Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

CE by Content: Supervision


 

Workshop #W19
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
A Practitioner's Guide to Evaluating Treatment Integrity in Applied Settings
Thursday, May 26, 2022
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 156C
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cody Morris, Ph.D.
CODY MORRIS (Salve Regina University ), STEPHANIE HOPE JONES (Salve Regina University), EMMA GRAUERHOLZ-FISHER (Salve Regina University), JACQUELINE WILSON (Salve Regina University), ELIZABETH MICAELA NARVAEZ (Salve Regina University), BIANCE JASMINE FERRUCCI (Salve Regina University), ZACHARY JOHN MORAIS (Salve Regina University)
Description: Monitoring and evaluating treatment integrity is an important clinical practice for behavior analysts who rely on others to deliver their recommended treatments. Practitioners seeking information about treatment integrity in applied settings will find research focused on the negative effects of treatment integrity errors, the types of treatment integrity errors, strategies to prevent and address treatment integrity errors, and many other practical considerations for practitioners. However, limited practical guidance is available to help practitioners create and utilize treatment integrity systems with their individual clients. This workshop will guide the participants through the critical components of establishing and utilizing treatment integrity systems in their clinical practice. At the end of this workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the importance of treatment integrity in applied settings; (2) identify risk factors related to reduced treatment integrity in applied settings; (3) create task analyses for their clients’ treatments, (4) identify priorities for treatment integrity data collection; (5) create data collection systems for treatment integrity; (6) select appropriate observation periods for treatment integrity monitoring; (7) effectively utilize treatment integrity monitoring systems; (8) analyze treatment integrity data; (9) select interventions to address treatment integrity concerns.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the importance of treatment integrity in applied settings; (2) identify risk factors related to reduced treatment integrity in applied settings; (3) create task analyses for their clients’ treatments, (4) identify priorities for treatment integrity data collection; (5) create data collection systems for treatment integrity; (6) select appropriate observation periods for treatment integrity monitoring; (7) effectively utilize treatment integrity monitoring systems; (8) analyze treatment integrity data; (9) select interventions to address treatment integrity concerns.
Activities: This workshop will utilize a behavioral skills training model that will include instruction, modeling, rehearsal and practice in small groups, and individualized feedback.
Audience: This workshop primarily targets practicing behavior analysts who rely on others (e.g., direct care staff, parents, teachers) to implement their recommendations.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Treatment Fidelity, Treatment Integrity, Treatment Monitoring
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: BACB/NASP — 
Supervision
Engineering Schools for Student Success
Friday, May 27, 2022
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 255
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an organization that provides services to students or clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your students’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many students don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that providers don’t do what they are told. But providers’ performance, just like their students’ performance, is a product of their environments. Do providers have the resources, training, and management necessary to help students achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide students with the outcomes they want. The failure of students to make adequate progress is not usually an individual provider performance problem, but a performance problem at the system, process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will introduce you to an organizational performance engineering process (EARS) that will allow you to Evaluate student progress; Analyze causes of provider performance problems; Recommend changes in provider resources, training, and management; and Solve performance problems by designing and implementing recommended solutions.
Learning Objectives: By the end of this three-part workshop, participants will know how to: 1. Distinguish between examples of Skinner’s pragmatic approach to the science and engineering of behavior change and other approaches; and describe the benefits of Skinner’s pragmatic approach. 2. Describe the steps in the organizational performance engineering process and how that process can be used to ensure that every student makes efficient progress. 3. Diagram your organization as a network of provider-recipient relationships. 4. Evaluate student progress and staff performance using sensitive measures of behavior and behavior change. 5. Analyze causes of can-do, know-how, and want-to provider performance problems due to inadequate resources, training, and management. 6. Recommend solutions based on a comprehensive data-based analysis of provider performance problems. 7. Solve provider performance problems by designing and implementing changes in provider resources, training, and management.
Activities: Each participant receives a workshop with readings, practice exercises, answer keys, datasheets, lecture fill-in sheets, 4 decks of practice cards, and the latest version of ProgressCharter, a web-mobile application that makes it easier to implement the EARS process of organizational performance engineering. Training practices include interactive readings, lectures and discussion, oral and written practice with workbook exercises and practice cards with instructions and answer keys provided for critical component skills and tasks, hands-on practice in the design, implementation, and evaluation of provider evaluation, learning, and management resources, using rate measures of student and provider performance, celeration efficiency measures of student and provider progress, and ProgressCharter to measure and evaluate student and provider performance and progress. Participants will have the opportunity for coaching on the design and implementation of the EARS process in their own organizations.
Audience: Supervisors, Staff Trainers, Program Designers and Directors of schools or clinics that provide educational services to students of clients with learning difficulties are responsible for designing and/or implementing organizational performance engineering processes that change how providers work together, so that every student or client makes efficient progress towards mastery of the types of performance necessary for a successful life. Prerequisite Skills for this Workshop: Master’s Level Mastery of the Application of Behavior Analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Celeration Efficiency, Data-based Analysis, Provider-Recipient Network, Skinner's Pragmatism
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Mitigating and Managing Workplace Conflict for Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 27, 2022
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 257B
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Shannon Biagi, M.S.
SHANNON BIAGI (Chief Motivating Officers; University of West Florida)
Description: Even with a behavior analyst's unique understanding of human behavior, conflict in the workplace is nearly inevitable. Despite all of our best efforts to create highly reinforcing work environments, we’re likely going to end up in conflict at some point. Whether we’re directly involved ourselves, or we are mediating the negotiation of conflicts between others, behavior analysts need a strategy for handling these issues. By establishing an understanding of the role of learning history, motivating operations, other antecedents, as well as the inevitable "people" issues that arise in these difficult situations, behavior analysts can harness the science they know and love to successfully navigate, and hopefully prevent, conflicts in their workplaces. During this workshop, a step-by-step approach for assessing and managing existing conflicts will be presented, with support of organizational behavior management (OBM) research findings in similar topics, including gossip and rumor. Participants will practice negotiating through difficult situations using scenario learning, leaving with a novel perspective on how and why people end up in conflict, and strategies for facing such issues as a united front.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Identify different types of conflict and how they relate to one another (2) Determine what is productive vs. non-productive conflict (3) Describe strategies for preventing conflicts before they arise (4) Once in a conflict, determine strategies for handling the “people issues” (5) Identify personal biases that might impact conflict resolution (6) Define the problem in a conflict, once people-issues are handled (7) Identify common interests when in conflict (8) Determine the steps in brainstorming solutions in conflicts (9) Identify systems issues and behavior change necessary to resolve conflicts in organizations (10) Describe strategies for determining the effectiveness of a conflict resolution
Activities: The format of this presentation includes lecture, small group activities, independent worksheet activities, and guided practice through scenario-based learning.
Audience: Early career behavior analysts and those who would like to practice their conflict-resolution and perspective-taking behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Conflict, Difficult Conversations, Leadership, OBM
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Planning for Organizational Growth: Data-Based Decision Making
Friday, May 27, 2022
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 257B
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Tiffany Kristin Mrla, Ph.D.
TIFFANY KRISTIN MRLA (Learning & Behavior Solutions, LLC)
Description: This workshop will address various aspects to consider when planning to scale your organization and service delivery model. It is focused on the small business owner, providing solutions for all aspects of growth to include managing referrals, assessments, and treatment planning for clients; tools for maintaining connections to your families and caregivers; staff onboarding and retention strategies, ongoing training, coaching and mentoring of direct care staff; developing student supervision models and mentorship programs for behavior analysts, students of behavior analysis and direct care staff; as well as utilizing organizational data to monitor all areas of organizational success through a data dashboard. In addition, examples of simple measures for financial modeling and forecasting, developing a plan for site development, recruiting and marketing plans, and monitoring staff performance from afar will be shared with the audience.
Learning Objectives: Learners will leave this workshop with tools for planning and monitoring growth initiatives. Ethical considerations in scaling your organization will be discussed with solutions identified for addressing concerns. Models for RBT, Student, and BCBA supervision and mentorship will be shared to ensure consistent, high quality service provision occurs across sites, as well as tools for developing client outcome measures. Financial metrics and measures will be shared, as well as systems for monitoring service delivery, and systems for monitoring quality assurance.
Activities: This workshop will utilize aspects of BST to assist in developing and utilizing various tools to monitor growth and ensure organizational sustainability, facilitate client and staff performance and growth, maintain a positive culture across sites, and ensure compliance in practices through systems design and analysis. Activities will include a combination of lecture, group discussion, small group breakout and guided practice for developing tools and plans for organizational growth. Some video presentations will be included. All materials will be available to participants electronically for assistance in processing and accessing learning materials post-conference.
Audience: Target audience includes small to medium size autism service provider organizational leadership teams. Necessary prerequisite skills include a basic understanding of spreadsheets, data and graphing tools, organizational behavior management, leadership development, as well as supervision, mentorship and training models, and basic financial metrics.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism Providers, Data Dashboards, Innovative Pathways, Organizational Growth
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Play Before Work: Teaching Supervisors How to Utilize a Rapport Building Curriculum to Implement, Train, and Report on a Systematic Approach to Pairing and Rapport Building in Applied Behavior Analysis Therapy
Friday, May 27, 2022
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 153B
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amy Rachel Bukszpan, M.S.
AMY RACHEL BUKSZPAN (Endicott College, Butterfly Effects), MOLLY ANN MCGINNIS (Butterfly Effects)
Description: These rapport-building goals have been taught to siblings, parents, respite care workers, and neighbors to promote and improve social relationships for clients as well as to promote generalization. In our work, we extended Lugo et al. (2017) by developing a formal rapport-building curriculum. The curriculum reflects the 7 pre-session pairing skills, data collection, and teaching procedures Lugo and colleagues (2017) outlined as well as guidance as to the implementation of these items, not only before instruction in the form of pre-session pairing but throughout the session to ensure maintenance of rapport between the client and clinician throughout the therapeutic relationship. Even more, this curriculum has been presented before insurance companies and meets mandates for coverage for both private and government payers. A rapport-building curriculum provides easy-to-follow directions for new clinicians to use as they develop their interpersonal skills when working with clients. Learning and teaching should be fun and functional! These pairing skills build on social and play interactions and increase opportunities to access reinforcement which benefits both the client and clinician ensuring a positive and rich therapeutic environment.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to effectively implement a systematic pairing procedure embedded throughout ABA sessions to increase motivation and assent; while decreasing interfering behaviors 2. Participants will be able to create reporting methods on rapport-building objectives as part of the treatment program that meets insurance mandates and guidelines. 3. Participants will be able to use behavior skills training to train clinicians on a systematic approach to pairing and rapport building.
Activities: Instructional activities include lecture-based instruction with discussion, small group instruction, and video and content modeling. Core content will be taught through interactive learning opportunities which include guided practice with feedback. A competency assessment will be used to assess competency across proposed learning objectives.
Audience: Basic. For individuals supervising the training and implementation of direct care providers, technicians, or parent traiing.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Paper Session #26
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
BCBA Supervision: A framework for the Real World
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 204A/B
Area: TBA
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Hana Lynn Jurgens (Positive Behavior Supports)
CE Instructor: Nicole Stewart, M.Ed.
 
Shaping Future Behavior Analysts: Reimagining the Framework of BCBA Supervision
Domain: Theory
NICOLE STEWART (Supervision Reimagined), Gabriella Davila (Supervision Reimagined), Megan Dennehy (Supervision Reimagined)
 
Abstract: Fieldwork for board certified behavior analyst (BCBA) certification has continued to become more rigorous over time. With the exponential growth of the field, the quality and experience of supervisors can vary greatly, particularly in settings that lack university affiliations. As a result of many factors to be discussed, uneven development of behavior analytic repertoires occurs across the field while fieldwork remains highly variable. This paper proposes a model that incorporates previous recommendations for supervision (e.g. contracts, establishing expectations), as well as additional behavior analytic principles to create a fieldwork sequence. The three-part sequence starts with fluency with direct care skills ensuring pre-requisites are met early. Next, a clinically applied project embeds motivating operations, self-management and behavior analytic professionalism. Finally, the third phase focuses on mentorship from a current BCBA utilizing a job-model for training. Threaded throughout this framework are competencies, behavioral skills training, opportunities for feedback, task list connections and suggestions to ensure all standards are closely adhered to as a trainee progresses. The further dissemination and adaptation of a framework such as this can support the continued push for ethical development of BCBA fieldwork across many types of settings; improving outcomes for trainees and clients alike.
 
Supervising Beyond the Tasklist: Preparing Your Supervisee to be a Real-World BCBA
Domain: Service Delivery
HANA LYNN JURGENS (Positive Behavior Supports), Yulema Cruz (Rutgers University), Karly L. Cordova (KHY ABA Consulting Group, Inc.)
 
Abstract: For the most part, supervision has primarily focused on teaching items from the task list. However, as supervisors, we often receive feedback regarding‚ soft skills‚ (known as common skills or core skills, including critical thinking, problem solving, public speaking, professional writing, teamwork, leadership, professional attitude, work ethic, career management and cultural competency, among others) that supervisees are lacking. Additionally, supervisors are often at a loss regarding how to systematically fade their supervisory support. Until now, there has not been a sequential means for supervisors to accomplish this, leaving students ready to pass the exam, and ready to work as a BCBA. This paper will highlight a competency-based approach to guiding and measuring soft skills. This includes how to systematically supervise, manage cases, build skills to demonstrate professionalism, as well as how to fade supervision ethically; thus, ensuring supervisees demonstrate competency, readiness, and independence.
 
Target Audience:

Intermediate

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the importance of developing a sequence and flow for effective supervision (2) classify beginner, intermediate and advanced skills for fieldwork trainees (3) define and provide examples of trainings that adhere to the job-model of training; (4) navigate supervisees’ soft skill deficits; (5) identify supervisory targets beyond the task list; (6) problem solve to help supervisees gain competency.
 
 
Symposium #28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Behavioral Skills Training: Applications in Real-World Settings With Typical Caregivers
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 254A
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Peter Sturmey (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Discussant: Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon)
CE Instructor: Peter Sturmey, Ph.D.
Abstract: Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is an evidence-based practice that behavior analysts must be competent to deliver. Despite its widely recognized importance, further real-world models and evaluations are needed. This symposium will present four examples of applying BST to such varied contexts as training a grandparent to deliver a behavior support plan to an adult with autism spectrum disorders; efficient training of discrete trial teaching to typical staff; training staff to implement correct redirection and restraint procedures; and, training parents via telehealth to implement effective sleep protocols. These studies demonstrate the versatility and robustness of BST in real-world-applied settings.
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): behavioral-skills training, caregeiver training, telehealth
Target Audience: Advanced: Participants should have at least a basic knowledge of graduate-level ABA such as is described in Cooper et al. including modeling, feedback, contingencies of reinforcement, programming generalization, small N experimental design. This can include current and potential supervisors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how to implement behavioral skills training (BST) in at least two contexts; (2) describe the telehealth application of BST; (3) describe strategies to maximize the efficiency of BST.
 

Grandparent-Implemented Interventions to Reduce Challenging Behavior of an Adult With Autism: A Pilot Telehealth Study

EMILY GREGORI (University of Illinois at Chicago), Christine Drew (Auburn University), Catharine Lory (Baylor University), Namhee Kim (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Abstract:

Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often engage in challenging behaviors that require intensive intervention. Due to the lack of services for adults with ASD, their caregivers are often responsible for providing behavioral support. However, caregivers, including grandparents, often lack adequate training and have limited access to ongoing support from professionals that prevents them from providing high-quality behavioral intervention. Telehealth is a mechanism that can potentially increase access to effective intervention for adults with ASD and training for their caregivers. However, most telehealth research has been conducted with young children and their parents. There is limited research to support the use of telehealth as a mechanism for improving service delivery for adults and their caregivers. This study explored the effects of grandparent-implemented interventions on the challenging behavior of an adult male with ASD. Research staff used individualized telehealth training and coaching to teach a grandparent to implement two function-based behavioral interventions. Data were collected on the grandparent’s implementation fidelity of both interventions and on the challenging behavior of the adult with ASD. Results showed that both interventions resulted in low to moderate levels of challenging behavior and that telehealth training and coaching resulted in high levels of implementation fidelity.

 
An Efficiency Tactic for Behavioral Skills Training
BRIAN C. LIU-CONSTANT (The Evergreen Center), John Claude Ward-Horner (Evergreen Center)
Abstract: Behavioral skills training (BST) was used to teach staff members a discrete trial training (DTT) procedure in a setting with a low trainer-to-staff ratio. Although effective, the rehearsal and feedback components of BST can be time-consuming and require more time with an expert trainer than the trainer has available. For the BST protocol, the researcher recorded and presented instructions and modeling on video, and developed scripts that participants followed during rehearsal and feedback. Each participant was assigned to a group of three. Participants took turns in one of three roles (teacher-participant, student-participant, or observer-participant) and, when serving in the role of teacher-participant, practiced the DTT procedure with a student-participant while the observer-participant delivered performance feedback to the teacher-participant. Results indicated that all participants were able to learn the DTT procedure when all feedback was provided by an observer-participant. The procedure was also efficient as evidenced by the expert trainer providing minimal feedback to observer-participants, and participants subsequent to the first participant of each group learning the DTT procedure in less time and with fewer sessions.
 
Behavioural Skills Training for Teaching Safety Skills to Mental Health Clinicians: A Pragmatic Randomized Control Trial.
Elizabeth Lin (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; University of Toronto), Mais Malhas (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health), Emmanuel Bratsalis (Center for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto), KENDRA THOMSON (Brock University ), Rhonda Boateng (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; University of Toronto), Fabienne Hargreaves (The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health), Heba Baig (Center for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto), Louis Paul Alexander Busch (Centre for Addictions and Mental Health)
Abstract: Workplace violence is an increasingly significant topic, particularly as it applies to staff working in mental health settings. The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Canada’s largest mental health hospital, considers workplace safety a high priority and consequently has mandated clinical staff safety training. Key components of this training are self-protection and 2–5 person team control skills, which serve as a last resort when other interventions are ineffective (e.g., verbal de-escalation). Training-as-usual (TAU) for the past 20 years has been based on a 3-D approach (description, demonstration, and doing), but without any competency-based assessment. Recent staff reports indicate that the acquisition and retention of these skills is problematic and that there are issues with staff confidence in their ability to address workplace violence. We will present the results of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral skills training (BST) against TAU in terms of the acquisition and 1-month post-training retention of self-protection team control skills as well as the impact on staff confidence. Results to date support the effectiveness of BST vs. TAU for improving staff performance compared to TAU.
 

Evaluation of a Telehealth Parent Training Program for Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder who have Sleep Difficulties

AMANPREET RANDHAWA (Brock University), Julie Koudys (Brock University), Angeline Savard (The Gregory School for Exceptional Learning), Catherine McConnell (Ontario ABA), Meghan Dunnet (Kalyana Support Systems), Jeffrey Esteves (York University), Andrea Valencia (kalyana Support Systems)
Abstract:

Research supports parent-implemented, behavior-analytic sleep interventions to address sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorder (Jin et al., 2013; Linnehan et al., 2021). Further, some research exists to support distance models of parent education and sleep intervention (Corkum et al, 2016). However, few studies directly assess parents’ ability to accurately implement sleep interventions (i.e., treatment fidelity). This limits our understanding of whether parents are implementing sleep interventions as designed and draws into question whether child behavior changes can be attributed to the interventions. As parents are typically the primary mediators of behavioural sleep interventions––and intervention success depends on the accurate implementation of the procedures and the consistency with which those procedures are implemented in the natural environment––this is a significant gap in the literature. The purpose of this concurrent multiple baseline design across participants study was to evaluate whether parents could accurately implement their child’s behavior-analytic sleep intervention. Four parent-child dyads were recruited. Behavioral skills training and nightly coaching support were provided to parents using a telehealth approach. Nightly coaching support was systematically faded. Results demonstrate that treatment fidelity increased for all participants. Interobserver agreement was above 80%. Clinical implications and future research recommendations will be discussed.

 
 
Invited Panel #48
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Integrating Cultural Responsiveness Into Supervision: Understanding the Context, Meeting the Need, and Suggestions for Practice
Saturday, May 28, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Mary Jane Weiss (Endicott College)
CE Instructor: Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D.
Panelists: KIM EDWARDS (SIQS Educational Consulting, LLC), ADRIANA RODRIGUEZ (Rollins), BRIAN CONNERS (Seton Hall University)
Abstract:

In recent years, much more emphasis has been placed on cultural competence, humility, and responsiveness, as they relate to ABA service provision. These concepts have received attention in published literature, in discussions about issues facing the field, and in our new Ethics Code. The field is making progress in defining these skills, and much discussion exists around the teaching and training of this skill set for practitioners. In addition to these needs, there is an obligation to integrate the coverage of these issues into supervision. In this panel discussion, panelists will review the context and need for this expansion of supervision, the development of a tool to assess the extent to which supervision is culturally responsive, the associated issues in practice and mentorship that should be considered in this context, and future directions for mentoring.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) summarize the ways in which cultural responsiveness enhances the quality and effectiveness of supervision, and how it fulfills our ethical obligations to supervise; (2) describe a tool that has been developed to assess the extent to which cultural responsiveness has been integrated into behavior analytic supervision; (3) discuss a variety of strategies that can be used to model cultural responsiveness within supervision.
KIM EDWARDS (SIQS Educational Consulting, LLC)
Ms. Kimberly Edwards, M.Ed., is a Program Manager and educator in Washington, DC. Kimberly has worked in the field of education for more than 10 years. She received a Master of Education from the University of Virginia in 2011 and a Graduate Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis from George Mason University in 2018. Prior to moving to Washington, DC, Ms. Edwards worked in Richmond, VA, in therapeutic day schools and public schools. Her current work aligns with her research interests, centering on coaching staff on culturally responsive and impactful learning pathways; instructing behavior management; focused professional development; strategizing and developing school-wide anti-racism and effective social behavior practices.
ADRIANA RODRIGUEZ (Rollins)
Adriana Rodriguez is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). She earned her master’s degree in Applied Behavior Analysis and Clinical Science from Rollins College. Adriana has experience working with individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Fragile X syndrome, she has worked with a variety of age groups ranging from early intervention to young adults. Ms. Rodriguez’s graduate research focused on the effect of including cultural concerns when providing parent training on behavioral interventions.
BRIAN CONNERS (Seton Hall University)
Brian Conners, Ph.D., BCBA, is a New Jersey Department of Education certified school psychologist and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. He originally developed the graduate program in Applied Behavior Analysis at Seton Hall University, where he currently serves on their faculty and is their Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Education and Human Services. He has worked within various sectors as a behavior analyst and consultant including public and private schools, psychiatric hospitals, and community agencies. He has presented at state and national conferences and has published articles and book chapters in multicultural and diversity issues in behavior analysis, crisis intervention, and restraint and seclusion practices in schools. He was the editor for the first book ever to be published on diversity issues in the field of ABA entitled, Multiculturalism and Diversity in Applied Behavior Analysis: Bridging Theory and Application.
 
 
Invited Panel #72
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Students' Perspective on Diversity and Culturally Responsive Supervisory Practices and Feedback
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Fernande Deguenon (Brooklyn Autism Center)
CE Instructor: Tanya Lopez, M.S.
Panelists: MAJDI BUZOOR (Arab American University-Palestine; Florida Institute Technology), ANNABEL GARZA (The University of Texas at Austin), TANYA LOPEZ (Positive Behavior Supports)
Abstract:

A critical step in the preparation toward certification as a Behavior Analyst is supervision (Turner et al., 2016). The purpose of supervision is to equip applied behavior analysis (ABA) students with behavior analytic, professional, and ethical skills necessary for effective client treatment in practice (BACB, 2021). The rules for supervision are found in the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts, also known as “the Code” (Sellers et al., 2016b). A successful supervision experience involves clearly defined expectations at the onset of the relationship (Sellers et al., 2016a), and accurate training and feedback by the supervisor (Sellers et al., 2019). Factors that are considered include the supervisees’ beliefs and values originating from previous supervision experiences (Turner et al., 2016). Supervisees from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds may also require unique interactions with the supervisors while still satisfying the BACB’s objectives. One aspect of supervision that should be discussed and explored further are the modifications made to the supervision experience for supervisees from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These candidates may require unique interactions with supervisors while still satisfying the BACB’s objectives. This panel discussion will explore the importance of cultural diversity and responsiveness in the supervision experience, challenges that may be experienced by relevant supervisees, and suggested solutions to address them. References Behavior Analyst Certification Board (2016). 2022 Eligibility Requirements. https://www.bacb.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/BCBA-2022EligibilityRequirements_210513.pdf Sellers, T. P., Valentino, A. L., & LeBlanc, L. A. (2016a). Recommended practices for individual supervision of aspiring behavior analysts. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 274-286. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0110-7 Sellers, T. P., Alai-Rosales, S., & MacDonald, R. P. F. (2016b). Taking full responsibility: The ethics of supervision in behavior analytic practice. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 299-308. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0144-x Sellers, T. P., Valentino, A. L., Landon, T. J., & Aiello, S. (2019). Board certified behavior analysts’ supervisory practices of trainees: Survey results and recommendations. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 12(3), 536-546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-019-00367-0 Turner, L. B., Fischer, A. J., & Luiselli, J. K. (2016). Towards a competency-based, ethical, and socially valid approach to the supervision of applied behavior analytic trainees. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 287-298. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0121-4

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe current and future states of BCBAs’ perceptions of supervisory practices; (2) identify at least three challenges and three practical solutions to supervisory practices; (3) describe components of supervisory practices that support cultural diversity and responsiveness.
MAJDI BUZOOR (Arab American University-Palestine; Florida Institute Technology)
Majdi Buzoor graduated in 2006 as an Occupational Therapist from Arab American University-Palestine. He is a certified Sensory Integration Specialist from USC 2012 and started his BCaBA course program at FIT last May and his fieldwork supervised experience with three “amazing” supervisors. Majdi loves his job as an OT, however, the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) has significantly augmented his professional practice, enriched, and improved the quality of his service delivery, which in turn has supported his passion to help many more children who need specialized, individualized effective interventions based on the science of ABA.
ANNABEL GARZA (The University of Texas at Austin)
Annabel Garza graduated from The University of Texas at Austin with a master’s degree in special education with a concentration in autism and developmental disabilities. She is currently working on finishing up her fieldwork experience hours at an early intervention center for children with autism in Austin, Texas. She is planning on sitting for the BCBA exam in the fall of 2022. Annabel enjoys working closely with families and coaching parents/caregivers during direct therapy sessions.
TANYA LOPEZ (Positive Behavior Supports)
Tanya Lopez graduated from Bay Path University with a master’s degree in applied behavior analysis (ABA). She is currently working as a board-certified behavior analyst (BCBA) for Positive Behavior Supports (PBS), providing in-home services for children diagnosed with autism in the state of Massachusetts. In her free time, Tanya enjoys spending time with her husband and son, shopping at Target and ordering Starbucks.
 
 
Symposium #111
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Measurement and Analysis of the Relation Between Supervision and Burnout Among Applied Behavior Analysis Professionals
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 153C
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Kate E. Fiske Massey (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University)
CE Instructor: Isabella Massaro, M.A.
Abstract:

Research indicates that staff members working in the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) report high levels of burnout associated with variables that include the support they receive from supervisors (Gibson et al., 2009; Plantiveau et al., 2018). However, limitations related to the measurement of burnout and supervisory skills constrain further investigation of this relationship. This symposium will present three related studies that seek to define and measure burnout, quality of supervisory skills, and the relation between the two. We will first explore the psychometric properties of the Stress Diagnostic Checklist (SDC), a measure developed to assess stressors faced by behavior therapists providing intervention to youth with autism spectrum disorders and related populations. We will then consider the measurement of effective supervisory behavior using the Operant Supervisory Taxonomy and Index (OSTI). Finally, we will examine rates of burnout among ABA professionals and the extent to which compassionate supervisory skills influence burnout.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Burnout, Measurement, Supervision
Target Audience:

The symposium is geared toward supervisors in the field of applied behavior analysis. As such, the attendee should possess basic competence in management and supervision of others, including the use of behavioral skills training (BST).

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe burnout using observable environmental variables; (2) identify effective qualities of supervisors according to the Operant Supervisory Taxonomy and Index; (3) list compassionate behaviors that can be utilized in supervisory contexts.
 

Toward Better Understanding of Burnout in Behavior Therapists: A Pilot of the Stress Diagnostic Checklist

SUMMER BOTTINI (May Institute), Joanna Lomas Mevers (Marcus Autism Center), Mindy Christine Scheithauer (Marcus Autism Center), Lawrence Scahill (Emory University)
Abstract:

Behavior therapists are at high risk for experiencing burnout. Burnout is a pressing concern given its negative consequences on the therapist, recipients of behavioral intervention, and the service delivery system at large. To date, burnout is predominantly measured as a mentalistic construct through self-reported surveys of current stress level. Alternatively, a functional-approach whereby burnout is measured via identifiable environmental variables associated with work may yield important information for intervening. We propose the Stress Diagnostic Checklist (SDC), a novel measure that assesses stressors facing behavior therapists providing intervention to autistic youth and related populations. This symposium will present initial psychometric properties of the SDC and commonly reported stressors. A total of 44 behavior therapists took an online survey including the SDC, traditional measures of burnout level, and measures of psychological flexibility and organizational commitment. Findings suggest the SDC has appropriate internal consistency across hypothesized environmental stressors and adequate test-retest reliability across two months. Comparison with other measures also suggest the SDC has promising convergent and discriminant validity. Taken together, the SDC may be a viable tool for identifying stressors in behavior therapists and potential targets for burnout prevention within behavioral service delivery settings.

 
A Proposed Framework to Identify and Measure Supervisor Behavior
ALYSSA R MCELROY (Western Michigan University), Jessica E. Van Stratton (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: With the recent increase in demand for behavior analysts (BACB, 2021), the field has begun to discuss how to define, measure, and improve supervisor behavior. The special section on supervision in Behavior Analysis in Practice (2016), authors postulated a myriad of important supervisory behaviors; however, to date, no distinct measurement system has been adopted fieldwide. Komaki and colleagues (1986) described and validated the Operant Supervisory Taxonomy and Index (OSTI) with a primary purpose to identify and classify behavior of effective supervisors. Komaki’s OSTI may provide a parsimonious framework to describe and analyze supervisor behavior and guide future research to further identify and validate best practices for behavior analytic supervision. Thus, the purpose of this study was to conduct a descriptive analysis of two supervisors’ behaviors during meetings with trainees using the OSTI. Specifically, videos of supervision meetings were analyzed, and supervisors’ behaviors were coded using a partial interval scoring method to determine how much time each supervisor engaged in specific categories of behavior. Results of this analysis and future directions of behavior analytic supervision, research, and practice, including the utility of this framework, will be discussed.
 
Compassionate Supervisory Practices as Predictors of Burnout in Applied Behavior Analysis Providers
AMANDA AUSTIN (Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey), Kate E. Fiske Massey (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University)
Abstract: Recent position papers have called for a focus on compassion in the training and practice of board certified behavior analysts (BCBAs; LeBlanc et al., 2019; Taylor et al., 2018). Much of this preliminary effort emphasizes the importance of compassion in behavior analysts’ work with families of individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities, highlighting research from other fields that demonstrates a relation between practitioner empathy and patient outcome. However, some research in burnout among applied behavior analysis (ABA) professionals indicates that supervisory relationships play important roles in the well-being of ABA professionals (Gibson et al., 2009). This presentation will report on findings from a survey of approximately 200 ABA providers that measures burnout and BCBA engagement in 29 supervisory practices. Descriptive analyses will highlight staff perceptions of BCBAs’ engagement in each practice. Multiple regression analyses will be conducted to determine the extent to which the use of compassion in supervision predicts staff burnout. Preliminary descriptive findings reveal several supervisory practices that BCBAs are not currently practicing regularly, notably the provision of feedback and use of praise. Implications for the training of BCBAs in supervision and for behavior analytic organizations will be discussed.
 
 
Invited Symposium #126
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Organizational Behavior Management, and Leadership: A Discussion of Definitions and Best Practice Among Three Vital Areas of Professional Emphasis in Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jacob A Sadavoy (Committed Behavior)
Discussant: Lina M. Slim (ASAP - A Step Ahead Program, LLC; Endicott College; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
CE Instructor: Jacob A Sadavoy, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This symposium brings together several important and interrelated topics in the field of behavior analysis. The first talk will discuss how supervision and organizational behavior management (OBM) overlap and address some common misunderstandings in the field. The next presentations will discuss best practice in both leadership behavior and applying supervision principles to the development of behavior analysts. The final presentation will discuss in detail how the principles of supervision, leadership, and OBM generalize outside of clinical training.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain how they can work smarter, not harder, as supervisors; (2) state at least three skills an effective leader must gain; (3) state exactly the steps they need to take to improve at least three skills.

Learning Objectives: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
 

Individualized Supervision of Students and New Behavior Analysts in Human Services

BYRON J. WINE (The Faison Center; University of Virginia)
Abstract:

This presentation will discuss best practices for training behavior analysts. Specifically, we will examine a mentorship model, where aspiring behavior analysts are trained as junior colleagues. During the formal accumulation of hours, we will discuss how to gain both the skills necessary to practice as a behavior analyst in general, but also to function in the specific role for an organization. Then, after certification we will discuss how behavior analysts can continue with the mentorship model and grow based upon their individualized goals.

Dr. Byron Wine is the vice president of operations at the Faison Center, as well as an assistant professor at the Florida Institute of Technology and visiting assistant professor at the University of Virginia. He completed his doctoral degree from Temple University under the guidance of Drs. Saul Axelrod and Donald Hantula. Dr. Wine has published over 20 peer-reviewed publications primarily in the area of organizational behavior management. Currently, he serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management and Behavior Analysis in Practice.
 

The Application of Supervision Competencies in Sports, Health and Fitness

LAURIE BONAVITA (Positive Behavior Supports Corporation; Bay Path University)
Abstract:

This presentation and discussion will examine all information presented and relate information to health, fitness, and sports performance. We will examine how supervision competencies can be trained and generalized to applications that may be considered atypical to our science. Consideration will be given to our ethical obligations in this type of supervision, and how our trainees and our science may benefit if we embrace these competencies and opportunities.

Dr. Bonavita has worked in the field of applied behavior analysis for over 20 years. Her experience includes working in home, school, and residential settings and she has served as an expert witness on autism spectrum disorders for the Massachusetts department of children and families. Dr. Bonavita is an avid sports fan, and her love of sports has guided several research projects surrounding increasing sports performance in athletes of all ages and abilities as well as the area of health and fitness. She is currently working with her students on research projects on the topic of building culturally sensitive behavior analysts. Dr. Bonavita is the Regional Clinical Training Coordinator for Positive Behavior Supports Corporation, Massachusetts where she oversees the Student Mentor program working with staff BCBA’s to provide quality supervision for those team members enrolled in an ABA graduate programs. Dr. Bonavita also serves as an adjunct faculty member at Bay Path University.
 

Supervision and Organizational Behavior Management: How They Interrelate and Why Distinguishing Between the Two is Important

SHARLET RAFACZ (California State University, Fresno)
Abstract:

Supervision in applied behavior analysis (ABA) has become more and more important to the field. This is reflected in several ways, including an increasing number of published articles on Supervision and changes to the coursework, training, and continuing education requirements for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA). However, there may be some issues with respect to conflating Supervision with Organizational Behavior Management (OBM), a commonly recognized subfield of ABA. The primary objective of this talk will be to help clarify where the two areas overlap and where they are distinct. We will begin by defining both OBM and Supervision. We will then discuss how specific elements of OBM are present in Supervision, but also how Supervision when utilized in ABA encompasses several additional components. Several examples of how this looks across different supervision roles will be presented. Why this distinction is important and how it informs course curriculum, training, and continuing education in both Supervision and OBM will then be discussed.

Dr. Sharlet Rafacz received her Ph.D. in Psychology with an emphasis in Behavior Analysis and Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) from the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Rafacz was an Assistant Professor at Savannah State University and is currently an Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at California State University, Fresno. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in learning, applied behavior analysis, research methods, ethics, health behavior, and OBM. Her research in OBM focuses on utilizing motivating operations to alter employee behavior, component analyses of performance scorecards, and on cooperation and countercontrol in organizational settings. She also conducts research on increasing healthy eating behavior by children, college students, and consumers in a variety of settings. Dr. Rafacz has published her research in several behavioral journals, including Perspectives on Behavior Science and the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. She also serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. She is the Past-President for the Organizational Behavior Management Network and has served on the California Association for Behavior Analysis Board as the Northern California Academic Liaison.
 
Common Skills of Effective Supervisors and Great Leaders
ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

Supervisors, as individuals in positions of leadership, need to be decisive, productive, dependable, and efficient at the same time of being caring and understanding. Great leaders are not born with such skills, but they do have common characteristics that are a set of skills they have gained in their lifetime. In this talk, I will discuss the core skills every great leader possesses and offer practical tips for supervisors looking to become strong leaders.

Dr. Kazemi is the Chief Science Officer at Behavioral Health Center of Excellence (BHCOE), where she oversees standard development, evaluation methodology, and measurement science. She is also a professor at CSUN, where she has developed and teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in behavior analysis. She founded the M.S. in Applied Behavior Analysis program in 2010 and has collaborated with the CSUN community to provide graduate students high quality supervision experiences. Her research interests involve identification of efficient, effective strategies for practical training, supervision, and leadership. She is also invested in leveraging technology (e.g., A.I., robotics, V.R) for efficient training and feedback using simulations. She has worked on several nationwide large projects (e.g., with FEMA and NASA) with a focus on effective training and behavioral outcomes. She has received several mentorship awards including the ABAI Best Mentor Award, the Outstanding Faculty Award, the Outstanding Teaching Award, and the Outstanding Service Award. She has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, staff turnover, and the use of technology in behavior analysis. She is the leading author of a handbook written for both supervisors and supervisees that is titled, Supervision and Practicum in Behavior Analysis: A Handbook for Supervisees.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #150
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Current Landscape of the Global Dissemination of Applied Behavior Analysis: Perspectives on Supervision and Beyond
Saturday, May 28, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Lina M. Slim (ASAP - A Step Ahead Program, LLC; Endicott College; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
CE Instructor: Jacob A Sadavoy, M.S.
Presenting Author: JACOB A SADAVOY (Committed Behavior)
Abstract:

The field of behaviour analysis is growing exponentially in North America (Carr & Nosik, 2017; Deochand & Fuqua, 2016) however, there exists many barriers that impede similar expansion of the field internationally. This presentation will share survey results related to those barriers from six regions: Africa, Asia, Australia/New Zealand, Europe, the Middle East, and South America. We will compare and contrast the behaviour analytic landscape in these regions with a focus on challenges related to supervision (e.g., access, financial constraints, infrastructure, etc.). We will examine the respondents' answers to gain greater insights into these barriers and discuss national initiatives and action steps to respond to this crisis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; graduate students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify five barriers that impede effective, sustainable international dissemination; (2) identify areas of need per region and develop individualized recommendations informed by respondent data; (3) describe the three ways in which the international behaviour analytic community can be supported domestically, in North America.
 
JACOB A SADAVOY (Committed Behavior)
Jacob A. Sadavoy is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst with over 20 years of experience applying the principles of applied behaviour analysis in home programs, clinical center-based programs, school environments as a teacher and educational consultant, businesses, and hospitals throughout North America. To date, Jacob has travelled to fifteen different countries to collaborate with local practitioners to develop culturally-informed, socially significant, behaviour analytic strategies dynamic to the local environment and culture. The ethical challenges and barriers of disseminating ABA effectively throughout the world culminated in Understanding Ethics in Applied Behavior Analysis: Practical Applications. Jacob also sat as the 2019 Vice President of the Ethics and Behavior Analysis Special Interest Group, Teamwork Healthcare's Clinical Board, and a member of the Behaviour Analysis Supervision Special Interest Group addressing international supervision. Jacob’s key areas of interest are ethics, supervision, sustainable dissemination, social justice, and services across the lifespan. Jacob's interest in social justice and compassionate care has culminated in a 2021 tome, A Scientific Framework for Compassion and Social Justice: Lessons in Applied Behavior Analysis.
 
 
Panel #216
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Using Organizational Behavior Management to Navigate Crisis in a Behavior Analytic Organization
Sunday, May 29, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 153C
Area: OBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paul "Paulie" Gavoni, Ed.D
Chair: Pierre D. Louis (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
PAUL "PAULIE" GAVONI (Professional Crisis Management Association)
JASON GOLOWSKI (Brett DiNovi & Associates)
Abstract:

For many, a crisis may be an insurmountable challenge that results in a failed business as many individuals and organizations tend to engage in habits that allow for the sustainability of a “comfort zone,” which may be in conflict with organizational success and survival. While we all seek balance, the comfort zone is often contradictory to the optimal performance zone desired where individuals and organizations are able to realize their greatest potential. However, those equipped with Organizational Behavior Management tools are far more prepared to adapt and systematically navigate crisis. In fact, “crisis equals opportunity” can ring true as those with an OBM toolbox can pivot and leverage the occasion to improve performance and business outcomes.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Junior BCBAs Behavior analysts within their first 5 years of practice, including practitioners, supervisors, etc. BCBAs and BCBA-Ds Licensed or certified individuals

Learning Objectives: 1. The participant will be able to describe various challenges related to leading during crisis 2. The participant will be able to describe critical components to increasing rapid and accurate response during crisis. 3. The participant will be able to describe 5 behavioral components for sustaining or increasing performance
Keyword(s): OBM, Performance Management, Process Improvement, Systems Analysis
 
 
Invited Paper Session #238A
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Award for Distinguished Contributions to DEI: Equitable Supervision Practices
Sunday, May 29, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: DEI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Ramona Houmanfar, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: DANYELLE BEAL (Loving Hands Family Support Services)
Abstract:

Representing the Black Applied Behavior Analysts (BABA)--recipient of the 2022 Award for Distinguished Contributions to DEI--Danyelle Beal will present on equitable supervision practices.

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) demographic data reports that approximately 40% of the certificants are Black, Indigenous, or People of Color (BIPOC) individuals. The BACB has added items to support equitable supervision practices which will come into effect in 2025 under the 6th edition task list. One of the new task list items specifies that supervisors are required to identify and implement methods that promote equity in supervision practices. BIPOC individuals are especially at risk of being affected by inequitable supervision practices given much of the behavior analytic leadership is White and may not have previously had training on appropriate strategies that will reduce these inequities for BIPOC supervisees. The mission of BABA is to create a safe community to support, encourage and uplift Black professionals in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. Since BABA's inception, our focus has been to shed light on the inequities that have marginalized our community for far too long while creating opportunities for growth, advancement and leadership for clinicians of color. It is vital that the responsibility of cultural responsiveness is shared by the field of ABA in its entirety. Thus, the purpose of this presentation will be to discuss how current supervisor practices could contribute to inequities, identify common barriers in supervisor practices, and provide some examples of solutions which could promote equitable supervision practices.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Clinicians and supervisors who work directly with clinicians of color

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) reflect on current supervision practices; (2) identify common barriers in supervisory practices for BIPOC supervisees; (3) provide examples of how they can establish equitable supervision opportunities with BIPOC supervisees.
 
DANYELLE BEAL (Loving Hands Family Support Services)
The mission of BABA is to create a safe community to support, encourage and uplift Black professionals in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis
 
 
Panel #258
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Scaling Up of Behavioral Professionals in the Philippines: Challenges and Opportunities During the Pandemic
Sunday, May 29, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 205B
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Maribel Castillo Stikeleather, M.A.
Chair: Maribel Castillo Stikeleather (BTS: Behavioral Teaching Solutions)
JENNIFER DELOS REYES SILAO (Don Bosco College)
ANNA MARIE LORENZO GALAY (Behavior Analysis Intervention Services)
ROBERT MAPANDO GOMEZ (Little Professors Learning Center - Davao City; Satit Bilingual School of Rangsit University - Thailand)
Abstract:

The Philippines ranks as the 13th most populated country globally, with more than 111 million people. The country’s prevalence of disability is estimated to be more than 12% of the current population. As of October 2021, there are 6 Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), 6 Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), and 71 Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) in the Philippines. These numbers highlight the staggering need for more certified practitioners to serve not only individuals with autism but also in other areas where this science of behavior can be utilized. When the pandemic happened, individuals pursuing their coursework faced hardships in meeting the supervision requirements. This effort led Filipino BCBAs abroad to assist and support 14 BCBA and BCaBA students. This initiative also led to the establishment and development of the first bachelor’s degree in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) that received approval from the Philippine Commission in Higher Education Development.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

BCBAs, BCaBAs, BCBA-Ds, QBA, QASP-S, ABATs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Understand the importance of cultural competence when providing supervision and mentorship. (2) Understand and transform barriers to opportunities in disseminating behavioral science in developing countries. (3) Strengthening collaboration amongst international and local practitioners in embedding behavior analysis in the educational system.
Keyword(s): Course development, Cultural competence, International dissemination, Supervision
 
 
Symposium #307
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Technology for Teaching and Training: Virtual Reality Applications Across Populations
Sunday, May 29, 2022
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 251
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Casey J. Clay (Children's Hospital of Orange County)
Discussant: Richard W. Serna (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
CE Instructor: Richard W. Serna, Ph.D.
Abstract:

To be effective behavior analysts must adapt to an ever changing world. This involves using the latest technology to progress our science and practice across all domains. In this symposium four data-based studies will be presented that span multiple areas of behavior analysis. All studies include a cutting-edge tool for teaching and training: virtual reality. Virtual reality is a tool that can be used across populations and settings and offers advantages that behavior analysts can leverage when applying our science. Discussion of how behavior science can be integrated into powerful technology including virtual reality will be included.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): skills training, teaching, technology, virtual reality
Target Audience:

The target audience is broad and will include researchers, practitioners, and those interested in technological applications of behavioral science.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Identify novel and effective practices in skills training; (2) Describe how skills training can be accomplished via the use of technology including video modeling and virtual reality; (3) Participants will be able to plan for how to incorporate technology in their supervision and training of students and practitioners to be more effective and efficient.
 
Exploring Teacher’s Preferences for Learning Behavioral Skills in Simulated Learning Environments
AARON J. FISCHER (University of Utah), Chathuri Illapperuma (University of Utah), Matt Roberts (University of Utah), Haylee Heller (University of Utah)
Abstract: Teachers require ongoing professional development and support on behavior management to best educate their students. Typically this work is completed in-service and in an experiential format with students. Simulating training opportunities for teachers, through virtual reality, provides a chance to learn skills and practice is a safe environment. As our team develops this training platform, we conducted a study exploring pre-service teachers preference for learning behavioral skills in a simulated learning environment (virtual reality). We conducted a mixed method study assessing acceptability for training in VR (pre/post) a brief experience in a virtual reality headset. Further, we conducted semi-structed interviews to asses preferences for training and social validity of elements to include. A total of 15 participants are enrolled in this study. The specific aim of our semi-structured aspect of the study is to identify: (a) the user’s task language, used to describe concepts, (b) the design tool’s input language, used to articulate the task to the tool, (c) the design tool’s output language, used by the tool to present changes to the user, and (d) the user’s environmental representation of the task, updated by observing the tool’s output.
 

Comparing the Effects of a Lecture and Feedback and Virtual Reality and Feedback on Teacher Performance and Generalization of Discrete Trial Training Skills

Lára Borg Bolladóttir (Reykjavík University and Klettaskóli), ASA INGIMARSDOTTIR (Klettaskóli), Berglind Sveinbjornsdottir (Reykjavik University)
Abstract:

Discrete Trial Training (DTT) methods are beneficial for teaching new skills set to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The current study aims to replicate and modify Sveinbjo¨rnsdo´ttir et al. (2019), who examined the effects of VR in training DTT skills, with two sets of studies. In the first study we examined how long participants reached mastery criteria in DTT after a lecture on how to implement DTT. In the second study a multiple baseline design across participants was used to examine how fast participants reached mastery criteria in DTT after VR training. In addition, we examined if the skills acquired in Study 1 and 2 generalized when implementing DTT with students. Participants in Study 1 acquired the DTT skills after on average 18 sessions. Participants in Study 2 acquired the DTT skills after four VR sessions on average, and the skills generalized to a regular teaching environment with ASD students and across different teaching tasks. In addition, the VR training produced fewer errors in the natural teaching environment compared to the lecture format. These results suggest that VR training might be a beneficial training method since it can minimize the time required in training and produce higher performance accuracy.

 

Technology-Based Interventions for Increasing Social Skills of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

CANNON OUSLEY (University of Missouri), Casey J. Clay (Children's Hospital of Orange County), Chad Rose (University of Missouri), Janine Stichter (University of Missouri)
Abstract:

Social skills deficits are a defining characteristic of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this literature review researchers examined articles that specifically focused on technology-based interventions for teaching social skills to children with ASD. Researchers extracted content related to format of technology, specific social skills taught, and effectiveness of intervention. Researchers also conducted a quality assessment of all included studies using What Works Clearinghouse standards. Researchers found positive effects in 12 of the 13 studies reviewed. Video modeling was the most prevalent format of technology used. Virtual reality interventions are increasing and made up 38% of the studies reviewed. Specific participant, setting, and procedural features that lead to the most effective intervention outcomes are highlighted, and implications for future research is discussed.

 

Working Through: Using Virtual Reality to Teach Social Skills for Employment to Individuals With Autism

HELENA LYDON (National University of Ireland Galway), Jennifer Holloway (National University of Ireland, Galway)
Abstract:

: Individuals with Autism face challenges with securing and maintain meaningful employment. Deficits in social skills are often considered the primary barrier for individuals with Autism in accessing this sector. Working Through used virtual reality to deliver a social skills intervention aimed at teaching 6 core social skills related to employment. The target skills included emotional recognition, initiating a conversation with a colleague, meeting friends/stranger, negotiating with a salesperson, working with a co-worker and managing conflict, and a job interview. Applied Behaviour Analysis was embedded in the pedagogical framework used to design the learning scenarios for each social skill. Participants included individuals with Autism across four countries: Ireland, Denmark, Cyprus, and Greece. Tests of knowledge and skill were taken as pre and post measures. In addition, performance within the virtual reality scenarios was also recorded. Social validity data was also gathered for participants and trainers. The results showed an increase in knowledge and skill following the intervention. Social validity data highlight the acceptability of virtual reality for both the participants and the trainers. The clinical outcomes and utility of virtual reality are discussed in the context of the current findings.

 
 
Symposium #458
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Intelligent Digital Technology to Advance Treatment, Procedural Fidelity, and Employment for Neurodiverse Individuals and Caregivers
Monday, May 30, 2022
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 254A
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Donald A. Hantula (Temple University)
Discussant: Donald A. Hantula (Temple University)
CE Instructor: Donald A. Hantula, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Rapid advances in intelligent agent technology and artificial intelligence technology present new challenges and new opportunities for neurodiverse individuals, their caregivers, and the professionals who work with them. The COVID-19 pandemic became a strong motivating operation for integrating these technologies into work with neurodiverse individuals and their caregivers. This symposium shares groundbreaking new work on applications of intelligent agent technology and artificial intelligence technology with neurodiverse individuals from pre-K to adulthood. Drawn from research conducted by a NIH and NSF funded network of academic and private sector researchers across several states, four illustrative examples show how these digital technologies have been incorporated into work with neurodiverse individuals. One presentation shows how an intelligent agent platform can enable families to access expert guidance in implementing home-based behavioral treatment for children with ASD. A second demonstrates how a similar platform can be used to instruct school age children with ASD. The third presentation evaluates how an intelligent agent based tool increases caregiver treatment fidelity when teaching children basic living skills. The final presentation discusses design considerations for developing a platform that will enable neurodiverse adults to work as data annotators in the IT industry. Although all presentations will review data, there is an equal focus on issues of usability, acceptability and reaction from caregivers and employees using the intelligent agent technology. The overarching theme for this symposium is that forward-thinking applied behavior analysts can help create and leverage innovative technologies to assist the neurodiverse individuals, their families, and the professionals who work with them succeed.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Cargiver support, Intelligent agent, Neurodiverse emoployees, Treatment fidelity
Target Audience:

Advanced: prerequisite skill/competency would include experience in supervising work with children with ASD and/or the work of neurodiverse employees; some basic educated lay person familiarity with AI, experience with efforts to improve program fidelity

Learning Objectives: Learning objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss how an intelligent agent can improve caregiver provided ABA therapy; (2) identify how an intelligent agent can be used to improve instruction with school age children and its supervision; (3) describe the concerns of neurodiverse employees working in data annotation jobs.
 

Supporting Caregiver-Delivered Behavioral Intervention for Children With Autism With an Intelligent Agent Platform

ALIYA YAGAFAROVA (Auburn U), Corina Jimenez-Gomez (Auburn University), Cecelia Drummond (Auburn U), Emily A Phaup (Auburn U), Donald A. Hantula (Temple University), John T Nosek (Guiding Technologies)
Abstract:

Caregiver involvement is an integral component of behavioral interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to ensure generalization and maintenance of skills. Coaching and supporting caregivers in the implementation of behavioral interventions often requires closely working with behavior analysts, which can be resource intensive and may not be feasible in some settings (e.g., rural communities). Further, ensuring sustained treatment fidelity may require additional monitoring and re-coaching. An intelligent agent platform that coaches and guides caregivers in the implementation of behavioral interventions may be useful for minimizing resources required to support caregivers and may aid in maintaining high, long-term treatment fidelity. Caregivers of children with ASD receiving services at a university-based clinic were recruited to deliver behavioral interventions in the home under the direction of written instructions or an intelligent agent platform. Treatment implementation fidelity, percentage of correct responses by the child, and acceptability of each support system served as the main dependent measures. Caregiver acceptability of the intelligent agent technology is discussed.

 

Evaluating Intelligent Agent Technology for Acquisition and Instruction of Hand-Washing in Children With Autism

ELIZABETH R. LORAH (University of Arkansas), Brenna R Griffen (University of Arkansas), Donald A. Hantula (Temple University), John T Nosek (Guiding Technologies)
Abstract:

Intelligent agent technology can help improve procedural fidelity and maintain high levels of performance by ABA therapists and the clients that they serve. However, this nascent technology has only very recently been introduced to ABA therapy. Much remains to be learned about intelligent agent technology and its effects on ABA therapists, including social validity and acceptability This study evaluated the use of an intelligent agent and data collection system for ABA therapist use while teaching handwashing to three school aged children with a diagnosis of autism. Using a multiple baseline design data were collected on therapists’ fidelity of implementation, as well as child acquisition of handwashing. Data were collected until the child participants mastered the ability to independently demonstrate washing hands. Following this, therapists were given the option to either continue with the app or use a traditional paper based protocol and data collection method for the purposes of handwashing instruction as a test of acceptability. The results of therapist reactions, as well as implications for digital technology and intelligent agent use will be discussed.

 

Intelligent Agent Technology for Caregiver Treatment Fidelity and Life Skills of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

KAORI G. NEPO (NeurAbilities), Donald A. Hantula (Temple University), John T Nosek (Guiding Technologies)
Abstract:

Behavior Analysis provides effective interventions for individuals with ASD and other developmental disabilities. However, the shortage of qualified and trained professionals to implement such interventions has been an ongoing problem nationally and internationally over the past decades. This study evaluated the effect of an innovative intelligent agent technology (GAINS) as a new tool for the caregivers of children with ASD to teach them important life skills such as dressing, feeding, hand washing, or packing a snack. Children with ASD (ages between 3-8) who receive services from a regional behavioral health organization and their caregivers participated. A single subjects design across participant dyads was used to evaluate independent completion of the task analyzed target life skill of the child and treatment fidelity data of caregivers following the cues from the intelligent agent technology. Both behavioral data and participant reaction and satisfaction with the intelligent agent technology were assessed. Recommendations for designing intelligent agent technology for use with this population are discussed.

 
Design Considerations for Building a Platform to Enable Neurodiverse Employees to Work in Data Annotation
ELIZABETH GARRISON (Temple University), Slobodan Vucetic (Temple University), Eduard Dragut (Temple University), Matthew Tincani (Temple University), Donald A. Hantula (Temple University), Ray Hong (George Mason University)
Abstract: Neurodiverse individuals often struggle to obtain employment. With the surge of large-scale data-driven innovation in Artificial Intelligence, data annotation tasks found in Amazon’s MTurk and similar platforms have presented significant employment opportunities for neurodiverse individuals. We recruited nine neurodiverse and ten neurotypical participants between the ages of 18-30 and built an interactive web-based training platform to determine when, how and why the annotation performance and their perception of images and text tasks vary between the two groups of participants. After we collected data using our platform, we conducted additional semi-structured interviews with neurodiverse participants to gain a deeper understanding of the reasoning for their particular responses. Our approach (1) highlights differences between neurodiverse and neurotypical workers in data annotation, (2) identifies which characteristics result in differences between neurodiverse and neurotypical data annotation responses, and (3) explains possible reasons for those responses. We suggest design considerations for building future neurodiverse-centered data annotation user interfaces.
 
 
Symposium #467
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Recent Trends in the Development of Professional Skills and Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Practices for Behavior Analysts
Monday, May 30, 2022
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 204A/B
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Landon Cowan (Marquette University)
Discussant: Kate E. Fiske Massey (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University)
CE Instructor: Landon Cowan, M.A.
Abstract:

The new Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2020) requires all BCBAs to engage in professional skills and culturally responsive practices which maximize the effectiveness of their services while treating others with compassion, dignity, and respect; however, resources to guide the training and incorporation of these practices remains limited. This symposium will describe four studies examining practices and future directions for the training of these skills. The first presentation describes a survey which evaluated the strengths and deficits of various professional skills for BCBAs. The second presentation will review potential barriers to effective supervision skills and present data on the utility of an assessment tool to guide BCBAs in their supervision practices and professional development. The third presentation will describe a study evaluating the use of behavioral skills training to teach culturally responsive practices to graduate students. Finally, the fourth presentation will describe a study evaluating procedures to increase the inclusion of content on diversity and culturally responsive practices in behavior analysis courses. To end, the discussant will review the findings in each presentation and consider areas for future research.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): culturally responsive, diversity, professional skills, supervision
Target Audience:

The target audience for this symposium will be students, researchers, and practitioners that are interested in the study and teaching of professional skills and DEI practices. Given that this symposium will offer supervision CEs, we anticipate a large number of attendees (i.e., 100+).

Learning Objectives: At the end of this symposium, participants will be able to (1) describe the clinical and social significance of teaching professional skills and DEI practices, (2) identify at least one key professional skill and culturally responsive practice relevant to ABA service delivery, and (3) describe at least one research-based strategy for teaching professional skills and DEI practices to trainees.
 
Diversity submission Professional Skills for Behavior Analysts: A Survey on the Proficiency and Importance of Hard and Soft Skills
LANDON COWAN (Marquette University), Tiffany Kodak (Marquette University)
Abstract: Individuals seeking certification as Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) require training in both hard and soft skills. Trainees seeking certification complete coursework and a BCBA exam that assess mastery of hard skills. However, training and mastery of soft skills is not as concrete. BCBAs are also expected to maintain these skills throughout their career. Previous research has shown that soft skills are (a) viewed as important by clients and their families but (b) are not consistently demonstrated from those providing services. Research also suggests that BCBA trainees may not consistently receive training on these skills. The current study presents the results of a survey distributed to individuals who supervise BCBAs on the proficiency of hard and soft skills demonstrated by their supervisees. The results suggest future directions for the research and training of professional skills for current and future BCBAs.
 
Diversity submission 

Improving the Future of Applied Behavior Analysis With the Assessment and Training of Supervisory Skills

KIMBERLY MADAR (May Institute), Noor Younus Syed (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
Abstract:

The rapidly increasing demand and increased number of BACB certificants in recent years results in many new BCBAs moving into the role of supervisor without the necessary skills and supports. In 2018 the BACB reported that the “most common actionable ethical violation is improper or inadequate supervision or delegation of responsibilities”. It is essential to the sustainability of ABA that we are meeting the needs of all individuals, families, trainees and practitioners. In this presentation we will discuss some of the barriers to ensuring quality supervision and attempts to address them will be reviewed. We will introduce the Supervisory Skills Assessment Tool (SSAT). The SSAT evaluates professional skills such as bidirectionality, perspective-taking and problem-solving. This allows mentors to create individualized competency criteria to ensure scaffolded support and training is provided to new BCBAs prior to independent supervision. Lessons learned from the initial stages of the pilot and next steps will be discussed.

 
Diversity submission An Evaluation of Behavioral Skills Training to Teach Culturally Responsive Clinical Service Provision in Behavior Analysis Graduate Students
KENYA MYLES (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Amanda King (Endeavor Behavioral Institute, LLC), Ellie Hardesty (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Abstract: With the expanding provision of ABA services, it behooves us as a field to evaluate procedures for providing culturally and linguistically responsive services. In the first experiment we evaluated the effects of Behavioral Skills Training (BST) and two types of feedback on teaching four graduate students in a Behavior Analysis master’s program to identify five culturally significant domains from hypothetical intake materials. In the second experiment we evaluated the effects of BST, in-vivo probes, and delayed feedback on teaching the same graduate students to respond to caregiver challenges to some feature of the treatment plan. The data show that BST training and feedback are effective in teaching both skill sets. This has important clinical implications in that the training is simple, efficient, and familiar to most trainers and supervisors.
 
Diversity submission A Pilot Evaluation of a Supplemental Curriculum on Diversity Content in Graduate Course Syllabi
STEPHANIE ORTIZ (Caldwell University), Melissa Ashley Joseph (Caldwell University), Meghan Deshais (Rutgers University)
Abstract: Recent data indicate that there is a lack of BACB certificants from diverse backgrounds (BACB, 2020) and many practitioners do not receive training in culturally responsive service delivery (CSRD). Applied behavior analysis (ABA) graduate programs would therefore benefit from incorporating training on diversity and CSRD. In this study, a pre-post design was used to evaluate the effects of providing ABA faculty members with diversity course objectives and resources tailored to their courses on the presence of diversity and CRSD content in their course syllabi. Six faculty members, who were collectively responsible for teaching courses assigned to control and intervention groups, participated in this study. All participants were provided with a general list of resources related to diversity and CRSD in ABA. Tailored diversity course objectives and supporting resources were only provided for courses assigned to the intervention group. Results indicated that increases in diversity course objectives and resources in syllabi were only observed for courses in the intervention group. Implications for graduate training programs in ABA and future work in this area are discussed.
 
 
Symposium #499
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Recent Research on Performance Feedback: Preference and Efficacy
Monday, May 30, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 153B
Area: OBM/TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Cory Toegel (Northern Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Cory Toegel, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Performance feedback is one of the most common strategies used to improve performance within organizational settings. The present symposium arranges three recent research projects that evaluate the use of performance feedback. The first presentation will discuss laboratory research designed to evaluate the effects of and preference for numerical and narrative variations of performance feedback. The second presentation investigated preference for various feedback modalities (e.g., paper and pencil, verbal feedback). The third presentation evaluated the effects of the number and type of feedback statements provided by a supervisor on participant’s procedural integrity. The goals of this symposium are to bring interested practitioners and researchers up to date with current research involving performance feedback, highlight areas in which performance feedback research is needed, and describe the utility of feedback strategies to enhance the practice of clinical supervisors and the performance of individuals receiving feedback.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): feedback modalities, performance feedback, supervisory feedback
Target Audience:

BCBAs and BCBA-Ds

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the purpose of performance feedback and its relevance to supervision; (2) describe different methods for delivering effective performance feedback to trainees; (3) describe different methods for assessing trainee preference for various forms of performance feedback.
 
A Comparison of Narrative and Numerical Feedback for Teaching Clinical Tasks
CORY TOEGEL (Northern Michigan University), Alexis Humphreys (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Claire C. St. Peter (West Virginia University)
Abstract: Across 3 experiments, we compared the effectiveness of and preference for different feedback strategies for training undergraduate participants to complete common clinical tasks. Experiments had two phases. In Phase 1 of all experiments, participants received exposure to various forms of narrative and numerical feedback while learning to implement two different types of preference assessments. By the end of Phase 1, all participants mastered the implementation of the assessments. In Phase 2, participants could choose the type of feedback they would receive from the experimenter while learning to implement discrete-trial teaching procedures. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants could choose to receive only one type of feedback: narrative or numerical feedback. Most participants preferred the numerical feedback. In Experiment 3, participants could choose any combination of the various types of narrative and numerical feedback. Although all participants preferred a specific feedback combination, the preferences were not systematic across participants. Given that all participants acquired the skills regardless of feedback type, the results may have implications for permitting choice of feedback type when training clinical skills.
 

CANCELED: Assessing Therapist Preferences for Feedback

STEPHANIE L. KINCAID (Rollins College), Sabrina Veilleux (Acorn Health of Florida), Maddison Holland (Rollins College)
Abstract:

In the organizational behavior management literature, several methods for identifying potential reinforcers in workplace settings have been explored. One empirically supported approach is analogous to stimulus preference assessments in clinical settings (e.g., ranking and paired-choice assessments), with the modification the choices between stimuli are presented in survey form. The present study applied such methods to identify therapist preferences for different modalities of supervisory feedback. We conducted preference assessment surveys for several organizations providing behavior-analytic services. Assessments were administered to 10 supervisees to assess their preferred feedback modality (e.g., paper and pencil form, verbal feedback, text message, etc.). In addition, 8 supervisors completed the assessment from the perspective of their supervisee to assess the degree to which they were able to predict their supervisee’s preferences. Preferences for feedback were somewhat idiosyncratic across participants, though verbal feedback emerged as generally high preferred relative to other feedback modalities. Consistency in preferences across supervisees and ability of supervisors to predict supervisee preference will be considered. Furthermore, barriers to applying feedback preference assessment in the context of supervision and implications for the supervisory relationship will be discussed.

 
Effects of Feedback Statements Delivered Via Telehealth on Staff Procedural Integrity
LYNETTE JOHNSON (University of Kansas), Thomas L. Zane (University of Kansas), Florence D. DiGennaro Reed (University of Kansas)
Abstract: The current study contributes to the development of more effective supervision of direct care staff. Effective supervision is an important topic due lack of information regarding the essential components of supervisor feedback. Supervisor feedback is a powerful and effective tool that can be used to increase employee performance. Staff training and staff supervision directly relates to the quality of staff intervention implementation. This study investigated the effects of the number and type of feedback statements provided by a supervisor on participant’s procedural integrity. Participants included two registered behavior technicians (RBTs) who implemented applied behavior analysis (ABA) procedures with children in the home setting. Verbal corrective-corrective (CC), corrective-corrective-corrective (CCC), positive-positive (PP), and positive-positive-positive (PPP), were provided as consequences during the implementation of a receptive identification two-dimensional (2-D) picture card program. Overall, results showed that all conditions increased procedural integrity, with the PPP conditioned producing a slightly greater influence. Research, such as the current study, is needed to identify ways of providing feedback that are most effective in changing behavior that it follows. Feedback is a powerful tool for a supervisor, but like any power, needs to be used correctly and responsibly.
 
 
Panel #536
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Dismantling Oppressive Practices in Clinical and Academic Supervision: How to be a Disruptor
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 156B
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Anita Li, Ph.D.
Chair: Anita Li (Western Michigan University)
NATALIA BAIRES (Southern Illinois University Carbondale)
DANYELLE SHARELLE GOITIA BEAL (Loving Hands Family Support Services)
ANITA LI (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

With diversity, equity, and inclusion becoming more of a trend than a value, it is imperative that behavior analysts self-reflect and commit to actions that disrupt oppressive practices in the field. The panel will focus on how behavior analysts can mentor and supervise underrepresented supervisees and students, with a specific emphasis on empowering them and guiding them to recognize their strengths independent of the validation of those in power. The panelists will also discuss how to utilize and leverage one’s own privilege to further these efforts to dismantle oppressive mentorship and supervision. Understanding that lived experiences are data, the panelists, who identify as women of color, will discuss how their own behaviors were shaped as a result of being oppressed in these systems (i.e., educational institutes, clinical settings, mental and behavioral health) and will share strategies to disrupt such systems. Audience members will be encouraged to participate and share their own lived experiences to contribute to this important conversation.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

N/A

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define and engage in self-reflection; (2) identify behaviors that promote disruption; (3) identify behaviors that empower underrepresented clinicians and students.
Keyword(s): compassion, disruption, self-reflection, supervision
 
 
Symposium #561
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Preparing Pre-Service Behavior Analysts
Monday, May 30, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 203
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Clare Liddon (University of Dayton)
Discussant: Clare Liddon (University of Dayton)
CE Instructor: Clare Liddon, Ph.D.
Abstract:

As the demand for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA) continues to grow, the need for high quality training across modalities grows with it. Performance feedback is an integral tool to an effective training environment. When providing training and supervision for pre-service behavior analysts, feedback is used to shape the skillsets of future clinicians. This symposium will include two presentations that will review the effects of feedback across modalities during training for pre-service behavior analysts and will conclude with discussion.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): parent training, performance feedback, supervision
Target Audience:

The target audience for this is practitioners and professors that contribute to the training of pre-service behavior analysts and/or to the training of individuals seeking BCBA certification.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to (1) describe performance feedback and its impact on the training of preservice behavior analysts overall; (2) describe effects of a remote format on feedback efficacy for parent training; (3) describe the effects of delayed versus immediate feedback on implementation of evidence-based interventions.
 
Effectiveness of Immediate versus Delayed Performance Feedback on Accurate Implementation of an Evidence-Based Intervention
Jessica Akers (Baylor University), Tonya Nichole Davis (Baylor University), Remington Michael Swensson (Baylor University), NICOLE OGUINN (Baylor University)
Abstract: Treatment fidelity is the extent to which essential intervention components are implemented accurately and consistently. This is an important component to implementing evidence-based practices for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, as higher levels of treatment fidelity are directly related to improved outcomes and strength of the intervention. Therefore, it is important to identify methods to promote and maintain high levels of treatment fidelity among practitioners implementing behavior analytic interventions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relative effectiveness of immediate and delayed performance feedback on the implementation of interventions incorporating compound schedules of reinforcement (i.e., multiple and chain schedules). Specifically, we provided immediate feedback for implementation of one of the compound schedules and delayed feedback for the implementation of the other compound schedule. We randomly assigned feedback to compound schedules ensuring an equal number of pairings across the participants. Participants were graduate students enrolled in a verified course sequence and completing supervised field experience. The results indicate that both immediate and delayed performance feedback effectively increased the fidelity of implementation, however participants did report a preference for immediate performance feedback.
 
Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Remote Performance Feedback on Accurate Implementation of Parent Coaching
Jessica Akers (Baylor University), Tonya Nichole Davis (Baylor University), Kristina McGinnis (Student- Baylor University), REMINGTON MICHAEL SWENSSON (Baylor University)
Abstract: The supervision of field experiences is an indispensable component of Board-Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA®) training. During the supervised field experience, supervisors regularly provide performance feedback to trainees for the purpose of improving fidelity of implementation of various assessments and interventions. Emerging evidence supports the efficacy of using telepractice to train teachers and parents to implement interventions, but no study has evaluated the effectiveness of the remote performance feedback among individuals completing BCBA® training. We used videoconference equipment and software to deliver remote performance feedback to seven participants enrolled in a graduate program and completing supervised field experience. Remote performance feedback was provided regarding participants’ implementation of caregiver coaching. The results indicate that remote performance feedback increased the correct implementation of caregiver coaching. These preliminary results indicate the efficacy of remote supervision and performance feedback.
 

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