstract:

In their seminal article, Baer, Wolf and Risley (1968), stated that behavior analytic intervention is expected to result in strong, socially important, and generalizable behavior change which, in this case, should mean more positive adult outcomes in ASD. Unfortunately, despite a nearly three decade-long emphasis on evidence-based, behavior analytic intervention in ASD, adult outcomes remain poor “for almost any outcome you choose.” (Roux, et al, 2015, p. 8). While there may be several reasons for continued poor outcomes (including the challenge of simply defining “good outcome”), the potential of behavior analytic intervention to develop more positive adult outcomes has yet to be fully realized. Such outcomes, however, are well within the reach of our behavior analytic technology. But to do that, the contingencies governing our behavior will, most likely, need to shift. For example, we will need to shift from contingencies that reinforce the technical precision of our classroom-based interventions to contingencies the reinforce the somewhat less technical precision of community-based intervention (assuming the target has a fair degree of social validity). This tutorial will identify a number areas, both internal and external to the field, where a “contingency shift” may be necessary if the power of behavior analytic intervention to significantly improve outcomes for adults with autism is to be more fully realized.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: PENDING.
 
PETER GERHARDT (The EPIC School)
Peter Gerhardt, Ed.D., is the Executive Director of the EPIC School in Paramus, NJ. Dr. Gerhardt has nearly 40 years of experience utilizing the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis in support of adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders in educational, employment, residential and community-based settings. He is the author or co-author on a number of articles and book chapters on the needs of adolescents and adults with ASD and has presented nationally and internationally on this topic. Dr. Gerhardt serves as Co-Chairman of the Scientific Council for the Organization for Autism Research and is on numerous professional advisory boards including the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. He received his doctorate from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey’s Graduate School of Education.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #444
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Exploring the Health Consequences of Cannabis in Animal Models
Monday, May 31, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: BPN; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Sally L. Huskinson (University of Mississippi Medical Center)
CE Instructor: Sally L. Huskinson, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MICHAEL TAFFE (UC San Diego Health)
Abstract:

The use of cannabis for medicinal and recreational purposes continues to expand as legal barriers are dismantled. This leads to a growing need to assess possible health consequences, including with a focus on specific cannabinoid compounds such as Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Understanding of the effects of CBD by itself, and in combination with THC, are only recently being explored in well-controlled studies. This talk will discuss the effects of CBD and THC along, and in combination, in animal models. Most pre-clinical models of cannabinoid effects use parenteral injections of cannabinoids, while human use continues to be by inhalation via combusted plant material and, now, e-cigarette devices. Models of vapor inhalation in rats will be discussed with a focus on the differences compared with traditional injection routes of administration.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the scope of cannabis use; (2) explain the spectrum of health concerns resulting from cannabis; (3) compare the utility of several animal models of cannabis use; (4) analyze cannabis policy discussions in terms of scientific knowledge.
 
MICHAEL TAFFE (UC San Diego Health)
Dr. Michael A. Taffe obtained his bachelor’s degree from The Colorado College in 1990 and went on to complete doctoral studies in Experimental Psychology at the University of California, San Diego in 1995. Following a brief postdoctoral stint in the Department of Psychiatry at UCSD, he joined The Scripps Research Institute as a post-doc and was eventually appointed to the faculty of TSRI in 2000. Dr. Taffe was recruited to join the faculty of the Department of Psychiatry at UCSD in 2019. The work of Dr. Taffe’s laboratory has been focused on the potential harms and health risks that attend both acute and chronic exposure to recreational drugs, including MDMA (“Ecstasy”), alcohol, ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and the designer cathinone psychostimulants (“bath salts”). The laboratory also investigates neurobiological alterations associated with prescription opioid abuse and potential new treatment strategies for Oxycontin dependence. The therapeutic development work in the laboratory extends to evaluating anti-drug vaccines for potential use against methamphetamine, oxycodone and “bath salts” abuse and dependence. Investigations with cannabidiol focus primarily on the way it modulates the behavioral effects of THC.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #479
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Improving Observed Parenting and Enhancing Well-Being in Parents of Young Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, May 31, 2021
5:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: DEV
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Jessica Singer-Dudek, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MARLA BRASSARD (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

Research has shown that parents of children with ASD are among the most stressed as compared to all other parents, including those who have children with other psychiatric conditions and developmental disabilities (Hayes & Watson, 2013). Parents of children with ASD are chronically stressed because the demands of the family environment often exceed the parent’s ability to cope. There are few evidence-based interventions available for professionals to use with parents of a child with ASD: some use cognitive therapies, such as meditation, some use social support to reduce stress and mental health problems, and others use implement parent training to improve child behavior. Few if any combine both mental health and behavioral approaches, and none of these are designed for implementation by school personnel. This presentation describes findings from a multi-year transdisciplinary investigation into the most common stressors for parents of preschool children with ASD attending a CABAS® model school. Specifically, in two studies we surveyed parents to determine their reported levels of stress and common stressors, as well as parents’ mental and physical wellbeing, self-care, and self-efficacy skills. In the first study we also examined mother-child interactions during free-play and demand situations in order to determine possible target behaviors for intervention. Implications of the findings and suggestions for interventions will be discussed.

Target Audience:

Those interested in parent education and interventions to help parents cope with the stresses of parenting a child with ASD. These may include practitioners, educators, researchers, or parents themselves.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the evidence as to whether a child’s negative behaviors are manipulative (and thus should be ignored) OR important signals of a child’s needs (and thus should be attended to); (2) describe how child characteristics (e.g., temperament, verbal behavior developmental level, rate of learning in the ABA school, co-morbid diagnoses, severity of ASD) relate to the quality of observed parenting and the implications of these findings for interventions; (3) describe the stressors and mental health of mothers and fathers and the implications for intervention; (4) list the self-care practices that are related to lower stress and better observed quality of parenting.
 
MARLA BRASSARD (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Marla R. Brassard, Ph.D., is a Professor in the School Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. For 37 years her research has focused on parenting, especially psychological maltreatment (PM) of children by parents, a non-physical form of abuse and neglect, that research shows is the equivalent in adverse causal impact to other forms of maltreatment and the most related to depression and suicidal behavior. Recently her work has expanded to include parenting in other high stress contexts, specifically parenting a young child with autistic spectrum disorder, with a focus on interventions that enhance parental wellbeing and increase quality of parenting. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and past president of the Council of Directors of School Psychology Programs.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #481
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Experimental and Behavioral Psychology at Harvard From William James to B. F. Skinner
Monday, May 31, 2021
5:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: PCH
Chair: Darlene E. Crone-Todd (Salem State University)
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SARA SCHECHNER (Harvard University)
Abstract:

In 1892, William James brought Hugo Münsterberg from Freiburg to direct the new, Harvard Psychological Laboratory that James had created in the Philosophy Department. Münsterberg had trained under William Wundt in Leipzig, who had pioneered an experimental method to explore the relationship between mental events and physical experience. The New Psychology banished the old method of introspection. Instead, it relied on highly controlled experiments with equipment borrowed from the domains of physics and physiology. Researchers studied the psychology of the senses, the timing of mental acts, judgement, memory, and attention. Starting with these “prism, pendulum, and chronograph philosophers,” as James called them, this talk will conclude with B. F. Skinner and his experiments on operant conditioning, reinforcement, and learning. Special attention will be paid to early apparatus such as reaction keys, prototype operant chambers, cumulative recorders, and teaching machines. The apparatus, laboratory records, memoranda, and correspondence of James, Munsterberg, and Skinner survive at Harvard University and can be accessed by scholars interested in the development of their thought.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the history of experimental psychology at Harvard University between 1875 and 1965; (2) list the types of research and teaching apparatus used by experimental psychologists William James, Hugo Munsterberg; BF Skinner, and others; (3) state how to gain access to historical scientific instruments and documents in the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments and Harvard University Archives.
 
SARA SCHECHNER (Harvard University)
Sara Schechner, Ph.D. is the David P. Wheatland Curator of the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments at Harvard University, where she is also on the faculty of the History of Science Department. She has served as Secretary of the Scientific Instrument Commission of the International Union of History and Philosophy of Science and Technology. She has published widely on the history of astronomy, scientific instruments, and material culture and has curated numerous exhibitions, including several on the history of psychology.

Schechner earned degrees in physics and the history and philosophy of science from Harvard and Cambridge. Before returning to Harvard, she was chief curator at the Adler Planetarium in Chicago, and curated exhibits for the Smithsonian Institution, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society. Schechner’s research, teaching, and exhibition work has earned her many awards. She is the 2019 recipient of the Paul Bunge Prize from the German Chemical Society and the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry, which is regarded worldwide as the most important honor in the history of scientific instruments. She has also received the prestigious LeRoy E. Doggett Prize for Historical Astronomy from the American Astronomical Society, the Joseph H. Hazen Education Prize of the History of Science Society, and the Great Exhibitions Award of the British Society for the History of Science.
 

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