Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

CE by Content: Supervision


 

Workshop #W9
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Conversations: The Only OBM Intervention You Will Ever Need
Thursday, May 27, 2021
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nicole Gravina, Ph.D.
NICOLE GRAVINA (University of Florida), JOHN AUSTIN (Reaching Results)
Description: In this interactive workshop, attendees will learn how to effectively lead and manage employees through regular conversations. In short conversations, leaders have the opportunity to develop rapport, agree on expectations, sample work, assess, and deliver feedback and reinforcement. Getting better at having effective and strategic conversations can reduce the need for add-on intervention plans. During the workshop, attendees will explore the facets of effective conversations and how they enable behavior change and employee development. Research and case study data will be shared to support each facet. Attendees should bring one business result they wish to change. Attendees will leave with an action plan for having better conversations with employees and for improving their selected business result.
Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to describe the facets of effective conversations Attendees will be able to describe the OBM intervention elements that can be embedded into short conversations Attendees will develop an action plan for improving their conversations with employees Attendees will develop an action plan for influencing a business result
Activities: Lecture, activities, chat box
Audience: This workshop would be most appropriate for leaders in organizations who want to improve their leadership skills.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Leadership, OBM, Supervision
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Severe Problem Behavior: From Research to Evidence-Based Practice
Friday, May 28, 2021
9:00 AM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Queens College, City University of New York), PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: Severe problem behavior is a debilitating and chronic repertoire that can significantly impact an individual’s quality of life. Although a multitude of different behavioral interventions have been developed to reduce problem behavior, there is rarely a comprehensive demonstration of a successful program from beginning (intake of client) to end (reintegration into classroom and home) of clinical services. In this workshop we will start with an introduction to a practical functional assessment and skill-based treatment model. We will describe the research that has led to the development of the model and how it has been applied to school, home, and outpatient settings. In addition, we will provide a guide to conducting the practical functional assessment and how to use those results to build caregiver-informed communication skills, tolerance skills, and cooperation skills. Considering that the goal of the entire assessment and treatment process is to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires of individuals who exhibit problem behavior, we will spend the second half of the workshop describing how to maintain treatment effects once the individual is returned to the home or school environment by training staff members and caregivers and programming for generalization of outcomes.
Learning Objectives: Participants will describe evidence-based approaches to 1. conducting a safe and practical functional assessment of problem behavior 2. teaching function-based skills to replace problem behavior 3. training caregivers using behavior skills training 4. programming generalization of caregiver training 5. managing restraint and restrictive behavior management practices 6. managing treatment integrity and relapse.
Activities: The workshop will include lectures, case presentations, and problem solving exercises.
Audience: Participants should have an understanding of common behavioral concepts as described in Cooper et al. (2020) and some experience and basic knowledge of ABA applied to severe problem behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Caregiver Training, Functional Analysis, Problem Behavior
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Outcome-Based Management of Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention Through Dynamic Programming at the Lovaas Institute Midwest
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest; University of Minnesota)
Description: The Lovaas Institute Midwest has delivered all of its EIBI services utilizing a comprehensive dynamic programming model for 18 years. The main goals of the model are: to ensure that each family is receiving the most appropriate level of individualized intervention at any given point in time; and to monitor each clinician's daily performance in a manner that contributes to continuous quality improvement. In dynamic programming, the interventions are continuously adjusted to produce accelerating progress, rather than to maintain static performance. The workshop will present the methods of managing the performance of all team members, parents, and supervisors through daily, weekly, six-month, and overall outcome measures. Dynamic measures focus on generative responding, acceleration toward single-trial mastery, recombinative generalization in matrix training, contingency management, and naturalization. Cost-effective staff training and management is also a fundamental concern, and so the system utilizes a data collection system that enables timely decision making, to both increase effectiveness when individual acquisition is challenging, and reduce the use of artificial training parameters as quickly as possible without impairing generalization or maintenance. Comprehensive program evaluation data will be presented on a substantial body of accumulated measures for 246 children served over 18 years.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to describe: 1) the specific system for evaluating child response to treatment. 2) the specific clinical management system. 3) the results of the comprehensive research program.
Activities: The main format will be didactic presentation of the model, using actual programming materials and data, with frequent pauses to engage in questions and commentary by the participants. Various programming materials will be distributed to the attendees.
Audience: The attendees will be best able to attain the workshop objectives if they have working knowledge and experience with any EIBI program.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): curriculum management, individualization, outcomes, short-term objectives
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Efficient and Effective Training and Supervision for RBTs In-Person or Virtually: Challenges and Strategies
Friday, May 28, 2021
1:00 PM–4:00 PM EDT
Online
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: RBT’s are in high demand to provide needed ABA services in person or virtual therapy to individuals with developmental disabilities, Unfortunately, BCBAs who train and supervise RBTs are time-challenged to assist the RBT to acquire and maintain the essential skills to be successful implementing data-based practices. In addition, RBTs working in non-clinical settings require additional support and training, as current ABA terminology and technology may not be supported in those environments. Participants will receivea study guide for the RBT exam and a detailed step-by-step curriculum download for BCBAs or RBT supervisors to use to teach required vocabulary and skills for the Competency Assessment.
Learning Objectives: The participants will be able to individualize additional instruction for the RBTs. The participants will be able to collect data and evaluate success using data-based strategies. The participants will be able to monitor the client’s progress and treatment integrity. The participants will be able to use self-management strategies. The participants will be able to use data-based decisions to determine the need for additional training and support.
Activities: The format combines lecture, video examples, small group hands on activities and guided practice.
Audience: BCBAs who train and supervise RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Symposium #46
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Digitizing Large Scale Behavior Change
Saturday, May 29, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: OBM/CSS; Domain: Theory
Chair: Laura L. Methot (Performance Ally)
CE Instructor: Lori H. Ludwig, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Companies are not effectively harnessing the tremendous power of human performance. Employees consistently report lacking the basic things needed to drive performance and feel good about their contributions (Gallup, 2020). According to Gallup, high performing, high engagement organizations put the focus on concrete, real-time performance management activities such as clarifying work expectations, collaboratively setting goals, getting people what they need to do their work, and providing ongoing, meaningful coaching conversations. The old-style command and control management style in companies is not working. The one-on-one OBM consultant approach is not scalable or sustainable. In today’s fast-paced modern workplace, a grassroots, digitally-enabled approach is needed to engage everyone real-time in addressing these needs to optimize human performance and help people succeed. This presentation will demonstrate how Performance Ally is addressing these issues and bringing OBM to the mainstream through the use of technology.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Anyone who works in an organization interested in OBM

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) Describe the OBM approach to behavior change to get results 2) Conduct a Rapid Behavior Systems Analysis in your organization to identify barriers to achieving results 3) Describe the importance of the Behavior Software Architect role in developing software that creates behavior change
 
Making OBM Easier by Digitally Enabling Large-Scale Behavior Change
JULIE SMITH (Performance Ally)
Abstract: Only a tiny fraction of behavior analysts specializes in Organizational Behavior Management. Why is that? Because it is really hard to scale up the methods of individual behavior change to achieve meaningful results across an organization. Julie has spent her entire career figuring out how to do that reliably. She will showcase the internationally-recognized, behavior-based management system that she and her colleagues developed over the last 30 years. Then she will share how her team at Performance Ally is embedding that management system into Ally Assist™, enterprise software that will make it easier for customers, associates, and leaders to: Rapidly align around performance expectations, artfully give and receive individualized feedback on Vital Behaviors, bust through human performance barriers, and use performance dashboards to continuously improve. Julie will demonstrate the key features and functions of this software. She will describe how this transformational software will not only establish OBM as a must-have management system in organizations of all types, but also make possible a rewarding career in OBM for behavior analysts who are interested in bringing about large-scale change.
 
Conduct a Rapid Behavior Systems Analysis to Identify Barriers to Achieving Results
LORI H. LUDWIG (Performance Ally)
Abstract: A Behavior Systems Analysis aligns three levels of performers within an organization (i.e., Senior Leaders, Front Line Leaders, and Front Line Associates) to produce desired results through coordinated human actions. This alignment must include proactive and timely communication about anything getting in way of a performer achieving their goals. There are two ways to address barriers: Work teams can resolve their local issues, or when a barrier is caused or can only be addressed by the larger system, it needs to be escalated to senior leaders. When a barrier identification/removal process is missing or takes too long, valuable time, energy, and resources bleed out of an organization and cause stress. There is a great opportunity to streamline Behavior Systems Analysis methodology to make it easy to use and help organizations quickly pinpoint barriers. An example of a Rapid Behavior Systems Analysis conducted in a Human Service setting will be shared that demonstrates how to sift through organizational complexity and identify barriers to human performance so they can be addressed strategically.
 
Why a Behavior Software Architect is Key to Building Software that Reliably Changes Behavior
TOM E. DONALDSON (Performance Ally)
Abstract: This presentation will describe traditional roles on a software development team and where and why a Behavior Software Architect is needed. The Ally Assist project will be used to bring the role to life and discuss the necessity of this role for a useful software application. The UI/UX design and implementation as well as the functional modeling of the system must align which requires understanding behavior analysis concepts such as functional analysis, response cost, stimulus control, and temporal contiguity.
 
 
Symposium #75
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Recent Developments in Applying Behavioral Skills Training in Contemporary Services
Saturday, May 29, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Sarah Davis (Brock University)
CE Instructor: Lindsay Maffei-Almodovar, Ph.D.
Abstract: Today, training staff and family members takes place in many different service contexts outside of the university-based laboratory or demonstration project. Although Behavioral Skills Training is a well established evidence-based practice for caregivers in autism and developmental disabilities services, we still need more demonstrations from the field of applications and related issues. This symposium will illustrate those issues with three empirical papers. The first illustrates the application of telehealth. The second addresses organizational issues in ABA organizations. The second addresses large-scale application of behavioral skills training over several years.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Caregiver training, Staff turnover, Telehealth
Target Audience: Audience members should have basic graduate level skills and knowledge in behavior analysis, such as knowledge of staff training methods, evidence-based practices, basic teaching strategies and behavior analytic concepts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the use of telehealth methods to train parents to teach adaptive behavior skills to older children and adolescents with autism; (2) Describe factors, including independent variables that could be manipulated to influence staff turn over; and (3) Describe the strategies used to implement large scale application of behavioral skills training over extended periods of time.
 

Parent-Implemented Behavior Interventions via Telehealth for Older Children and Adolescents

(Applied Research)
CHRISTINE DREW (Auburn University), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon)
Abstract:

This study used independent ABAB withdrawal designs to determine whether BPT increased parent fidelity of implementation of function-based intervention which then resulted in decreasing rates of child challenging behavior while increasing rates of appropriate replacement behavior. Four participants aged 8-17 were included in the study with their parents serving as interventionists. The routines of concern were mealtime, toothbrushing, and room cleaning with various topographies of challenging behavior impacting the quality of these family routines. Each parent achieved high treatment fidelity with one session of BPT and bug-in-ear coaching. Three participants had an immediate decrease in challenging behavior upon the introduction of the intervention. Three participants showed reliable reversals to their challenging behavior with the withdrawal of the intervention and corresponding decreases in challenging behavior when the intervention was reintroduced. All parents reported high acceptability, ease of use, and contextual fit pre- and post-intervention. Results and implications for practice and future research were discussed.

 

An Examination of Variables That Predict Turnover, Staff and Caregiver Satisfaction in Behavior-Analytic Organizations

(Applied Research)
DANIEL J CYMBAL (Florida Tech), Sara Gershfeld Litvak (Behavioral Health Center of Excellence), David A. Wilder (Florida Institute of Technology), Gary Burns (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Staff turnover can pose a significant problem for human service organizations. For Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) service providers, turnover may be particularly problematic due to the resources required for training. Accreditation organizations such as the Behavioral Health Center for Excellence® (BHCOE®) collect large amounts of organizational data that can point to trends in ABA organizations and provide a basis for problem identification and intervention. In this study, we evaluated BHCOE® data to examine potential predictors of staff turnover as well as staff and caregiver satisfaction in ABA organizations. Results of multiple regression analyses suggest that high rates of turnover among job classes (i.e., technicians and supervisors) correlate with each other’s turnover. Behavior Technicians are also more likely to turnover when wages are lower and caregiver satisfaction wanes. Staff satisfaction was not a significant turnover predictor but was generally predicted by caregiver satisfaction. These findings suggest that turnover and satisfaction are multi-faceted processes worthy of examination; we provide broad recommendations for improvement and avenues for further study.

 
Pyramidal Behavioral Skills Training, Productivity Monitoring, Goal Setting, Feedback and Teacher Incentives Across Three Schools: Six Years of Data
(Service Delivery)
LINDSAY MAFFEI-ALMODOVAR (Quality Services for the Autism Community (QSAC)), Cynthia E. Martinez (Quality Services for the Autism Community), Lillian Rothmaler (QSAC), Peter Sturmey (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Abstract: Adequate training productivity is an important goal for schools serving students with autism due to frequent staff turnover and a need for newly hired staff to implement behavior analytic protocols correctly soon after being hired. The presenting author monitored the weekly and cumulative number of behavior analytic skills trained to staff by clinical coordinators and classroom teachers across three schools over six years. Weekly permanent product counts before and after the implementation of pyramidal behavioral skills training, public posting, goal setting and feedback, and teacher incentives indicated that these practices may have contributed to an increased proportion of weekly training completed by teachers over time and increased overall training productivity from year to year. Variables including staff and trainer turnover, staffing additions and shortages, differing numbers of students and behavioral support needs in classrooms, and new or different job responsibilities assigned to clinical coordinators or teachers made training productivity an important aspect of service delivery to monitor, but also interfered with isolating responsible factors when increased productivity occurred.
 
 
Symposium #145
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Compassion and Self-Compassion Among Supervising Behavior Analysts and Direct Care Staff
Saturday, May 29, 2021
5:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Kate E. Fiske Massey(Rutgers University)
Discussant: Bridget A. Taylor (Alpine Learning Group)
CE Instructor: Kate E. Fiske Massey, Ph.D.
Abstract: Recent research has highlighted the importance of compassion in applied behavior analysis (ABA). A survey of parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) indicated that parents often rated behavior analysts poorly on their demonstration of behaviors that indicate compassion and empathy for the family (Taylor et al., 2019). Further, LeBlanc and colleagues (2019) noted that the majority of surveyed behavior analysts had not received training on relationship-building skills during their graduate studies. As noted by these authors, compassion is required for behavior analysts working with families of individuals with autism and other related disabilities. Additionally, compassion is necessary when behavior analysts oversee direct care staff working with these same populations. Research indicates that staff members working in the field of ABA report high levels of burnout associated with variables that include the support they receive from supervisors (Gibson et al., 2009; Plantiveau et al., 2018). In the current symposium, we will first examine the qualities of exemplary behavior analysts, including those that center on compassion for others. We will then examine factors within ABA settings—such as supervision—that contribute to employee burnout, and consider steps behavior analysts can take in the workplace to promote compassion by altering supervisory practices and focusing on staff self-care.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): compassion, self-care, supervision
Target Audience: The target audience is current board certified behavior analysts, including and especially those who are currently serving in supervisory roles.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the qualities of an exemplary behavior analyst that are directly related to supervising others; (2) describe organizational factors, especially those related to supervision, that can contribute to staff burnout; (3) describe compassionate approaches that can be taken by behavior analysts in interactions with supervisees to reduce burnout.
 
The Composition of Exemplary Practitioners: Perspectives of Behavior Analysts
ALYSSA R MCELROY (Western Michigan University), Jessica E. Frieder (Western Michigan University), Ryan M. Zayac (University of North Alabama), Thom Ratkos (Berry College), Madison Williams (University of North Alabama), Ashton Geiger (University of North Alabama), Amber Paulk (University of North Alabama), Lily Coleman (University of North Alabama)
Abstract: What characteristics and behaviors makeup an exceptional behavior analyst? We should be well prepared to answer this question with our field’s emphasis on objective definition, description, quantification, and experimentation. However, many of us may struggle to identify differences between exemplary and average behavior analysts. The current multiphase study, asked BCBAs and BCBA-Ds to identify their top five qualities and attendant behaviors of individuals they considered exemplary behavior analysts. Two hundred seventy-four participants completed the survey which yielded 180 different identified qualities. Similar qualities (e.g., compassionate, thoughtful, caring) were consolidated into one category (“Empathetic”), and the authors narrowed the list to 35 qualities and corresponding behaviors, which we named the Exemplary Behavior Analyst Checklist (EBAC). An initial 392 BCBAs and BCBA-Ds in the United States rated the extent to which exemplary behavior analysts displayed each quality and corresponding behaviors from the previously developed list, using a 1 (never exhibits this quality) to 5 (always exhibits this quality) Likert-type scale. Participants also ranked their top 10 qualities in order of importance. Data from international participants will also be shared. A discussion of the EBAC and participants’ ratings will be presented, including implications related to training, study limitations, and future research.
 

Burnout in Providers Serving Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Multi-Method Examination of Organizational Causes

SUMMER BOTTINI (Binghamton University; Marcus Autism Center ), Colin S. Muething (Marcus Autism Center), Kaylie Wiseman (Binghamton University ), Jennifer M. Gillis (Binghamton University)
Abstract:

Providers serving individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are at high risk of experiencing burnout. Burnout is of serious concern as it negatively impacts one’s physical/psychological health and quality of services. Research has focused on individual predictors of burnout; however, understanding organizational causes may elucidate targets for prevention. Study 1 surveyed 149 individuals providing direct-care services to individuals with ASD to examine the relation between areas of work-life and burnout using standardized measures. We found a high percentage of providers experience burnout. Workload, reward, fairness, and values emerged as the best work-life predictors of burnout but predicted little variance in burnout (Table 1), suggesting existing measures do not sufficiently capture organizational aspects that contribute to burnout. To better understand the unique experiences of this population, we recruited 11 providers to interview regarding experiences of burnout and organizational factors that affect burnout. Qualitative analysis revealed nine core themes. Workload, coordinating providers, supervision, and colleagues were frequently reported to contribute to burnout; whereas, social support from colleagues and supervision were frequently reported to mitigate burnout (Table 2). Findings suggest areas for prevention within organizations servings individuals with ASD and avenues for better measuring relevant work-life factors.

 

Evaluating the Effects of Behavioral Skills Training With Behavior Analysts to Increase Essential Supervisory Skills

Allison Hawkins (Rutgers University), KATE E. FISKE MASSEY (Rutgers University)
Abstract:

Many individuals with autism spectrum disorders are enrolled in specialized private schools due to challenging behavior or specific learning difficulties. Job responsibilities in these settings can be stressful for staff employed in direct-care positions. Previous research suggests that high-quality supervisor relationships can moderate staff stress and burnout for direct-care staff in specialized ABA schools (Gibson et al., 2009). Literature suggests that improving Board Certified Behavior Analysts’ (BCBA) use of corrective feedback, empathetic statements, and reinforcement could contribute to improved supervisory relationships. To date, no research has presented the use of behavioral skills training (BST) to teach BCBAs supervisory skills, and the current study sought to fill this gap in the research. Two BCBAs were taught two essential supervisory skills: corrective feedback and empathetic statements. Both participants mastered each skill following BST. A third skill, reinforcement, met mastery criteria for both participants before BST was implemented. Staff ratings of perceived supervisor support did not support the hypothesis that ratings would improve following BCBA mastery of target skills. Staff ratings were initially high during baseline and remained stable following BCBA training. The results of the present study suggest that behavioral skills training is an effective tool for teaching supervisory skills to BCBAs.

 
Effects of Short-Term Self-Care Training on the Well-Being of Staff in an ABA Setting
DEBRA PAONE (Rutgers University), Kate E. Fiske Massey (Rutgers University), Margaret Swarbrick (Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care), Susan Gould-Fogerite (Rutgers New Jersey Medical School), Catriona Beauchamp Francis (Rutgers University)
Abstract: In past research, professionals working in ABA report high levels of burnout affected by factors such as supervisory and social support (Plantiveau et al., 2018) and employee exposure to aggressions (Hastings et al., 2000). Taylor and colleagues (2018) called for a focus on self-care for ABA professionals. In a pilot study, we examined the effects of a short-term self-care program on 14 ABA staff members working with adolescents with ASD and severe challenging behavior. We offered three 1-hour trainings on self-care skills such as focused breathing techniques and tips for healthy eating and sleep hygiene. Contrary to expectations, staff reported low levels of burnout prior to trainings, and reductions in burnout were not observed following training. However, 100% of staff reported that the program was relevant to their needs. A second, 4-session self-care program will be conducted remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic to evaluate the impact of self-care skills on employees’ perceived stress, sleep, and mindfulness skills during this unprecedented time. Taken with the results of our first pilot study, the importance and evaluation of future self-care programs with this population will be discussed.
 
 
Symposium #210
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Key Behavior-Analytic Applications During the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Experimental Analysis of Online Academic Performance, Mask Wearing, and Face Touching
Sunday, May 30, 2021
10:00 AM–10:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/EDC; Domain: Translational
Chair: Javier Virues Ortega (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain) & The University of Auckland (New Zealand))
CE Instructor: Javier Virues Ortega, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The current COVID-19 pandemic has claimed the lives of over 1.5 million people across the world and have changed the lifestyle of humanity, possibly, for years to come. In this context, specific behaviors that had received minimal or no attention in the past have been moved up the social validity scale overnight. In this symposium we will evaluate various interventions addressing some key COVID-related behaviors. Online teaching and internet use has exploded during the pandemic. The first study looks at the potential role of social media in facilitating academic performance during online university-level courses. There are essentially no experimental analyses in the literature evaluating whether social media engagement (in the context of closed Facebook learning groups) could be an important channel for multi-component behavioral interventions. The second study presents a telehealth mask-wearing training program for children with autism presenting mask-induced problem behavior. The study evaluates a caregiver-delivered intervention among an international sample of participants from Belgium, India, Mexico, and Costa Rica. In the final study we turn to face touching. Face touching is thought to account for tens or hundreds of thousands of Sars-CoV-2 infections across the world due to physical contact with contaminated surfaces. It has been suggested that face touching, a high frequency behavior, may limit the protective role of hand washing, which occurs inevitably at lower rates. In this third presentation we evaluate the suppressive effect of contingent vibrotactile stimulation on face touching in a group of typical adults as they go about their daily lives. In addition to the treatment evaluation side of the study, it also provided an opportunity to conduct a thorough quantitative and descriptive analysis of face touching in ecologically relevant settings. Overall, these studies give a perspective of the diversity of behavioral applications that can be brought to bear in order to mitigate the effects of the current pandemic.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): COVID, Face touching, Mask wearing, Social media
Target Audience:

Students, practitioners and applied researchers.

Learning Objectives: 1. Learn the mechanisms by which social media closed groups can be used to deliver reinforcement-based interventions and understand their likely effect on academic engagement and performance. 2. Understand the proposed treatment model for mask wearing acquisition among clients with developmental disability in cross-cultural settings. 3. Understand the behavioral processes underlying face toaching and its importance as a health risk behavior.
 
An Experimental Evaluation of a Facebook Group’s Contribution to Academic Engagement and Performance among Postgraduate Students
(Applied Research)
AIDA TARIFA RODRIGUEZ (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid & ABA España), Javier Virues Ortega (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain) & The University of Auckland (New Zealand))
Abstract: This study examines the effectiveness of a multi-component package designed to increase engagement between faculty and professional specialization students in an online course. We hypothesized that enhancing online interaction can be an active element of teaching effectiveness and can have a measurable impact on performance. The intervention was delivered through a closed Facebook group. The multi-component package was comprised of peer reinforcement and cooperative learning, student self-monitoring, self-evaluation, goal setting, and teacher antecedent- and consequent-based strategies. A total of 46 students participated in a concurrent multiple baseline design across groups. The intervention was staggered across the groups over a period of eight weeks. The results indicated that the intervention was effective in increasing social media engagement in the learning group and academic performance. A post hoc multi-level analysis suggested that social media interaction responses (observing and intraverbal responses) mediated the effect of the intervention on academic performance. We will discuss the implications of our findings in the context of the widespread use of online teaching during the current pandemic.
 

Telehealth Mask-Wearing Training for Children With Autism and Mask-Induced Problem Behavior During the COVID-19 Pandemic

(Service Delivery)
Maithri Sivaraman (Ghent University, Belgium), AGUSTIN PEREZ-BUSTAMANTE PEREIRA (Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Spain), Javier Virues Ortega (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid & The University of Auckland), Herbert Roeyers (Ghent University, Belgium)
Abstract:

SARS-CoV-2 is the virus causing COVID-19 and is spread through close person-to-person contact. The use of face masks has been described as an important strategy in the combat to contain and slow down its transmission while a vaccine is not made widely available. We evaluated the effects of telehealth training for caregivers to teach mask wearing to children with ASD. Six participants with a history of challenging behavior associated with mask wearing were recruited from different parts of the world, and trained using a combination of graduated exposure, shaping and contingent reinforcement. By the end of the intervention all participants wore a face mask for a target period of 10 min without exhibiting challenging behavior, and generalized the skill to a novel mask and a community setting. The findings support previous tolerance training treatment evaluations in children with developmental disability exhibiting resistance to healthcare routines. Clinical recommendations and areas for future research are discussed.

 

Suppressive Effect of Contingent Vibrotactile Stimulation on Face Touching During the COVID-19 Pandemic: An Experimental Treatment Evaluation

(Applied Research)
JAVIER VIRUES ORTEGA (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid & The University of Auckland), Maithri Sivaraman (Ghent University), Agustin Perez-Bustamante Pereira (Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Spain), Aida Tarifa Rodriguez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid & ABA España), Carolina Trujilo-Sánchez (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain), Rebeca Pardo-Cebrian (ABA España, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid), Peter A. Krause (University of California Santa Cruz), Neil Timothy Martin (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Abstract:

Facial contact behavior is a high frequency, high duration behavior that contributes to the transmission of communicable diseases by interaction with contaminated surfaces. Studies indicate that the Sars-CoV-2 virus remains viable for hours on surfaces such as paper, plastic, or metals. Hand-face contact has a long history among mammals and primates and is likely maintained by sensory consequences. It is estimated that thousands of infections may be mediated by hand contact with contaminated surfaces with pathogens being subsequently transferred to mucous membranes by hand contact with the mouth, nose, or eyes. We used contingent vibrotactile stimulation as an intervention to reduce hand-face contacts in ecological settings. Ten consecutively recruited adults wore one or two bracelets that delivered vibrotactile stimuli following face touching. Stimuli were delivered through Bluetooth-connected devices that were calibrated for each participant. We also evaluated the social validity of the intervention and how various environmental events were related to the level of face touching. In addition, the study provides an opportunity to discuss the quantitative characteristics of face touching. The results indicated that the face touching can be reduced considerably with this simple intervention.

 
 
Panel #271
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
BCBAs Working in Public School Settings: Pre-training, Retaining, and Recharging Behavior Change Agents
Sunday, May 30, 2021
3:00 PM–3:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kristy Park, Ph.D.
Chair: Kristy Park (George Mason University)
SELENA J LAYDEN (Old Dominion University)
JOHANNA COLSON (Orange County Public Schools)
CHRISTINE MCKEE (Loudoun County Public Schools)
Abstract:

The methods of applied behavior analysis (ABA) have been incorporated into the field of education to produce socially significant and practical change in public school settings, particularly to improve the use of evidence-based practices (EBPs). Despite the fact that providing free and appropriate education to children with disabilities has been a public responsibility since 1975 (PL 94-142, IDEA, 2004), multiple barriers interfere with implementation of EBPs in school settings. This panel discussion will focus on current challenges behavior analysts face across different school districts in Virginia. The discussion will provide suggestions to prepare future behavior analysts and consider ways to retain current BCBAs in school settings. The targeted audience for this panel discussion are those currently working in public school settings and those supervising future behavior analysts in the public school setting. Identifying and discussing barriers to implement behavior change as well as possible solutions provides the field a basis to address wellness strategies and ensure behavior analysts are effective in supporting public schools.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

The prerequisite skills fall within professional practice guidelines related to service delivery in the classroom, school, and system levels for students with disabilities in public schools. Audience should have competencies in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code specifically in the guidelines as a Supervisor and Ethical responsibilities to the profession of behavior analyst and to the BACB. Supervision provided within defined area of competence and perform to advance the values and ethics of the profession of behavior analysis (6.01).

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will identify at least three challenges to working in public schools as a BCBA. 2. Participants will develop and describe at least two potential resolutions to identified challenges. 3. Participants will identify at least four potential considerations when supervising students working toward BCBA certification who wish to work in public education settings.
Keyword(s): School-based, Supervision
 
 
Symposium #295
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
The Fluency Flashcard App: A Tool for Building Fluency and Learner Success
Sunday, May 30, 2021
4:00 PM–5:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kent Johnson (Morningside Academy)
Discussant: Kent Johnson (Morningside Academy)
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, M.S.
Abstract:

Behavioral fluency is defined as responses that are easily demonstrated whenever required, adeptly performed for as long as needed, not readily distractible, and performed proficiently in new environments. These outcomes are more likely to occur when responses are accurate and performed at high frequencies. SAFMEDS (Say All Fast Minute Every Day Shuffled) cards were developed as a practice procedure to help learners foster fluency. SAFMEDS are often used to help learners become fluent with definitions and concepts. Historically, SAFMEDS were created using cardstock and manipulated physically. In this symposium, however, we will introduce a new tool, the Fluency Flashcard App, that allows users to create fluency flash cards and run a SAFMEDS-like procedure electronically. Results from practice are displayed visually within the app on a quasi-Standard Celeration Chart in order to augment effective decision making. The first presentation will describe research related to behavioral fluency and SAFMEDS. The second presentation will highlight the role the Standard Celeration Chart plays in displaying data and making decisions. The third presentation will introduce the Fluency Flashcard App, provide demonstrations, and describe its development. The fourth presentation will depict an implementation of the app in a supervisory setting for students preparing for an exam.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Fluency, Instruction, Practice, SAFMEDS
Target Audience:

N/A

Learning Objectives: 1.) At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to define behavioral fluency 2.) At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to define SAFMEDS and it's applications from the literature. 3.) At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to define all the components of the Standard Celeration Chart and their importance in decision making 4.) At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to describe the features and utilit of a new technology: the Fluency FlashCards app
 

The Research Behind Fluency Building and SAFMEDS

ADAM PEAL (The Behavioral Education Research Initiative; The Walden Learning Collective)
Abstract:

A body of research exists that demonstrates fluency building, via building accurate and high frequency responding, is an effective way for instructors to enhance learner outcomes. In particular, when element skills are taught such that learners can emit them at high frequencies, those elements may then be more readily combined to enhance the likelihood that more complex skills will emerge. Many of these complex skills often require verbal discriminations in order for them to be emitted with ease. For example, one must often be able to adequately define terms and concepts in order to write effective treatment plans in clinical and instructional settings. SAFMEDS (Say All Fast Minute Every Day Shuffled) is a practice procedure that systematically builds the frequency of saying terms and definitions in a flashcard-like arrangement. Employing SAFMEDS using evidence-based frequency building procedures may result in the emergence of fluent skills. Research, and the related outcomes and limitations, pertaining to fluency building and SAFMEDS will be discussed.

 

Why Fluency Flashcards Are Different: The Importance of the Standard Celeration Chart in Decision Making

DEBORAH L. BROWN (SCOE/Morningside Academy)
Abstract:

What makes Fluency FlashCards so innovative? Individuals are used to studying in various ways. One popular method is using a common flashcards arrangement. Often, however, flashcards do not give the learner the results of fluent performance, but instead it is a quick cramming resulting in information overload. What information should go on a card? How does one make decisions about one's learning? How does one know when their studies are finished? The foundation of Fluency FlashCards is that it is not just a practice tool for learning like typical flashcard arrangements, rather it is a practice and decision making tool that builds skills to fluent performances. The foundation of the decision making is the Standard Celeration Chart. This presentation will take you into the inner workings of the app. It will describe what the Standard Celeration Chart is, what makes it different than ordinary graphs, and it’s benefits. It will describe how the daily per minute and timings charts are integrated into the app. It will also explain how the app uses frequency aims and celeration to aid in decision making.

 
Why Did I Develop the Fluency FlashCards App?
VICCI TUCCI (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.)
Abstract: In 1958, B. F. Skinner proposed the notion of utilizing Sidney L. Pressey’s “Teaching Machine” to arrange optimal conditions for self-instruction. Skinner wanted “the […]student to take an active role in the instructional process.” His version of a teaching machine was based on work in the area of the technology of teaching. He and several of his colleagues isolated many of the instructional practices that facilitate learning and instruction. The author developed a Teaching Machine so parents, instructors, and TUCCi colleagues could be competent at formulating, delivering, and monitoring evidenced-based practices (i.e., ABA, DI, and Precision Teaching). The Teaching Machine presents small units of instruction with on-going active student [User] responding and provisions for incorporating learning tools (e.g., Course Glossary, Printable Note Taking per Task, Questions with Immediate positive student feedback, and the Fluency FlashCards App). The author added the Fluency FlashCards to the Teaching Machine when she read about the science and application of frequency building. In addition, she observed the positive effects that Dr. Kent Johnson and his teachers were having at Morningside Academy with their students.
 

Usability and Implementation of the Fluency Flashcards App With the Next Generation of Behavioral Educators

KRISTINA ZACCARIA (CLM Center of Excellence, Division of TUCCi Learning Solutions)
Abstract:

Developing competent behavior educators for the next generation takes a multifaceted approach consisting of a well-designed board certified behavior analyst course sequence, effective supervision curricula, fluency building, competency, and application components. Our presentation will explore a model for developing future behavior analysts with these evidence-based practices. System examples will include the dual applied behavior analysis and Competent Learner Modell Certificate Program in partnership with Clarion University, consisting of a uniquely crafted scope and sequence curricular design with emphasis on component-composite analysis. Additionally, the Competent Learner Model’s Center of Excellence Supervision Curriculum will highlight a wrap-around supervision model and curriculum that provides an extension of the dual applied behavior analysis and Competent Learner Model coursework. The Fluency Flashcards App is an integral tool embedded in both of these systems to build fluency of verbal associations. Competency assignments then build skill acquisition around the verbal associations mistreated. Design development, usability, application, and limitations will be discussed at the system level. Individual uses and feedback from board certified behavior analyst supervisees will be highlighted.

 
 
Symposium #311
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Current Research and Ethical Issues in Supervision
Sunday, May 30, 2021
5:00 PM–6:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Melissa L. Olive (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Discussant: Tyra Paige Sellers (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
Abstract:

With almost 31 states requiring licensure in behavior analysis and over 42,000 Board Certified Behavior Analysts (hereafter behavior analysts), the demands on our growing field could not be greater. Less than half of those behavior analysts have been certified 5 years or longer leaving few experienced supervisors to train the next generation of behavior analysts. Moreover, very few behavior analysts receive training in how to supervise. At best, behavior analysts complete the BACB required 8-hour training prior to providing supervision. Luckily, future behavior analysts will receive formal training as part of the new coursework requirements for the 5th Edition task list (BACB, 2017). Given the importance of and need for quality supervision, this symposium on will focus on current research, ethical issues, elements of effective supervision, and considerations when conducting remote supervision. Disclaimer: This session will not prepare you to become a supervisor but may be used in conjunction with additional training and experiences to become a supervisor.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Effective Supervision, Ethical Supervision, Ethics, Supervision
Target Audience:

Senior behavior analysts, Behavior Analysts thinking of becoming supervisors, and Supervisors

Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will describe the current research in supervision practices 2. Participants will identify ethical considerations regarding supervision of independent fieldwork as well as how to incorporate ethics into supervision practices 3. Participants will describe the importance of structuring supervision sessions with measurable and targeted goals. 4. Participants will identify the importance of developing a meaningful supervision plan to support treatment fidelity 5. Participants will explain the importance of developing a scope and sequence for supervision prior to starting the supervision process 6. Participants will describe the components of BST as it relates to remote supervision 7. Participants will explain methods for assessing competency when supervising remotely
 
A Review of the Literature: Supervision Best Practices
NISSA VAN ETTEN (Cultivate Behavioral Health and Education)
Abstract: In 2016 Behavior Analysis in Practice published an entire issue on supervision requirements, standards, and research for the future. Since that publication, various leaders in the field have further defined and provided evidence on supervision skills of aspiring behavior analysts. This presentation will include a review of the pertinent literature on supervision as well as identify implications of the research and discuss next steps for future research.
 
Ethical Considerations When Supervising Independent Fieldwork
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Abstract: This session will apply the Professional and Ethical Codes to various ethical situations that arise as a supervisor and supervisee move through the independent fieldwork process. Strategies for problem solving ethical dilemmas will be presented and finally procedures for preventing subsequent ethical missteps will be discussed.
 
Effective Supervision for Treatment Fidelity and Job Satisfaction
MELISSA SAUNDERS (Creative Interventions)
Abstract: The importance of having strong supervisory skills as a clinical supervisor can be easily overlooked. Supervisors are essential; not only to ensure that there is fidelity in treatment, but also to support behavior technicians so they have a solid foundation and are able to enjoy their work. Given that a sizable percentage of the behavior analyst's role is to act as a supervisor, it is essential to hone evidence-based supervision strategies that are grounded in best practice. Participants will learn the importance of structuring supervision with measurable and targeted goals as well as developing a meaningful supervision plan to support treatment fidelity. Finally, participants will explain the importance of developing a scope and sequence for supervision prior to starting the supervision process.
 
Utilizing Behavioral Skills Training in a Remote Supervision Model
LISA N. BRITTON (Britton Behavioral Consulting)
Abstract: Given the paucity of qualified supervisors, there is a greater need for remote supervision. The purpose of this presentation is to outline steps for using BST when providing remote supervision. The first step in this process is to develop a scope and sequence aligned to the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) task list. The next step includes teaching concepts to competency and utilizing systems to ensure that trainees are able to demonstrate performance in an applied capacity. The final area of focus includes building competency in all areas that will be expected of the trainees once they become a BCBA.
 
 
Symposium #370
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Applications of Training Packages to Increase Fidelity of Core Competencies for Registered Behavior Technicians
Monday, May 31, 2021
9:00 AM–9:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Jennifer Lynn Hilton (Endicott College)
CE Instructor: Jessica Piazza, M.Ed.
Abstract:

The Registered Behavior TechnicianTM (RBT®) credential has resulted in over 80,000 individuals being certified by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) since its creation in 2014. RBTs provide direct service to individuals receiving Applied Behavior Analysis services, which has resulted in individuals with this credential becoming the face of the field, which many families and clients work with the majority of their treatment time. It is imperative that the training of individuals who hold the credential of RBT receive high quality and effective training. Empirically validated training packages can be used to train a variety of topics essential to the core competencies of the RBT credential. This symposium will present applied research that has investigated effective training focused specifically on individuals who are certified as an RBT. Training topics include the writing of effective session notes, treatment integrity of RBT implementation of preference assessments and discrete trial training, and RBT session feedback delivery to families of clients.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Intermediate

Learning Objectives: Learning objective: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify one training technique for training RBTs to write objective session notes (2) treatment fidelity for discrete trial training and preference assessments, (3) provide culturally sensitive session feedback
 
Diversity submission Treatment Integrity: A Comparison Study
ROXANNE GAYLE (Trumpet Behavioral Health; Endicott College)
Abstract: As Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) becomes more prevalent, practitioners within the field of behavior analysis continue to develop therapeutic techniques. With that being said, there is an increasing legal and ethical burden placed on the practitioner working with an ASD population to use evidence-based interventions that have been evaluated in the scientific literature (Detrich 2008). As practitioners sift through the literature, they also have to consider the treatment integrity regarding implementation of procedures that are selected for clients. Treatment integrity refers to the extent to which the intervention was implemented as intended (Vermilyea, Barlow, & O’Brien, 1984; Yeaton & Sechrest, 1981). Treatment integrity, as a construct, factors considerably in the implementation of an intervention and a high level of treatment integrity has been associated with increased probability of changes on treatment outcome measures (Livani et al, 2013; Perepletchikova & Kazdin, 2005). A comparison study was conducted to determine if different types of treatment integrity checklists yield different results. The current study provided similar results as previous studies, when treatment integrity increased, client outcomes increased. Although one checklist did not yield greater results, the participants rated written feedback on a detailed checklist most useful with gaining and retaining accuracy in implementation.
 
Diversity submission 

Implementing the Teaching Interaction Procedure to Train Objective Session Notes Via Telehealth

JESSICA PIAZZA (Endicott College; CARE, LLC)
Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using Teaching Interaction Procedure (TIP) in order to remotely train RBT certificants to write objective session notes. Session notes are a required component for each behavior analytic session conducted by an RBT. This requirement is present for acquiring and maintaining the certification as well as necessary for many funders of behavior analytic services. It is imperative that session documentation presents information in an objective format in order to accurately detail client progress. Behavior analysts can utilize proven training techniques in order to increase the fidelity of documentation of services completed by RBTs. A multiple baseline design across participants was employed with 3 RBTs. RBTs’ session notes during in home behavior analytic sessions were used as probes. Each RBT received the training, which implemented the TIP remotely, detailing how to write narrative sections of session notes objectively. Results indicate that all participants met mastery criteria within 3-4 teaching sessions and maintained these results across maintenance probes.

 
Diversity submission Providing Culturally Sensitive Feedback
NICHOLAS VINCENT ORLAND (Endicott College; Dubai Autism Center)
Abstract: Dubai, United Arab Emirates is composed of 90% expats who hail from various parts of the world (such as the United Kingdom, India, and Philippines). As Registered Behavior Technicians (RBT) provide session feedback to these parents from various parts of the world, miscommunications can occur which can potentially cause a variety of challenges (which can range from the therapist being viewed as “rude” by the parent to the parent discontinuing the service due to a miscommunication). A multiple baseline study across participants was employed at the Dubai Autism Center (a state-of-the-art treatment environment located in the heart of Dubai) with 3 RBTs. The RBTs were trained on core competence skills associated with providing culturally sensitive session feedback. Behavior Skills Training (BST) was utilized as the training intervention. This study is currently in progress and results are expected to indicate mastery criteria within 3 to 4 teaching sessions and will maintain over time across maintenance and generalization probes.
 
 
Panel #396
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Why Language Matters in a Social Justice Framework: Exploring the Implications of Language on Social Issues and Developing New Verbal Repertoires (A Compassion and Social Justice: Contributor Series)
Monday, May 31, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Lauren Schnell, Ph.D.
Chair: Meredith Andrews (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
ERIN DONOVAN (Beautiful Humans Change; Capella University)
LAUREN SCHNELL (Hunter College)
LAUREN ALICIA GOODWYN (Seton Hall University)
Abstract:

Our verbal behaviour is an essential skill for navigating our social world and our inability to understand the value of the words we use can contribute to social conflicts, aggression, racial bias, prejudice, discrimination, and many other social issues. In an effort to combat these societal limitations and move towards an inclusive culture in which everyone’s individuality is championed; our language must be explored and compassion, perspective-taking, and empathy must be promoted. In this panel we will discuss a behavior-analytic description of perspective-taking and its role in establishing compassion skills and utility in social justice, overcome the deeply ingrained societal gender binary system in favour of a compassionate, gender expansive society, and how our language establishes and can topple societal prejudice. Behaviour analysis can replace current behaviours around social relations and replace them with compassion. The anticipated result would lead to impactful acquisition of social justice rights for those from marginalized populations.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

Intermediate - BCBAs and BCBA-Ds ~ A discussion on verbal behaviour and ways in which our language informs our social world and the need to see the value of the words we use as it relates to social conflicts (e.g., aggression, racial bias, prejudice, discrimination, and many other social issues).

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) learn verbal behavioural strategies to engage in compassion, perspective-taking, and empathy; (2) recognizing the importance of language in societal injustices towards marginalized groups; (3) promoting a workplace culture in which language matters and developing anti-discriminatory practices and policies
Keyword(s): Compassion, perspective taking, relational frame, verbal behavior
 
 
Panel #401
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Kantor Today: Modern Applications of Interbehavioral Psychology in Educational, ABA, and Clinical Contexts
Monday, May 31, 2021
11:00 AM–11:50 AM EDT
Online
Area: PCH/CBM; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Evelyn Rachael Gould, Ph.D.
Chair: Abbey Warren (University of Louisiana at Lafayette Louisiana Contextual Science Research Group)
EVELYN RACHAEL GOULD (New England Center for OCD and Anxiety)
KAREN KATE KELLUM (University of Mississippi)
TROY DUFRENE (California School of Professional Psychology: San Francisco)
Abstract: J.R. Kantor’s work diverges from traditional Skinnerian behaviorism both at philosophical (i.e., Interbehaviorism) and theoretical (i.e., Interbehavioral Psychology) levels. Further, these divergences have implications for the applications of behavior analysis across settings, particularly when complex human behavior (or interbehavior) is the focus. In some cases, it may be that interbehavioral psychology is well-positioned to answer questions or solve problems of great social significance where Skinnerian accounts fall short. This panel is comprised of professionals who use interbehaviorism and interbehavioral psychology in their daily work as behavior analysts in ABA, clinical, and higher education settings. Panelists will highlight how they conceptualize their work from an interbehavioral perspective, expand on the applications of interbehavioral psychology in their mentoring, teaching, training, supervision, and clinical work, and demonstrate the core differences between language-based interventions from an interbehavioral perspective and more dominant approaches in behavior analysis.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Some applied experience with clinical or applied behavior analysis
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to (1) conceptualize the interbehavioral approach to current literature (2) expand on the use and implications of interbehaviorism in clinical practice, and (3) demonstrate the core differences between interbehaviorism and other traditional approaches to the larger field of behavioral psychology.
Keyword(s): Interbehavioral Psychology, Interbehaviorism, Kantorian
 
 
Invited Paper Session #414A
Supervision
Effective Leadership and Supervision
Monday, May 31, 2021
12:00 PM–12:50 PM EDT
Online
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Corina Jimenez-Gomez (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Ellie Kazemi, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

Behavior analysts are expected to lead treatment teams by training and supporting staff. However, many behavior analysts were not formally trained for such leadership positions. In this talk, I will address some of the common barriers supervisors face in their leadership roles and provide practical tips for efficient, effective leadership and supervision of staff.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the primary functions of effective supervision; (2) explain how to give tough feedback effectively; (3) describe the importance of performance feedback in supervision.
 
ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Dr. Kazemi is a Professor at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she has developed and teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in behavior analysis for the past 10 years. She founded the Masters of Science Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in 2010 and has collaborated with the CSUN community to provide graduate students high quality supervision experiences. She currently has two different lines of research. Her applied research interests involve identification of efficient, effective strategies for practical training, supervision, and leadership. Her laboratory research involves leveraging technology (e.g., robotics, virtual or augmented reality) for efficient training and feedback using simulations. She is currently working on several nationwide large projects (e.g., with FEMA and NASA) with a focus on effective training and behavioral outcomes. She has received several mentorship awards including the ABAI Best Mentor Award, the Outstanding Faculty Award, the Outstanding Teaching Award, and the Outstanding Service Award.  She has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, staff turnover, and the use of technology in behavior analysis. She is the leading author of a handbook written for both supervisors and supervisees that is titled, Supervision and Practicum in Behavior Analysis: A Handbook for Supervisees.
 

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