Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Program by Continuing Education Events: Saturday, May 28, 2016


 

Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Applying the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts in Everyday Practice
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin/The Meadows Center)
Description: Ethics in behavior analysis is of utmost importance in today's world. Certified behavior analysts and applicants are now required to abide by the new compliance code (BACB, 2014). This newly approved document became enforceable on January 1, 2016. Changes to the document involve: supervisory volume by supervisors, multiple relationships, media presentations, advertising, and many more. Addressing the "real world" ethical dilemmas during implementation of behavior analysis can be a challenging endeavor especially for new professionals (Bailey & Burch, 2011). This workshop will actively engage participants in discussions surrounding ethical dilemmas that occur in the home, clinics, and within schools and other organizations. These examples will demonstrate the 10 guidelines that comprise the new professional and ethical compliance code (BACB, 2014). The instructors will quiz participants on their knowledge of each of the 10 guidelines, review each guideline, assist participants in identifying the appropriate ethical guideline related to case scenarios, foster conversation around appropriate actions to take, and revisit quiz questions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state the 10 guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014); (2) accurately identify ethical dilemmas presented in video and/or case examples; (3) accurately state which guideline addresses the dilemma; (4) correctly answer quiz questions related to ethics in behavior analysis.
Activities: Take pre/post quizzes regarding ethical behavior of behavior analysts. Lecture on the 10 Guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that became effective January 1, 2016. Lecture on Bailey and Burch (2011) viewpoints on ethical guidelines of behavior analysts. Watch and discuss video examples (or discuss written scenarios) for each of the 10 Guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. Discussion on how to respond to "real world" dilemmas that professionals in the field have encountered and shared with the group.
Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are seeking additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals/families, supervisors/supervisees, and other service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): compliance code, ethics, home/community
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Takin' It to the Zoo: ABA Solutions for Animals in Human Care
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Vevey 1, Swissotel
Area: AAB/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D.
SUSAN G. FRIEDMAN (Utah State University/Behavior Works ), STEVE MARTIN (Natural Encounters, Inc.)
Description: The window of opportunity is wider now than ever before to disseminate behavior analysis science and technology to new user groups. Professionals working with exotic zoo and aquarium animals and companion animals are increasingly interested and in need of ABA solutions. Although the fundamental principles and procedures in our field are universal, working with different species, individuals, and conditions poses different challenges that often require creative tailoring quite different than working with children with special needs. The issues run the gamut from responsibly managing the motivation to work for food to shaping new behavior without frustration lest a six-ton animal behave aggressively. This workshop is designed for all behavior analysts interested in learning more about the growing field of ABA with non-human animals. Topics include the relevance of the natural science of behavior change, incorporating different levels of analysis, operationalizing respectful and trusting relationships with animals (what it looks like and how to achieve it), creating motivation through distant and immediate antecedent arrangement, and a hierarchy of behavior change procedures based on the least intrusive effective alternative concept.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the different focuses and relevance of the ethological and behavioral models as they apply to solving behavior problems with zoological and companion animals; (2) describe 5 or more motivating operations to establish strong reinforcers working with non-human animals; (3) shape new behaviors without words or gestures.
Activities: Participants will operationalize common animal behavior labels, conduct ABC assessments from video observation, brainstorm strategies and new skills to replace problem animal behavior, and shape new behavior with participants without words or gestures.
Audience: This workshop is designed for all behavior analysts at any level of education or experience who are interested in learning more about the growing field of ABA with zoo and companion animals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Following a Safer and More Efficient Functional Analysis and Treatment Model
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Child Study Center), MAHSHID GHAEMMAGHAMI (Western New England University)
Description: Functional analysis is a powerful methodological tool that can provide an effective and humane treatment for problem behavior (Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Despite its growing empirical support, a recent survey (Oliver, Pratt, & Normand, 2015) suggests that the majority of practicing behavior analysts are not conducting functional analyses to inform treatment considerations. Practitioners may be avoiding functional analysis because of concerns that it places the patient or clinician in a dangerous environment and requires too much time or resources. The instructors will teach the audience how to conduct a safe functional analysis that takes an average of 25 min and as little as 5 min based on their research (e.g., Jessel, Hanley, & Ghaemmaghami, in press; Ghaemmaghami, Hanley, & Jessel, accepted) and collection of replications from clinical practice. The instructors will also discuss how to use the functional analysis results to design effective, function-based treatments that include teaching complex and developmentally appropriate functional communication skills, and skill-based delay tolerance procedures that increase other social behaviors (e.g., compliance, task engagement, and social interaction) to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires needed to be successful in contextually complex environments.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) conduct a functional analysis of problem behavior in 5 to 25 minutes; (2) teach a child complex functional communication skills; (3) teach a child how to tolerate delays and denials to reinforcement; (4) program for generalization and maintenance of these skills.
Activities: Workshop activities will include a lecture broken up with discussions and activities. Activities will include example vignettes where the audience will practice conducting interviews, videos where they will practice collecting data, and a workbook to be filled out throughout the lecture.
Audience: BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers who need to learn a fast and safe approach to assessing and treating problem behavior. This approach has been empirically validated for those with and without intellectual disabilities, with children as young as 1 and adults as old as 30, and can be conducted in multiple contexts such as classrooms, clinics, or homes.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): FCT, functional analysis, problem behavior, tolerance training
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: BACB
Mastered Picture Exchange Communication System: What's Next: Transitioning From PECS to Speech Generating Devices
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall CD, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Catherine Horton, M.S.
CATHERINE HORTON (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), ANNE OVERCASH (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), DONNA MARIE BANZHOF (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), JAIME WEDEL (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc. ), JESSECA COLLINS (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.)
Description: High-tech speech generating devices (SGDs) are being used more frequently with children with autism spectrum disorders. While research is expanding on the use of various communication apps on smart tablets, many recent publications are fraught with procedural and logical problems. There are no standard protocols established regarding how to teach the use of an SGD. The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an evidence-based protocol. This workshop will review the key elements that are necessary to demonstrate that the use of an SGD would qualify as verbal behavior (Skinner, 1957) and which teaching issues, especially regarding discrimination, should be incorporated into training protocols. We will briefly review the main components of the PECS protocol and review how to best transition users to an SGD. We will review published guidelines (Frost and McGowan, 2012) identifying key variables that may influence successful transitioning. We will review recent studies looking at the effectiveness of either attempting to begin communication training with an SGD or how to effectively transition from PECS. Participants are encouraged to bring either an SGD or an app for a tablet to actively practice key transitional steps including how to identify SGD features that may influence learning.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe key elements to demonstrate verbal behavior via SGD use; (2) describe key elements of the PECS protocol; (3) describe assessment targets to transition from PECS to an SGD; and (4) describe how to evaluate functional use of an SGD.
Activities: Review of recent literature regarding SGD use, review PECS protocol, review published guidelines on how to effectively transition from PECS to SGD, review videos demonstrating effective use and potential problems with transitions, and review how to transition from PECS to SGDs and/or tablet apps brought to workshop by participants.
Audience: Anyone working with current users of PECS or with individuals for whom an SGD or tablet app is being considered. This may include behavior analysts, speech/language pathologists, teachers, or others involved with communication training with children and adults with disabilities including ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Roosevelt, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jamie Siden Salter, Ed.S. (School Psychologist)
JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education), KATHARINE M. CROCE (Bucks County Intermediate Unit #22)
Description: This interactive and hands-on workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a “match” component will be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match System, a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically-supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. Additionally, participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. The Self & Match System has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional behavior disorders, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. The Self & Match System can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems or class-wide and school-wide management procedures as a part of school-wide positive behavioral intervention and supports. It has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings, including, but not limited to, public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring; (2) effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system; (3) identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system; (4) identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention; (5) identify the basic components of the Self & Match System; (6) systematically individualize an intervention based on collaborative and critical thinking; (7) create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace; (8) systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities.
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own Self & Match System. The format combines lecture, small group collaboration, whole group responding utilizing interactive digital polling software, and discussion. Core content will be taught through a combination of lecture, video examples, data analysis, and guided practice.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who primarily support individuals from pre-K to 21 in school, home, or clinic settings. This is a great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, behavior intervention, school, self-monitoring
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
From Assessment to Behavior Plan Implementation: Creating Comprehensive Interventions That Work
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall IJ, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mark P. Groskreutz, Ph.D.
MARK P. GROSKREUTZ (Southern Connecticut State University), NICOLE C. GROSKREUTZ (University of Saint Joseph)
Description: Effective BCBAs must be able to use principles of ABA to inform their assessment, intervention development, and training responsibilities. There are many sources available that describe various behavioral assessments and interventions, yet there are fewer resources that cover how ABA practitioners should select from among available options and individualize these interventions for a variety of clients and settings. This workshop will provide specific information on how to use various assessment strategies to inform decision making, including selecting and designing assessments, as well as using the results of those assessments to create effective interventions. Specific strategies and practical extensions will be discussed, such as preference assessment (e.g., Fisher et al., 1992; DeLeon et al., 1996), reinforcer assessment (e.g., Roscoe et al., 1999), and functional behavior assessment (e.g., Hanley, 2012; Iwata et al., 1982/1994). However, the primary goal of the workshop will be to identify when to use which assessments and how to use the outcomes to inform specific details within a developing intervention plan. Interventions will cover topics from imitation and chaining to differential reinforcement and stimulus control procedures, but again, the focus will be on how to select from the various well-researched intervention options.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify and state behavioral priorities in objective terms and identify relevant measures; (2) based on priorities, identify and design relevant assessments to inform intervention development; (3) select and plan assessments targeting identification of prerequisite skills, motivating operations, and maintaining variables; (4) use assessment results (prerequisite skills, MOs, and maintaining variables) to create comprehensive interventions for skill acquisition and behavior reduction priorities; (5) draft intervention guidelines (skill acquisition and behavior reduction) with content and format to improve treatment integrity.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, small group work, scenario-based instruction (i.e., videos, role playing) Workshop activities will generally use the following format for each subtopic area and last roughly 25-45 min each:short lecture, guided practice, small group or individual practice, review and relation of subtopic to overall topic (behavior intervention planning process). A variety of self-management tools will be provided throughout to help attendees identify the critical variables influencing assessment and intevention design, as well as to serve as a reference for later use in practice.
Audience: Early or intermediate level BCBAs who are looking to improve or expand their selection, use, and design of a variety of assessment and intervention paradigms.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavior Plans, Behavioral Interventions, Consultation, Functional Assessment
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Socially Savvy: An Assessment and Curriculum Guide for Young Children
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich B, Swissotel
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James T. Ellis, Ph.D.
JAMES T. ELLIS (Step By Step Behavioral Solutions), CHRISTINE ALMEIDA (Newton Public Schools)
Description: This workshop will introduce the “Socially Savvy Checklist,” which serves as a social-skills assessment and curriculum guide. Participants will learn how to use the checklist to determine appropriate and individualized social-skills targets, as well as to develop individualized education program objectives. Additionally, participants will become familiar with different evidence-based approaches to teaching social skills, including how to make decisions about the most appropriate approach given a child's skills and learning profile. Ideas for intervention will be provided for children of all levels of functioning, from those children who are developing basic social skills to those learning to navigate more complex social situations. A major emphasis in the workshop will be placed on developing and implementing social-skills groups, including determining appropriate skills for all group members, selecting activities and teaching strategies that can be employed to teach a variety of social skills, and developing and using practical data collection systems.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) determine target social skills for a child based on the Socially Savvy Checklist; (2) determine an appropriate context and teaching approach to teach targeted social skills; (3) describe a continuum of instructional approaches that promote the generalization of social skills to the natural environment; (4) implement at least three activities that facilitate the use of social skills; (5) and describe an appropriate structure for a social-skills group.
Activities: PowerPoint will be used to teach various parts of the assessment and intervention process, and videos and live modeling will be used to demonstrate examples of various intervention strategies and activities. Participants will be provided with examples of activities to teach social skills, sample data sheets, and curriculum. Participants will engage in a variety of hands-on activities, including using completed Socially Savvy Checklists to identify appropriate targets, playing games and activities that can be used to teach social skills, collecting data on multiple children in a group activity, and designing their own social-skills group.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts, psychologists, early childhood educators, special educators or anyone interested in starting or running a social-skills group.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Running Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Montreux 1, Swissotel
Area: AUT/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Hazel Baker, M.S.
HAZEL BAKER (Advances Learning Center and Endicott College), ASHLEY RODMAN (Advances Learning Center), MEGHAN GLADU (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: grouping students in effective clusters, using group contingencies, taking data on multiple students at once, and individualizing prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running effective activities that provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social stimuli. This workshop will teach specific learning activities that target skills in the domains of body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking. It will also provide training on how, when, and why to use group contingencies and give strategies for individualizing social instruction in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) use a variety of activities designed to provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social cues; (2) facilitate activities that teach body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking; (3) group students into effective learning clusters; (4) use several different group contingencies and identify the reasons behind using each type of contingency; (5) collect data on multiple students; (6) individualize prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students; (7) take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups to complete guided notes and case studies and participate in video-modeled activities and role plays.
Audience: The intended audience includes: BCBAs who train staff to run social skills groups; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors, or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional communication, generalization, pragmatics, social skills
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: BACB
Strategies and Tactics in Training Topographical Mands for Students With Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
St. Gallen 2, Swissotel
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael Miklos, M.S.
MICHAEL MIKLOS (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network), AMIRIS DIPUGLIA (PaTTAN/ Autism Initiative), WILLOW HOZELLA (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Net)
Description: Mand training is frequently a central skill deficit for children and young adults with autism spectrum disorder. The Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network Autism Initiative has established a range of training procedures that have been widely accepted in Pennsylvania school-based autism support programs in relation to establishing topographical mand repertoires for students with autism. This workshop will include a brief review of relevant literature regarding procedures for teaching vocal and signed mands. Additionally, the workshop will specify and review instructional skills such as evoking response variability, transfer of control from prompted to unprompted mands, and a thorough description of strategies to manipulate motivative variables. Aspects of programming to be addressed include selecting and sequencing mand targets, selecting effective prompt strategies, and issues such as spontaneity and generality of mands. Basic and complex mand protocols will be reviewed. The workshop will review strategies for transferring response forms from signed to vocal mands. Teaching practices will be related to data collection, analysis, and decision making. School-based programs to teach the mand will be emphasized.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) develop skills related to the use of mand training for students with autism; (2) practice procedures related to prompt and prompt fading for vocal and signed mands; (3) identify strategies related to the manipulation of motivating variables; (4) review sequences of mand skill acquisition and context variables relevant to the generalization of mand function.
Activities: Workshop activities will include a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video review of mand training processes, and opportunities for participant responding and discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts and other practitioners involved in supervising or implementing programs to establish or extend mand repertoires for individuals with ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism Interventions, Mand Training
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: BACB
Programming for Pragmatics: Bringing Assessment to Practice for High-Functioning Learners on the Autism Spectrum
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Skyway 272, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alexia Stack, M.Ed.
ALEXIA STACK (A Block Above Behavioral Consulting), MAGDALENA A. MARKIEWICZ (A Block Above Behavioral Consulting)
Description: It is well known that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience qualitative impairments in social skills development (DSM-5, 2013), including especially impaired pragmatic language skills. Moreover, pragmatic language deficits place individuals with ASD at risk for social bullying, limit their ability to develop and maintain friendships and romantic relationships, and increase their likelihood of suffering from anxiety and depression. Support for the assessment and development of pragmatic language skills is crucial for individuals with high-functioning ASD. There is an increase in evidence-based practice within the fields of applied behavior analysis, speech and language pathology, and developmental psychology for pragmatic language assessment and programming. Therefore, early intervention addressing pragmatic language skills is necessary for individuals with ASD. Learning to use assessment tools to select goals for intervention, designing programs based on assessment results, and on-going data analysis to monitor learning are all skills required by behavior analysts in delivering services to high-functioning learners on the autism spectrum.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define pragmatic language skills; (2) discuss higher order pragmatic language skills that are known to be challenging for learners on the autism spectrum; (3) name the assessment tools that can be used to guide program development; (4) use assessment tools to identify missing component skills needed for higher order pragmatics; (5) design programs based on assessment results; (6) clearly define target behaviors and effective measurement procedures.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, group discussion, data analysis, video analysis, sample assessment data, small group practice, program development coaching, and application of data-based decision making. Participants will receive supplemental materials to follow lecture material and for note taking purposes. Example assessment data will be made available for small group practice. Sample worksheets and sample data will be included for small group learning objectives.
Audience: BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, and service delivery staff
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): pragmatic language, program development
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: BACB
Making and Maintaining Friendships: Interventions for Developing Meaningful Relationships for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich G, Swissotel
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training (IBT)), CECILIA KNIGHT (Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD)), ANGELA M. PERSICKE (Autism Research Group, Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD))
Description: Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) often demonstrate core deficits in the areas of social interaction and the development of appropriate social relationships with others, especially peers. Developing and maintaining friendships involves the interplay of multiple complex skill repertoires, including perspective taking, basic and complex social behaviors, maintaining appropriate social boundaries, understanding non-vocal social behavior, and demonstrating appropriate emotional responses to the private and non-private behaviors of others. This workshop will review various evidence-based procedures to address these and other skill repertoires necessary to develop successful social relationships, including specific strategies to teach skills such as giving compliments, identifying the preferences of others, maintaining appropriate social boundaries, and developing empathy. Additionally, behaviors related to the appropriate use of social media will be identified and discussed. The presentation will also include video clips of teaching strategies, as well as learning activities for participants to practice developing intervention strategies for teaching key skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify core skill deficits within several skill domains common to individuals with ASD which impact the development of successful social relationships; (2) identify various behavior analytic intervention strategies to teach skills such as perspective taking, complex social behaviors, following social rules and maintaining appropriate boundaries, and developing appropriate social and emotional responding to others; (3) identify areas of need and develop intervention strategies to improve the social behaviors of individuals with ASD within sample case vignettes and/or other practice activities.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using instructional strategies including: lecture, discussion, case review and video review, small group practice activities, and group feedback.
Audience: Behavior analysts, BCBAs, BCaBAs, teachers, psychologists, speech therapists, social skills instructors, and other professionals who work with individuals diagnosed with ASD, specifically in the areas of social skill development.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Perspective Taking, Social Relationships, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Mobile Technologies for Autism Intervention: Strategies for Communication and Visual Support, and Remediating Challenging Behavior
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich D, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mandy J. Rispoli, Ph.D.
OLIVER WENDT (Purdue University), MANDY J. RISPOLI (Purdue University), MATTHEW T. BRODHEAD (Purdue University), RAVI NIGAM (Governors State University)
Description: This workshop will focus on the use of mobile technologies to implement augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), functional communication training (FCT), and visual supports into behavioral services for individuals with severe autism. Approximately 25–50% of children on the autism spectrum have complex communication impairments resulting in a lack of functional speech and language and unresolved challenging behaviors. AAC augments or replaces spoken language through alternative means of communication. AAC can remediate challenging behaviors within a FCT approach. Graphic AAC materials such as photographs, symbols, and line drawings provide visual support to enhance comprehension and learning. Breakthroughs in contemporary mobile technologies offer new opportunities to provide these interventions in efficient yet motivating and engaging ways to learners with severe autism. This workshop will start with evidence-based AAC strategies for functional and social communication, as well as natural speech production. Subsequently, presenters will address FCT applications for remediating challenging behaviors, and showcase how to use visual activity schedules to promote independence, choice-making, and social interactions. Particular emphasis will be on suitable tablet and app solutions to support these intervention goals. Data and video-cases from recent single-subject experiments will illustrate successful implementation into daily activities in clinical and school settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) successfully apply principles of AAC and FCT to enhance behavioral programming for learners with severe autism; (2) effectively select technology solutions that are most suitable for a variety of AAC, FCT, and visual support applications; (3) effectively implement visual supports for a range of instructional and behavior modification activities; (4) distinguish well-designed from poorly-designed communication apps, and identify app features that are important to facilitate sensory-processing and prevent cognitive overload; (5) explain how single-subject research is used to evaluate the effectiveness of AAC and related interventions.
Activities: Workshop goals will be met through a balanced delivery of lecture, hands-on activities with follow-up discussion, and video case demonstrations. Infusion of empirical data will promote an evidence-based practice approach. Participants will learn the role of single-subject experimental designs for evaluating intervention efficacy for the presented strategies and approaches. Videotaped case studies will illustrate differences between AAC approaches and provide a better understanding of intervention components. Video cases will also demonstrate how to use AAC for facilitating natural speech development and remediating aggression and self-injury. Group discussion will evolve around the presentation of different types of app solutions and evaluation of app features; these will be examined in terms of ease of access and programming, suitability for ABA instruction, symbol iconicity, cost-efficiency, and ability to track progress. Finally, resources will be discussed that are available to practitioners seeking for further resources and treatment evidence. Attendees will be provided with supplemental materials and digital handouts of the information covered in the workshop.
Audience: Do you currently have learners with severe communication disorders and challenging behaviors such as aggression and self-injury? Are you finding your students are successful with manding but have difficulties with advanced communicative functions and complex language? Practitioners with motivation to implement evidence-based practices in AAC and particular interest in learning about mobile technology applications will find this workshop very suitable for their needs. This target audience includes applied researchers, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, licensed psychologists, special education teachers, speech-language pathologists, and graduate students in any of these disciplines. A basic understanding of single-subject research methodology is advantageous to fully benefit from this workshop, but not strictly necessary.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): challenging behavior, communication intervention, mobile technology, visual supports
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Evolving More Nurturing Societies Through Behavioral Science
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich A, Swissotel
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Anthony Biglan, Ph.D.
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
Description: This workshop is designed to assist behavior analysts in using their skills and knowledge to bring about significant improvements in prevalence of wellbeing. The workshop will explain the public health framework and the ways it relates to behavior analysts’ aspirations to improve wellbeing in society. A precise definition of wellbeing will be provided within that framework. The instructor will provide an overview of the prevention and treatment interventions that have been developed and tested over the preceding 40 years and the contextualist principles that underlie the success of these interventions. The instructor will show how the same contextualist principles are relevant to understanding how the larger social system of corporate capitalism affects wellbeing and how and why it has evolved in a problematic direction in recent years. The instructor will then describe successful efforts to change practices at the level of corporations. Finally, the instructor will assist participants in identifying specific outcomes that they would like to work toward and will help small groups plan to take specific steps toward their goals. The workshop will have ample opportunity for participants to interact with each other and with the instructor.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe at least five evidence-based family interventions; (2) describe at least five evidence-based school interventions; (3) describe the four principles that characterize nurturing environments; (4) describe the recent evolution of corporate capitalism and its impact on human wellbeing; (5) state at least one specific goal for improving human wellbeing that they plan to pursue; (6) describe a plan for pursuing their goals.
Activities: Workshop Activities will include: lecture, discussion, small group discussion and planning, presentations of the small groups to the entire workshop.
Audience: Professionals, including behavior analysts, health care providers, teachers, school administrators, and family therapists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): community development, cultural evolution, nurturing environments, prevention
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Verbal Behavior Development Protocols: The Foundations of Language Development From Imitation to Naming
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Montreux 3, Swissotel
Area: DDA/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Lin Du, Ph.D.
LIN DU (Teachers College, Columbia University), SUSAN BUTTIGIEG (Fred S. Keller School)
Description: This workshop will teach attendees about five different verbal behavior developmental cusps (generalized imitation, listener literacy, auditory matching, observational learning, naming) necessary to access a variety of contingencies in school and in life. The instructors will present assessment and intervention procedures (Greer & Ross, 2008; Greer & Speckman, 2009), sources of reinforcement, and appropriate candidates for these interventions. Skill and next steps once the cusps/capabilities are acquired will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) detail vocally how to probe for and induce five cusps/capabilities; (2) role play and run errorless instruction (probe and intervention); (3) list the change in the source of reinforcement once each cusp is induced; (4) describe a candidate for each intervention; (5) describe how they can teach the child differently once each cusp is induced.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, speech therapists, supervisors, or paraprofessionals who are working with children with and without disabilities. Participants should be well-versed in the vocabulary of the science of behavior, including basic verbal operants.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral cusps, CABAS, conditioned reinforcement, developmental protocols
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Promoting Appropriate and Effective Sexual Education and Instruction for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Alpine, Swissotel
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Eden II Programs), SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
Description: Sexuality is a topic that is difficult, or at least uncomfortable, for many professionals and parents to discuss, but it is a topic that will often be an issue needing to be addressed for the many individuals with developmental disabilities and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Issues vary from individual to individual but may include social skills deficits impacting romantic relationships and interpersonal sexual relations, deficits in independence as related to personal hygiene, issues with masturbation, inappropriate sexual behaviors in public, sexual advances towards inappropriate people, and issues with perspective taking to name a few. Applied behavior analytic treatments can be highly effective in promoting appropriate sexual behaviors and sexual expression in adolescents and adults. This workshop will focus on behaviorally based strategies useful for individuals with developmental disabilities including individuals on all ends of the autism spectrum. This talk will begin with an overview of general issues regarding sexuality development as it relates to individuals with developmental disabilities. We will address the understanding of problem sexual behavior through functional assessment methods and discuss replacement treatment options based on function. We will discuss topics such as sexual development, sexuality knowledge, sexual behaviors both appropriate and inappropriate, issues regarding consent and common parent concerns. We will then move into more specific topics which could be included within a behaviorally-based sexual education curriculum designed for individuals with developmental disabilities and ASD. Treatment strategies discussed will include, but are not limited to, reinforcement-based procedures, video modeling, task analysis schedules, picture activity schedules, scripts and script fading, and social stories. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available. Although sexuality is an issue that often comes to the forefront in adolescence or early adulthood, information on sexuality is important for individuals of all ages. Topics related to ethical decision making will also be discussed. Audience questions and discussion will be welcomed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state common issues experienced by people with developmental disabilities and ASD as they relate to appropriate and satisfying sexual development and expression; (2) develop several teaching programs for skill acquisition of several sexual behaviors using techniques and theories consistent with applied behavior analysis; (3) conduct a functional assessment of problem behavior as it relates to sexual expression and develop a behavior intervention plan based on the function; (4) identify issues associated with consent.
Activities: The workshop will consist of the following activities: didactic instruction from the presenter; group discussion; presentation and review of teaching materials; role play and practice of presented teaching procedures.
Audience: The current workshop content is geared towards the following audience: (1) experienced behavior analysts who have a desire to learn how to apply behavioral principles and teaching methods to the subject of sexual behavior; (2) educators and related service professionals who have a behavioral background and work with children with developmental issues that have needs in the area of sexuality; (3) although not specifically geared towards parents and family members of individuals with needs, parents would be welcomed to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, developmental disabilities, sexual behavior, sexuality
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part 2: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Skyway 260, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don’t do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must register for all 3 parts (WPBID #20; WPBID #50; WPBID #80) and must attend all 3 parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Designing Sustainable Behavior Change with Habit Design
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Douglas A. Johnson, Ph.D.
MICHAEL KIM (Habit Design), DOUGLAS A. JOHNSON (Western Michigan University)
Description: Programs that “motivate behavior change” frequently fail to generate sustained engagement: over 80% of those who attempt to create new, healthy behaviors still fail at continuing their training after just the first 30 days. Corporate lifestyle management programs return only $0.50 for every $1 invested. The CDC attributes 80% of chronic conditions to this inability to form successful wellbeing habits, resulting in almost $1 trillion in lost productivity. The problem isn’t that people resist change, but they resist being changed. While health promotion may motivate episodic, temporary changes, when it comes to creating lasting results, learning the skill of creating habits is what is vital for long-term behavior change. The reason: While motivation may get you started, habit keeps you going. Developed by licensed, clinical psychologists from Yale and the University of Washington, this workshop covers best practices in the design of sustainable behavior change protocols that have led to the successful training of unconscious, daily habits, derived from more than eight years of clinical testing of evidence-based research from over 100 behavioral researchers. More than 500 companies and 100,000 employees helped to clinically test and refine the tools, methods, and techniques which serve as the focus of this session. Attendees should download the Poll Everywhere app before the workshop. It is available for iOS and Android.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify 4 key ingredients that must be present for creating successful behavior change; (2) differentiate and diagnose behavior change into 15 distinct classes; (3) define 3 key strategies that successfully harness motivation for sustainable behavior change; (4) translate 15 design principles and tactics to create winning recipes for training new habits, or “habit designs;” (5) apply 5 impactful tactics for creating lasting, self-perpetuating communities of practice.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, real-time mobile polling, and group discussion & exercises. Supplemental printed material will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: Individuals interested in developing long-term practices to sustain initial behavior change.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Contingency Management, Habits, Routinization, Social Contagion
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Behavior Analytic Supervision at Work: What Every Behavior Analyst Needs to Know About Delivering Effective Supervision
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich C, Swissotel
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa N. Wilson, Ph.D.
ALYSSA N. WILSON (Saint Louis University), HEATHER LYNN LEWIS (Saint Louis University)
Description: The code for responsible conduct for behavior analysts clearly states the importance of effective supervision and supervisory activities. Behavior analytic research on supervision has identified the effectiveness of using behavioral applications (e.g., behavioral skills training) to teach competent trainees. Supervisors may need additional assistance with identifying evidence-based practices when it comes to implementing effective and competency-based supervision, particularly when supervising large groups of trainees. Therefore, the current experiential workshop seeks to assist supervisors who work with multiple trainees in a given period of time and collaborate with outside corporations, including universities, in order to provide attendees an opportunity to refine their supervision skill sets. The workshop will highlight 5 domains of the supervision process: (1) supervisor-trainee relationship during and after supervisory period; (2) delivering competency-based supervision; (3) successful tips for managing independent and group supervision; (4) organization strategies (e.g., evaluation rubrics, mapping clinical projects, goal setting, etc.); and (5) shaping professional behavior. Attendees will be provided supplemental materials during the workshop, to practice the skills presented. The workshop will use in-vivo training paired with problem-based learning paradigms to assist attendee’s with acquiring skills discussed during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) list important features and elements of supervision; (2) determine best-practices for supervision; (3) list aspects of appropriate supervisor-trainee relationship throughout various phases of supervision; (4) demonstrate competency-based supervision skills; (5) demonstrate skills for conducting individual and group supervision; (6) design and implement organization strategies; (7) demonstrate skills to shape professional behaviors.
Activities: The workshop will use lecture, discussion, video observation, in-vivo modeling, rehearsal, and feedback to assist trainees with achieving the learning objectives. Problem-based learning (e.g., small groups work through a supervision issue/problem) will be used to assist attendees with putting the discussed skills into practice. In-vivo and video demonstrations of strategies will be conducted with group discussions and role-play to ensure skill acquisition. Supplemental materials will be provided to support attendee learning during the workshop. Attendees will also be able to use the supplemental materials after the workshop, as an example/guide for the supervision process.
Audience: The nature of the workshop is geared towards behavior analysts who have had minimal supervision experience. The content of the workshop will be focused on more intermediate and advanced topics often faced by supervisors, and attendees with little to no (or basic) knowledge and/or experience with supervision might find themselves lost or unable to connect with content and other attendees.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): education, evidence-based training, service delivery, supervision
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Acting Out: Learning BACB Ethics and Problem-Solving Strategies Through Interactive Teams
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Randolph, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: PRA/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University), JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
Description: This workshop is designed primarily for practitioners who have some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) and wish to improve their skills to (a) identify and analyze ethical challenges, (b) develop strategies to resolve ethical challenges, (c) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, and (d) obtain CEUs in the ethics domain as required for BACB recertification. Others, including licensed psychologists, who are interested in applying BACB ethical guidelines to real-world ethical challenges in practice and research are also encouraged to attend. Participants should be prepared to describe and discuss real world ethics cases in a manner that protects the identity of those individuals involved in the ethics cases.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify and analyze ethical challenges; (2) identify and troubleshoot strategies to resolve ethical challenges; (3) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges.
Activities: This workshop will include very limited lecture content. Emphasis will be placed on small group activities and discussion, role plays, guided practice and fluency building exercises.
Audience: Intermediate level. This workshop assumes some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall KL, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This day-long workshop will focus on the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the issues that practicing behavior analysts should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments (FBAs), writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term “positive behavior supports” as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations (IEE) including FBAs. Information will be linked to the 2016 BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided. Please note: this workshop will apply to United States law only, but all are welcome to attend.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the major components of the IDEIA; (2) identify the areas of IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst; (3) identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may serve under IDEIA; (4) identify the legal requirements of an independent educational evaluation; (5) identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA; (6) identify when a behavioral intervention plan must be developed under the IDEIA; (7) identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA; (8) describe how the 2016 Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to special education law.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, case study analysis, question and answer.
Audience: Practicing behavior analysts, supervisors of practicing behavior analysts, school administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Special Education
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
BACB-Compliant, Multi-Media Supervisor Training
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Lucerne I, Swissotel
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc; TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: Hundreds of BCBAs have participated in this mixed-media, BACB-compliant supervision training workshop since 2013, with overwhelmingly positive feedback! This workshop prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional 2.5 hours online through www.TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost 9 hours of content while using only 6 hours of conference time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and interesting video situations, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Multiple populations and environments are represented, including child welfare, education, and in-home. Additionally, participant-trios will participate in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, an additional 3 CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. *This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the purpose of supervision, how to incorporate important features of supervision, their obligations regarding behavioral skills training, and methods to evaluate the effects of supervision; (2) demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback.
Activities: Participants will engage in: Didactic lecture, critiques of video supervision scenarios, and guided and directed discussions of professional and ethical responsibilities. Additionally, all participants will be divided into triads for multiple role play scenarios, taking turns as supervisor, supervisee and observer with each new scenario.
Audience: This workshop is for BCBAs who will be supervising pre-certification interns, BCaBAs, and Registered Behavior Technicians
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, supervision, Supervisor, supervisor training
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: BACB
Creating Free Online Data Collection Systems: No Programming Skills Necessary
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Vevey 3, Swissotel
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paul W. Heering, M.A.
PAUL W. HEERING (May Institute), EILEEN PORRO (May Institute and National Autism Center), ASHLEY KATE ABBOTT (May Institute)
Description: This workshop will guide attendees through the entire process of creating free, online data-collection systems. Attendees will create data sheets that can easily be shared and filled out on any Internet-connected device including smartphones and tablets. These data collection systems will be created through the use of free Google Docs software. The workshop will demonstrate how to create behavioral data sheets, task analysis data sheets, skills acquisition data sheets, forms for staff to complete, and more. The data sheets created will use many time-saving features such as drop-down menus, checkboxes, scales, and pop-up calendars to enter information. Attendees will be given instruction, video demonstrations, and live demonstrations on all the steps needed create these online data-collection systems. Attendees will be walked through every step in the process from initially logging onto the website to viewing graphs of results. Attendees will also be given time to practice the skills learned during the workshop. During this time, attendees will be given instruction and guidance on how to set up their own data sheets and/or program books. Because of the hands-on nature of this workshop, it is strongly recommended that attendees bring a laptop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) navigate the website used to create online data sheets; (2) create data sheets; (3) use nine possible data-collection types and four document elements; (4) use advanced features such as decision trees and randomization; (5) share data sheets; (6) automatically receive email notifications when data sheets are completed; (7) set up automatically updating graphs; (8) use advanced graphing features such as automatically converting words (e.g., prompt levels) to numbers that can be graphed and automatically creating color coded tables to quickly show task analysis data; (9) build a library of programs; (10) set up folders on an iPad or other portable device with direct links to data sheets for all programs for a specific child.
Activities: Workshop activities will include: (1) demonstrations of data sheet capabilities; (2) lecture-based instruction with step-by-step instructions containing screen shots; (3) recorded video demonstrations of how to perform all steps (all videos will be made available to workshop attendees after the conclusion of the workshop); (4) live demonstration of all steps; (5) guided practice of all skills; and (6) attendees will be guided and instructed while building their own custom program book.
Audience: This workshop is designed for anyone interested in creating online data-collection systems. It is not required that attendees have any computer coding knowledge or experience but attendees should be comfortable working on a computer and navigating websites.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Data Collection, Online Data, Technology
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: BACB
Navigating Insurance Coverage for Applied Behavior Analysis Services: An Organizational Process for Obtaining Insurance Approval
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Michigan ABC, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Gwen Dwiggins, Ph.D.
GWEN DWIGGINS (Accelerated Learning Clinic), KARA BATSON (Accelerated Learning Clinic), JILLIAN JARVIS (Accelerated Learning Clinic)
Description: As insurance coverage for applied behavior analysis in the treatment of autism expands, BCBAs need to become proficient in the processes of the insurance industry. Providers will need to be prepared to field questions regarding insurance coverage, understand the steps to obtaining benefits, prior authorizations, and the development of treatment plans. The process can be overwhelming to practitioners unfamiliar with insurance funding. While regulations vary in every state in accordance to each plan, several steps in the process are common across carriers. Practitioners opening a new practice often have no mentoring in working with insurance companies. The goal of this workshop is intended to alleviate participants learning through trial and error. Presenters will share lessons learned in navigating insurance funding and provide solutions to challenges faced along the way. The workshop will also serve as a work group. Participants will create documents they can use in practice to include an organizational flow chart, tracking and intake forms, and an initial evaluation and treatment plan.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define key terminology and technical jargon related to the insurance industry and how these terms translate into behavioral terms; (2) create their own organizational flowchart from intake to setting up initial assessments with families outlining each step in the insurance approval process; (3) identify all the key components required for initial evaluation and treatment plans as outlined by the insurance industry; (4) produce a template of their flow chart, tracking forms, and initial evaluation and treatment plans.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include: lecture, group discussion, role-play, and small-group activities
Audience: The workshop is at the intermediate level. Participants should have a basic knowledge of assessment and treatment planning. The targeted audience is practitioners looking for information on how the insurance process works.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Best Practices and Ethical Considerations for Behavior Analysts in Public School Consultation
Saturday, May 28, 2016
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dena Shade-Monuteaux, Ph.D.
DENA SHADE-MONUTEAUX (Beacon ABA Services), DAVID M. CORCORAN (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: This workshop will provide educators and behavior analysts with strategies and frameworks for optimizing the role of the BCBA in a public school setting in an ethical, effective, and clinically sound manner. Beginning with an overview of the scope of practice for BCBA’s, the workshop will provide attendees with a basic understanding of the parameters in which they are expected to competently operate. These parameters include: the new BACB Professional and Ethical Conduct Code, BCBAs as consultants, functional behavioral assessments, instructional programming, data collection, staff/parent trainings, and on-going treatment efficacy monitoring. Finally, this workshop will teach providers how to translate this knowledge into effective and operationally defined applied behavior analytic and educational procedures. A primary focus of the workshop is on the establishment of effective collaboration between the BCBA and school personnel. The collaborations this workshop will focus on are in the areas of BCBA services in public schools; roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders; individualized education programs; the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act and special education law; understanding the role of BCBAs as school consultants; identifying some limitations of the application of ABA principles and technologies in public schools; and identifying the critical elements of a successful school-based ABA program. Participants will learn how to apply these elements in school settings with a focus on antecedent interventions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the types of BCBA services available in a public school; (2) identify roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders; (3) articulate the basics of IDEA and special education law and regulations; (4) understand the role of BCBAs as school consultants; (5) identify the application of ABA principles and technologies in the public school and the limitations; (6) identify the critical elements of a successful school-based ABA program; (7) understand applications of these elements in different school-based settings; (8) understand and identify antecedent and consequent interventions.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion, small group activities, exemplars of permanent products and competency and knowledge based evaluations.
Audience: Special education teachers, BCBAs, students in BCBA programs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Behavior Assessment, Ethics, School Consultation
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Extending Behavior Analysis in Zoos and Aquariums
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Lucerne I, Swissotel
Area: AAB/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lindsay Mehrkam, Ph.D.
LINDSAY MEHRKAM (Oregon State University), LANCE MILLER (Chicago Zoological Society - Brookfield Zoo)
Description: Today's accredited zoos and aquariums are held to high standards of animal welfare. This involves assessment, implementation, and evaluation of current animal husbandry practices across a wide range of species, a task for which behavior analysis is well suited. This workshop will provide attendees with an overview of how behavior analytic methods are being extended in zoo settings to evaluate enrichment and training effectiveness. Participants will learn how to successfully implement behavioral assessments using single-subject designs in a zoo setting. Participants will be guided through video demonstrations of preference assessments and positive reinforcement training with a variety of zoo species to observe the generalizability of these procedures. Attendees will also participate in discussions on future directions for behavior analysts in these nontraditional animal settings. This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings. On the day prior to the workshop (Friday), participants are invited to travel to world-renowned Brookfield Zoo and directly observe how behavioral principles are being used to guide animal care practices in zoos. The visit is planned from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, meeting at 12:00 pm and returning to the Hyatt Regency by 5:00 pm. For those interested, there will be an additional fee of $45, payable directly to the workshop presenters. (Please note: there are no more spaces available for the visit to Brookfield Zoo.)
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) operationally define environmental enrichment and identify ways in which enrichment strategies are evaluated and deemed effective; (2) identify, review, and critique applications of operant conditioning in behavioral husbandry practices for variety of species; (3) recognize and discuss variables to consider to ensure ethical and effective implementation and evaluation of behavioral assessments in zoos and aquariums using single-subject designs.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, direct observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies and procedures will be provided. Participants will be encouraged to participate in open discussions about content and future directions for practical application. Supplemental materials for reviewing training plans and ethograms will also be provided.
Audience: This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): environmental enrichment, preference assessment, single-subject, zoo
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessing and Teaching Functional Skills to Children With Autism in Home, School, and Community Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall IJ, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will describe the assessment and teaching of functional skills in individuals with autism. Functional skills will be discussed in terms of how they differ from basic conceptual skills on several levels that include when, where, and why functional skills are demonstrated, as well as the immediate benefit to the child. Children with autism require learning sequences and teaching curricula in various “everyday” aspects of their lives. These useful and necessary functional life skills are naturally clustered into: skills used at school, in the community, at home, and skills that impact all aspects of life. Within these broad skill cluster areas, 48 specific skill groupings have been identified. This workshop will present information on the assessment of these specific skill groupings. The results of the assessment of functional skills will be useful for understanding which skills are required to enable independence within any given skill area. Next, using the assessment results to establish teaching sequences for functional learning programs will be discussed. Finally, specific strategies for teaching certain functional skills will be taught.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the differences between functional and basic/conceptual skills; (2) identify 6 broad skill clusters of functional skills; (3) identify and assess 48 specific skill groupings of functional skills; (4) choose initial instructional skills for teaching functional skills; (5) identify methods to teach functional skills in various settings; (6) identify methods to measure and track progress of functional skills from initial assessment and throughout the teaching process.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, video review of teaching methods, handouts, and group discussions
Audience: Behavior analysts who work with individuals with autism or other developmental delays.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Social Skills in Learners With Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Assessment to Intervention
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 3, Swissotel
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mary Ellen McDonald, Ph.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (Hofstra University), ERIN ARCHIBALD (Eden II Programs/ The Genesis School), SANJA CALE (SUNY Old Westbury)
Description: Children with autism exhibit many deficits in the area of socialization. It is difficult for children with autism to respond to peers in social situations as well as to initiate to others. There are many other areas of socialization that children with autism have great difficulty with, such as ending a conversation, listening to another conversation to obtain information, and knowing how to join in a conversation. This workshop will discuss a variety of innovative strategies that have been successful for improving social skills in children with autism. Specific strategies to be discussed will include topics such as the use of behavioral rehearsal, role playing, using video modeling and video rehearsal, along with other technology-based interventions, and conducting ABC analyses of social situations. Carol Gray’s social stories will also be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify a minimum of three new methods for increasing social skills in children with autism; (2) operationalize advanced concepts such as friendship when teaching a child with autism; (3) use behavioral rehearsal with children with autism to improve social skills; (4) use self-monitoring for children with autism to help them to monitor their social skills.
Activities: Participants will watch video clips of a variety of strategies that can be used to increase social skills in individuals with autism. Specific activities will include writing a story about a social situation or a student, conducting an ABC analysis on a social situation, and operationalizing a variety of advanced social concepts.
Audience: Psychologists, special educators, social workers, speech pathologists, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: BACB
Incorporating iOS (Apple) Apps into Effective Behavioral Programming in Applied Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Montreux 1, Swissotel
Area: AUT/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lindsey Clark, M.S.
LINDSEY CLARK (Advances Learning Center), FRANCES NIEVES SERRET (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center)
Description: “There’s an app for that”™. In September 2012, Apple announced it had 700,000 approved applications available in The App Store, with 250,000 specifically for iPad. By September 2014 that number increased to 1,300,000 applications, 670,000 for iPad. The Apple App Store itself is currently the largest digital application distribution platform. With the number of approved apps increasing exponentially, the spillover of this new resource into the field of ABA is a tremendous opportunity to further realize Skinner’s dream of a “teaching machine”. The four capacities reviewed in this workshop include instructor tools, teaching, communication, and fun. Instructor tools apps include apps designed to facilitate data collection, graphing, and assessment. Apps for teaching include apps that are either designed specifically or used incidentally to promote skill acquisition. Apps for communication outlines apps created to facilitate augmentative alternative communication (AAC), and apps for fun highlight some of the countless apps that may function as reinforcers. This workshop outlines multiple apps from each of these capacities, incorporate learning activities to demonstrate use of these applications in behavior analytic programming, discuss ethical considerations in using apps for applied programming, and review tricks of the trade and helpful resources to find apps for programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify evidence-based apps appropriate for programming and practice using apps from the following categories based on cost, description, pre-requisite exemplars and reputable sources: (a) instructor tools apps (e.g., data collection, discrete trial implementation, graphing, preference assessments, assessment of target behavior, self-monitoring, social stories, video modeling and data conversion), (b) apps for teaching (e.g., activity schedules, apps to promote independence in vocational settings and fine motor skills, discrete trial apps to teach expressive and receptive language and pre-academic and academic skills across multiple subject areas), (c) apps for fun (e.g., preference assessment apps to determine potential reinforcers, new hot games on the market, lesser-known activities and apps designed to teach functional skills hidden in “kid friendly” activities), (d) apps for communication (e.g., based on AAC features including cost, age range, compatibility, text to speech output, accessibility (e.g., switch output, eye gaze, sequential, row/column, auditory scanning), sentence/phrase mode, shared library, computer-based interface, support site, and fun additional features); (2) utilize assistive technology terminology to select appropriate AAC applications based on learner need and pre-requisite skills; (3) implement creative strategies, using applications, to replace stigmatizing methods commonly used to monitor behavior in community settings; (4) reference ethical considerations in selecting applications including determining reputable sources, evidence based apps, pre-requisites, informed consent, privacy, treatment efficacy and noting which considerations directly reference sections of the BACB guidelines; (5) use the same resources as professionals in the assistive technology field to find even more applications and find deals on more costly applications.
Activities: Alternating among lecture and hands-on activities and demonstrations, participants will work in groups to use apps from each capacity, review case studies, and participate in creating sample videos for video modeling.
Audience: The intended audience includes Board Certified Behavior Analysts currently providing behavior analytic services in the home, school and/or community setting; teachers; speech and language pathologists; physical therapists; behavioral instructors or therapists who facilitate behavior analytic services; school staff intending to utilize apps to access portions of the curriculum, or who work with students that have an assistive technology written into their individualized education plans; and anyone currently using applications in the field or wishing to use them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA, Autism, Teaching Programs, Technology
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Building Foundational Social Skills in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Montreux 2, Swissotel
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ian Melton, M.Ed.
IAN MELTON (Endicott College/Hopebridge Pediatrics ), LORRAINE OTTE (Endicott College), BRITANY MELTON (Endicott College), JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Autism Intervention Specialists), ASHLEY HUDSON (Hopebridge Pediatric Specialists)
Description: One of the most prevalent challenges for students with autism is in the area of social skills, including difficulty with observational skills, imitation, play interactions, joint attention, and social pragmatics. Consistent with recommendations in the literature (Gresham, et. al, 2001; Peters, et. al, 2007; and Quinn, et. al, 1999), the teaching of foundational skills is essential to effective social relationships. Effective social relationships can be defined as, “socially acceptable learned behaviors that enable a person to interact with others in ways that elicit positive responses and assist the person in avoiding negative responses.” (Elliott, Racine & Busse, 1995) As with all of what we do, these learned social responses are emitted over time in efforts to access reinforcement and to avoid punishment. The difficulty with children with autism is that they often cannot access these skills, and so become what many refer to as “withdrawn.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe evidence based teaching methodologies for effective social skills instruction; (2) identify assessment tools to identify foundational social skills deficits in learners of varying cognitive functioning; (3) implement teaching methodologies for foundational social skills.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and targeted reading. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture, and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials for identifying language and learning barriers will be provided in order to support participant learning. The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, and frequency building exercises.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BCBAs that train staff to run social skills groups; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; and anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Help! Successful Home Programs: A How-To for BCBAs
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Randolph, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: Many parents have access to home programs for students with autism via insurance, but the programs are challenging for BCBAs to manage effectively due to issues with challenging behaviors, treatment integrity, parental adherence, and lack of a full-proof curriculum. Unfortunately, without a proper plan in place, BCBAs are often managing home programs that are ineffective and frustrating to all and may inadvertently cause other side effects such as a lack of respect by outsiders for the science of applied behavior analysis. This workshop is a step-by-step simple curriculum to help a BCBA create a simple, effective program that all staff and parents can implement. This program teaches the student to perform a range of skills from simple directions to complex communication, and independent activities. Using positive behavioral supports, the student will learn to increase his attention span, markedly improve his direction-following skills, and decrease self-stimulatory behavior and other disruptive behavior including aggression and self-injurious behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) determine and make environmental changes that reduce the need for behavior analysis services; (2) identify the contingencies governing the behavior of those responsible for carrying out behavior change procedures and design interventions accordingly.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, hands-on tasks, small group breakouts, and videos.
Audience: Intermediate BCBAs, teachers, administrators, CST members
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavior management, parental adherence
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessing and Addressing Anxiety-Related Behavior in Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Roosevelt, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joanne Sgambati, Ph.D.
JOANNE SGAMBATI (Eden II/Genesis Programs), JAMIE OBRIEN (Eden II/Genesis)
Description: There is considerable evidence that children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are at increased risk of anxiety and anxiety disorders. Anxiety may worsen during adolescence, as young people face increasingly complex social situations. In some instances, individuals with ASD may become more aware of their differences and interpersonal difficulties and this in turn may lead to higher levels of anxiety. This workshop will address assessment of anxiety through multiple means. The role of functional assessment and functional analysis in the assessment of behavior related to anxiety will be discussed. This workshop will discuss the prevalence of anxiety, a description of anxiety based on the research, specific potential causes of anxiety, and clinical interventions. There will be a focus on the use of self-assessment and self-management. Clinical case examples will be provided throughout the session. Attendees will have an opportunity to work on cases of students with ASD during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe specific risk factors for anxiety in ASD; (2) select tools for assessment of anxiety-related behavior; (3) develop at least 2 proactive strategies to address anxiety-related behavior; (4) identify at least 2 self-management strategies to be used with students.
Activities: Participants will work on clinical cases provided in a case study format, watch videos of interventions and develop alternative strategies to be used, develop a proactive intervention based on a student case.
Audience: Psychologists, special education professionals, social workers, speech pathologists, parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Anxiety, ASD, Asperger's, Autism
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treating Children With Behavioral and Emotional Disorders: Integrating Emotional and Moral Behaviors to Promote Generalization
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Michigan ABC, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Children that have been victims of abuse and/or neglect often exhibit behaviors that appear to be callous, unemotional, antisocial and immoral. Often, the learning histories of these children affect their emotional and moral behaviors and these behaviors can serve as motivational operations. Behavioral treatment facilities often use a contingency-based focus when teaching appropriate behavior that works well for managing children's behavior in a structured setting where individuals follow-through with predictable contingencies, but do not prepare these children to function in a generalized setting. The presenter will provide a behaviorally-based explanation of why these children lack a repertoire for appropriate emotional and moral behaviors. She will also discuss what environmental factors can encourage appropriate emotional and moral behaviors and ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that are relationship-based, focus on emotional and moral skills, and promote generalization.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe how the learning histories of children that have been victims of abuse and/or neglect effect their emotional and moral behaviors; (2) explain why these children lack a repertoire for appropriate emotional and moral behaviors and how those behaviors can serve as motivational operations; (3) describe the difference between contingency-based and relationship-based treatment approaches; (4) describe what environmental factors can encourage appropriate emotional and moral behaviors; (5) describe ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that are relationship-based and promote generalization.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools and community settings, take notes, ask questions, view a PowerPoint presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who typically-developing who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Stimulus Control and its Relationship to Teaching, Prompting, Error Correction, and Errorless Learning
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich B, Swissotel
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), ANTHONY CASTROGIOVANNI (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: Behavior analysis can be succinctly described as the study of “behavior under what conditions.” That is, while the emphasis on behavior per se is novel to many people, the most unique characteristic of behavior analysis is the emphasis on how environmental conditions systematically influence behavior. In the study of operant behavior, not only did Skinner place emphasis on the role of consequences but his work also emphasized how the three-term contingency brings about stimulus control. Furthermore, an in-depth understanding of stimulus control may reduce the likelihood of engaging in ineffective, ritualistic teaching strategies. The first section will introduce critical nuances in the establishment of stimulus control, using examples from discrimination training. We will note that the definition of “prompt” is just as dependent upon behavior as is the term “reinforcer.” Next, we will focus in detail on the critical distinction between prompts and cues. The content will then focus on a major current aspect of most lessons, the removal of the prompts. Finally, we will focus on stimulus control and error-correction as well as various errorless teaching formats. We will use a variety of didactic strategies to review common teaching errors and practice identifying stimulus control issues within various lessons.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe stimulus control as defined within the laboratory and applied situations; (2) describe how stimulus control related to applied definitions of prompt and cue; (3) describe a variety of teaching strategies in terms of changes in stimulus control; (4) describe simple rules associated with prompt inclusion and removal; (5) describe how stimulus control relates to both error-correction strategies and errorless learning strategies within their own lessons.
Activities: Review standard definitions of stimulus control including the dependency between discriminative stimuli and behavior, review operational distinctions between the terms prompt and cue, review a variety of lesson formats and identify critical stimulus control issues within each lesson type (e.g., least-to-most prompt hierarchy, time delay, etc.), review video and case descriptions of a variety of teaching errors in terms of poor stimulus control, review various strategies commonly grouped as errorless-learning strategies, and review the difference between error fixing and error correction.
Audience: Anyone arranging lessons for a variety of learners in which prompts or shaping play a prominent role. This may include behavior analysts, speech/language pathologists, teachers or others involved with communication training with children and adults with disabilities including ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Neurobehavioral Analysis of Epileptic Seizures
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich D, Swissotel
Area: DDA/BPN; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware of how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. In addition, persons with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These could be better managed, and important new life skills could be acquired, if their behavior analyst knew basic epileptology. This workshop will educate behavior analysts about epilepsy with a behavioral approach. The neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be briefly reviewed. The etiology, genetics, and classification of various seizure disorders will be reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be related to analog human studies. Many clients are incorrectly medicated for pseudo-seizures. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy, and participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with this test, without sedation or anesthesia. Epileptic seizures dynamically modulate an organism's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates the frequency, intensity and duration of epileptic seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about these relationships.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define an epileptic seizure; (2) describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures; (3) recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior; (4) objectively describe, count, and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions, (5) recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress; (6) recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures; (7) prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia; (8) discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures, (9) manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy.
Activities: Examples of epileptic and non-epileptic behaviors and state of the art ways of analyzing them with EEG and behavior analysis will be presented in lecture and video presentations. Audience questions and experiences regarding epilepsy are welcome.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts, special education teachers, psychologists and therapists who write behavior plans for individuals with developmental disabilities (autism, mental retardation, psychosis, cerebral palsy) and a history of seizures.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, behavior analysis, electroencephalography, seizures
 
Workshop #W80
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part 3: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Skyway 260, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don’t do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must register for all 3 parts (WPBID #20; WPBID #50; WPBID #80) and must attend all 3 parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Developing Applied Behavior Analysis Departments in Public School Systems
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich C, Swissotel
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Daniel Almeida, Ph.D.
DANIEL ALMEIDA (University of Massachusetts-Boston/Newton, MA Public Schools)
Description: This workshop will provide participants with an introduction to the steps required to develop an ABA department within a public school system. Development of quality ABA services within the bureaucratic and multi-disciplinary public school environment poses many regulatory, organizational, and ethical challenges for behavior analysts. This workshop will present the chronology of the development of a ABA department within a culturally diverse public school system of over 12,500 students. Over the course of 8 years, the department expanded from a single BCBA to 8 BCBAs. The development of organizational structures, service delivery models, and policies and procedures within the school district will be reviewed. Participants will conduct self-assessments of their current settings and use the workshop content to develop plans for expanding the ABA services within their work setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the challenges to providing quality behavioral analytic services in public school settings; (2) identify organizational structures, service delivery models, and policies and procedures that are effective in public school settings; (3) assess their work settings and develop plans for organizational growth.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be achieved by lecture, small group discussion, and review and completion written case study materials.
Audience: The workshop is directed to behavior analysts working in or are interested in working in public school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Will Work for Reinforcement: Creating Organizational Alignment to Enable Robust Management Across Systems, Processes, and Behaviors
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adam E. Ventura, M.S.
ADAM E. VENTURA (World Evolve, Inc.), DENNIS URIARTE (Florida Intstitute of Technology), MANUEL RODRIGUEZ (ABA Technologies, Inc.)
Description: The driving force behind every business is its employees. Too often, we forget that just like the individuals we serve and provide services to, employees are products of their environment. Unfortunately, many businesses today are afflicted with common issues such as poor mission statements and misaligned job responsibilities and roles, all of which amount to a detrimental work environment for employees. Organizational behavior management (OBM) provides the fundamental principles of behavior analysis applied to business, offering the business leader steps to creating organizational alignment from mission statements, balanced scorecards, to job matrices and performance management systems. This hands-on workshop will instruct attendees on how to create an organizational mission statement based on both behavior and results, align job responsibilities and roles in part to help ABA supervisors provide ethical supervision with this mission statement, and design employee scorecards based on objective measures to help create a performance pay system for your organization. This workshop will also address how the ethical considerations involved in assigning job responsibilities can be addressed using OBM. In addition to receiving feedback for their performance in the workshop, attendees will also receive supplemental materials to carry on what they have learned about OBM.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define a mission statement; (2) describe the features of a mission statement; (3) create a mission statement based on behavior and results; (4) define a behavior-based pinpoint; (5) create behavior-based pinpoints based on objectives measures; (6) develop scorecards and job matrices.
Activities: Lecture and discussion: Instructions and examples provided on how to identify the organization and individual job missions using both behavior and results. Instructions and examples on how to create balanced scorecards and develop performance matrices. Video presentations will be provided to compliment traditional direct instruction. Small group breakout: Guided practice sessions will be conducted where small groups will be able to develop their own mission, measures, and pinpoints. Feedback will be provided to each group based on their performance. Group presentation: Each group will present their work to the class for feedback. Supplemental material: Each learner will be provided with materials to take with them to continue their education on OBM concepts and specific material presented during the workshop.
Audience: The workshop level is Intermediate. This workshop will target BCBA-level business owners, administrators, and behavior analysis entrepreneurs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Mission statements, Performance matrices, Performance Pay, Scorecards
 
Workshop #W83
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Molecular Functional Analysis: An Alternate Approach for Applied Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich G, Swissotel
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, Ph.D.
MICHAEL WEINBERG (Innovative Learning), WILLIAM T. MARSH (Brevard Public Schools)
Description: Participants in this workshop will learn a new and unique method for functional assessment and functional analysis referred to as molecular functional analysis. This approach will offer a different view of functional analysis and assessment and offer practice opportunities for participants. Through the use of vignettes, role play, and practice exercises, as well as video clips in small groups during the workshop, participants will be actively engaged in learning processes throughout this workshop. Participants will practice use of the new functional assessment tools to aid in identifying concurrent reinforcement schedules affecting problem and functional behavior of a person such as in school, along with demonstrations via video vignettes. Participants will have opportunities to practice using the approach to quickly identify function and use the data to devise an initial functionally linked treatment intervention based on these tools. Utilizing vignettes, participants will practice applying molecular functional analysis design logic to determine single or multiple functions of problem behavior in-vivo while the motivating operation is in effect.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) complete and implement new descriptive assessment tools to identify function and replacement behaviors to incorporate in the behavior plan; (2) identify at least 3 primary differences in the functional analysis approach presented in this workshop relative to prevailing functional assessment logic; (3) use molecular functional analysis methods for the purpose of determining function based on a modified single-trial alternating treatments design procedure; (4) identify at least 3 situations in which these approaches can be applied, based on interactive practice opportunities during this workshop; (5) identify function of behavior when there are multiple functions, using the approaches practiced in this workshop.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include use of multimedia presentation of the concepts, principles and processes of Molecular Functional Analysis incorporating PowerPoint Slides, videos, lecture and group discussion, as well as small group practice activities during the workshop. Participants will be provided with vignettes in small groups during which each group will complete the contingency assessment form, devise a procedure to conduct single trial functional analyses to identify function, and practice use of the approach via role play in dyads to demonstrate the application of the procedure and potential results.
Audience: This workshop targets all audiences and will provide a review of basic principles of behavior involved in the identification of multiple functions and use of systematic manipulations and descriptive assessment of behavior. Review of the basic 4-term contingency, definition and identification of motivating operations, and the introduction of new terms needed to describe the process and concepts of this methodology will also be provided so that those at the entry level will be able to understand the principles involved. New terms will be defined to permit all participants to understand the concepts necessary for optimal use of this approach in their own practice settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W85
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Learning to Behave Well Using Mindfulness-Based Cognitive and Behavior Analytic Practices
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert Stromer, Ph.D.
ROBERT STROMER (George Brown College), ELISABETH KINNEY (Behavioral Learning and Leadership), MARK GEREN (QBS Inc)
Description: The instructors share the opinion that, “To enjoy life at any age one must view each difficulty as simply a problem to be solved” (Skinner & Vaughan, 1997). For many, “enjoying life” includes being the best practitioner one can be; and doing that may require being well self-managed and as stress-free as possible. For the instructors, being well self-managed meant retooling their existing problem-solving skills. They opted to add mindfulness practices to better manage life’s stressors and ongoing concerns of health and wellness. This approach resulted in improved ways of dealing with and replacing verbal behavior that often got in the way of enjoyment. So, this workshop is about supplementing one’s problem-solving skills to better cope with life’s challenges and to reduce the likelihood of disabling emotional states such as stress, anxiety, and depression. The mindfulness practices stem from evidence-based mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) that blends traditional meditative teachings and behavior therapy techniques. Williams and Penman’s (2011) self-help version of MBCT is introduced; its skills can be readily learned and generalized, if regularly practiced and used in real life. As a take-home practice, and to begin a little therapeutic self-change, attendees learn MBCT’s signature meditation, the “three-minute breathing space.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state potential benefits of mindfulness meditation as a supplement to one’s self-managed, problem-solving repertoire; (2) describe some of the key elements of the skill set involved in mindfulness practices common to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and other “third wave” cognitive therapies; (3) demonstrate the recommended chair-supported sitting posture used during formal practices and the kinds of self-talk used to practice the three-minute breathing space; (4) identify exemplary digital and other resources for further mindfulness study and practice.
Activities: In a large-group format, we introduce mindfulness, describe its nature and relevant background and rationales for offering a workshop on it. We also provide guided opportunities to participate in several “warm-up” meditations. Then, during the bulk of the workshop, methods resembling aspects of behavioral skills training and interteaching (e.g., dyadic discussion, question-and-answer, feedback) are used to inform meaningful practice opportunities in a pivotal meditation of the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy program, the Three-Minute Breathing Space. Activities include the use of (a) live and video demonstrations, (b) written rationales and scripts appropriate for the two roles to be rehearsed by pairs of attendees, facilitator or teacher, and meditative student, (c) dyadic rehearsal of scripted and unscripted guidance of the Breathing Space and evaluative discussions of experiences, and (d) informative feedback while the instructors oversee dyad rehearsals. Finally, a wrap up period addresses questions and comments from the entire group and we share knowledge of several digital resources found helpful in our ongoing practices and self-study.
Audience: The workshop is designed for all certified behavior analysts (full or assistant), those who already practice mindfulness, but especially those with little or no experience in mindfulness meditation.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W86
CE Offered: BACB
Navigating the 10th Circle of Hell: A Road Map to Effectively Appealing Insurance Denials
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 3, Swissotel
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William Tim Courtney, M.S.
WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), BREANNE K. HARTLEY (Little Star Center ), VINCENT LAMARCA (Little Star Center), MARY ROSSWURM (Little Star Center)
Description: In this workshop, the presenters will discuss how to respond when an insurance company has partially, or completely denied hours. Unfavorable determinations of medical necessity and the subsequent appeals is a fairly common aspect of providing medical services. In 2011, the Center for Medicare and Medicaid services (CMS) paid out 37.9 million dollars as a result of medical appeals. The appeal process can be very timely and heavy on clinical resources. This presentation looks to reduce the time required to analyze adverse determination letters, formulate appeal arguments, and solicit the help from parents and other key players. Attendees will review a case that consisted of several levels of internal appeals, as well as the external appeal process. The workshop is laid out in a behavior skills training format, in which the presenters will model effective procedures, provide instructions, and then have attendees role play behavior with feedback provided by the presenters. Attendees will receive example appeal letters, worksheets for reviewing denial letters, and example spreadsheets utilized to track the appeal process.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) analyze denial letters to determine the primary reason for the denial; (2) describe the internal and external appeal process; (3) develop appeal letters, grounded in medical necessity, specifically addressing the reason for the denial; (4) develop strategies to involve family members and other advocates in the appeal process.
Activities: The workshop follows a behavior skills training format. The presenters will provide instructions and model strategies effective within their organization. Attendees will then practice strategies, while receiving feedback from the presenters.
Audience: The workshop is primarily targeting providers with experience providing medically necessary services, with a history of working through the appeal process. Attendeesthat are just starting to provide medically necessary services could benefit by being aware and practicing the presented appeal strategies.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA Practice, Autism, Billing, Insurance Mandate
 
Workshop #W88
CE Offered: BACB
Conducting Functional Analyses in Home-Based Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 1, Swissotel
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ashley Williams, M.S.
STEPHANIE PHELAN (ABACS, LLC), ASHLEY WILLIAMS (ABACS), Meghan Clausen (ABACS, LLC), BRANDON HERSCOVITCH (ABACS, LLC)
Description: Functional analysis (FA) is a powerful tool for the assessment of challenging behavior in students with autism and other disabilities. FAs systematically manipulate the antecedents and consequences of target behavior so as to experimentally determine the function(s) of that behavior. The literature indicates that treatments based on the results of functional analyses are more effective than treatments based on other assessment methodologies. However, FAs may not be conducted regularly in home- or school-based settings. Several reasons have been cited for this, including the lack of resources typically needed to conduct these analyses. Given that functional analysis is the only experimental methodology available to determine the function of behavior, and that function-based interventions have been demonstrated to more effective, it is important to extend this methodology to home-based settings. The current workshop is designed to prepare practitioners to develop and implement FAs in their current setting, within the scope of time and resources typically available for home-based services. Participants will work through the entire assessment process, from identification of procedures, steps to take, analysis of data, and selection of function-based intervention. Workshop activities will include a pre- and post-test, guided notes, and small-group discussions and case studies.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) articulate in writing the importance of conducting functional analyses in home-based settings; (2) determine if a functional analysis is appropriate for a given target behavior; (3) articulate in writing the risks associated with performing a functional analysis of that behavior; (4) articulate in writing the steps to preparing for a functional analysis in a home-based setting (including selecting an experimental design, procedures, measurement methods, and methods for collecting and evaluating interobserver agreement and procedural integrity data); (5) articulate in writing what resources should be taken into account when planning to conduct a functional analysis in a home-based setting and analyze how to work within the constraints of the available resources; (6) articulate in writing his or her evaluation of functional analysis outcomes; (7) match function-based treatments with the functional analysis outcomes; (8) articulate in writing a variety of issues that occur while planning for and conducting functional analyses and how to respond to such issues.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, group-discussion, targeted case-studies, and small group breakout. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion, and guided practice. Core content will be taught through lecture and a guided discussion of case studies to be presented. (Supplemental materials for identifying language and learning barriers will be provided in order to support participant learning).The format combines lecture, group discussion, guided practice, and small group breakout.
Audience: Graduate students, BCaBA or BCBA with limited experience designing and/or conducting functional analyses seeking to expand his/her knowledge of functional analyses in home-based settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): challenging behavior, Functional-analysis, home-based
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond the Elementary Verbal Operants: Teaching Complex Generalized Verbal Behavior to Children With Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Francesca Degli Espinosa, Ph.D.
FRANCESCA DEGLI ESPINOSA (ABA Clinic, UK), DAVID C. PALMER (Smith College)
Description: In this workshop we will review the concepts of multiple control, intraverbal control, and recall. For each topic to be addressed, we will firstly provide a conceptual analysis, and, consequently, illustrate how that analysis can be translated into applied procedures to establish flexible and contextually appropriate verbal behavior in children with autism. We will explore the following conceptual distinctions in both theory and practice: (a) divergent and convergent multiple control; (b) the intraverbal as an elementary operant and intraverbal control as a pervasive variable in the control of autoclitic frames; (c) recall as the endurance of stimulus control and recall as novel problem solving. We will demonstrate the generality of the analyses presented by showing applied examples from children in both Italy and the United Kingdom. In so doing, we will offer a conceptual and applied framework within which to sequence language objectives and that participants can directly adopt or modify for use in their own clinical practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define the role of convergent and divergent multiple control in the teaching of language objectives; (2) define the role of intraverbal control and autoclitic frames in the establishment of verbal conditional discriminations; (3) sequence language objectives along a continuum of stimulus control complexity.
Activities: The workshop theoretical and applied objectives will be achieved through a balanced use of spoken lecture and video demonstrations.
Audience: Advanced
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): autoclitic frames, conditional discriminations, intraverbal control, multiple control
 
Workshop #W92
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Derived Stimulus Relations: Understanding Equivalence and RFT
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Alpine, Swissotel
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Timothy M. Weil, Ph.D.
TIMOTHY M. WEIL (Tandem Behavioral Health & Wellness)
Description: Derived stimulus relations is a topic that has been around for awhile but is recently growing in interest with both scientists and practitioners of behavior analysis. There is a great deal of basic behavior analytic research supporting the emergence of derived relations which is currently extending into the applied research domain. Equivalence in particular has been accepted as a necessary topic for behavior analysts as can be seen with its inclusion in the fourth edition of the BACB Task List. Students and practitioners will benefit from this workshop in its basic level, and focus on providing a link from theory to practice. This workshop will gently start with the theoretical system of radical behaviorism/functional contextualism and move towards understanding through presentation on basic and applied research.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe basic characteristics of stimulus equivalence; (2) describe basic characteristics of RFT and contrast these with stimulus equivalence; (3) describe transformation of stimulus function as a process and identify its crucial outcomes; (4) diagram relational networks and identify transformation of function via myriad relations as a first step towards inclusion in their programming.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture and discussion of derived stimulus relations from theory to practice. Small group break out periods will occur as interteach sessions in an effort to facilitate understanding of the material.
Audience: This workshop will be focused on the basic level to ensure all who participate receive a solid foundation in understanding of derived stimulus relations and the implications of this approach. Although delivered at the basic level, this topic is seemingly a tough one for first timers, thus a concerted effort will be made to deliver the information in a consumable manner by those who know little to nothing of the topic.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Derived Relations, Equivalence, Relational Responding, RFT
 
Workshop #W93a
CE Offered: BACB
American Sign Language Training for Professionals Who Work With Children on the Autism Spectrum
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 2, Swissotel
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karelix Alicea, M.S., BCBA, M.S.
KARELIX ALICEA (Lotus Behavioral Interventions)
Description: The workshop will actively engage participants in understanding why American Sign Language (ASL) is a beneficial response form for non-verbal children on the autism spectrum through the use of guided notes, brief quizzes, and immediate feedback. Participants will be taught how to employ ASL in a “total communication” format in order to learn a basic vocabulary of at least 30 items/activities that commonly function as reinforcers for children with autism spectrum disorders. Finally, participants will be guided on how to use these newly acquired signs for mand training with the opportunity to break into groups for role-playing opportunities. Data and video from individual cases will be presented to further support learning, with an opportunity to discuss these practices with the group at large.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the difference between topography-based and selection-based verbal behavior; (2) describe the benefits of using sign language as a starting point for mand training in comparison to other more popular methods such as the Picture Exchange Communication System, Augmentative/Alternative Communication (AAC) devices, and others; (3) discriminate between children who would benefit from sign language training and the few who would not; (4) manually sign at least 30 commonly preferred items/activities in ASL that can be used as a starting point for skill acquisition with their clients; (5) effectively conduct motor imitation training trials of manual signs within the context of a motivating operation.
Activities: Workshop activities will include the following: lecture, discussion, brief quizzes, small group breakouts, immediate feedback, data and video presentation.
Audience: This is a basic workshop level for all professionals who work with non-verbal children on the autism spectrum.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic

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