Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

CE by Type: QABA


 

Workshop #W46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
VOX: An Experimental Analysis of Verbal Behavior for Speakers With Autism and Other Language Disorders
Friday, May 27, 2022
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 153A
Area: VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lee L Mason, Ph.D.
ALONZO ALFREDO ANDREWS (The University of Texas at San Antonio), LEE L MASON (Cook Children's Health Care System)
Description: Skinner (1957) writes, "It is my belief that something like the present analysis reduces the total vocabulary needed for a scientific account. In many ways, then, this seems to me to be a better way of talking about verbal behavior" (p. 456). Language is a much sought after, yet elusive subject matter for scientific investigation. Skinner proposed that language fell within the scope of a science of behavior, and was therefore open to functional analysis and interpretation. Over the past 60 years, much has been done to further the scientific explanation, prediction, and control of verbal behavior as a function of environmental variables. This workshop provides an interactive approach to conducting verbal operant experimental (VOX) analyses, and using the results of this assessment for developing individualized treatment plans for individuals with autism and other language disorders. Specifically, we use multiple-exemplar training and mediated scaffolding to demonstrate the procedures and interpretation of a VOX analysis. The methodology described in this workshop is empirically supported, and conceptually systematic with a behavior-analytic approach to language assessment and intervention. Special attention will be paid to speakers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the strength of verbal operants in relation to one another; (2) conduct a VOX analysis; (3) develop individualized treatment objectives; and (4) demonstrate the process for transferring stimulus control across verbal operants.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video modeling, role-playing, and workbook demonstrations. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Guided notes will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop is geared towards Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts, Registered Behavior Technicians, special education teachers, school psychologists, speech language pathologists, and other professionals who provide direct services to strengthen the language of children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): errorless learning, functional analysis, stimulus control, verbal behavior
 
Symposium #17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Theory and Intervention for Misophonia: A Conditioned Aversive Respondent Behavior
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 104A
Area: CBM; Domain: Translational
Chair: Thomas H. Dozier (Misophonia Institute; Misophonia Treatment Institute)
Discussant: Emily Thomas Johnson (Behavior Attention and Developmental Disabilities Consultants, LLC)
CE Instructor: Thomas H. Dozier, M.S.
Abstract:

Misophonia is an understudied but relatively common learned respondent behavior condition, the impact of which ranges from annoying to debilitating. Misophonia is known as a condition where commonly occurring innocuous stimuli (e.g. chewing sound, specific voice) elicit anger and accompanying physiological responses which function as motivating operations for overt aggression, escape, and avoidance. Although there are many common misophonic stimuli, each person has a unique set of trigger stimuli. Misophonia has similarities with general sensory sensitivity which is common with autism, but is distinctly different. Misophonia was first identified and named by audiologists and has been considered a hearing disorder. Recently misophonia has come to be viewed as an anger disorder and the focus of psychologists and neuroscientists, however our research indicates the core of misophonia is a Pavlovian conditioned muscle reflex, so it may be more appropriate to view misophonia as a conditioned behavioral disorder. Once a misophonic respondent behavior develops, it generally strengthens with repeated exposure to the trigger stimulus and persists indefinitely unless there is an intervention to reduce the respondent behavior. One intervention that has been effective for misophonia is counterconditioning of trigger stimuli by paring a continuous positive stimulus with an intermittent trigger.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): ABA Intervention, aggression, counterconditioning, misophonia
Target Audience:

basic

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Identify the core reflex of the misophonia response chain. 2. Identify the neurological learning process that creates and maintains the core reflex of misophonia response chain. 3. Identify one treatment method that can change the misophonic response when used in an intervention. 4. Distinguish between general sensory sensitivity, common to ASD, and misophonia.
 
The Composition of Misophonia: A Conditioned Respondent Behavior
(Basic Research)
THOMAS H. DOZIER (Misophonia Institute; Misophonia Treatment Institute)
Abstract: Misophonia is a recently identified condition in which an individual has an immediate acute emotional response (e.g., anger, disgust, anxiety) when exposed to specific commonly occurring stimuli. We conducted two basic research studies that indicate the core component of misophonia is a Pavlovian conditioned muscle reflex. Following the muscle reflex, misophonia includes an intense conditioned emotional response, which is the hallmark feature of misophonia. An fMRI neurological imaging research study results will be presented which indicates the emotional response develops through experiential learning of emotions. Unconditioned physiological responses are elicited by the distress of the reflex and emotional response and have been validate with skin conductance measurements. Conditioned operant behavior develops around these core responses which often include avoidance, escape, and sometimes aggression. The “learned” nature of misophonia is also supported by age of onset data, and case data which support that counterconditioning the learned physical reflex results in a reduction in the emotional response and overall severity ratings of misophonia.
 

Counterconditioning Intervention for Misophonic Triggered Aggressive Behavior of a Student With Autism

(Service Delivery)
MOLLY LUTZ (Pediatric Therapeutic Services)
Abstract:

Misophonia is a disorder in which specific innocuous stimuli trigger negative emotional and physiological responses. Reactions can range from annoyance to fight-or-flight. Commonly occurring triggers are oral and nasal sounds, but can be any stimulus. This study reports a successful intervention of a male high school student diagnosed with the primary educational classification of intellectual disability, a secondary classification of autism spectrum disorder, and speech and language impairment. Prior to intervention, the student was frequently triggered by vocal stimuli of one student, and he was continually removed from class due to aggressive and perseverative episodes towards that student. Pre-intervention rate of perseverative behavior was 12.3 times per hour. The intervention consisted of 10-30 minute counterconditioning sessions in a public education setting for three recorded trigger stimuli. Counterconditioning was accomplished by pairing continuous preferred stimuli (e.g., video or music) while the trigger played intermittently using the Misophonia Trigger Tamer app on an iPad. Staff observed overt behavior which indicated physiological responses after the trigger played and increased or decreased volume to maintain a minimal response. The intervention successfully reduced the misophonic respondent behavior, and the aggressive behavior extinguished. Preliminary post intervention rate of perseverative behavior is 0 times per hour.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #24
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Preventing and Identifying Human Trafficking Among Individuals With Disabilities
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
CE Instructor: Susan Wilczynski, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LAURA CUSACK (Coalition for Independent Living Options, Inc.)
Abstract:

Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are at increased risk for abuse, violence, and human trafficking. According to the Trafficking Victim Protection Act (TVPA), trafficking is the use of force, fraud, or coercion for commercial sex, or if the individual is under 18 years. Labor trafficking includes involuntary servitude, peonage, debt bondage, or slavery. Individuals with disabilities may be targeted as they may be more isolated, be more easily manipulated and groomed or not be able to communicate what is occurring. Sometimes there are signs of abuse such as an increase in certain behaviors, difficulty at school, home or therapy and new behaviors not present prior. Considering that some children with disabilities are nonverbal they may not be able to communicate any abuse that may be occurring. It is vital to teach healthy and unhealthy relationships, appropriate and inappropriate touch, how to communicate an occurrence and who they should confide in. More research should be conducted with individuals with disabilities for identification, screening, and prevention. All clinics should include mandatory training for human trafficking and abuse prevention and identification. Collaboration with therapists and families is vital to increase training and reporting to reduce the rates of human trafficking in this population.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs, RBTs, anyone developing treatment plans and/or working with youth or those who may be at risk for abuse

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain human trafficking; (2) outline risk factors for human trafficking among clients with disabilities; (3) identify barriers to reporting faced by clients; (4) connect at-risk individuals to national resources.
 
LAURA CUSACK (Coalition for Independent Living Options, Inc.)
Laura Cusack is a Senior Crime Victim Practitioner at the Coalition for Independent Living Options, Inc. and serves as the President for the Human Trafficking Coalition of the Palm Beaches. She currently participates on Palm Beach County’s Sexual Assault Response Team’s Community Action Network and Training Committee. She also serves on the People with Disabilities Community Consultant Panel, as well as is a member of the National Human Trafficking and Disabilities Working Group. Laura’s experience includes providing training to service providers on specific needs of crime victims with disabilities according to the Rehab Act, ADA, and fair housing act, as well as providing training on human trafficking and crimes against children; facilitating psychoeducational groups for high-risk youth with trauma-related disabilities; and leading community outreach efforts. Laura launched the Hope Campaign in Florida, a community outreach in Palm Beach County that works with local hotels to identify missing children and increase public access to the National Human Trafficking Hotline. She has also conducted street outreach with law enforcement to women in street-based prostitution to promote safety and wellness, and has instructed a criminal diversion curriculum to men arrested for buying sex. Laura is a member of the Palm Beach County Human Trafficking Task Force, and regularly attends the Statewide Council on Human Trafficking meetings. Laura earned her Master’s Degree in Social Work (MSW) from Florida Atlantic University and is certified in the My Life My Choice, iEmpathize Empower Youth Program, and Men Breaking Free national curriculum.
 
 
Symposium #28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Behavioral Skills Training: Applications in Real-World Settings With Typical Caregivers
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 254A
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Peter Sturmey (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Discussant: Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon)
CE Instructor: Peter Sturmey, Ph.D.
Abstract: Behavioral Skills Training (BST) is an evidence-based practice that behavior analysts must be competent to deliver. Despite its widely recognized importance, further real-world models and evaluations are needed. This symposium will present four examples of applying BST to such varied contexts as training a grandparent to deliver a behavior support plan to an adult with autism spectrum disorders; efficient training of discrete trial teaching to typical staff; training staff to implement correct redirection and restraint procedures; and, training parents via telehealth to implement effective sleep protocols. These studies demonstrate the versatility and robustness of BST in real-world-applied settings.
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): behavioral-skills training, caregeiver training, telehealth
Target Audience: Advanced: Participants should have at least a basic knowledge of graduate-level ABA such as is described in Cooper et al. including modeling, feedback, contingencies of reinforcement, programming generalization, small N experimental design. This can include current and potential supervisors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how to implement behavioral skills training (BST) in at least two contexts; (2) describe the telehealth application of BST; (3) describe strategies to maximize the efficiency of BST.
 

Grandparent-Implemented Interventions to Reduce Challenging Behavior of an Adult With Autism: A Pilot Telehealth Study

EMILY GREGORI (University of Illinois at Chicago), Christine Drew (Auburn University), Catharine Lory (Baylor University), Namhee Kim (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Abstract:

Adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often engage in challenging behaviors that require intensive intervention. Due to the lack of services for adults with ASD, their caregivers are often responsible for providing behavioral support. However, caregivers, including grandparents, often lack adequate training and have limited access to ongoing support from professionals that prevents them from providing high-quality behavioral intervention. Telehealth is a mechanism that can potentially increase access to effective intervention for adults with ASD and training for their caregivers. However, most telehealth research has been conducted with young children and their parents. There is limited research to support the use of telehealth as a mechanism for improving service delivery for adults and their caregivers. This study explored the effects of grandparent-implemented interventions on the challenging behavior of an adult male with ASD. Research staff used individualized telehealth training and coaching to teach a grandparent to implement two function-based behavioral interventions. Data were collected on the grandparent’s implementation fidelity of both interventions and on the challenging behavior of the adult with ASD. Results showed that both interventions resulted in low to moderate levels of challenging behavior and that telehealth training and coaching resulted in high levels of implementation fidelity.

 
An Efficiency Tactic for Behavioral Skills Training
BRIAN C. LIU-CONSTANT (The Evergreen Center), John Claude Ward-Horner (Evergreen Center)
Abstract: Behavioral skills training (BST) was used to teach staff members a discrete trial training (DTT) procedure in a setting with a low trainer-to-staff ratio. Although effective, the rehearsal and feedback components of BST can be time-consuming and require more time with an expert trainer than the trainer has available. For the BST protocol, the researcher recorded and presented instructions and modeling on video, and developed scripts that participants followed during rehearsal and feedback. Each participant was assigned to a group of three. Participants took turns in one of three roles (teacher-participant, student-participant, or observer-participant) and, when serving in the role of teacher-participant, practiced the DTT procedure with a student-participant while the observer-participant delivered performance feedback to the teacher-participant. Results indicated that all participants were able to learn the DTT procedure when all feedback was provided by an observer-participant. The procedure was also efficient as evidenced by the expert trainer providing minimal feedback to observer-participants, and participants subsequent to the first participant of each group learning the DTT procedure in less time and with fewer sessions.
 
Behavioural Skills Training for Teaching Safety Skills to Mental Health Clinicians: A Pragmatic Randomized Control Trial.
Elizabeth Lin (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; University of Toronto), Mais Malhas (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health), Emmanuel Bratsalis (Center for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto), KENDRA THOMSON (Brock University ), Rhonda Boateng (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health; University of Toronto), Fabienne Hargreaves (The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health), Heba Baig (Center for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto), Louis Paul Alexander Busch (Centre for Addictions and Mental Health)
Abstract: Workplace violence is an increasingly significant topic, particularly as it applies to staff working in mental health settings. The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Canada’s largest mental health hospital, considers workplace safety a high priority and consequently has mandated clinical staff safety training. Key components of this training are self-protection and 2–5 person team control skills, which serve as a last resort when other interventions are ineffective (e.g., verbal de-escalation). Training-as-usual (TAU) for the past 20 years has been based on a 3-D approach (description, demonstration, and doing), but without any competency-based assessment. Recent staff reports indicate that the acquisition and retention of these skills is problematic and that there are issues with staff confidence in their ability to address workplace violence. We will present the results of a pragmatic randomized controlled trial designed to evaluate the effectiveness of behavioral skills training (BST) against TAU in terms of the acquisition and 1-month post-training retention of self-protection team control skills as well as the impact on staff confidence. Results to date support the effectiveness of BST vs. TAU for improving staff performance compared to TAU.
 

Evaluation of a Telehealth Parent Training Program for Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder who have Sleep Difficulties

AMANPREET RANDHAWA (Brock University), Julie Koudys (Brock University), Angeline Savard (The Gregory School for Exceptional Learning), Catherine McConnell (Ontario ABA), Meghan Dunnet (Kalyana Support Systems), Jeffrey Esteves (York University), Andrea Valencia (kalyana Support Systems)
Abstract:

Research supports parent-implemented, behavior-analytic sleep interventions to address sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorder (Jin et al., 2013; Linnehan et al., 2021). Further, some research exists to support distance models of parent education and sleep intervention (Corkum et al, 2016). However, few studies directly assess parents’ ability to accurately implement sleep interventions (i.e., treatment fidelity). This limits our understanding of whether parents are implementing sleep interventions as designed and draws into question whether child behavior changes can be attributed to the interventions. As parents are typically the primary mediators of behavioural sleep interventions––and intervention success depends on the accurate implementation of the procedures and the consistency with which those procedures are implemented in the natural environment––this is a significant gap in the literature. The purpose of this concurrent multiple baseline design across participants study was to evaluate whether parents could accurately implement their child’s behavior-analytic sleep intervention. Four parent-child dyads were recruited. Behavioral skills training and nightly coaching support were provided to parents using a telehealth approach. Nightly coaching support was systematically faded. Results demonstrate that treatment fidelity increased for all participants. Interobserver agreement was above 80%. Clinical implications and future research recommendations will be discussed.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #43
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Partnering With Caregivers to Support Development in Young Children With Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Corina Jimenez-Gomez (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Aubyn C. Stahmer, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: AUBYN STAHMER (UC Davis Health)
Abstract:

Caregiver-mediated early interventions have demonstrated positive child and family outcomes for young children with, or at high likelihood of having, autism (Zwaigenbaum et al., 2015; Burrell & Borrego, 2012). Additionally, there is consensus that effective early intervention includes a caregiver component, including input in the development of treatment goals and priorities, identifying support for the family, and learning specific strategies to support their child’s development. However, many intervention providers working with children with autism and their families have limited training in how to partner with parents or how to coach them in the use of evidence-based intervention strategies. Recent research has identified key elements for caregiver coaching and engagement (e.g., Pellecchia et al., 2020). This presentation will examine the literature on effective coaching strategies and provide methods to increase caregiver partnership in the intervention process. The use of telehealth to deliver coaching will be examined.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience: Providers and researchers interested in engaging caregivers in delivering interventions
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe at least three strategies for engaging caregivers in early intervention; (2) identify at least three barriers to caregiver participation in early intervention and strategies to address those barriers; (3) consider methods for individualizing caregiver involvement in intervention based on family characteristics and needs; (4) identify common elements of caregiver coaching across evidence-based early interventions; (5) identify potential benefits and drawbacks of caregiver coaching through telehealth platforms.
 
AUBYN STAHMER (UC Davis Health)
Dr. Aubyn Stahmer is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the UC Davis MIND Institute, a clinical psychologist and a board certified behavior analyst. She directs the Center of Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. Dr. Stahmer has over 25 years of experience in implementation of evidence-based practices for children with autism, including a range of caregiver-implemented interventions. She is an expert in the translation of evidence-based autism research to community-based practice and delivery. She is an internationally respected expert in the use of naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions which are validated treatments for autism. Dr. Stahmer has conducted extensive research in the areas of caregiver coaching, early intervention, inclusive education and services research in autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Stahmer leads several grants funded through the U.S. Department of Education that involve adapting evidence-based practices for children with autism in collaboration with teachers and community providers.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #50
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Discrete Trial Teaching: The Worst Form of Instruction Except for All Those Other Forms of Instruction
Saturday, May 28, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: John McEachin, Ph.D.
Chair: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
Presenting Authors: : JOHN MCEACHIN (Autism Partnership)
Abstract:

Discrete trial teaching (DTT) is one of the most widely implemented interventions for children with autism and at the same time one of the most maligned. It can be an incredibly powerful tool and is an acknowledged key component in intensive early intervention for children with autism. But it is also the intervention that everyone loves to hate: “It is too rigid and formulaic…Behavior change does not generalize to real-world contexts…It is overly contrived and unnatural…It does not have curb appeal.” But we have to consider whether all these purported shortcomings are inherent in the DDT model or are they by-products of rigidly formulated or incompletely implemented translations of the model. This talk will propose a broader conceptualization of DTT that allows for flexible application along a number of relevant continua according to the readiness of the learner. It will be argued that while the structure that is commonly viewed as a defining characteristic of DTT and arguably a major contributor to its effectiveness can and should be varied according to the needs of the student. In other words, we should aim to provide the just right amount of structure. This flexible but systematic approach has been referred to as progressive (e.g. Leaf et al., 2016). Within this progressive model all elements of DTT are fair game for rethinking what we do and why we do it. Willingness to contrive learning opportunities and space them closely together could actually be an advantage, not a shortcoming of DTT. The research behind this model will be described and the areas where more research is needed will be highlighted.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Instructional program developers and interventionists

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the historical development of DTT and the application to learners with autism; (2) name three examples of widely held rules for DTT that we should reconsider based on currently available evidence; (3) describe a continuum of structured vs. naturalistic teaching style and three important considerations for where to position your instruction on that continuum; (4) name a potential important advantage of willingness to contrive learning opportunities.
 
JOHN MCEACHIN (Autism Partnership)
John McEachin is a licensed psychologist and behavior analyst who has been providing intervention to children with autism as well as adolescents and adults with a wide range of developmental disabilities since 1974. He received his graduate training under Ivar Lovaas at the UCLA Young Autism Project. During his 11 years at UCLA, Dr. McEachin served in various roles including Clinic Supervisor, Research and Teaching Assistant, and Lecturer. His research has included a long-term follow-up study of the children who received intensive behavioral treatment at the UCLA YAP, which was published in 1993. In 1994 he joined with Ron Leaf in forming Autism Partnership, which they continue to co-direct. In 1999 they published A Work in Progress, a widely used behavioral treatment manual and curriculum for children with autism. Dr. McEachin has lectured throughout the world and co-authored numerous books and research articles. He is an instructor at Long Beach State University and consults regularly to families, agencies, and school districts, assisting in the development of treatment programs and providing training to parents, interventionists and teachers.
 
 
Panel #65
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Diversity submission Queering Our Science: How Behavior Analysts Can Work Toward LGBTQ+ Liberation
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 156B
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Fernanda Suemi Oda, M.A.
Chair: Fernanda Suemi Oda (The University of Kansas)
MATTHEW CAPRIOTTI (San Jose State University)
SARAH CAMPAU (University of Arkansas)
CODY MORRIS (Salve Regina University)
Abstract:

The last thirty years have seen enormous growth in the application of psychological science to better the lives of LGBTQ+ people. Behavior analysts have been largely absent from this movement (Morris, Goetz, & Gabriele-Black, 2021). There has been a recent discourse around harms that behavior analysts have enacted upon LGBTQ+ people in the past, accompanied by a discussion of steps we can take to “do better” in the future. This panel focuses on future actions that behavior analysts can take to support LGBTQ+ people’s wellbeing. Panelists have each done significant professional work in support of LGBTQ+ people; two are members of LGBTQ+ communities, and one has done this work in an ally role. We will discuss both what behavior analysts can do in the domains of research, practice, and organizational behavior and how they can do it. We will also discuss particular considerations behavior analysts at various career stages (e.g., graduate student, early career faculty) and spheres of professional practice. The panel will conclude with ample time for audience questions and discussion.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

N/A, level is beginner

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, attendees will be able to: (1) Describe behavior analysts' contributions to research on LGBTQ+ issues. (2) Discuss areas of applied research through which behavior analysts can contribute to knowledge about best practices for promoting the wellness of LGBTQ+ people. (3) Identify current best practices for supporting LGBTQ+ clients, staff, and students.
Keyword(s): diversity, ethics, LGBTQ, social justice
 
 
Invited Paper Session #77
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Diversity submission Defining, Measuring, and Ensuring the Social Validity of Skills in Interprofessional Collaboration, Compassionate Care, and Cultural Humility in Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 204A/B
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Peter F. Gerhardt (The EPIC School)
CE Instructor: Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
Abstract: In recent years, there has been some discussion of the need to increase the training of behavior analysts in soft skills. Examples of soft skills that have been discussed include active listening, engagement, empathetic statements, and the provision of support. Specifically, some sources of data indicate that behavior analysts may be less skilled in these areas than is ideal (e.g., Taylor et al., 2018; LeBlanc et al., 2019). Given the humanitarian foundations of the field, the focus on the improvement of the human condition, and the associations between consumer satisfaction and outcomes, it is important to maximize the extent to which behavior analysts master and demonstrate these skills. Challenges include operationally defining terms that may be mentalistic in nature, and measuring behaviors that are inherently somewhat subjective. Additional challenges include ensuring that there is a genuineness and authenticity to the demonstration of the skills, and that social validity measures support that they are received well by clients. In recent years, progress has been made in issuing calls to action in the realms of interprofessional collaboration (e.g., Brodhead, 2015), compassionate care (e.g., Taylor et al, 2018; LeBlanc et al, 2019) and cultural humility (e.g., Fong et al, 2016; Miller et al, 2019; Wright, 2019). Models from other fields have been reviewed, adaptations of existing tools and models have been suggested, and the BACB Code of Ethics has been expanded to include these obligations (BACB, 2020). Several recent empirical explorations of work in these areas will be shared, and directions for future research and training will be suggested. Reasons for enthusiasm and hope will be reviewed, as the field both returns to its roots and meets the challenges of the future in this endeavor to expand the skill sets of practicing behavior analysts.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate student.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list several component skills that have been suggested as lacking in the professional repertoires of behavior analysts; (2) describe how soft skill components might enhance outcomes of behavior analytic intervention and of collaboration with other professionals; (3) provide examples of how the component skills of compassionate care, interprofessional collaboration, and cultural humility might be defined for the contexts of collaboration and service provision; (4) review challenges in evaluating the mastery of these skills, including generalization to natural contexts, passing tests of authenticity, ensuing culturally responsive skill development, and obtaining social validity ratings from multiple stakeholders and experts; (5) identify future research questions and current strategies for student/staff training in these areas.
 
MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LABA, is a Professor at Endicott College, where she has been for 10 years, and where she serves as the Executive Director of ABA and Autism Programs, including overseeing the master’s programs in ABA and directing the Ph.D. Program in ABA. She also does research with the team at Melmark. She has worked in the field of ABA and Autism for over 35 years. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University in 1990 and she became a Board Certified Behavior Analyst in 2000. She previously worked for 16 years at the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center at Rutgers University. Her clinical and research interests center on defining best practice ABA techniques, exploring ways to enhance the ethical conduct of practitioners, teaching social skills to learners with autism, training staff to be optimally effective at instruction and at collaboration, and maximizing family members’ expertise and adaptation. She serves on the Scientific Council of the Organization for Autism Research, is on the board of Association for Science in Autism Treatment, is a regular contributor to the ABA Ethics Hotline, and is an advisor to the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. She is a regular reviewer for several professional journals, and is a frequent member of service committees for a variety of organizations.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #78
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Understanding Language Development: The Deeper Wisdom in B. F. Skinner’s Completely Incorrect Theory
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: VRB; Domain: Theory
Chair: Rocio Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
CE Instructor: Catherine Snow, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CATHERINE SNOW (Harvard University)
Abstract:

In 1959 Noam Chomsky published a famously scathing review of Skinner’s 1957 book, Verbal Behavior. For the next 30 or so years, invoking the role of the child’s language environment in explaining acquisition was viewed positively only in limited clinical and restricted educational contexts, while the majority of legitimate child language researchers focused on children’s acquisition of rules and abstract patterns remote from their actual verbal behavior. However, the role of the child’s language environment was never fully ignored as a research topic, and in the last 30 years has regained legitimacy as an explanation for individual and group differences in rate and course of acquisition. Although some might take this as an affirmation of the claims in Verbal Behavior, child language researchers would vehemently reject that interpretation, noting, for example, the central role that must be attributed to infants’ innate social-pragmatic categories and their general cognitive capacities, which far transcend the learning mechanisms Skinner posited. This talk will summarize the findings supporting a role for variation in the child’s language environment in explaining aspects of language development, and argue that the polarizing dispute between Skinner and Chomsky retarded progress toward understanding how children’s innate socio-pragmatic skills and linguistic input interact to support language development.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Anyone interested in language development or the intellectual history of behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain to parents or supervisors the mechanism by which producing verbal behavior can contribute to learning language; (2) explain to parents or supervisors why success at inducing verbal behavior falls so far short of supporting language acquisition; (3) reconsider the wisdom of engaging in polarized debates about language development.
 
CATHERINE SNOW (Harvard University)
Catherine Snow is the Patricia Albjerg Graham Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She received her Ph.D. in 1971 from McGill University, having written a dissertation on Mothers’ Speech to Children in which she argued against Chomsky’s claim that the ‘primary linguistic data’ available to children was misleading, degraded, and ungrammatical. She subsequently worked for 8 years in the Linguistics Department of the University of Amsterdam, and has worked since 1980 at Harvard. Her current work focuses on the quality of early childhood programs, and on promoting discussion to support learning in elementary classrooms.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #107
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Verbal Behavior and the Emergence of Novel Responses in Children With Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Yanerys Leon (University of Miami)
CE Instructor: Andresa De Souza, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANDRESA DE SOUZA (University of Missouri St. Louis)
Abstract: Skinner (1957) developed a taxonomy of verbal behavior and referred to the different functional responses as verbal operants. Focused behavior interventions for children with autism and other developmental disabilities typically target each verbal operant individually and increase complexity as children expand their verbal repertoire (Sundberg & Partington, 1999). Considering the extent of a person’s verbal repertoire, it is unrealistic to believe that one can directly teach a child with communication and language delays all topographies of verbal behavior. Therefore, it is important not only to evaluate the effectiveness of verbal behavior interventions but also to identify strategies that can efficiently promote the acquisition of new responses. Research has shown that instructional conditions can be arranged to facilitate the emergence of novel, untrained verbal responses. This presentation will share some of the research about this topic and present strategies to promote the emergence of novel responses when programming verbal behavior instructions for children with autism.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Behavior analysts, speech and language pathologists, psychologists, graduate students, autism service providers
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain the importance of programming for the emergence of verbal responses; (2) distinguish between directly taught and emergent responses; (3) describe at least one procedure to facilitate the emergence of verbal operants.
 
ANDRESA DE SOUZA (University of Missouri St. Louis)
Dr. Andresa De Souza is an Assistant Professor at the University of Missouri – St. Louis and currently serves as the Dissemination Coordinator for the Verbal Behavior – Special Interest Group (VB-SIG). She received a Master’s in Behavior Analysis and Therapy from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale under the supervision of Dr. Ruth Anne Rehfeldt and a Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis from the University of Nebraska Medical Center under the supervision of Dr. Wayne Fisher. She completed her Post-Doctoral Fellowship at Marcus Autism Center and Emory University in Atlanta, GA. During her studies, Dr. De Souza gained valuable experience in early-intervention applications for children with autism, the assessment and treatment of severe problem behavior, and the autism diagnostic criteria. She has provided supervision for behavior analysts and worked as a consultant for international sites. Dr. De Souza published several peer-reviewed articles on applications of Skinner’s verbal behavior within the framework of an autism diagnosis, and currently serves on the editorial board of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior. Her research focuses on strategies for teaching verbal behavior, the arrangement of conditions that can facilitate the emergence of novel language and decrease restricted stimulus control, and caregiver training.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #129
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
The Camouflaged Reinforcer for Learning to Talk, Read, Write/Think
Saturday, May 28, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: R. Douglas Greer, Ph.D.
Chair: Jo Ann Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenting Authors: : R. DOUGLAS GREER (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: Research that identified how children develop verbal behavior from experience located some of the stimulus control for learning names, their functions, and their many attributes as the network of relations expand. The learned reinforcers for the sequence of verbal developmental cusps evolve into bidirectional verbal operants. One of these (i.e., Incidental Bidirectional Naming or Inc-BiN) allows children to learn language relations without instruction or the delivery of reinforcement, rather the reinforcer resides in the effects of the behavior. Once this veiled reinforcement for relating stimuli crossmodally (i.e., overarching reinforcement for parity across listening and speaking) becomes part of the child’s community of reinforcers, EXPOSURE ALONE results in the accumulation of more complex relations. Some more complex relations include incidentally learning unfamiliar stimuli relations along with learning them from exclusion, including arbitrarily applicable relations. When this cusp joins reading and writing, contact with print results in listening and writing is speaking. Recent research found that children’s difficulties with reading, writing, or computing are often traceable to the lack of, or weak, stimulus control with the lnc-BiN cusp and is fixable by addressing reinforcement stimulus control for this or a developmentally earlier cusp.
Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify three bidirectional operant verbal developmental cusps; (2) identify the source of reinforcement for Incidental Bidirectional Naming (Inc-BiN); (3) identify levels of complexity for Inc-BiN and how the complexity expands from exposure alone; (4) identify the relation of Inc-BiN to reading, writing/thinking/computing; (4) identify how Inc-BiN is complementary to derived relational responding and RFT.
 
R. DOUGLAS GREER (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Doug Greer is Professor of Psychology and Education at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and Teachers College of Columbia University. He has served on the editorial boards of 10 journals, published over 200 research and theoretical articles in more than 21 journals and is the author or coauthor of 14 books. Two of his most recent books are translated into Korean, Spanish, Chinese, and Italian. Greer has sponsored 252 doctoral dissertations, taught over 2,000 teachers and psychologists, originated the CABAS? model of schooling used in the USA, Ireland, Italy, England and founded the Fred S. Keller School (www.cabasschools.org). He has done basic and applied experimental research in schools with students, teachers, parents, and supervisors as well as pediatric patients in medical settings. He and his colleagues have identified verbal behavior and social developmental cusps and protocols to establish them when they are missing in children. He is a recipient of the Fred S. Keller Award for Distinguished Contributions to Education from the American Psychology Association, a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), the ABAI award for International Contributions to Behavior Analysis, and is recipient of May 5 as the R. Douglas Day by Westchester County Legislators and the Jack Michael Award for Contributions to Verbal Behavior. He has served as guest professor at universities in China, Spain, Wales, England, Japan, South Korea, India, Ireland, Germany, Italy, USA, and Nigeria.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #131
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Getting Unstuck: How Behavior Analysts Can Talk to Marginalized Communities, Behave Flexibly, and Change the World
Saturday, May 28, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jeanne M. Donaldson (Louisiana State University)
CE Instructor: Matthew Capriotti, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MATTHEW CAPRIOTTI (San Jose State University)
Abstract: As behavior analysts, we know the potential of our science to change the world. Behavior analysis points to powerful interventions for a range of individuals’ challenges and societies’ ills, without assigning stigmatizing diagnoses of personal or cultural deficits, such as character problems and broken brains. Our beloved science has made enormous impacts in a few areas. And yet, behavior analysis’ reach is far from what Skinner imagined possible. At the same time, we behavior analysts often bemoan feeling misunderstood by colleagues and by society. Our science, and our reputations, tend to get stuck within our research and practice communities, and within tried-and-true applications. I propose that we can get our science “unstuck” through thoughtful collaboration with underserved and oppressed communities, and with the professionals who have long served them. As an exemplar of a recent (and ongoing) success story that has leveraged these principles, I will discuss how behavior analysts have changed the landscape of treatment for people with tic disorders across the world. To exemplify an unfulfilled opportunity for such progress, I will discuss potential applications of behavior analysis into LGBTQ+ health and wellness. I will present my own work in these two areas, with particular attention to intentional professional actions outside the traditional bounds of behavior analysis. This will include honest discussion of both “wins” (wherein such work has led to increased impact) and “misses” (wherein such projects have led down the rabbit holes of mentalism). I will conclude with practical suggestions for behavior analysts looking to expand the scope of their work into new areas.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: faculty researchers, university educators, applied practitioners, graduate students
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss research strategies and tactics that enable pragmatic scaling of behavior analysis; (2) describe how non-behavior-analytic research approaches contributed to the successful dissemination of behavior-analytic treatments for tic disorders; (3) identify steps that may aid early career researchers in conducting community-partnered research in new areas.
 
MATTHEW CAPRIOTTI (San Jose State University)
Dr. Matthew Capriotti is an Associate Professor of Psychology at San Jose State University. He completed his BS in Psychology at the University of Florida in 2010, and he then earned his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2015. Prior to joining the faculty at San Jose State University, Dr. Capriotti completed predoctoral and postdoctoral fellowships in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California San Francisco. His research interests lie in the behavioral treatment of Tourette Syndrome and in the study of processes that drive health and wellness among LGBTQ+ people. Dr. Capriotti has employed varied methodological approaches to conduct research across the basic-to-applied continuum. His earliest work investigated rats’ responding on multiple schedules. His subsequent programs of research on tic disorders and LGBTQ+ health have employed a range of methodological approaches and content foci, including within-case laboratory studies on behavioral processes in clinical populations, clinical trials, dissemination and implementation projects, phenomenological and epidemiological investigations of neurobehavioral and psychiatric conditions, experiments evaluating environmental determinants of stigma, survey- and interview-based qualitative research on facilitators and barriers of psychosocial treatment, and community-based participatory research. Dr. Capriotti is the author of 46 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference presentations.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #140
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Positive and Negative Reinforcing Effects of Opioids: The Opponent Process Theory From a Clinical Perspective
Saturday, May 28, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: BPN
Chair: Sally L. Huskinson (University of Mississippi Medical Center)
CE Instructor: Sandra Comer, Please Select...
Presenting Author: SANDRA COMER (New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University)
Abstract:

Over 92,000 drug-related overdose deaths, the majority of which were due to opioids, were reported in the U.S. in 2020 (https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/drug-overdose-data.htm). This increase in opioid-related overdose deaths occurred despite the availability of several effective treatment medications. Both positive and negative reinforcing effects of opioids may underlie the initiation of opioid use and development and maintenance of opioid use disorder (OUD). Some investigators suggest that the negative reinforcing effects of opioids become more prominent with repeated use. Evidence for this position will be presented using clinical data from a variety of sources. While both processes appear to be supported by the data, the relative contribution of positive and negative reinforcing effects in maintaining opioid use is unclear. Additional research should be conducted to directly address this issue because it has relevance for the development of more effective pharmacotherapeutic and behavioral treatment strategies for OUD.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Basic researchers and clinicians
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) examine clinical laboratory data using self-administration paradigms and subjective reports of drug effects and opioid withdrawal symptoms to assess the positive and negative reinforcing effects of opioids; (2) characterize opioid self-administration among individuals who are maintained on medications for treating OUD; (3) evaluate self-reported reasons for using heroin among a large cohort of individuals with OUD.
 
SANDRA COMER (New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University)

Dr. Sandra Comer is Professor of Neurobiology in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University. She received her BS at Vanderbilt University and Ph.D. at the University of Michigan for her research on the effects of drugs using preclinical models. Dr. Comer is Director of the Opioid Laboratory in the Division on Substance Use Disorders and her current research focus is on the clinical testing of medications for treating opioid use disorder, methods to maximize the use of naloxone by opioid users, and evaluations of the comparative abuse liability of prescribed pain medications. Dr. Comer served as President of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence, the longest standing scholarly society in the U.S. devoted to research on substance use disorders, and currently is the Public Policy Officer for CPDD. Dr. Comer is a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence for the World Health Organization and has over 160 publications on substance use disorders.

 
 
Special Event #154
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Presidential Scholar Address: Giant Rats to the Rescue! Applied Principles Shape Behaviors and Communities
Saturday, May 28, 2022
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Carol Pilgrim, Ph.D.
 
Presidential Scholar Address: Giant Rats to the Rescue! Applied Principles Shape Behaviors and Communities
Abstract: Adopting fundamental principles of behavior, the Belgian NGO, APOPO, developed a hero out of the most unlikely of creatures, the African giant pouched rat (Cricetomys ansorgei). The rats are native to Tanzania where they have historically been viewed as pests. APOPO established operational headquarters in Tanzania in 2000 to train the rats to use their keen sense of smell for locating buried landmines in former conflict zones. Landmines not only pose serious safety and psychological risks, they also hamper economic development by blocking access to agriculture and displacing communities. To date, APOPO’s rats have safely located more than 140,000 landmines and unexploded ordnances (UXOs) to help return more than 65 million m2 of safe land to local communities in Africa and Southeast Asia. Research that began in 2003 has successfully trained the rats to also detect tuberculosis (TB). Until recently, TB stood as the world’s deadliest infectious disease. Working in partnership with local health authorities in Sub-Saharan Africa, TB-detection rats screen upwards of 100 sputum samples from suspected TB patients in under 20 minutes. To date, the rats have efficiently identified more than 20,000 patients that had otherwise been misdiagnosed, effectively increasing case detection by 40%. Ongoing research continues to inform training techniques by revealing the universal nature of behavioral principles. For example, recent results suggest interventions developed to prevent extinction in scent detection dogs and laboratory rats may reduce the need for routine maintenance training of deployed landmine-detection rats. Applying standardized training procedures in additional lines of research provides insights for optimizing how the rats are deployed and where. Recent results show they can be trained to detect other pathogens posing health and economic risks, contribute to various environmental initiatives by detecting contaminated soil and illegally trafficked wildlife, and even support search and rescue efforts following natural disasters. Through the process of training scent detection rats, APOPO’s collective work continues to shape behaviors, perspectives, and livelihoods.
 
CYNTHIA FAST (APOPO)
 
Dr. Cynthia Fast is the Head of Training and Innovation at APOPO, a Belgian NGO that trains African giant pouched rats (Cricetomys ansorgei) for scent detection of humanitarian targets. Cindy has more than twenty years of experience training a variety of animals, including rats, mice, pigeons, and hermit crabs, in addition to family cats, dogs, birds, and horses. She holds a Ph.D. in psychology from UCLA where her research focused on comparative cognition and behavioral neuroscience. While a member of the Behavioral and Systems Neuroscience department at Rutgers University, she investigated the neurobiology of rodent olfaction including how learning influences olfactory sensation and perception. Her research has received numerous professional awards, including the prestigious James McKeen Cattel Gold Medal from the New York Academy of Sciences. She is a member of the Pavlovian Society, Society for Neuroscience, Women in Learning, Association for Chemoreception Sciences, and Comparative Cognition Society and has served as a mentor in both Women in Learning and the STEM Alliance Next Scholars program.
 
Target Audience:

All convention attendees are welcome and encouraged to attend.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) consider shaping strategies tailored to the experiential factors of the individual; (2) evaluate methods for objectively quantifying behavioral changes and their feasibility; (3) explain broader societal and environmental impacts of a project applying behavior analysis; (4) discuss the breadth of applications for the science of behavior analysis.
 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #199
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Impact on Maternal and Infant Outcomes by Intervening With Maternal Health Behavior
Sunday, May 29, 2022
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
CE Instructor: Yukiko Washio, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: YUKIKO WASHIO (RTI International)
Abstract: Women are often motivated to stay healthy for the well-being of their child during pregnancy and lactation. Generally speaking, women who are pregnant are recommended to eat healthy, exercise properly, and stay away from substance use, including illicit and prescription drugs, alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco, which are potentially harmful to their child. Additionally, breastfeeding is increasingly encouraged as the most recommended feeding practice for at least 6 months, if not longer, to maintain the health of women and their infants. While most women are able to practice a healthy lifestyle during pregnancy and lactation, women with certain social determinants (such as socioeconomic disadvantage, younger age, race/ethnic status, mental health issues, violence exposure, and reproductive and sexual health issues) have difficulties maintaining healthy lifestyles during these critical periods. Various treatment options including behavioral and pharmacological interventions have been developed using computer-based and telecommunication technology to address substance, alcohol, and tobacco use, breastfeeding, contraceptive use, and adherence to maternal-infant care among pregnant and postpartum populations. Tested interventions include, but are not limited to, brief interventions, contingency management, cognitive behavioral therapy, peer and group support, additional to other forms of counseling, and pharmacological treatment such as bupropion. Treatment interventions generally provide education and referral information, nudge to focus on healthy practices, reinforcement on healthy behavior, and cognitive and behavioral exercises such as skill training, to increase the value of natural or contrived reinforcers to engage in healthy behavior. Comprehensive and combined intervention approaches are probably the most ideal for intervening with pregnant and postpartum populations to address intertwined health issues and social determinants that interact with each other. With under-resourced communities, healthcare settings, and workforces that deal with pregnant and postpartum populations, dissemination and sustainability of evidence-based interventions is another major challenge that we need to face. This presentation provides an overview of maternal health behavioral issues, some of the intervention studies, and challenges and efforts to overcome sustainability issues.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Professionals and students in obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics, nursing, women’s health, substance use treatment, technology use, behavior science
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list WHO-defined maternal health behaviors that significantly contribute to female non-communicable diseases; (2) list at least two studies that used contingency management to improve maternal health behaviors; (3) list other forms of interventions to treat maternal health behaviors; (4) list future direction of maternal health behavior research introduced during the presentation.
 
YUKIKO WASHIO (RTI International)
Yukiko Washio is a researcher at Substance Use, Gender, and Applied Research of RTI International and an adjunct faculty at Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at Temple University Lewis Katz School of Medicine. She consults in both the US and Japan for public health research and implementation using behavior analysis. She currently teaches behavior analysis at Capella University. Her research focus and interest are intervention development, adaptation, and testing to address persistent maternal health behavioral issues that tend to result in a major economic burden at the societal level. Her behavior analysis graduate and postdoctoral training thrives on development of behavioral interventions and professional network to expand research activities and dissemination.
 
 
Panel #210
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
To What Extent Does the BACB Code of Ethics Protect Clients and Practitioners?
Sunday, May 29, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 258C
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Justin Leaf, Ph.D.
Chair: Melissa Saunders (Creative Interventions)
JUSTIN LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation)
AMANDA N. KELLY (BEHAVIORBABE)
ROBERT ROSS (Beacon ABA Services)
Abstract:

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board® (BACB®) was established in 1998 in order to certify individuals who are practicing within the field of behavior analysis. To protect the rights and dignity of consumers, practitioners and society the BACB® has established the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2020). The ethics code is important as a guiding document to early career and seasoned practitioners within the field. The ethical responsibilities set forth by the BACB (2020), though essential, may seem impossible to uphold given the wide spectrum of potential ethical violations. With the increase in social media use for professional activities, there’s an increased likelihood of encountering potential violations. Additionally, how one navigates ethical violations may vary from practitioner to practitioner. Further, the consequences that one faces with ethical violations seems to vary. Thus, the purpose of this panel is to have an open discussion about the code of ethics, how professionals can navigate the code of ethics, and what protection (if any) does the code is provide in protecting our clients/consumers and practitioners. The panel will be interactive between the panelists and audience members.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

The audience members should have in depth knowledge of the BACB cod and the audience members should have completed their supervision training.

Learning Objectives: (1) At the conclusion of this panel, participants will be able to identify three ways which the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts can protect consumers and participants. (2) At the conclusion of this panel, participants will be able to identify three ways to respond to potential ethical violations that occur via social media. (3) At the conclusion of this panel, participants will be able to describe a decision making model of how to respond when an ethical violation has been brought up against them.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #214
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Reimagining Solutions to the Persistence of Gun Violence in K-12 Schools
Sunday, May 29, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jo Ann Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Sonali Rajan, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SONALI RAJAN (Columbia University)
Abstract:

Gun violence in the United States (U.S.) persists as a public health crisis. Over 40,000 individuals die from firearm-related injuries each year and another 60,000 are shot. Of these, nearly 8,000 are children. And gun violence specifically within K-12 schools continues. Indeed, recent data have underscored that over 250,000 children in the U.S. have been exposed to gun violence specifically in K-12 schools since the Columbine High School mass shooting tragedy in 1999, with Black children disproportionately impacted in comparison to their White peers. And rates of gun violence have increased precipitously since the onset of the Covid19 pandemic.

The impact of gun violence on children is particularly concerning as exposure to gun violence is considered an adverse childhood experience (ACE). ACEs are potentially traumatic events that occur during childhood. An extensive body of research on exposure to ACEs has been linked to dozens of negative outcomes over the life course (poor mental health, increased risk for chronic disease, asthma, poor oral health, cancer, injury, suicide, premature mortality, and even decreased school success). They’re also highly prevalent: an estimated 30% of children report experiencing at least one ACE. Thus, preventing this kind of violence is of utmost importance. Despite this urgency, meaningful responses to the prevention of gun violence in K-12 schools over the past decade have been lacking and largely not informed by evidence.

In this presentation, I draw on existing research, novel data, and a child-centric framework to present a new model that reimagines what solutions to the persistence of gun violence in K-12 schools looks like. In pursuing this work, I seek to answer the following question: what if our collective response to school gun violence did not prepare our schools for the inevitability of the next school shooting, rather treated the eradication of gun violence in schools as a genuine possibility? Knowledge, support, prevention, policy, engagement, commitment, leadership, and consistency are guiding principles we can use to reimagine how our schools can be kept safe, while ensuring that our children thrive.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Researchers (e.g. in the behavioral sciences, public health, education, school psychology), school leadership (principals, superintendents), school health professionals, K-12 teachers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify a comprehensive of "gun violence" as it pertains to child health and development; (2) describe the specific relationship between exposure to gun violence, child health, and learning outcomes; (3) identify specific and evidence-informed school safety strategies that are known to effectively reduce rates of gun violence in K-12 schools.
 
SONALI RAJAN (Columbia University)

Dr. Sonali Rajan is an Associate Professor of Health Education in the Department of Health and Behavior Studies at Teachers College, Columbia University. She also holds a secondary faculty appointment in the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. Rajan is a school violence prevention researcher, studying gun violence, school safety, and adverse childhood experiences. She holds faculty affiliations with the CDC-funded Columbia Center for Injury Science and Prevention, the Columbia Scientific Union for the Reduction of Gun Violence, and the Institute for Urban and Minority Education. She also co-produces Re(Search) for Solutions, a podcast hosted by the Media and Social Change Lab at Teachers College devoted to amplifying creative and evidence-based solutions to the persistence of gun violence. For over a decade, Dr. Rajan has conducted research in K-12 public schools across the U.S.  And for nearly 15 years, Dr. Rajan has collaborated closely with the non-profit organization Girls on the Run; she currently serves on their National Board of Directors. Dr. Rajan has published over 50 peer-reviewed journal articles in additional to multiple talks, book chapters, and other written pieces. Her work has also been featured in multiple national media outlets (including National Public Radio, the Hechinger Report, and CSPAN).

 

 
 
Invited Panel #218
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Diversity submission Affirming Neurodiversity Inside Applied Behavior Analysis: Evolving Toward Inclusivity and Compassion
Sunday, May 29, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
CE Instructor: Jonathan J. Tarbox, Ph.D.
Panelists: KRISTINE RODRIGUEZ (Autism Learning Partners), AMY GRAVINO (A.S.C.O.T Consulting), WORNER LELAND (Sex Ed Continuing Ed)
Abstract:

Neurodiversity is a concept that asserts that the idea of normal cognition is a false premise, based on the medical model of disability. Instead, neurodiversity, which was conceptualized by the neurodiverse individuals we serve, states that all humans are born with different cognitive strengths and skills and that difference in cognition is valuable and even important for human evolution and creativity. As applied to ABA, advocates in the neurodiversity movement have pushed for a more flexible, more compassionate, and less ablelist approach to ABA supports for autistic people. Some of the criticisms from the neurodiversity movement appear controversial to many in the ABA field and many behavior analysts have rejected the concerns and/or attempted to defend our field against neurodiversity. This panel discussion will engage in an honest, vulnerable, and frank discussion of the strengths and limitations of what we do in ABA and use the neurodiversity movement as an opportunity to discuss practical steps the ABA field can take to moving our field to a future of greater inclusivity, flexibility, and less ableism. The neurodiverse panel of presenters includes researchers, practitioners, family members, and advocates.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define neurodiversity; (2) define ableism; (3) describe simple strategies for centering autistic voices in ABA research and practice.
KRISTINE RODRIGUEZ (Autism Learning Partners)
AMY GRAVINO (A.S.C.O.T Consulting)
Amy Gravino, M.A., is an autism sexuality advocate and Relationship Coach in the Center for Adult Autism Services at Rutgers University. She is also the President of A.S.C.O.T Consulting, which offers autism consulting, college coaching, and mentoring services for organizations, schools, individuals on the autism spectrum, and their families. Amy is an international speaker who has given TED talks, spoken twice at the United Nations for World Autism Awareness Day, and presented worldwide to audiences on a variety of topics related to autism, with a dedicated special focus and research on the subject of autism and sexuality. Ms. Gravino obtained her Masters degree in Applied Behavior Analysis from Caldwell University in 2010 and currently serves on the Boards of Directors of Specialisterne USA, Yes She Can, Inc. and the Golden Door International Film Festival of Jersey City, as well as the Scientific Advisory Board of Simons Foundation Powering Autism Research (SPARK). She is an award-winning writer whose work has been featured in Spectrum, the leading online news source for autism research, Reader’s Digest, special education textbooks, and other outlets. Visit www.amygravino.com to learn more.
WORNER LELAND (Sex Ed Continuing Ed)
Worner Leland, MS, BCBA, is an agender, neurodivergent human, a former researcher and educator with Upswing Advocates, a current educator with Sex Ed Continuing Ed, and an organizer with the annual SexABA Conference. Their work focuses on assent and consent education, harm reduction and coercion reduction education in behavior analysis, and maximizing autonomy and access to appetitives. Worner is also a past President and past Research and Dissemination Liaison of the ABAI Sexual Behavior Research and Practice SIG.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #219
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Autism 24/7: Promoting Functional Communication at Home and in the Community
Sunday, May 29, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
Chair: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
Presenting Authors: : ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.)
Abstract: The Pyramid Approach to Education helps the design of effective educational environments, within school settings, as well as the home and community. This talk will address how activities and routines around the home and in the community, along with the accompanying functional materials, may involve a variety of functional communication skills. We will discuss how a set of critical communication skills can be taught by parents and caregivers independent of the learner’s modality. How to incorporate a variety of functional skills within all activities and routines will be described.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Those involved with parent training
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how the Pyramid Approach can be implemented at home and in the community; (2) describe a set of critical functional communication goals; (3) describe how four distinct lessons can be built into each activity or routine.
 
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.)
Andy Bondy, Ph.D., has almost 50 years of experience working with children and adults with autism and related developmental disabilities. For more than a dozen years he served as the Director of a statewide public school program for students with autism. He and his wife, Lori Frost, pioneered the development of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS). He designed the Pyramid Approach to Education as a comprehensive combination of broad-spectrum behavior analysis and functional communication strategies. He is a co-founder of Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc., an internationally based team of specialists from many fields working together to promote integration of the principles of applied behavior analysis within functional activities and an emphasis on developing functional communication skills. He currently serves as Vice-Chair of the Board of Directors for the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. He was the recipient of the 2012 Society of the Advancement of Behavior Analysis (SABA) Award for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis.
 
 
Symposium #241
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Multiple-Exemplar Training on Verbal Operant Experimental Analyses of Culturally/Linguistically Diverse Speakers With Autism
Sunday, May 29, 2022
11:00 AM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 258C
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Lee L Mason (Cook Children's Health Care System)
Discussant: Alonzo Alfredo Andrews (The University of Texas at San Antonio)
CE Instructor: Alonzo Alfredo Andrews, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Speakers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds have been disproportionately identified with communication deficits, a defining feature of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Traditional approaches to language assessment focus on the topography of a response, without regard for the context in which it was emitted. In contrast, the functional analysis of verbal behavior offers a rigorous and innovative approach to language assessment that subsumes the cultural and linguistic diversity of the speaker. Through multiple-exemplar training, we demonstrate verbal operant experimental (VOX) analyses across different children with autism from a variety of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. VOX analyses are used to identify specific functional language deficits, and differences in the strength of verbal operants are examined through non-parametric analyses. Moreover, the results can be used to develop an individualized treatment plan, using a most-to-least prompt hierarchy to shape a response topography specific to each unique verbal community. In this way, functional analyses of language are shown to be a verbal-community-centered approach to observing and measuring the verbal behavior of speakers from diverse backgrounds.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): cultural diversity, functional analysis, linguistic diversity, verbal behavior
Target Audience:

Practitioners (BCBAs, LSSPs, Educational Diagnosticians, etc) who work directly with children with autism from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Audience should be familiar with the concept of functional analysis and the verbal operants.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list the conditions of a verbal operant experimental analysis (2) describe the procedures for developing an individualized treatment plan based on the results of a VOX (3) explain how a VOX analysis is applicable to speakers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
 
Diversity submission 

Analyzing the Functional Language of a Child With Autism Who Speaks English

JANET SANCHEZ ENRIQUEZ (The University of North Carolina at Charlotte)
Abstract:

Functional analyses of language have been useful for measuring the strength of a speaker’s verbal repertoire, identifying verbal behavior deficits, and monitoring language development. An extension of the functional analysis methodology used to identify the variables that maintain challenging behavior, a verbal operant experimental (VOX) analysis is used to identify the variables that maintain a speaker’s verbal behavior. This presentation introduces the VOX analysis along with the procedures used to sample the speaker’s verbal repertoire. Using an English-speaking, three-year-old boy with autism as a case study, we demonstrate a pretreatment VOX analysis, describe how the results were used to develop an individualized intervention plan, and then show the results of a follow-up VOX analysis after six months of early intensive behavioral intervention. Whereas the pretreatment VOX results demonstrated examples of stimulus overselectivity, follow-up results show the development of more proportionate levels of stimulus control. Implications of VOX analyses for English-speakers with autism are discussed, and areas of future research are highlighted.

 
Diversity submission 

Analyzing the Functional Language of a Child With Autism Who Speaks Spanish

MARIANA DE LOS SANTOS (Bloom Childrens Center)
Abstract:

While all members of a verbal community speak a common language, not all speakers of a common language are members of the same verbal community. In addition to sharing a common language, members of a verbal community also share common reinforcing practices. Mere translation of an assessment into another language fails to address these critical issues of cultural and linguistic diversity. Consequently, topography-based language assessments provide an insufficient analysis of a speaker’s verbal behavior. Here we extend the research on functional analyses of verbal behavior to include speakers of a language other than English. Using a Spanish-speaking, five-year-old girl with autism as a case study, we demonstrate the use of a pretreatment VOX analysis conducted in the speaker’s native language, describe how the results were used to develop an individualized intervention plan, and then show the results of a follow-up VOX analysis after six months of referent-based verbal behavior instruction. Whereas the pretreatment VOX results demonstrated examples of stimulus overselectivity, follow-up results show the development of more proportionate levels of stimulus control. Implications of VOX analyses for Spanish-speakers with autism are discussed, and areas of future research are highlighted.

 
Diversity submission 

Analyzing the Functional Language of a Child with Autism Who Speaks Multiple Languages

SREEJA ATHERKODE (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

For speakers who belong to multiple verbal communities, functional analyses of verbal behavior allow for dynamic control of response topography. The simple practice of allowing the speaker the freedom to select the language of instruction minimizes cultural bias and hegemony. Here we extend the research on functional analyses of verbal behavior to include speakers of multiple languages. Using a multilingual, seven-year-old boy with autism as a case study, we demonstrate the use of a pretreatment VOX analysis, describe how the results were used to develop an individualized intervention plan, and then show the results of a follow-up VOX analysis after six months of behavior-analytic intervention. Notably, the follow-up VOX analysis was conducted in three different languages, and we compare the results of each. The results show a clear hierarchy of strength across English, Telugu, and Tamil, with overarching patterns across the three assessments. Implications of VOX analyses for multilingual-speakers with autism are discussed, and areas of future research are highlighted.

 
Diversity submission 

Analyzing the Functional Language of a Child With Autism Who Speaks With a Speech-Generating Device

MARIA JOSE OTERO (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Within the context of cultural and linguistic diversity, speakers who use augmentative and alternative communication are often overlooked. The selection of augmentative/alternative communication (AAC) for non-vocal speakers with autism spectrum disorder has been described as more of an art than a science for the population of children with autism who do not develop functional speech. While the decision to use one AAC modality over another is largely subjective, what limited research exists primarily focuses on mand training. Here we extend the research on functional analyses of verbal behavior to include speakers who communicate with speech-generating devices. Using a non-vocal, five-year-old girl with autism as a case study, we demonstrate the use of a pretreatment VOX analysis conducted in which the speaker uses AAC, describe how the results were used to develop an individualized intervention plan, and then show the results of a follow-up VOX analysis after six months of early intensive behavioral intervention. Whereas the pretreatment VOX results demonstrated a functional mand repertoire, follow-up results show the development of more proportionate levels of stimulus control. Implications of VOX analyses for speakers with autism who use AAC are discussed, and areas of future research are highlighted.

 
 
Invited Symposium #249
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Dismantling Ableism From Your Practice
Sunday, May 29, 2022
11:00 AM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Kaston Dariel Anderson-Carpenter (Michigan State University)
Discussant: Cailey M M Rodgers (Integrated Therapy Solutions)
CE Instructor: Cailey M Rodgers, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Ableism involves stereotypes (biased verbal behavior) and discriminatory actions against disabled people. Ableism results from the assumption that there is a normative way of living that is superior and that being disabled reflects deficits in need of “fixing,” and are thus, inferior. The Practice Board of ABAI developed a “Beginner’s Guide to Dismantling Ableism in Your Practice” in recognition of the fact that ableism is ubiquitous in helping professions, and behavior analysis is no exception. Behavior analysts have a particularly heavy responsibility for dismantling ableism given the large number of contact hours they have with Autistic clients and the immediate and long-term problems resulting from this form of discrimination. This symposium will include the perspective of four behavior analysts contributing to the development of the “Beginner’s Guide” and will reflect their perspectives and barriers they have experienced as activists--including that of an Autistic, a doctoral student, a professor, and a Board Coordinator. The symposium will conclude with discussion from a neurodivergent behavior analyst who has not been involved in the development of the “Beginner’s Guide;” she will reflect on ways this and additional work is needed to actualize a paradigm shift in ABA.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define ableism; (2) explain why dismantling ableism is important in ABA; (3) describe how ableism powerfully impacts the roles of students, professors, and Autistics.
 
Diversity submission 

Ableism and ABA: I Have Caused Harm

SHAWNNA SUNDBERG (Ball State University)
Abstract:

Studying behavior analysis involves a love for the science as well as a drive to support others. With the growing awareness of ableism and applied behavior analysis (ABA) as abuse, students are faced with challenging information and are required to navigate through the controversy in the field. It is critically important to inform these future practitioners and leaders in the field what ableism is and how to actively dismantle it in their practice. Ableist beliefs are present in everyone due to our society’s continuous reinforcement whether in the media (i.e. infantilizing, dehumanization) or in or taught in educational settings. The Beginner’s Guide to Dismantling Ableism in Your Practice is an introduction to these issues and a way to listen to Autistic voices. Listening to Autistic voices is essential to dismantling ableism in ABA. Learning that you have discriminated and caused harm can be an overwhelming realization. Students must learn how to move forward and practice using true client centered care and make the changes in the field that the people we support so desperately need from us.

Shawnna received a B.A. in Psychology from Purdue University in 2008, and a M.A. in Special Education with Certifications in ABA and Autism from Ball State University in 2015. Shawnna is a board certified behavior analyst (BCBA) with over 13 years of experience working in the mental health and ABA/VB field. Shawnna is currently a Ph.D. student in special education at Ball State University where she will be completing her dissertation on prompting methods to reduce ableism used to support Autistic students. She focuses both her clinical and research efforts on dismantling ableism and ABA reform as well as training other behavior analysts and parents on issues of social justice-diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of ABA. She has a special interest in sexuality education for Autistics. Previously in her career, Shawnna was a parent training coordinator focusing supporting families in home. In addition, Shawnna was the 2018-2019 Hoosier Association for Behavior Analysis Secretary assisting with licensure for BCBAs in the state of Indiana. She has published two chapters on using interventions with Autistic children and three peer-reviewed chapters accepted for publication that focus on sexuality education, self-management, and college alternatives for transition-aged Autistic students.
 
Diversity submission 

Considerations for Academic Training Programs

JENNIFER J. MCCOMAS (University of Minnesota)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysts possess deep knowledge and strong skills in teaching desired behavior and addressing interfering behavior of individuals with a wide variety of needs. However, at least two issues interfere with practitioners’ ability to engage effectively with the people they aim to support. First, individual practitioners bring their own beliefs, values, and attitudes to their practice, yet their beliefs, values, and attitudes will inevitably vary from those of the people they serve. Second, applied behavior analytic practitioners have historically approached their work in a very technocratic manner – as elite technical experts. Behavior analytic practitioners must attend to these two issues and adjust their approach if they wish to achieve their aim of providing effective supports. Actively working to dismantle ableism is one approach to addressing these two issues, and training programs bear responsibility to teach aspiring behavior analysts how to think, talk about, and treat the people they serve and support in anti-ableist ways. I will discuss infusing a training program with instruction and practice in the use of anti-ableist attitudes, language, and practice.

Jennifer J. McComas, Ph.D., is Professor of Special Education and holds the Rodney S. Wallace Professor for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning Endowed Chair at the University of Minnesota and faculty lead of the Collaborative Action for Radical Equity in Applied Behavior Analysis (CARE ABA) lab. Her research focuses on systematic and individualized analysis and intervention for academic and social behavior. She co-coordinates the University of Minnesota Master’s program in special education with an emphasis in applied behavior analysis, recently co-authored a chapter titled, “Beyond Cultural Responsivity: Applied Behavior Analysis Through a Lens of Cultural Humility,” and co-authored ABAI Practice Guidelines, “Beginner’s Guide to Dismantling Ableism in ABA Practice: Where Do We Go From Here?”
 
Diversity submission 

Activism and Life-Long Learning

SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (Ball State University)
Abstract:

The Practice Board redefined our mission in 2020 as, “The mission of Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA is to recommend systemic changes to ABAI and leaders in the field of applied behavior analysis regarding how best to meet the needs of the people we serve. We maintain that anti-ableist, person-centered services that promote meaningful outcomes through socially valid and effective intervention is the means to achieving this mission. We further recommend reflection, honesty, and effective communication regarding the strengths and limitations of evidence regarding the utility and adverse side effects of all interventions applied by behavior analysts.” The Beginner’s Guide to Dismantling Ableism in Your Practice is consistent with that mission and collaborating on this work with Practice Board members learning from Autistics who are outside the field of ABA led to growth opportunities. For example, I had learned that White people need to do the heavy lifting for producing systems change with respect to social justice and race because they (we) had created the structures that produce marginalization. I incorrectly generalized this thinking to the development of The Beginner’s Guide by having only one Autistic person on the original group writing the document. However, this decision violated the trust of the Autistic community by not sufficiently addressing the need for representation. This presentation will focus on lessons learned and the need for self-reflection and reconsideration of our positions as we all consider how to dismantle ableism in our practice and field.

 
 
Panel #252
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Compassion-Focused Applied Behavior Analysis
Sunday, May 29, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 258B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jonathan J. Tarbox, Ph.D.
Chair: Kristine Rodriguez (Autism Learning Partners and Endicott College)
GREGORY P. HANLEY (FTF Behavioral Consulting)
NASIAH CIRINCIONE-ULEZI (ULEZI, LLC; Pivot 2 Inclusion; Capella University)
JONATHAN J. TARBOX (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
Abstract: Recent literature has called our profession toward a re-focus of expanded social validity and more robust compassion repertoires. This work poises professionals working in Applied Behavior Analysis to become increasingly effective in serving the world, across populations and areas of emphasis. This is particularly necessary work for behavior analysts who serve in healthcare/helping profession sectors, such as those who work within autism services, but expanding compassion focused-ABA beyond client and caregiver to compassion repertoires toward colleagues and ourselves makes this emphasis universally applicable for addressing problems of great social significance. This panel will explore committed actions behavior analysts can adopt today to infuse compassionate practices into our interactions with clients, caregivers, colleagues, and with ourselves. Panelists will highlight existing tools and resources within the literature, as well as new directions for compassion-focused ABA. In particular, panelists will discuss more compassionate procedures for functional analysis of challenging behavior, extinction, avoiding behavioral escalation, and procedures for honoring assent in treatment.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Practicing behavior analysts
Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to define compassion behavior analytically Attendees will be able to describe common ABA procedures that are often not perceived as compassionate Attendees will be able to describe simple changes to make our everyday procedures more compassionate
Keyword(s): assent, compassion, ethics, extinction
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #255
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Power and Empowerment: Honoring by Decision and Design
Sunday, May 29, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Sarah M. Richling (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Sarah M. Richling, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANDRATESHA FRITZGERALD (Building Blocks of Brilliance)
Abstract:

Equitable and inclusive learning environments are built on the choices of individuals. This session will explore the notions of power and empowerment that are made evident in our decisions, our designs, and our outcomes. With antiracism and Universal Design for Learning we can begin inviting every voice to powerful positions by honoring identity, culture, and learning needs.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Anyone interested in deepening and solidifying the partnership toward creating equitable learning environments.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define honor and power; (2) evaluate power-filled choices and examine the implications of power in equitable access to learning; (3) co-create a community of educators who are conscious of how to use power to honor learners.
 
ANDRATESHA FRITZGERALD (Building Blocks of Brilliance)
Andratesha Fritzgerald is the author of Antiracism and Universal Design for Learning: Building Expressways to Success (CAST, 2020), winner of a Benjamin Franklin Award from the Independent Book Publishers Association. She has worked as a teacher, curriculum specialist, administrator, and director. As an international speaker, presenter, and facilitator, Fritzgerald exhibits an audacious perseverance that calls organizations to evolve into inclusive antiracist safe zones for all learners. As a book nerd, Jeopardy enthusiast, and imagination expert, she loves writing and dreaming out loud with her husband, two children, and committed educators who believe in academic success for all. She is the founder of Building Blocks of Brilliance Educational Consulting Firm. For more information, go to www.buildingblocksofbrilliance.com. Twitter: @FritzTesha
 
 
Panel #258
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Scaling Up of Behavioral Professionals in the Philippines: Challenges and Opportunities During the Pandemic
Sunday, May 29, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 205B
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Maribel Castillo Stikeleather, M.A.
Chair: Maribel Castillo Stikeleather (BTS: Behavioral Teaching Solutions)
JENNIFER DELOS REYES SILAO (Don Bosco College)
ANNA MARIE LORENZO GALAY (Behavior Analysis Intervention Services)
ROBERT MAPANDO GOMEZ (Little Professors Learning Center - Davao City; Satit Bilingual School of Rangsit University - Thailand)
Abstract:

The Philippines ranks as the 13th most populated country globally, with more than 111 million people. The country’s prevalence of disability is estimated to be more than 12% of the current population. As of October 2021, there are 6 Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), 6 Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), and 71 Registered Behavior Technicians (RBTs) in the Philippines. These numbers highlight the staggering need for more certified practitioners to serve not only individuals with autism but also in other areas where this science of behavior can be utilized. When the pandemic happened, individuals pursuing their coursework faced hardships in meeting the supervision requirements. This effort led Filipino BCBAs abroad to assist and support 14 BCBA and BCaBA students. This initiative also led to the establishment and development of the first bachelor’s degree in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) that received approval from the Philippine Commission in Higher Education Development.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

BCBAs, BCaBAs, BCBA-Ds, QBA, QASP-S, ABATs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Understand the importance of cultural competence when providing supervision and mentorship. (2) Understand and transform barriers to opportunities in disseminating behavioral science in developing countries. (3) Strengthening collaboration amongst international and local practitioners in embedding behavior analysis in the educational system.
Keyword(s): Course development, Cultural competence, International dissemination, Supervision
 
 
Symposium #265
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Influences on Acquisition and Outcomes of Foreign-Language Tact Instruction
Sunday, May 29, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 255
Area: VRB/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Anabela Santos (Caldwell University)
CE Instructor: Danielle LaFrance, Ph.D.
Abstract: Around the world, many people receive compulsory foreign-language instruction or choose to study foreign languages for reasons that include employment prospects, mobility, cultural awareness, and desire to maintain connection with their ancestral cultures. Learning a new language, however, is a monumental task. In terms of vocabulary alone, students need to master thousands of words to communicate in everyday situations (see e.g., Nation & Waring, 1997). This symposium reports the results of three studies on teaching foreign-language vocabulary words in the form of tacting to students of various ages from various linguistic backgrounds. Anabela Santos presents on the effects of mastery criterion stringency on acquisition, generalization, and maintenance of foreign-language tacts. Elma Dögg Birgisdóttir presents an evaluation of the role of response contingencies in tact acquisition, intraverbal emergence, and maintenance in a comparison of a pair-test procedure with discrete-trial instruction. Finally, Danielle LaFrance presents on the effects of stimulus preference on tact acquisition and intraverbal emergence. Together, the three studies provide insights into the use of behavior-analytic concepts and tools to solve problems in foreign-language teaching and learning.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): acquisition, foreign language, intraverbal, tact
Target Audience: Researchers, educators, BCBAs, graduate students
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to 1. describe how mastery criteria, response contingencies, and stimulus preference were found to affect the acquisition of foreign-language tacts. 2. define two types of intraverbal responding that may emerge as a result of foreign-language tact instruction. 3. identify maintenance as an important outcome to evaluate in research on foreign-language instruction.
 
Effects of Mastery Criteria on Skill Maintenance of Foreign-Language Tacts
ANABELA SANTOS (Caldwell University), Ruth M. DeBar (Caldwell University), Kenneth F. Reeve (Caldwell University), Jason C. Vladescu (Caldwell University)
Abstract: There is minimal evidence to guide practitioners on selecting mastery criteria based on its effects on acquisition and maintenance across skills and populations. Although strategies for teaching foreign language skills have been investigated, the implications of mastery criteria on foreign language targets have not been explored. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and efficiency of acquisition and maintenance of 67%, 89%, and 100% mastery criteria of foreign language tacts by four adults of typical development. Stimulus generalization of tacts, maintenance at one- and three-weeks post-mastery, and the social validity of goals, procedures, and outcomes were assessed. Findings suggest that each mastery criterion effectively led to the acquisition of target responses and that responding generalized across untrained targets. Three of four participants demonstrated low responding across targets and untrained stimuli during the three-week maintenance probe. Goals, procedures, and outcomes were rated socially significant by practitioners. Although our results contribute recommendations for selection of mastery criteria by clinicians based on values that are both efficacious and efficient, our findings are limited by the points in time in which maintenance was assessed and warrant both intra- and inter-subject replication.
 

Evaluation of a Pair-Test Procedure in Computerized Foreign Language Vocabulary Instruction

ANNA PETURSDOTTIR (Texas Christian University; Reykjavik University), Juliana Sequeira Cesar de Oliveira (Texas Christian University), Elma Birgisdóttir (Reykjavik University)
Abstract:

Stimulus pairing procedures without contingencies on active student responding can result in the emergence of both conditional discriminations and topography-based verbal operants. However, dense student response contingencies have been found to improve outcomes of computerized programmed instruction. The present study compared two approaches to teaching foreign-language (FL) vocabulary words: discrete-trial (DT) instruction with a response contingency in every trial, and pair-test (PT) instruction with intermittent response contingencies. Participants were eight adults whose native language was Icelandic. Each participant was exposed to DT tact instruction with one set of Arabic words, and PT tact instruction with another set. A multielement design was used to compare tact acquisition in the two conditions. A within-subjects design was used to compare performance on an immediate post-test and a one-week follow-up test that assessed FL tacts and emergent intraverbal responding. PT instruction was found to produce highly similar outcomes to DT instruction on all measures, and three of five participants reported preferring PT to DT instruction.

 
Effects of Stimulus Preference on the Acquisition of a Small Foreign Language Vocabulary
Mariele Cortez (Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia sobre Comportamento, Cognição e Ensino (INCT-ECCE) ), Maira Costa (Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil), DANIELLE LAFRANCE (Elemy Autism Care; Hunter College - City University of New York), Mayara Ferreira (Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil), Caio F. Miguel (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract: There is a growing body of literature examining the effectiveness of teaching a foreign language using behavior-analytic procedures. This study compared the acquisition of foreign tact responding as a function of stimulus preference and assessed the emergence of bidirectional intraverbal responses (Native-Foreign and Foreign-Native). Three typically developing Brazilian children participated. Sessions were conducted remotely using a platform for video and audio communications. First, the experimenter conducted a preference assessment to select the target stimuli for each participant based on their preference. During tact instruction, the experimenter presented a visual stimulus and asked for its foreign name. A progressive prompt delay was used. Emergent intraverbal responses were evaluated across Native-Foreign and Foreign-Native directions before and after instruction. Results showed that all participants met the learning and the emergence criteria for the high preferred stimulus set in fewer trial blocks than for the low preferred stimulus set. Also, the high-preferred set yielded greater emergence of all intraverbal relations. Results confirmed those of previous studies, showing that tact instruction is effective in producing emergent intraverbal responding, and suggesting that stimulus preference is an important variable when teaching a foreign language.
 
 
Invited Panel #299
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Ableism and the Social Model of Disability: What Does it Have to do With Behavior Analysts?
Sunday, May 29, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Summer Bottini (May Institute)
CE Instructor: Summer Bottini, Ph.D.
Panelists: DOROTHEA C. LERMAN (University of Houston-Clear Lake), STEPHANIE PETERSON (Western Michigan University), ANDREW HALL (Pyles and Associates)
Abstract:

Recipients of behavior analytic services have traditionally been viewed through a medical model lens that treats deficits. Alternatively, a social model of disability views societal barriers and systemic biases as limiting people with disabilities’ ability to thrive and meet their own needs/wants. Some disciplines have increasingly acknowledged this social conceptualization of disability and begun to adopt more equitable language and practices across research and practice. In both research and practice, behavior analysts have generally have not ascribed to a social model of disability, perhaps contributing to ongoing negative perceptions of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in some communities. This panel will begin with a brief overview of terms and concepts relevant to equity in behavior analysis and disability research. Our panel will then discuss these concepts as they relate to ethical research and practice in ABA. Namely, the panel will (1) discuss the importance of considering these concepts as diversity issues in practice, (2) identify indicators of ableism in ABA research and discourse, and (3) consider how subtle ableism may influence behavior analytic interventions. Last, the panel will discuss initial steps behavior analysts may take to challenge their own assumptions and support equity for people with disabilities in our field.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Trainees, direct-care therapists, and active certified behavior analysts at the masters or doctoral level. Individuals that provide/supervise clinical services, consume research, and/or contribute to the empirical literature may benefit from this session.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define ableism and the social model of disability as it relates to research and practice in behavior analysis; (2) identify behaviors and permanent products that reflect ableism in behavior analytic research; (3) state at least two behaviors that behavior analysts should engage in to promote ethical and equitable care of disabled people or those with developmental delays
DOROTHEA C. LERMAN (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Dorothea Lerman is currently a Professor of Behavior Analysis at the University of Houston - Clear Lake, where she chairs the master’s program in behavior analysis and serves as Director of the UHCL Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities (CADD). She received her doctoral degree in Psychology from the University of Florida, specializing in behavior analysis. Her areas of expertise include autism, developmental disabilities, early intervention, functional analysis, teacher and parent training, and treatment of severe behavior disorders. She currently oversees several programs at CADD, including a focused intervention program for children with autism, a vocational program for adults with disabilities, a student support program for college students with autism, and a teacher training program for local school districts. Dr. Lerman has published more than 100 research articles and chapters, served as Editor-in-Chief for The Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice and has secured more than $2 million in grants and contracts to support her work. She was the recipient of the 2007 Distinguished Contribution to Applied Behavioral Research Award and the 2001 B.F. Skinner Award for New Researchers, awarded by Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. She also was named a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis-International in 2008. Dr. Lerman is a Licensed Behavior Analyst and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.
STEPHANIE PETERSON (Western Michigan University)
Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D. is Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Western Michigan University. She earned her doctorate in Special Education at The University of Iowa in 1994. She is also Professor of Psychology and the previous chair of the Department of Psychology. Previously, she taught at Gonzaga University, Utah State University, The Ohio State University, and Idaho State University. Her primary research interests are helping to decrease chronic severe behavior problems in children with developmental disabilities. Specifically, she studies choice making in the treatment of problem behavior, functional communication training, reinforcement-based interventions for children with problem behavior, concurrent schedules of reinforcement in the treatment of severe problem behavior, functional analysis of problem behavior, and teleconsultation. She also has interests in applications of behavior analysis to educational interventions and teacher/behavior analyst training. She has served on a variety of editorial boards, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice and is currently the editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice. She also served as a Senior Editor for Education and Treatment of Children for many years. She served two 3-year terms on the Board of Directors for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board and was appointed by the Governor of Michigan to the Michigan Board of Behavior Analysts, Michigan’s licensing board for behavior analysts. She served as the President of the Board for two years.
ANDREW HALL (Pyles and Associates)
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #325
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
The Case of the Disengaged Learner
Sunday, May 29, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Karl Kapp, Ed.D.
Presenting Author: KARL KAPP (Bloomsburg University)
Abstract:

Engaging learners is a difficult task. They are constantly confronted with distractions and demands on their time. So how can we create instruction that pulls learners into the content and helps them gain the knowledge required to be successful? How do we grab and hold a learner's attention? How do we motivate them to engage with the content we are teaching? There are techniques and factors that can be borrowed from games which are shown to influence the behavior of individuals. Incorporating these techniques and factors from games into learning is often called “gamification.” This decidedly unacademic presentation will model using those technique to engage and educate the learners. Attendees will discover firsthand how research-based practices and game-thinking are used to engage learners, increase learning, and lead to performance driven results.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: Engaging learners is a difficult task. They are constantly confronted with distractions and demands on their time. So how can we create instruction that pulls learners into the content and helps them gain the knowledge required to be successful? How do we grab and hold a learner's attention? How do we motivate them to engage with the content we are teaching? There are techniques and factors that can be borrowed from games which are shown to influence the behavior of individuals. Incorporating these techniques and factors from games into learning is often called “gamification.” This decidedly unacademic presentation will model using those technique to engage and educate the learners. Attendees will discover firsthand how research-based practices and game-thinking are used to engage learners, increase learning, and lead to performance driven results.
 
KARL KAPP (Bloomsburg University)

Karl M. Kapp, Ed.D., is an award-winning professor of Instructional Technology at Bloomsburg University in Bloomsburg, PA. where he teaches instructional game design, gamification classes and online learning design.  He is the Director of Bloomsburg’s Institute for Interactive Technologies and is recognized internationally as an expert in the application of games, game-thinking and gamification to learning.  Karl earned his doctoral degree from the University of Pittsburgh.

He is currently a senior researcher on a grant sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) which involves the application of microlearning and gamification to help childcare workers identify child abuse. Karl has co-founder of Enterprise Game Stack, a company that has created a digital card game tool for instructional designers. He is also the creator of the popular web video series, “The Unauthorized, Unofficial History of Learning Game.”

Karl has authored or co-authored eight books including The Gamification of Learning and Instruction, its accompanying fieldbook and the widely popular, Play to Learn. His latest co-authored book with Robyn Defelice is Microlearning: Short and Sweet. Karl is author of ten LinkedIn Learning courses including Learning How to Increase Learner Engagement and has been a TEDx speaker. In 2019, he received the ATD Distinguished Contribution to Talent Development Award. The award is presented in recognition of an exceptional contribution that has had a sustained impact on field of the talent development.

Karl’s academic and practitioner work explores the research, theoretical foundations and practical application of gamification, game-thinking and activity-based learning to organizational performance issues. His goal is to help organizations create engaging learning experiences through intelligent, research-based application of instructional strategies and techniques. He shares his expertise and knowledge through consulting, workshops and one-on-one mentoring with start-up firms, Fortune 100 companies and various governmental agencies. Follow him on Twitter @kkapp or check out his website at www.karlkapp.com

 
 
Invited Symposium #326
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Ableism, Professional Growth, and the Task Force for Quality and Values-Based Applied Behavior Analysis
Sunday, May 29, 2022
4:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago)
CE Instructor: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Ph.D.
Abstract:

In the summer of 2021, ABAI pulled together a team of professionals and created the Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA. This symposium begins with an overview of the Task Force and then brings together three members of the Task Force to discuss the topic of ableism and how that connects to the mission of the Task Force. This symposium discusses the importance of behavior analysts with different views about social justice--diversity, equity, and inclusion convening to discuss the topic of ableism so that we can all begin making substantive changes to the practice of ABA without sacrificing the technical precision that supports skill development in areas identified as important by Autistic clients. Each presenter will address how involvement with the Task Force has changed their views on ableism, their role in the field, or pivotal growth opportunities that have helped them evolve as behavior analysts. Reconsideration of the ways social validity should influence professional decision-making, an emphasis on compassionate care, the need to provide person-centered behavior analytic services, and the myriad ways behavior analysts should challenge their own assumptions as providers will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define the purpose of the Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA; (2) explain why each behavior analyst needs to collaborate with others to gain insights and grow around the topic of ableism; (3) describe at least one form of ableism in their practice that they can begin discussing with behavior analytic colleagues.
 
Diversity submission 

Ableism: From the Journey Without to the Journey Within

AMY GRAVINO (A.S.C.O.T Consulting)
Abstract:

As an Autistic adult and member of the ABAI Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA, I have had the opportunity to bring a unique perspective to the Task Force’s work. My journey as a professional working in the field of ABA has dovetailed with my journey as a person on the autism spectrum understanding my own internalized ableism, and mention will be made of how each of these spheres work to inform the other. Emphasis will also be placed on the challenges faced as a member of the Task Force in overcoming the idea of my presence as an “other” in the group and the difficulties I experienced based on my own learning history. Engagement with and attitudes toward Autistic people influence the willingness of BCBAs to confront ableism and ultimately make changes to the culture of the field at large will be discussed. Examples of efforts that have been made to encourage dialogue between BCBAs and Autistic advocates will also be discussed, as well as the successes and limitations of these efforts.

 
Diversity submission 

Ableism: What's That Have to Do With Me? Some Reflections on a 50-year Journey as a Behavior Analyst

GORDON BOURLAND (Trinity Behavioral Associates)
Abstract:

As a person identifying as a behavior analyst for over 50 years, I have observed from a behavior analytic perspective many changes in my behavior, the scope and sophistication of behavior analysis, and in society in the United States during the time of that journey. Sometimes those changes are obvious and recognition of them unavoidable; at other times, they are noticed after comments by others or after times of personal reflection. Mention will be made of some relevant substantial changes in behavior analysis and in society at large as will changes in my personal perspective and practice as a behavior analyst during this 50-year journey. Particular emphasis will be given to changes in my personal and professional perspectives regarding persons said to have disabilities as well as persons whose behavior varies from what is commonly expected in society in the United States. One group of people regarding whom I have experienced and continue to experience changes in my perspective is the very homogeneous group of people identifying or identified as Autistic. As a member of the ABAI Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA, my thinking and behavior regarding the latter people, including regarding ableism, have changed and continue to change at an accelerated rate. Instances of the latter set of changes will be discussed.

Gordon Bourland completed his Ph.D. in General-Experimental Psychology at the University of Texas Arlington. Subsequently he was a Postdoctoral Fellow in Behavioral Psychology at the John F. Kennedy Institute (now Kennedy-Krieger Institute) of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral and a Licensed Behavior Analyst in Texas. For over 40 years he has held a variety of clinical and administrative positions involving services for persons with a variety of needs in public and private settings, published a number of papers in behavior analytic journals, and participated in the editorial process for several professional journals. Currently, he is the owner and principal in Trinity Behavioral Associates, providing behavior analytic services to persons across the age span with a variety of needs and diagnoses and in a variety of settings. He has been an active member of the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis (TxABA) for over 30 years. He has been a member of the organization's Executive Council and twice elected President of the TxABA. Dr. Bourland has been the initial President of the TxABA Public Policy Group, Past President of the group, and now is a member of the Advisory Committee. He has been actively involved in activities promoting public policies related to behavior analysis in Texas, primarily licensure of behavior analysts. Following establishment of behavior analyst licensure in Texas in 2017, Dr. Bourland was appointed and continues as Presiding Officer of the Texas Behavior Analysis Advisory Board. In addition, Dr. Bourland has been active in the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI). In 1975, he attended the first convention of the Midwestern Association for Behavior Analysis that evolved into ABAI, with membership in the organization spanning over 40 years. His roles in ABAI include: Coordinator of the ABAI Affiliate Chapters Board from 2010-2016 and 2020-present; membership on the ABAI SIG Task Force; and Chair of the ABAI Licensing Committee that consults with ABAI Affiliate Chapters regarding licensure of behavior analysts.
 
Diversity submission 

Coordinating, Collaborating, Leading, and Learning

SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (Ball State University)
Abstract:

Given the purpose of applied behavior analysis is to use our technology and principles to lead to socially meaningful improvements in quality of life, we should all be concerned with how ableism influences the way we interact with disabled people. According to the BACB, most behavior analysts serve Autistic clients, and Autistic clients often receive a large number of service hours. The Task Force for Quality and Values-Based ABA was convened, in large part, to identify and address some of the concerns raised about ableism in the practice of ABA. The need to coordinate and collaborate with others with whom you share differences of opinion have served as a growth opportunity for all Task Force members. But growth is always accompanied by some level of pain, and my role in the Task Force is no exception. For example, my effort to lead gave me insights into the differences between impact and intention that can cause pain based on the point of view of Autistics and neurotypical behavior analysts. Learning more about professional actions, I have historically taken that I have caused harm when I thought I was creating good, has also been painful. Balancing the need to regularly dedicate time to examine our own ableist thinking and actions with the self-care that is needed to maintain a long-term commitment to changing ableism in our practice, is challenging but critical for our success as a field.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #345
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Using Organizational Behavior Management to Develop Ethical and Effective Leaders and Supervisors
Sunday, May 29, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Byron J. Wine (The Faison Center; University of Virginia)
CE Instructor: Alicia M. Alvero, Please Select...
Presenting Author: ALICIA ALVERO (Queens College, CUNY)
Abstract:

“ABA techniques can be used to improve and target specific behavior.” Most would agree that this is a common statement among ABA practitioners. It often triggers thoughts of therapists and clients or classrooms and teachers—but the same exact statement can be used to describe the practice of OBM in organizations including the human service industry. This presentation will explore ways in which ABA techniques can improve ethical and effective leadership behaviors. It will also explore why it is critical for leaders and OBM practitioners to practice what they preach. Topics such as feedback, performance evaluation, training and creating an ethical culture will be explored.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: OBM students, practitioners, ABA supervisors, executive leadership of ABA agencies, BACBs serving as supervisors
Learning Objectives: PENDING
 
ALICIA ALVERO (Queens College, CUNY)
Alicia M. Alvero is the Associate Provost for Academic and Faculty Affairs at Queens College, The City University of New York. She began her academic career at Queens College in 2003 as a professor of Organizational Behavior Management and she helped streamline workflow within the Department of Psychology to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of processes affecting students, staff and faculty. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Florida International University, her M.A. in Industrial-Organizational Psychology and her Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis from Western Michigan University (WMU). Dr. Alvero was awarded the prestigious Ford Foundation Fellowship while at WMU for her research in behavioral safety and the effects of safety observations. She has extensive experience teaching leaders across a number of domains, including human service agencies and higher education, how to utilize OBM to help solve organizational challenges and strengthen their leadership skills. She has published in various journals including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Behavior Analysis in Practice, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, and Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education and has served on several editorial boards. Dr. Alvero has been an invited speaker across the country and also serves as an organizational consultant in the areas of training, leadership, and performance management.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #439
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Consent, Disability, and Applied Behavior Analysis: What We Can Learn from Fries, Tea, and Pizza
Monday, May 30, 2022
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Barbara Gross, M.A.
Chair: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
Presenting Authors: : BARBARA GROSS (Missouri Behavior Consulting; Sex Ed Continuing Ed)
Abstract:

The word "consent" may mean different things, depending on context and audience. Conceptualizations of sexual consent are often delivered in metaphor or acronym by sexuality educators and abuse prevention specialists. It is possible to use these frameworks to explain other consent-based behaviors. Additionally, it is our responsibility to think critically about how some of our practices may violate consent/assent without due care. This conversation will explore consensual behavior as a consideration when supporting clients, as well as our role in teaching others how to engage in consent behaviors.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

BCBAs and BCaBAs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) extend popular models of affirmative sexual consent to non-sexual consent; (2) identify practices within the field of applied behavior analysis which impact development of consent repertoires; (3) develop steps to build capacity to consent to sexual and non-sexual activities for learners with intellectual and developmental disabilities.
 
BARBARA GROSS (Missouri Behavior Consulting; Sex Ed Continuing Ed)
Barbara Gross, MA, MEd, BCBA, LBA, CSE, (she/her/hers), is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and AASECT Certified Sexuality Educator. She specializes in staff and caregiver training and development of sexual behavior intervention plans for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (ID/DD). She also works to coordinate with special educators and sexuality educators to promote equity in access to comprehensive sexuality education for youth with disabilities. Other areas of practice and research interests include pornography literacy, abuse prevention for children and adults with disabilities, and dissemination of behavior analysis and the potential it offers to promote healthy sexuality for people of all abilities. Barb is the current president of the Sexual Behavior Research and Practice Special Interest Group (SBRPSIG) of ABAI.
 
 
Symposium #441
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Assessment and Treatment of Face Touching During the COVID-19 Pandemic
Monday, May 30, 2022
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 103
Area: CBM/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Javier Virues Ortega (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Discussant: Raymond Miltenberger (University of South Florida)
CE Instructor: Javier Virues Ortega, Ph.D.
Abstract:

While airborne respiratory aerosols are currently thought to be the main transmission pathway for the SARS-CoV-2, fomite-mediated transmission remains an important risk during the current pandemic. Fomites are inanimate object surfaces where viral particles can remain viable for hours or days. Community-based epidemiological studies cannot readily establish the relative contribution to infection risk of several transmission pathways when they operate simultaneously and most transmission models have focused on human-to-human transmission of the SARS-CoV-2. However, recent studies indicate that transmission due to contact with contaminated surfaces may play an important role, particularly in the early stages of an outbreak and in closed environments such as child daycare services, schools, nursing homes, and offices. Hand contact with contaminated surfaces poses a risk of infection when subsequently engaging in hand-to-face contact with the mouth, nasopharynx, or eyes. Therefore, face-touching is a risk behavior of significant public health interest. In the current series of studies we will explore various treatment approaches to reducing face touching in both typically developed adults and children with autism spectrum disorder. We will also present various strategies for detecting and recording face touching including automated systems. The studies will be discussed by Dr. Ray G. Miltenberger, a world-renowned expert in the assessment and treatment of habitual behaviors.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): COVID-19, face touching, habit reversal, video analysis
Target Audience:

Students, practitioners and applied researchers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Understand the behavioral processes involved in face touching and its importance as a health risk behavior; (2) Understand various methodological approaches to monitor face touching in typically developed adults and people with autism spectrum disorder; (3) Understand various approaches to reducing face touching including awareness training, habit reversal, and differential reinforcement of other behavior.
 

Decreasing Face Touching for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

MARY HALBUR (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Tiffany Kodak (Marquette University), Marisa E. McKee (Marquette University), Jessi Reidy (Marquette University), Elizabeth J. Preas (UNMC ), Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract:

Face touching is a prevalent behavior for individuals of all ages. However, frequent face touching has potential negative side effects such as the transmission of viruses, bacterial infections, and skin infections. The present investigation extended previous research by evaluating a reinforcement-based intervention package on the reduction of face touching for children with autism spectrum disorder who tolerated wearing face coverings (i.e., face masks, face shields). The treatment package included an unsignaled, momentary differential reinforcement of other behavior procedure with prompts. Results indicated that rates of face touching decreased from baseline levels for children during 5-min treatment sessions. Furthermore, low levels of face touching were observed during follow-up sessions that were longer in duration (i.e., 15 min) across participants. Minor procedural modifications across participants will be described. Overall, results support the utility of behavioral interventions on the reduction of potentially unsafe behaviors related to medical routines for children with autism.

 
A Habit Reversal Intervention for Face Touching
EMMA AUTEN (University of North Carolina Wilmington), Carole M. Van Camp (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Abstract: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that touching one’s own face with unwashed hands can transmit infections, and previous literature has reported the average rate of face touching for neurotypical adults to be 17.8-23 times per hour (Kwok et al., 2015; Morita et al., 2011). Habit reversal is a multicomponent intervention developed by Azrin and Nunn (1973) that has been successful for a variety of behaviors including hair pulling, nail biting, speech disfluencies, and motor or vocal tics (Azrin & Nunn, 1973; Nunn & Azrin, 1976; Pawlik and Perrin, 2019; Rapp et al., 1998; Twohig & Woods, 2001). The purpose of the current study was to apply a simplified habit reversal intervention to face touching behavior evaluated in a multiple baseline design. Participants were students at a university, and they were blind to the purpose of the study during baseline. Simplified habit reversal consisted of a sequential application of awareness training and competing response training. For some participants, debriefing on the purpose of the study reduced face touching. For other participants, at least one component of habit reversal (i.e., awareness training or competing response training) was necessary to significantly reduce face touching.
 
Automated Detection of Face Touching as an Aid to Face Touching Reduction Studies
AIDA TARIFA RODRIGUEZ (ABA España, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Peter A. Krause (University of California, Santa Cruz California State University, Channel Islands ), Javier Virues Ortega (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Agustin Gonzalo Perez-Bustamante Pereira (Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal)
Abstract: In the current study we evaluated an automated face-touching detection system. Face touching was detected automatically for the two participants wearing head-mounted camera. Five hours of naturalistic footage was obtained from each participant. A custom Python script divided each video recording into 10 s segments and each of these segments was then processed by the OpenFace 2.0 face-tracking software. OpenFace detects the most prominent face within a digital video, compares it to a normalized facial model using 128 key parameters, and estimates the three-dimensional position of each parameter frame by frame. We identified modal parameter displacement patterns that were suggestive of face-touching events by using parallel behavioral observation data. We integrated the parameter displacement patterns into a face-touching detection algorithm. We then conducted signal detection analyses to evaluate the precision of the detection algorithm when applied to novel samples of video both within and across individuals. We will discuss the potential of using this system in applied research
 

Reducing Face-Touching through Motion Sensing and Vibrotactile Cueing During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Treatment Effects and Disruptor Descriptive Analysis

JAVIER VIRUES ORTEGA (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Agustin Gonzalo Perez-Bustamante Pereira (Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal), Neil Timothy Martin (Behavior Analyst Certification Board), Mariola Moeyaert (University at Albany, SUNY), Peter A. Krause (University of California, Santa Cruz California State University, Channel Islands ), Aida Tarifa Rodriguez (ABA España, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Carolina Trujilo-Sánchez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Maithri Sivaraman (Ghent University, Belgium)
Abstract:

Fomite-mediated self-infection via face-touching is a potentially important and understudied transmission pathway for COVID-19. In the current study we evaluated the effect of a computer-mediated vibrotactile cues (presented through experimental bracelets located on one or both hands of the subject) on the frequency of face-touching among eight healthy adults living in the community. We conducted a treatment evaluation totaling over 25,000 minutes of observation. The treatment was evaluated through a multiple treatment design and a hierarchical linear model indicated that all participants engaged in significant levels of face-touching prior to the intervention. On average, the one-bracelet intervention did not produce significantly lower levels of face-touching, whereas the two-bracelet intervention did result in significantly lower levels. The effect increased over repeated presentations of the two-bracelet intervention with the second implementation producing 31 fewer face-touching events, on average, relative to baseline levels. The intervention effect was robust to potential face touching disruptors including wearing a mask, speech, moving around, or being outdoors. Dependent on the dynamics of fomite-mediated self-infection via face-touching, treatment effects could be of public health significance. The implications for research and practice are discussed.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #453
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
A Social Justice Framework for Intervention
Monday, May 30, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Renee Hawkins (University of Cincinnati)
CE Instructor: Tai Collins, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: TAI COLLINS (University of Cincinnati)
Abstract:

As the school-age population continues to diversify, it is now more important than ever that we provide services with a social justice focus that recognizes and values individuals’ unique identities and dismantles systems of oppression and marginalization. With a particular focus on school-based intervention, we will discuss a social justice approach to service delivery. Implications for integrating an ecological-behavioral framework with a social justice approach informed by critical race theory, intersectionality, and dis/ability critical race studies will be discussed. We will discuss the adaptation of evidence-based interventions to fit various contexts, as well as the development of novel interventions built specifically for minoritized populations. We will also examine peer-mediated interventions as a promising suite of culturally relevant strategies.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students; faculty members
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) ? define social justice and articulate a social justice framework for intervention; (2) integrate the ecological-behavioral model with a social justice framework; (3) discuss the importance of theoretical foundations (e.g., critical race theory; intersectionality; dis/ability critical race studies) in the social justice framework; (4) identify methods of adapting evidence-based interventions to fit various populations; (5) identify interventions developed for specific populations.
 
TAI COLLINS (University of Cincinnati)
Tai A. Collins received his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in 2013. Dr. Collins is primarily interested in the development of time- and resource-efficient behavioral interventions to support Black students in urban schools with limited resources.  Dr. Collins has focused on developing peer-mediated interventions to improve the academic, behavioral, social, and emotional functioning of students within multi-tiered systems of support.  Dr. Collins is also interested in applications of a social justice framework in school psychology research, practice, and training. He currently teaches graduate courses including the Applied Behavior Analysis sequence, Advanced Behavioral Research Methods, and Working with Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in Schools. 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #474
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Video Modelling to Teach Social and Play Skills to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, May 30, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Yanerys Leon (University of Miami)
CE Instructor: Christos Nikopoulos, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CHRISTOS NIKOPOULOS (Autism Consultancy Services, London)
Abstract:

Peer relations serve many important functions in children’s development. Social reciprocity or reciprocal peer interactions occur when children engage in social interactions with one another or when their actions support each other in their relationships. In autism spectrum disorder (ASD), however, reciprocity of social exchange is missing and is manifest as a lack of both social responses and initiations to other people. Over the years, various behavioral strategies have been developed to promote social interactions between children with ASD and their peers for a successful integration in inclusion settings. Video modelling, as one of them, is not only an effective and evidence-based method for developing many social and play skills, but it can also be a practical and efficient tool that is well-suited to the school environment. In this presentation, pertinent video modeling methodologies will be explored and specific suggestions on the effective use of video modeling will be provided.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Graduate students; RBTs; board certified behavior analysts (BCBA); board certified assistant behavior analysts (BCaBA); psychologists; therapists and special educators working in a variety of applied and experimental settings as well as educational and social science settings who are interested in the promotion of social and play skills in children with ASD.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the attendee will be able to: (1) name the salient features of video modeling procedures as guided by findings from the literature (e.g., with what ages video modeling can be effective, what intervention goals can be addressed by the implementation of video modeling, in which settings video modeling can be effectively used, etc.); (2) describe different types of video modeling and the advantages and disadvantages of each type when targeting social and play skills in children with ASD; (3) demonstrate step by step different types of video modeling (e.g., video modeling, self-modeling, priming modeling, point of view modeling) that could be designed and implemented.
 
CHRISTOS NIKOPOULOS (Autism Consultancy Services, London)
Dr. Christos Nikopoulos is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst (Doctoral Level; BCBA-D), former member of the Board of Directors of the BACB and of the European Association of Behaviour Analysis (EABA). He has served as a clinician, a University lecturer, an educator, a consultant, a researcher, and an author in the areas of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), intellectual and other developmental disabilities, as well as neurological and behavioural interventions in special education for more than 23 years. He is currently the founder and CEO of Autism Consultancy Services in London (UK) and Riyadh (KSA). He has obtained international experience in working with children with autism and other developmental disabilities--from 18 months old until adults--as well as their families and has published widely on the topic. Dr. Nikopoulos has co-authored two books and a few book chapters that have become key reference texts on subject of video modelling and autism and he has been chosen to deliver keynote speeches at international conferences quite frequently (more than 90 presentations at international conferences worldwide). Dr. Nikopoulos has also obtained substantial experience in the administration of a number of assessments tools as well as employing a variety of different behavioural procedures/methods, running home- and school-based intervention programmes in many European and Middle East countries. He is also either the Course Leader or the Lecturer of five BACB Verified Course Sequences (VCS) in Europe. Finally, due to his research activities and expertise in the area of autism, he has gained the award of Chartered Scientist from the Science Council, he is the scientific advisor for the Research Autism charity, an EU expert reviewer, as well as a reviewer for a number of international journals and governmental agencies.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #476
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Motivation and Self-Regulation and Health Behavior Promotion
Monday, May 30, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Vivian F Ibanez (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: Paula Magalhaes, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: PAULA MAGALHAES (Universidade do Minho, Portugal)
Abstract:

Health behavior promotion in childhood has been dominated by knowledge-centered paradigms. However, research shows that beliefs about what is healthy have a stronger influence on behavior than factual knowledge. Motivation and self-regulation frameworks highlight the agent role of the individual in controlling the personal, behavioral, and environmental influences that impact one’s behavior. Although individuals may be influenced and regulated by external factors and agents, exclusively relying on external regulation does not allow the individual to develop adaptive competences and skills, such as choosing a healthy snack. The aim of this presentation is to describe how healthy habits in childhood can be promoted, including diet and sleep, through the modelling of self-regulation skills via story-tools/narrative-based programs.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Anyone interested in motivation and self-regulation, and health behavior promotion

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify motivational components of health behavior; (2) describe the core components of empirically supported story-tools/ narrative-based programs to model and promote Self-regulation skills for health; (3) discuss what and how children learn the self-regulation competences for health behavior.
 
PAULA MAGALHAES (Universidade do Minho, Portugal)
Paula Magalhães is a researcher at the Psychology Research Center, Universidade do Minho, Portugal. She earned her PhD in Psychology in 2014, focused on the experimental analysis of behavior, with animal models, at the University of Otago, New Zealand, under the supervision of Professor K. Geoffrey White. Since then, she has directed her efforts into an applied psychology research path. In 2014, she was invited to an Assistant Professor position, at Universidade do Minho, and, later on, received Post-Doctoral training at the same university focusing on developing and implementing intervention programs aiming at promoting self-regulation skills via the use of story-tools/ narratives. Her current research focuses on health behavior promotion through self-regulation (e.g., healthy eating, sleep, exercise). She is also interested in the use of Gamification to engage individuals in health behavior interventions. She has already been awarded a research grant as a PI on these topics “In-person and Online Healthy Eating Promotion through Self-regulation: Assessing the Efficacy of a Narrative-based Intervention.”
 
 
Symposium #493
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Advances in Assessment and Intervention for Difficult-to-Treat Problem Behavior
Monday, May 30, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 251
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
CE Instructor: Lindsay Lloveras, Ph.D.
Abstract: Since seminal work by Iwata et al. (1982/1994), researchers and clinicians have adapted functional analyses (FA) to assess and treat a wide variety of forms of problem behavior across many populations and settings. Although treatments derived from FAs are substantially more effective than non-functional, default treatments, there remain behavior disorders that present difficulty for identifying relevant controlling variables. Without precise identification of these variables, it can be difficult to develop effective, function-based treatment. Recently, researchers have begun adapting common FA procedures, to better identify the influence of idiosyncratic variables on problem behavior (e.g., Roscoe et al., 2015). These adaptations present an opportunity to further understand forms of problem behavior for which common FA procedures are insufficient to identify all relevant variables. In this symposium, three presenters will describe experimental analyses of variables related to three difficult-to-treat forms of problem behavior: automatically maintained problem behavior, problem behavior influenced by sleep, and rumination. Each presenter will describe their unique experimental analyses and how these analyses allowed for more precise determination of the relevant controlling variables, which increases the likelihood of effective, function-based treatment.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): assessment, functional analysis, problem behavior, treatment
Target Audience: Intermediate. Attendees should have a experience with conducting in experimental analyses and treatments of severe behavior disorders.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentations, participants will be able to: 1. Describe how a function-analytic approach can be used to assess variables related to difficult-to-treat problem behavior. 2. Describe how to assess, through behavioral and physical measures, the influence of sleep on problem behavior. 3. Describe how an analysis of components of control conditions in FAs can be used to inform treatment. 4. Describe methods to analyze various parameters of food, to determine which parameters most influence rumination.
 

An Evaluation of the Relation Between Sleep and Problem Behavior in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder

LINDSAY LLOVERAS (University of Florida ), Timothy R. Vollmer (University of Florida)
Abstract:

Previous research has demonstrated that children with ASD exhibit less sleep in a 24-hour period than their typically developing peers (Goodlin-Jones, 2008), and increases in problem behavior are associated with sleep deprivation (Goldman et al., 2011). However, there are few studies that evaluate this putative relation using direct measurement of both behavior and sleep. The general aim of this study is to extend the research on sleep and its relation to problem behavior. Using wearable and non-wearable sleep trackers, we collected data on various measures of sleep and compared them to in-clinic daytime problem behavior. Additionally, we conducted structured descriptive assessments (Anderson & Long, 2002) across days to evaluate if changes in sleep change how different establishing operations affect behavior. We will discuss how the social validity of well-established sleep treatments (e.g, Jin et al., 2013) would be greater if the effect of improved sleep on daytime behavior was directly evaluated.

 

An Analysis of the Play Condition in a Functional Analysis as a Basis for Treatment of Self-Injury Maintained by Automatic Reinforcement

SAVANNAH TATE (University of Florida), Timothy R. Vollmer (University of Florida)
Abstract:

Hagopian et al. (2015) delineated subtypes of self-injurious behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement partially based on occurrence of self-injury in the play condition (i.e., subtype one). They also analyzed treatment data with respect to subtypes and found that subtype one is less resistant to treatment than subtypes two and three. For one child with autism with oral-motor self-injury, we conducted a functional analysis and a more fine-grained analysis of engagement in the play condition. The functional analysis indicated that oral-motor self-injury was maintained by automatic reinforcement. However, oral-motor self-injurious behavior was reduced in the play condition. We used this information to conduct a component analysis of the play condition, and we found that combinations of stimuli reduced engagement in self-injurious behavior, with little differentiation across multiple stimuli used in this condition. We then conducted a competing stimulus assessment, both with items used in the play condition and with novel items, and found single stimuli were insufficient for reducing self-injury.

 

An Evaluation of Variables That Influence Rumination

AARON JOSEPH SANCHEZ (University of North Texas), Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas), Richard G. Smith (University of North Texas), Elizabeth Joy Houck (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Rumination, repeated regurgitation of ingested food, can be a difficult problem to assess and treat. Early research focused on punishment of rumination (e.g., Becker et al., 1978 ) whereas more recent research has focused on the food quantity (e.g., Kenzer & Wallace, 2007). However, there is limited research on the influence of food type on rumination. We analyzed effects of several dimensions of food, including food type and food category, in addition to total quantity and total calories, on rumination with an adult with intellectual disability. Initially, we equated calories across food types, which involved different quantities of food based on food type. We observed that rumination was lower when our participant consumed larger quantities of food. Subsequent analyses suggested a more dynamic interaction between food type and food quantity – at least two foods with different quantities produced low levels of rumination. We will discuss how an analysis of parameters of food could advance effective treatment of rumination.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #535
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Behavioral Economics Approaches to Improve Care for Seriously and Critically Ill Patients
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: CBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
CE Instructor: Scott Halpern, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SCOTT HALPERN (University of Pennsylvania)
Abstract:

Six decades of research on human decision making has revealed how sensitive our choices are to the ways in which options are framed. A key insight from this line of scholarship, which is typically referred to as behavioral economics, is that the influence of nudges – or intentional framings of options so as to make certain choices more likely – is greatest when people lack deep-seated or well-ordered preferences among the options. Most of us know, for example, whether we prefer vanilla or chocolate ice cream, or at least the situations in which we prefer one or the other, and so are unlikely to be nudged to choose differently. But unlike ice cream selections, seriously patients’ (and their family members’) choices about end-of-life care are made infrequently, and typically without receiving feedback about how choosing one way versus another makes us feel. For these reasons and perhaps others, research over the past decade has shown that these high-stakes, seemingly preference-sensitive decisions are in fact quite strongly influenced by the ways in which options are framed. This talk will begin by differentiating among behavior change strategies that differ in their likely effectiveness and threats to autonomous choice, and will then explore how behavioral economic concepts are being used by the speaker and others in efforts to improve the quality of serious illness care in the U.S. Examples from ongoing and recently completed randomized trials will be presented, and the ethics of consciously “nudging” certain end-of-life decisions will be considered.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Any clinicians who may engage with seriously ill patients
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) differentiate among behavior change strategies that differ in their likely effectiveness and threats to autonomous choice; (2) describe how behavioral economic concepts are being employed in efforts to improve serious illness care; (3) evaluate the ethics of consciously “nudging” certain end-of-life decisions.
 
SCOTT HALPERN (University of Pennsylvania)
Scott D. Halpern, MD, Ph.D. is the John M. Eisenberg Professor of Medicine, Epidemiology, and Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania, and a practicing intensive care doctor. He is the founding Director of the Palliative and Advanced Illness Research (PAIR) Center, which generates evidence to advance policies and practices that improve the lives of all people affected by serious illness. His awards include the American Federation for Medical Research’s Outstanding Investigator Award for the best scientist in any field under the age of 45, the Association of Clinical and Translational Science’s Distinguished Investigator Award, and the Arthur K. Asbury Outstanding Faculty Mentor Award. He is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians, and serves on the Editorial Boards of the Annals of Internal Medicine and the American Journal of Bioethics.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #538
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Until Earth and Heaven Ring: How Academicians Can Recognize and Help Dismantle Systemic Racism in Child Health
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: DDA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Kelly M. Schieltz (University of Iowa)
CE Instructor: Kelly M. Schieltz, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: RAY BIGNALL (Nationwide Children’s Hospital)
Abstract:

Structural racism is one of the most pervasive and impactful social paradigms in American life, and often works in tandem with systems of inequality to drive social factors that adversely affect child health. Understanding the influence of racism on these unjust systems can aid individuals in narrowing health disparities. First, individuals should acknowledge a shared definition of racism as a “system of structuring opportunity and assigning value based on the social interpretation of how one looks… that unfairly disadvantages some… unfairly advantages others, and saps the strength of the whole society through the waste of human resources.” Next, an identification of these systemic inequities should be made, with throughlines drawn connecting social adversity with poor health outcomes. Finally, intentional and evidence-based strategies should be employed to counteract these adverse influences in both health care and society, and these interventions studied to gauge efficacy and direct resources.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Healthcare providers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define racism, and overview its historical context and systemic nature in medicine and society in the United States; (2) briefly highlight a few of the racial/ethnic health disparities we see in pediatrics, link them to structurally racist and unjust systems that perpetuate these disparities; (3) discuss changes academicians and health care leaders can make to help dismantle systems of inequality and promote health equity and justice in medicine and society.
 
RAY BIGNALL (Nationwide Children’s Hospital)
O. N. Ray Bignall II, MD, FAAP, FASN is Director of Kidney Health Advocacy and Community Engagement in the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension at Nationwide Children's Hospital, and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at The Ohio State University College of Medicine. A graduate of Howard University and Meharry Medical College, Dr. Bignall completed his general pediatrics residency, clinical fellowship in nephrology, and NIH post-doctoral research fellowship at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center. As a physician-advocate, Dr. Bignall’s work addresses the social determinants of child health, kidney disease, and transplantation through community-based scholarship, engagement, and advocacy. He is an appointed Fellow of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN); the Founding Chair of the ASN’s Health Care Justice Committee; and serves as a member of the Council on Medical Legislation for the National Medical Association. Dr. Bignall is a recipient of the American Academy of Pediatrics Community Access to Child Health (CATCH) Award; a John E Lewy Fund Advocacy Scholar of the American Society of Pediatric Nephrology; and was named a 40 Under 40 Leader in Minority Health by the National Minority Quality Forum and the Congressional Black Caucus Health Braintrust. Twitter: @DrRayMD
 
 
Invited Paper Session #542
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Operant Conditioning to Combat Addiction, Unemployment, and Poverty
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Elizabeth Kyonka (California State University - East Bay)
CE Instructor: Shrinidhi Subramaniam, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SHRINIDHI SUBRAMANIAM (California State University, Stanislaus)
Abstract: Over 37 million people in the United States lived in poverty in 2020. Poverty is a top risk factor for premature mortality and can exacerbate other health conditions like drug addiction. There is a clear relation between poverty, unemployment, and addiction. Addiction is more prevalent in unemployed than employed individuals and employment predicts positive treatment outcomes in people with addiction. Two evidence-based approaches to combat addiction and poverty are to: 1) treat addiction using incentives to promote drug abstinence (a proximal intervention), or 2) address poverty with education and job-skills training (a distal intervention). In this presentation, I will highlight behavior analytic research merging a proximal and distal approach to treat addiction in unemployed adults living in poverty. These studies evaluated the effectiveness of wage supplements to increase competitive employment and promote drug abstinence; assessed job readiness in this population; and incentivized job readiness activities during the search for employment. Interventions that promote full-time, steady employment can help improve socioeconomic position and have the added benefit of removing barriers to addiction recovery.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior analysis students, practitioners, and researchers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain the relation between unemployment and addiction; (2) describe how incentives promote drug abstinence and employment; (3) list the essential features of an operant antipoverty program.
 
SHRINIDHI SUBRAMANIAM (California State University, Stanislaus)
Dr. Shrinidhi Subramaniam is an Assistant Professor in Psychology at California State University, Stanislaus and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. Dr. Subramaniam received her PhD in Psychology from West Virginia University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in behavioral pharmacology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She teaches courses in applied behavior analysis, research methods, ethics, and addiction treatment, and mentors graduate students in their thesis research. Dr. Subramaniam’s research applies behavior analytic principles to solve problems like addiction, unemployment, and poverty in her community. Currently, her lab is evaluating the feasibility of a contingency management program to engage residential substance use disorder patients in continuing care. In addition to this work, she has published over 20 manuscripts and chapters across broad research interests. These publications include clinical studies evaluating the effectiveness of behavioral interventions like incentives and education, and basic and translational studies exploring processes underlying human decision making such as choice and temporal learning. Dr. Subramaniam is an Associate Editor for The Psychological Record, is on the editorial board for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and serves as the Board Secretary of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior. She is the Association for Behavior Analysis, International’s 2022 winner of the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences Early Career Impact Award.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #543
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling in Italy as a Strategic Model for Service-Design Innovation
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 203
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Lin Du (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Fabiola Casarini, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: FABIOLA CASARINI (Errepiu R+ Association)
Abstract:

For over a decade, CABAS was implemented in Italy by several learning centers that aimed to test the effects of education as a social innovation tool. We found that this model can provide schools and health services with an evidence-based system to design interventions that are both effective and efficient. Also, it greatly contributed to maintaining treatment integrity for children and adults with autism spectrum disorder during the COVID-19 pandemic. During these challenging times of economic and health crisis across the world, consequences for failing to design early and efficient ABA treatments were being highlighted by researchers. In addition, all countries in terms of reaching the “sustainable development goals” (SDGs) for fighting educational poverty, can do so only by providing people with a disability with individualized proper interventions. CABAS was able to offer help with identifying criteria for effective behavioral interventions, with particular attention to highly critical groups, such as people with autism. Luckily, the science of teaching provides researchers all over the world with a system to measure education. A growing number of research findings show that CABAS is among the most cost-effective educational model in the world. Moreover, its implementation across all age groups and for both special and general education, suggest that it is a cross-cultural, flexible tool for different contexts. Therefore, in Italy, we implemented it as a tactic within social, health and school services, for individuals with and without disability, from 18 months to adulthood. We found that the implementation of such a comprehensive model of education fits the need for sustainability of welfare systems drastically different from those in the United States. CABAS® was first replicated in Italy in 1991 and further expended through a great deal of applied research across various fields and disciplines. International replications are paving the way for further research and trans-disciplinary analysis of its effects, using longitudinal measurements and both criterion and norm-based data.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

ABA master and Ph.D. students, school directors, supervisors, service managers, community health advocates

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify indicators of educational poverty; (2) list five CABAS components; (3) describe CABAS as a model and a tactic.
 
FABIOLA CASARINI (Errepiu R+ Association)
Fabiola Casarini, Ph.D, BCBA, founded the first Italian Fab Lab for Education and is currently serving as Scientific Director for a network of CABAS(R)-based learning and research centers. She is President of "Errepiu R+" Association for the dissemination of Applied Behavior Analysis in Italy. She is the President of the Verbal Behavior SIG for AARBA (Italy Associate Chapter of ABAI) and one of the founders of ADC Italia, the national Association for Board Certified Behavior Analysts. She taught in several ABAI VCS courses trained dozens of doctoral students and professionals in the field. She promoted initiatives to fight educational poverty in Italy and she was awarded the Sustainable Innovators Award from Emilia-Romagna Region, in 2020, because of her initiatives for children during the Covid-19 pandemic. She has been a consultant for schools and publicly funded centers, also conducting workshops to raise awareness of science-based education. In 2018 she co-authored the first Italian book about the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis in Schooling, "Strategie Educative CABAS" with her mentor, R. D. Greer.
 
 
Symposium #545
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
HAL 9000 or R2-D2?: Accessibility of Advanced Data Analytic Techniques for Behavior Analysts
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 254B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Jonathan E. Friedel (Georgia Southern University)
Discussant: Brent Kaplan (University of Kentucky)
CE Instructor: Shawn Patrick Gilroy, Ph.D.
Abstract:

With modern computers, there is an ever-increasing promise for the ability to conduct complex data analyses that are designed for behavior analysts and the types of data we collect. However, many of these useful techniques remain out of the grasp of the average behavior analyst because the techniques do not exist as a functional tools and are just promises. A wholly different behavioral repertoire related to data analysis and computer programming is necessary to translate the promises into functional tools. The goal of this symposium is to highlight the growing effort within behavior analysis to develop useful data analytic tools and applications for ourselves. Topics will cover efforts to analyze behavioral data in relation to environmental variables outside of the behavior analyst’s control (e.g., client medications), neural network computing to analyze multiple baseline data, methods to develop decision support systems for functional analysis, and development of a system for charting of single-subject design data that can be easily extended to support advanced statistical analysis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): computing, data analysis, statistics
Target Audience:

Attendees should be aware of pharmacotherapy and should have knowledge of multiple baselines and functional analyses.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) describe some new methods to analyze behavioral data, 2) list some of the benefits of computer aided data analysis, and 3) compare and contrast traditional visual analysis with computer aided data analysis.
 

Demonstrating an Analyses of Clinical Data Evaluating Psychotropic Medication Reductions and the ACHIEVE! Program in Adolescents With Severe Problem Behavior

(Applied Research)
ALISON COX (Brock University), Duncan Pritchard (Aran Hall School), Heather Penney (AmethystABA), Llio Eiri (Aran Hall School), Tim J. Dyer (Aran Hall School)
Abstract:

Researchers report increasing trends in psychotropic medication use to treat problem behavior in individuals with intellectual and developmental disability, despite some controversy regarding its application and treatment efficacy. While a substantial evidence-base exists supporting behavioral intervention efficacy, research evaluating separate and combined interventions (i.e., concurrent application of behavioral and psychopharmacological interventions) effects is scarce. This talk demonstrates a series of analysis using the clinical treatment data of four adolescent males who engaged in severe problem behavior to retrospectively explore separate and combined intervention effects. First, we calculated individual effect sizes and corresponding confidence intervals. The results indicated larger problem behavior decreases may have coincided more often with behavioral intervention adjustments compared to medication adjustments. Second, a conditional rates analysis indicated surges in problem behavior may not have reliably coincided with medication reductions. Spearman correlation analyses indicated a negative relationship between behavioral intervention phase progress and weekly episodes of problem behavior compared to a positive relationship between total medication dosage and weekly episodes of problem behavior. However, a non-parametric partial correlation analyses indicated individualized, complex relationships may exist between total medication dosage, behavioral intervention and weekly episodes of problem behavior. Although our conclusions are tentative, we will discuss many potential clinical implications, as well as rationale for behavioral researchers and practitioners to consider applying creative analytic strategies to evaluate separate and combined interventions effects on problem behavior to further explore this extremely understudied topic.

 
Artificial Neural Networks to Analyze the Results of Multiple Baseline Designs
(Applied Research)
MARC J. LANOVAZ (Université de Montréal)
Abstract: Since the start of the 21st century, few advances have had as far-reaching impact in science as the widespread adoption of artificial neural networks in fields as diverse as fundamental physics, clinical medicine, and psychology. In behavior analysis, one promising area for the adoption of artificial neural networks involves the analysis of single-case experimental designs. The purpose of our study was to compare the predictions produced by an artificial neural network with more traditional methods of analysis. To this end, we trained a new model using 100,000 samples generated with a Monte Carlo simulation to analyze multiple baseline graphs and compared its outcomes with those produced by visual raters and the dual-criteria method. Using artificial neural networks improved power by more than 15% whereas Type I error rate remained consistent across all three methods. Our results suggest that researchers may use artificial neural networks to develop novel models to analyze the outcomes of single-case experimental designs.
 
Automating Functional Analysis Interpretation II: Better Approximating an Expert Human Rater
(Applied Research)
JONATHAN E. FRIEDEL (Georgia Southern University), Alison Cox (Brock University)
Abstract: Functional analysis (FA) has been an important tool in behavior analysis. The goal of an FA is to determine problem behavior function (e.g., access to attention) so that treatment can be designed to specifically target causal mechanisms (e.g., teaching a socially appropriate response for attention). Behavior analysts traditionally rely on visual inspection to interpret the results of an FA. However, existing literature suggests interpretations can vary across clinicians resulting in poor interobserver agreement (Danov & Symons, 2008; Ninci et al., 2015). To increase objectivity and address interrater agreement across FA outcomes, Hagopian et al. (1997) created visual-inspection criteria to be used for FAs. Hagopian and colleagues reported improved interobserver agreement but limitations of the criteria were noted. Therefore, Roane et al. (2013) addressed these limitations when they created a modified version. Cox and Friedel (2020) described a computer script designed to automatically interpret functional analyses based on the above-mentioned criteria. In that study, the authors noted several instances where the script provided incorrect interpretations because an experienced interpreter would ignore the strictness of the criteria. Here, we outline further refinement of the script to produce more accurate FA interpretations.
 

Integrating Visual and Statistical Analysis With R: Fast, Efficient, Pixel-Perfect Charting with the fxl R Package

(Applied Research)
SHAWN PATRICK GILROY (Louisiana State University)
Abstract:

Applied work in Behavior Analysis is moving towards regularly integrating quantitative metrics in the design, delivery, and evaluation of behavioral interventions. Efforts in this area are constrained by the tools available to practitioners. Whereas commercially available spreadsheet software supports robust charting capabilities, only the most basic types of computations are supported. Furthermore, this approach cannot be fully automated and places significant demands on the analyst. The approach presented here leverages the capabilities of the free, open-source R program to support both quantitative as well as the existing charting conventions (e.g., style, formatting) expected of commercially available spreadsheet software. The combination of which is a toolset that supports both visual analysis and the integration of robust statistical methods (e.g., multi-level modeling). This paper ends with a discussion on the importance of statistical consultation and training and exploration of free and open-source alternatives to commercial software packages.

 
 
Symposium #546
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
On Incorporating Trauma-Informed Care into Applied Behavior Analytic Research and Practice
Monday, May 30, 2022
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 103
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Adithyan Rajaraman (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Discussant: Patrick C. Friman (Boys Town)
CE Instructor: Adithyan Rajaraman, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Trauma-informed care (TIC) can be defined as a proactive, universal approach—taken by practitioners and organizations—to appropriately support and avoid re-traumatizing individuals who may have experienced trauma. Researchers and clinicians from various human service disciplines have articulated commitments of TIC and argued for their adoption into service delivery models. Although rationales provided in such arguments seem relevant to applied behavior analysis (ABA), discussions surrounding TIC have only recently taken shape in the ABA literature, and an evidence base and technology for practical application of TIC has not been adequately developed. In this symposium, we progress toward bridging this divide by: (a) defining trauma-informed care; (b) describing a rationale and framework for its incorporation into behavior-analytic research and practice; (c) detailing multiple examples of TIC in ABA research and practice; and (d) providing preliminary empirical data on the effects of trauma-informed procedures on socially important behaviors purported to be relevant to trauma. In recognizing the importance of a robust evidence base to the adoption of potentially novel procedures (and the current paucity thereof), presenters in this symposium will share survey, clinical-case, and experimental data in an attempt to illustrate what TIC in ABA research and practice might look like.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ensuring Safety, Promoting Choice, Trauma, Trauma-informed Care
Target Audience:

The target audience for this CE event includes any behavior analysts who conduct research or practice in service of addressing behavioral challenges exhibited by individuals with and without intellectual/developmental disabilities, and is particularly relevant for those who provide care to individuals who have experienced trauma. Content is designed to be consumable to beginning behavior analysts, although certain intermediate topics (e.g., a behavior-analytic conceptualization of trauma) will be discussed.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Define trauma and trauma-informed care (2) Describe the core commitments of trauma-informed care as they relate to applied behavior analysis (3) Describe multiple examples of how trauma-informed care could be incorporated into ABA-based services to contribute to positive treatment outcomes across a range of socially important behaviors (4) Articulate several reasons why an increased emphasis on trauma-informed care in ABA is both timely and warranted
 
A Framework for Trauma-Informed Applications of Behavior Analysis: What Might it Look Like? And Do We Really Need It?
JENNIFER L. AUSTIN (University of South Wales), Adithyan Rajaraman (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), HOLLY GOVER (Ivymount School), Anthony P. Cammilleri (FTF Behavioral Consulting), David R Donnelly (In Private Practice), Gregory P. Hanley (FTF Behavioral Consulting)
Abstract: Despite a growing acknowledgement of the importance of understanding the impacts of trauma on therapeutic approaches across human service disciplines, discussions of trauma have been relatively infrequent in the behavior analytic literature. In this session, we delineate some of the barriers to discussing and investigating trauma in applied behavior analysis and describe how the core commitments of trauma-informed care could be applied to behavior analysis. We also provide data from a survey of 447 behavior analysts across the globe, which shows that although most reported working with individuals who had experienced trauma or were at high risk for such experiences, many fewer felt confident in their knowledge and skills for working with these types of clients. We discuss the implications of the findings on future research and practice, and consider how increased attention to a trauma-informed framework might benefit clients and the behavior analysts who serve them.
 

Applications of Trauma-Informed Care to the Assessment and Treatment of Food Selectivity via Promoting Choice and Client Assent

HOLLY GOVER (Ivymount School), Adithyan Rajaraman (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), Gregory P. Hanley (FTF Behavioral Consulting)
Abstract:

Trauma-informed care, although widely recognized for its importance to human services, has yet to fully integrate into applied behavior analysis. Rajaraman et al. (2021) described what that integration could look like on a universal scale. In this presentation, we discuss what a model might look like when applied to the assessment and treatment of food selectivity. Food selectivity is a pervasive problem and affects up to 45% and 80% of individuals with and without disabilities, respectively. Food selectivity and mealtime problem behavior have primarily been treated through differential reinforcement and various forms of escape extinction. Escape extinction, while efficacious, may result in increased aggression, gagging, or vomiting and, therefore, may not be feasible to implement under some conditions. Through various case examples, we discuss a model, consistent with the commitments of trauma-informed care, in which mealtime problem behavior was assessed and treated without evoking severe problem behavior or emotional responding. Treatment components included multiple choice-making opportunities, including the opportunity for participants to participate or leave the treatment context at any point. Treatment sessions consisted of children self-feeding with no physical prompting or physical management on the part of the therapist. Implications for practitioners and future research will be discussed.

 

Ensuring Safety While Building Skills: A Preliminary Telehealth Investigation of a Trauma-Informed Behavioral Intervention

ADITHYAN RAJARAMAN (University of Maryland, Baltimore County), HOLLY GOVER (Ivymount School), Joshua Jessel (Queens College, City University of New York), Jennifer L. Austin (University of South Wales)
Abstract:

Ensuring safety and trust when providing therapeutic services is a core commitment of trauma-informed care. This commitment has implications for the assessment and treatment of dangerous problem behavior in that different approaches to intervening upon problem behavior may be associated with differential levels of experienced safety and perceived trust. One example of a potential violation of perceived trust pertains to the physical management of individuals exhibiting problem behavior. During this presentation, after providing a behavior-analytic conceptualization of the constructs of safety and trust, we share findings from a survey that returned 716 responses, from behavior analysts across the United States, regarding their experiences and opinions on the use of physical management procedures in ABA practice. Findings suggest that there are varied opinions regarding the safety and feasibility of such procedures, with a majority advocating for reduced use in everyday practice. We connect these findings to an evaluation of a systematic replication of the enhanced choice model of skill-based treatment—initially described by Rajaraman et al. (2021)—that importantly avoids the use of physical management, and that was delivered via telehealth consultation. Survey and single-subject data are discussed in the context of exploring trauma-informed processes for addressing dangerous problem behavior.

 

Lessons from the Field: Applying and Adapting Behavior-Analytic Strategies for Children With Histories of Abuse and Neglect

BARNEY GEORGE HUXTABLE (The Behaviour Clinic), Laura Anne Neal (The Behaviour Clinic), Jennifer L. Austin (University of South Wales)
Abstract:

Children and adolescents who have experienced substantial abuse and neglect typically require input from a range of professionals to support effective assessment and intervention. Unfortunately, behavior analysts have not always been considered key players on those multidisciplinary teams. Although there may be many reasons for that, in our experience, one prevalent concern is that behavior analytic approaches are unsuitable for children who have experienced traumatic events. In this presentation, we will describe how behavior analysis has been integrated into treatment delivery models for supporting a range of children and young people who have experienced substantial abuse and neglect. Through the presentation of data-based case studies, we will describe how behavior-analytic strategies were selected and applied based on the client’s unique trauma histories, as well as the adaptations we made to ensure the strategies were trauma-informed, client-centered, and capable of being maintained in the clients’ homes. We also will describe some of the challenges in integrating behavior analysis into social services in the United Kingdom, as well as suggesting specific strategies for overcoming those obstacles.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #558
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
Diversity submission A Risk-Driven Approach to Applied Behavior Analysis Across Ages: Implications for "Medical Necessity"
Monday, May 30, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 258C
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Patrick Romani (University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus)
CE Instructor: Rachel Taylor, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: RACHEL TAYLOR (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is the “gold standard” for service provision aimed at helping young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). However, the increased attention to this population may be detracting from the value associated with taking an ABA approach to support individuals of all ages, across a range of diagnoses. Further, the shift to define ABA as medically necessary for individuals diagnosed with ASD (APBA, April 10, 2020) requires effective patient, provider, and payor collaboration, and recent publications have highlighted the need for structured approaches to decision-making based in analytical ethics to support this transition. Accordingly, APBA released guidelines directing practitioners to provide services based on individualized risk exposure requiring a more patient-informed approach to care. The purpose of the current presentation is to outline a collaborative risk-driven approach designed to help guide practitioners to make ethically informed decisions regarding ABA service delivery, regardless of setting, age, or severity. Considerations regarding a potential divide between science and ABA-based service delivery will be addressed, including misconceptions about that which defines our professional and ethical obligations; specifically, how our related responsibilities extend far beyond particular ABA-based clinical programming procedures, necessitating constant empirical evaluation of the overall continuity of care for a given individual (e.g., placement, transition, community-based activities, and more).

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how ABA services need to be adjusted for individuals across a range of ages and diagnoses; (2) describe the benefits associated with adopting a risk-driven approach to ABA service delivery; (3) identify the defining features of “medically necessary” services and related implications for ABA-based practice across both crisis and non-crisis scenarios; (4) identify several common misconceptions regarding ABA-based practices and procedures and discuss crucial considerations related to established BACB ethical requirements.
 
RACHEL TAYLOR (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis)
Dr. Rachel Taylor (formerly Dr. Tarbox) has supported individuals diagnosed with neurodevelopmental disorders for more than 20 years. She started her career working in several prestigious institutions including the New England Center for Children and the Kennedy Krieger Institute at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She is the former Co-Director of Research and Development for the Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD) and the former Chief Clinical Offer for Intercare Therapy, Inc.. Dr. Taylor has also held several academic positions including founding Department Chair for the ABA Masters and PhD programs at The Chicago School of professional Psychology Los Angeles, and Faculty member in Psychology at the California State University Los Angeles and Channel Islands. Dr. Taylor is as an Advisor to the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, Scientific Council member for the Organization for Autism Research, and former Executive Council member for the International Association for Behavior Analysis (ABAI), in addition to her longstanding service on the Board of Directors for the California Association for Behavior Analysis (CalABA), most recently as the 2020 Conference Chair. Her interests include 1) protecting against a potential divide between science and practice and 2) demonstrating how ABA produces socially significant improvements regardless of age or diagnosis.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #578
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Demystifying the Motivating Operation
Monday, May 30, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 258C
Area: PRA; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP CE Offered. CE Instructor: Caio F. Miguel, Ph.D.
Chair: Sarah Frampton (May Institute, Inc. )
Presenting Authors: : CAIO F. MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract:

Motivating operations (MO) are antecedent variables responsible for the transitory effects of reinforcing consequences. The MO concept helped behavior analysts focus on environmental, rather than organismic variables when trying to predict and control someone’s wants and needs, as MOs can be defined, observed, measured, and manipulated. The MO also served to stimulate research and allow clinicians to better understand behavioral functions in clinical settings. Despite its obvious utility, the MO is a complex and controversial concept involving multiple origins, effects, and functions. The purpose of this talk is to describe the different types of MOs, differentiate between motivational and discriminative effects, and address some of the most common misconceptions about the concept regarding the utility of the value-altering effect, the direct nature of its control over behavior, its private nature, the multiple functions of MOs, and the need for the different types of Conditioned MOs.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; graduate students; licensed psychologists

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the two main effects of the MO and why they should be separate; (2) describe the different types of conditioned MOs and their relevance for practice; (3) describe and be able to respond to some of the main criticisms of the MO concept; (4) describe different ways to manipulate MOs; (5) describe the indirect effects of the MO and learn to recognize them.
 
CAIO F. MIGUEL (California State University, Sacramento)
Dr. Caio Miguel is a Professor of Psychology and Director of the Verbal Behavior Research Laboratory at California State University, Sacramento. He is also an adjunct doctoral advisor at Endicott College, MA. He is the past editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and a former Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Dr. Miguel's research focuses on the study of verbal behavior and stimulus control. He has given hundreds of professional presentations around the world, and has had 90 manuscripts published in English, Portuguese, and Spanish. He is the recipient of the 2013 award for outstanding scholarly work by the College of Social Sciences at Sacramento State, the 2014 Outstanding Mentor Award by ABAI, the 2019 Award for Excellence in Teaching Verbal Behavior, the 2019 Alumni Achievement Award from the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University, and the 2020 Jack Michael Award for Outstanding Contributions to Verbal Behavior. He is the co-founder of Verbale - a firm that provides behavior-analytic consultation all around the world.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE