Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

CE by Type: PSY


 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behaviorally Based Social Skills Groups for Individuals With Autism: Lessons From Research and Clinical Practice
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich D, Swissotel
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joseph H. Cihon, M.S.
JEREMY ANDREW LEAF (Autism Partnership), MITCHELL T. TAUBMAN (Autism Partnership), CHRISTINE MILNE (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOSEPH H. CIHON (University of North Texas), RONALD LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOHN JAMES MCEACHIN (Autism Partnership)
Description: Researchers have demonstrated that social skills groups may be beneficial for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For the past 20 years the instructors have been implementing social skills groups for individuals diagnosed with ASD. Recently, they have completed a randomized control trial which evaluated a 16-week behaviorally based social skills group for individuals diagnosed with ASD. Based upon the instructors’ clinical experience and research experience they will present how behavior analysts can effectively implement behaviorally based social skills group. Research data, clinical data, and video examples of how to implement social skills group will be presented and the various teaching and reinforcement procedures that can be used within social skills group will be discussed. The instructors will also discuss ways to evaluate students’ progress within a social skills group. Finally, future directions for both clinicians and researchers will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify 3 different teaching procedures that can be used in social skills groups and identify what skills can be taught with these procedures; (2) identify 3 different formal assessments and identify what these formal assessments asses; (3) describe various data collection systems that can be used during social skill groups.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts who have previous experience working with individuals diagnosed with autism or developmental disability and who have implemented behaviorally based procedures to teach social behavior
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): group instruction, social behavior, social skills
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Establishing Creative Play: A Behavior Analytic Perspective
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 2, Swissotel
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: The purpose of this intermediate workshop is to train participants in the use of various strategies to teach creative play, through the use of visual supports. Creativity will be defined using behavioral definitions with an emphasis placed on planning for generalization. A variety of systematic strategies for teaching creative play using visuals will be reviewed with participants. Some of these strategies will include: matrix training, video modeling, visual checklists, and picture activity schedules. Video modeling has been shown to be a successful teaching strategy in increasing pretend play skills in children diagnosed with autism (MacDonald, Sacramone, Mansfield, Wiltz & Ahearn, 2009), while matrix training has demonstrated successful results in teaching generalized language responses without direct teaching (Goldstein & Mousetis, 1989). Picture activity schedules have also been used to foster independent play in children with autism spectrum disorders (MacDuff, G. S., Krantz, P. J., & McClannahan, L. E., 1993). This workshop will describe the expanded use of visual supports to facilitate generalization of materials, settings and play skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe and understand creativity; (2) describe the deficits in children with ASD to rationalize a need for teaching creativity; (3) identify the need to plan for generalization; (4) identify types of play to teach and who to teach it to; (5) describe matrix training and create a matrix for a pretend play activity; (6) describe video modeling and one scenario in which to implement it; (7) identify settings and occasions to use them and learners to use them with; (8) describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individuals’ learning styles.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a variety of approaches including: lecture, guided practice, video observations and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies provided. Hands on activities will follow: matrix , video models and visual schedules will be developed in small groups.
Audience: BCBAs, SLPs,graduate students
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Activity Schedules, Creativity, Play skills
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder a Variety of Skills Through the Use of Video Modeling
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich C, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christos Nikopoulos, Ph.D.
CHRISTOS NIKOPOULOS (Autism Consultancy Services, London)
Description: Over the last few decades, there has been a shift in emphasis from language-based instruction to more visual instructional supports as a catalyst for learning in individuals with multiple disabilities and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This is due to extensive reports that individuals with ASD demonstrate enhanced performance on simple visual search tasks that require detecting a target set among distracters. Given the visual superiority of people with ASD, it is perhaps not surprising that the majority of current educational programs for these individuals frequently employ visual supports. Picture prompts, photographic activity schedules, visual schedules, or videos appear to be appropriate and particularly motivating for these individuals. The range of target behaviors and different methods by which video modeling has been successfully implemented to teach individuals with ASD ages 3 to 20 years, attests to its robustness as an approach for supporting appropriate behaviors in this population. This approach, which has been so favorable to researchers and therapists for a number of reasons, will be the focus of this workshop, wherein extensive and updated details and findings from the literature, as well as from the clinical and research practice of the instructor, will be provided to the audience.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the essential conceptual underpinnings of observational learning, which are critical for the formation of video modeling procedures; (2) name the salient features of video-modeling procedures as guided by findings from the literature (e.g., with what ages video modeling can be effective, what intervention goals can be addressed by the implementation of video modeling, in which settings video modeling can be effectively used, etc.); (3) describe different types of video modeling and the advantages and disadvantages of each type when targeting different performance areas in children with ASD (e.g., social skills, daily living skills, communication/language, play skills, joint attention, challenging behaviors); (4) demonstrate step-by-step different types of video modeling (e.g., video modeling, self-modeling, priming modeling, point-of-view modeling) could be designed and implemented; (5) design and analyze a video modeling intervention using selected case scenarios.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, guided practice, video demonstrations of practice strategies, real-life case scenarios and examples, small group activities and exercises as well as group discussion.
Audience: Graduate students and RBTs, Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA), and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBA), psychologists as well as respective therapists and special educators working in a variety of applied and experimental settings as well as educational and social science settings who are interested in teaching a number of different skills to children/adolescents with ASD and other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Communication skills, Social skills, Video modeling
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Generative Instruction for Individuals With Learning Challenges
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Skyway 272, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Eduational and Developmental Therapies, Inc), GLADYS WILLIAMS (CIEL, SPAIN)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to introduce clinicians to generative instruction technology. Both the conceptual and research base of generative instruction promises to significantly improve the efficacy and efficiency of ABA-based educational technologies for both neurotypical and atypical learners, and to resolve many of the learning challenges presented by children with autism and related disorders. The presentation is divided into three components: part 1 identifies and reviews the knowledge base that supports generative instruction design and delivery; part 2 reviews and demonstrates varius generative instructional design and delivery options; part 3 includes activities to acquire and practice each instructional design and delivery option.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify several types of generative instruction designs and procedures within hear/say, read/say, read/write, and hear-think/write learning channels, and describe the potential for each to establish generative learner performance; (2) identify the key studies and projects that have lead to contemporary, applied generative instructional design within hear/say, read/say, read/write, and hear-think/write learning channels; (3) demonstrate application of three major generative instruction procedures to individual, self-choose cases within hear/say, read/say, read/write, and hear-think/write learning channels and discuss/review with other workshop participants.
Activities: Activities will include didactic presentation of the conceptual and research history of generative instruction. The presentation will include video examples of various generative instructional design and delivery procedures (e.g., general case programming through direct instruction delivery). Presentation will include built in Active Student Response opportunities throughout. Active discussion will be encouraged throughout. After presentation of each major generative contingency (e.g., contingency adduction), small break out groups will be formed to produce a clinical example of the use of that contingency. Several procedures will require participants to complete pre-structured instructional design templates.
Audience: Intermediate level clinicians and clinical supervisors of instructional programming to address the learning, comprehension, and performance challenges of individuals with learning deficits and difficulties.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Contingency adduction, Generalcase programming, Generative instruction, Recombinative generalization
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Differential Reinforcement Schedules: What's the Difference and How to Implement in Classroom and Community Settings?
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich A, Swissotel
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ed.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LAUREN DEGRAZIA (Partners in Learning, Inc.), JENNIFER CORNELY (Partners in Learning, Inc.), NICOLE M. RZEMYK (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LORI LORENZETTI (Partners in Learning, Inc,)
Description: Differential schedules of reinforcement have long been scientifically validated as successful methods to improve human behavior (Vollmer et.al., 1999). When properly implemented, clinicians have demonstrated reduced levels of inappropriate targets (Call et.al., 2011; Rozenblat et.al, 2009), as well as increased rates of desired responses (Napolitano et.al., 2010). Children with autism can engage in both high rates of challenging behavior and profound deficits in social interactions. These deficits may impede successful inclusion within normalized classrooms. Rates of social responding, initiating, and reduced outbursts should be targeted at an early age to increase successful community integration. This workshop will demonstrate via case studies how to implement a variety of differential reinforcement (DR) schedules to: increase social initiations and responding in students with autism spectrum disorders towards peers in class by using a peer-led differential reinforcement of high rates of behavior schedule (DRH); reduce rates of challenging behaviors by using differential reinforcement of low rates of behavior schedule (DRL) fixed interval schedules in class and community settings; run multiple DR schedules as part of a treatment package; implement DR schedules using high and low tech options; design intervention plans via DR schedules that may best fit learner challenges and setting considerations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe each differential schedule of reinforcement treatment option; (2) state the relevant clinical information needed to apply appropriate DR schedule to fit the needs of the learner, (3) describe both high and low technology options to run DR schedules in a variety of settings
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video case study examples, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials for identifying appropriate guidelines for DR schedule applications to match learner needs will be provided in order to support participant learning. Both high and low technology options will be shared with participants.
Audience: Junior BCBAs, school consultants, child study teams, behavior specialists, BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): differential reinforcement
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Keep Calm and Carry On: Teaching Toleration of Non-Preferred Activities/Items to Individuals With Autism
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nicole Pearson, Psy.D.
NICOLE PEARSON (NYC Autism Charter School), JENNIFER JAYE (NYC Autism Charter School), REBECCA WELLS (New York Center for Autism Charter School), LEIGH COOPER (NYC Autism Charter School)
Description: Many individuals with autism exhibit challenging behavior when confronted with non-preferred items or activities. While behavior intervention plans are often put in place to decrease maladaptive behavior, much more can be done through targeted programming to offset the likelihood of challenging behavior occurring in these instances. Specifically, programming to increase the toleration of non-preferred activities and items will increase appropriate responses and potentially establish a generalized repertoire of appropriate alternative responses and self-regulation skills that can be used in other non-preferred scenarios. This workshop will enable participants to develop, plan, and implement effective, evidence-based skill acquisition programming to increase the toleration of non-preferred activities and items in individuals with autism. Through an analysis of toleration programming components and case studies, participants will learn how to identify and break down goals into successive steps and how to shape toleration. This workshop will review the types of skills that can be targeted (e.g., eating a variety of foods, tolerating medical exams, tolerating wearing an ID bracelet), and allow participants to apply what they’ve learned through interactive, small group activities. Because programming can occur in school, home, and/or community settings, participants will also learn best practices and implementation procedures for working collaboratively with families/caregivers.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe how the principles of shaping apply to instruction to teach students with autism how to maintain appropriate behavior in the presence of nonpreferred activities and/or stimuli; (2) list components of effective teaching strategies to teach individuals with autism to maintain appropriate behavior around specific activities (e.g., birthday parties) and/or stimuli (e.g., automatic toilet flushing signals); (3) design a program that includes teaching procedures, plans for systematic fading of teaching procedures and/or reinforcement, data collection options and generalization to a novel setting for at least one activity or stimulus (e.g., getting a haircut); (4) use information about programming for effective home/school collaboration and parent training best practices to apply teaching strategies to home/community environments.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video demonstrations, and small group activities which will then be discussed with the larger group. Specific small group activities to include: each group will select a target skill from a list of potential targets (e.g., getting a shot, tolerating an ID bracelet, eating a new food) and create a de-sensitization procedure from start to finish; discuss data collection options and include strategies for generalization, fading, and parent training; problem solving a case study scenario; identifying alternatives/modifications that can be used if teaching to toleration is not an option.
Audience: The intended audience includes BCBAs and related providers currently providing behavior analytic services in home, school, and/or community settings; teachers/administrators; parents of individuals with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism education, desensitization, parent training, toleration programming
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
First Three Months of Behavioral Intervention for Children With Autism: A Developmental Perspective
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Montreux 2, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monika M. Suchowierska-Stephany, Ph.D.
Monika M. Suchowierska-Stephany (SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center), KATRINA OSTMEYER (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.), MIKAYLA M. MCHENRY-POWELL (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.)
Description: The first three months of early intensive behavioral intervention are a crucial period for a young learner with autism. It has been recommended that the behavioral intervention take into account a developmental perspective, especially as it relates to behavioral cusps leading to autistic development. In this workshop, we will examine several related skills that may be present or absent in young children with autism: stimulus overselectivity, facial recognition, mutually responsive orientation, joint attention, and social referencing. Based on this information, we will propose major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention, together with teaching strategies to accomplish those goals. Major challenges of the first three months will also be discussed. The workshop will conclude with some suggestions for the next months of therapy.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) list developmental concepts that relate to early behavioral intervention; (2) characterize skills that are present or absent in young children with autism and that are behavioral cusps for autistic development; (3) list major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention as they relate to the precursors of autism; (4) plan the following months of therapy.
Activities: During the course of the workshop, participants will have an opportunity to analyze videos of typically developing children and autistic children to search for the behavioral cusps discussed in the workshop as well as to plan–based on videos of autistic children–goals for the beginnings of their therapy. Small group activities will be organized.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts who work with families of young children with autism and are responsible for programming therapeutic goals for their pupils.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, behavioral cusps, child development
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Diagnosis and Treatment of Children With Psychiatric Disorders: Functional Assessments and Motivating Operations
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University), JESSICA MINAHAN (Consultant)
Description: Typically, functional behavioral assessment (FBA) has been used with individuals with developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders. The goal of FBA is to identify the function of aberrant behavior and to teach the individual to exhibit an acceptable replacement behavior that can serve the same function. Traditional counselors view aberrant behaviors in individuals with psychiatric disorders as symptoms of underlying constructs and use the diagnosis as a reason for these behaviors, proposing more global treatments such as evidence-based therapies or medications. On the other hand, behaviorists view those behaviors as serving an environmental function. Once the environmental function of a psychiatric symptom is identified, it can be treated effectively by replacing it with a more acceptable behavior serving the same function. However, there are several components that are often missing in the analysis of behavior that is related to psychiatric diagnoses. These include: the analysis/understanding of establishing/abolishing operations in the form of private events (e.g., physical sensations, covert tacts/mands) and learning history with SDs for reinforcement/punishment. Workshop presenters will discuss the process of conducting FBAs and developing function-based treatments for several different symptoms of psychiatric diagnoses including anxiety, disturbed attachment, and oppositional/defiant behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the symptoms of psychiatric disorders as behaviors serving an environmental function; (2) describe the process of conducting FBAs with children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (3) describe the role of learning history in treating with children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (4) describe the role of motivating operations in the form of private events in treating children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (5) describe how to develop and implement function-based treatments for children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools and community settings, take notes, ask questions, view a PowerPoint presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who typically-developing who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavior Analytic Training for Health, Life, Fitness, and Peak Personal Performance
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Alpine, Swissotel
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephen Ray Flora, Ph.D.
STEPHEN RAY FLORA (Youngstown State University)
Description: As obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other health problems are at epidemic proportions for many populations, including populations served by Behavior Analysts, it is vital Behavior Analysts learn to apply behavior analysis to ameliorate these problems and to promote healthy lifestyles effectively. Medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of exercise, athletic participation, physical fitness and healthy living are covered. The workshop will teach participants to use applied behavior analysis principles to objectively access, analyze, and optimally improve their own, or their clients’ physical fitness, health related lifestyles, and, if desired, athletic performances. Emphasis will be placed on Behavior Analytic ‘gradual change techniques;’ optimal goal setting parameters; objective, data based analysis and decision making; and how Behavioral Analytic Experimental Designs, such as Multiple Baselines Across Situations and Bounded Changing Criterion Designs, may not just be used to measure change, but actually facilitate effective behavioral change. A new focus, from a behavior analytic perspective, will be on the uses and misuses of web based, social media fitness tools (e.g. Strava, fitbit, etc). Finally, participants will learn how improved health allows individuals to live a valued life and aid in chosen life directions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) state many of the behavioral, psychological, and medical benefits of physical fitness, athletic participation, and living a healthy lifestyle; (2) perform functional assessment of current health and fitness related behaviors; (3) perform task analyses of healthy eating behaviors; safe, effective exercise; and skilled athletic performances; (4) identify personalized reinforcers, motivations, incentives, and values for healthy lifestyles, physical fitness and athleticism; (5) understand the importance of, and how to effectively use goal setting, task analysis, pinpointing; how to identify skill gaps; how to set realistically achievable goals; and how to effectively use publicly posted goals to achieve fitness and optimal athletic performance; (6) use behavior analytic experimental designs to not only measure and access behavioral change but to facilitate health, fitness and athletic behavioral changes; (7) use the concepts of optimal physiological arousal, periodization, and super compensation in designing a personalized training program; (8) analyze and use web-based, social media tools as health and fitness aids; (9) use data collection, charting, and graphing to optimize fitness and improve eating related behaviors.
Activities: Participants will be guided though presented information with PowerPoint slides, worksheets and lecture handouts that will provide participants with the information necessary learn the medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of fitness and develop effective programs for improving health, physical fitness, diet behaviors, and healthy lifestyles; develop effective programs to optimize athletic performance; and to use Behavior Analytic Experimental Designs to access and facilitate desired behavioral change. Participants will be shown, from a behavior analytic perspective; how to access, use and evaluate information and data collected from fitness based social media. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture utilizing PowerPoint, presenter provided practice materials, video observation, and group discussion.
Audience: The target audience is board certified behavior analysts, BCaBAs, psychologists, personal trainers, and others interested in learning to use behavior analytic procedures to promote healthy lifestyles, fitness, or to optimize elite performance. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, or health and fitness will also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): diet, health, physical fitness, sport psychology
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Functional Skills and Curriculum-Based Assessments for Learners With Moderate-to-Severe Disabilities: It's as Much About What We Teach as How We Teach It
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall KL, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates), TROY FRY (Patrick McGreevy and Associates)
Description: In recent years, many teachers, curriculum coordinators, and behavior analysts have struggled with “what to teach children” with moderate-to-severe disabilities or limited skill repertoires, including many children with autism, especially as they grow older. In public schools, teachers are often instructed to adhere to the Common Core State Standards, while in ABA centers they are often offered only developmental curricula designed to help young children “catch up” to their typically developing peers. When they look for alternative sources of more functional skills, they often find few options. If they look to the BACB Fourth Edition Task List, they find no items that assist in resolving this or any other curricular issue. The presenters will describe functional skills and curriculum-based assessments, their value for specific children and adults, and the scientific literature that supports their use.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe four criteria that can be used to determine if a skill is functional for a learner with moderate-to-severe disabilities; (2) describe four examples of speaker, listener, daily living, academic, and tolerating skills that are functional for learners with moderate-to-severe disabilities; (3) describe examples of available curriculum-based assessment instruments and the advantages and disadvantages of each; (4) describe four barriers to an effective method of speaking.
Activities: The presenters will present some of the material in a lecture format, followed by directed discussions and participant interactions. Participants will also be provided with opportunities for guided practice in the selection of functional skills, including the most important functional skill of all -- functioning effectively as a speaker.
Audience: BCBAs and BCaBAs who function as teachers, residential care providers, curriculum coordinators and supervisors, clinical directors, and university professors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Pica: From Research to Practice
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich B, Swissotel
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Deborah L. Grossett, Ph.D.
DON E. WILLIAMS (Don E. Williams, Ph.D., BCBA-D), PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York), DEBORAH L. GROSSETT (The Shape of Behavior)
Description: Pica is the consumption of non-nutritive items. Although observed in other populations and contexts, pica is common among individuals with profound intellectual disabilities and is sometimes dangerous and even lethal. Functional analyses have almost always identified the function of pica as automatic positive reinforcement, hence, it is difficult to treat and manage pica without resorting to positive punishment. This workshop will describe methods for conducting functional assessment and analysis of pica, describe non-punishment interventions and the ethical role of positive punishment, describe other treatments and environmental management strategies, describe the evidence for effective treatment of pica,and finally, describe issues related to staff training, management, supervision and organizational behavior management.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state the definition of pica and describe its associated risks; (2) describe methods for conducting functional assessments and analyses of pica; (3) describe strategies to prevent pica; (4) describe strategies to teach alternate behaviors; (5) describe the situations in which positive punishment may be ethically justified; (6) name evidence-based practices for pica; (7) describe issues related to staff training, management, supervision and organizational behavior.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lectures, reading case studies, small group break out, and discussion and feedback.
Audience: BCBAs in training; BCBAs; other professional staff and administrators working with clients with pica; applied researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, evidence-based practice, functional assessment, pica
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessing and Teaching Students With Significant Needs: The Impact of Essential for Living in a School Setting
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Michigan ABC, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lisa N. Britton, Ph.D.
LISA N. BRITTON (Spectrum Center), DIANINHA SEAL (Spectrum Schools), AMANDA BECK (Spectrum Schools and Programs)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to train people on the Essential for Living (EFL) assessment and curriculum. EFL is a skills-based assessment designed specifically for individuals with severe to profound disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviors and struggle with basic communication skills. The focus of this workshop is to describe EFL with a significant emphasis on how to conduct the assessment and develop targets for instruction. During the workshop the instructors will also describe and demonstrate the data collection process followed by opportunities to practice data collection. Outcome data and case studies will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) articulate what EFL is and the population that would benefit from it; (2) implement a quick assessment and apply the assessment procedures for a student/client on their case load; (3) identify appropriate targets based on the assessment results; (4) collect data with the EFL data collection tools.
Activities: The format of this workshop will include lecture, guided practice, and small group discussion.
Audience: Graduate students and professionals working with individuals with developmental disabilities in either an educational, group home, or day program setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Individualized Program Development: A Cohesive Model for a Student's Program Book That Expands Far Beyond Direct Teaching Settings
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich E, Swissotel
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mark J. Palmieri, Psy.D.
MARK J. PALMIERI (The Center for Children with Speical Needs), SHAUNESSY M. EGAN (The Center for Children with Special Needs)
Description: The use of individualized program books is a well-known practice within educational settings. These procedures are considered essential for tracking student progress with those skills targeted for instruction using ABA-based methods. Increasingly, entire educational programs for students are expected to apply ABA-based methods of instruction. This work, however, rarely includes high-quality methods for implementing precise programming across the student's entire instructional day. That is, the quality of skill-focused program planning, data collection, intervention consistency, and empirical evaluation of progress are rarely equal across direct, or 1:1, teaching settings and the integrated environment. This workshop will present a program book model that offers a framework for the application integrated and precise lesson planning to address every component of a student's education program. This includes not only direct academic skill instruction but, importantly, integrated academic, social, and adaptive skill instruction as well as related service (e.g., psychology, speech and language, motor) targets. Throughout the workshop participants will study and be provided with models for such programs. Further, staff training methods and strategies for establishing system-wide buy-in for this model of program planning will be addressed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify models of individualized lesson plan development that address related service (e.g., psychology, speech and language) skill sets; (2) understand the essential features of individualized lesson plans address skills to be taught in integrated settings; (3) understand the critical elements of diverse direct teaching models including cold-probe, interspersed, and quick transfer models; (4) construct a model of a comprehensive program book which addresses all skills addressed within the student's educational program; (5) understand critical elements of staff training and methods for building system-wide support for the application of evidence-based lessons day-long.
Activities: This workshop will include direct lecture as well as applied practice opportunities for participants to develop individualized program books for use across all environments. Participants will have opportunities to review samples and work with templates to ensure appropriate familiarity with the workshop content.
Audience: This workshop is targeted toward practitioners with an intermediate familiarity with individualized program planning. It is designed to address contemporary issues with program planning that ABA-based program faced when attempting to support full and effective integration practices within educational settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): individualized instruction, natural environment, program planning, staff training
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing Classroom Environments to Produce Generative Behavior
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), VICCI TUCCI (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.)
Description: Educators cannot possibly teach everything that needs to be learned with explicit instruction and practice to fluency. Effective, independent adults must learn how to learn without teachers and instruction. They must demonstrate generativity, the emergence of complex behavioral repertoires without explicit instruction. Many studies have been published demonstrating the process of generativity (e.g., Johnson & Layng, 1992; Andronis, 1999; Layng, Twyman & Stikeleather, 2004; Epstein, 1999). People must engage in behaviors they've learned in instruction in a wider variety of contexts than the classroom. We call this kind of generativity, application. They also engage in novel, untaught blends and re-combinations of behavior that they learned in school, in the context of new stimuli not encountered in classrooms. We call this kind of generativity, adduction, or contingency adduction. In this workshop participants will examine two instructional models that promote generativity, the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction (MMGI) for typical and near-typical learners (e.g., Johnson & Street, 2004, 2012, 2013), and the Competent Learner Model (CLM) for learners with autism and developmental disabilities (e.g., Tucci & Hursh, 1991; Tucci, Hursh & Laitinen, 2004). Participants will also design MMGI and CLM-based classroom environments to produce application and contingency adduction.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) break down a selected curriculum into its key tool skills, component skills, and composite repertoires; (2) design a generative application environment for one or more instructional objectives that they currently teach, using either MMGI or CLM procedures, including key motivational operations; (3) design a generative environment that is likely to produce contingency adduction of one or more instructional objectives that they currently teach, using either MMGI or CLM procedures, including key motivational operations.
Activities: Workshop presenters will teach each objective through lecture, study guides, and discussion. Participants will work in pairs or trios to analyze a selected curriculum area into its key tool skills, component skills and composite skills. Participants who work with children with autism will work in pairs or trios to design a CLM non-directed classroom environment to produce generative application of selected instructional objectives. Participants who work with typical or near-typical learners will work in pairs or trios to design an MMGI application classroom environment for selected instructional objectives. Each participant will be able to compare and contrast MMGI and CLM procedures employed to guarantee application. Participants who work with children with autism will work in pairs or trios to design a CLM non-directed classroom environment to produce generative contingency adduction of selected instructional objectives. Participants who work with typical or near-typical learners will work in pairs or trios to design an MMGI classroom environment to produce generative contingency adduction of selected instructional objectives. Each participant will be able to compare and contrast MMGI and CLM procedures employed to guarantee contingency adduction.
Audience: Those who deliver instructional services to typically developing children and youth, near-typical children such as those with ADHD and learning disabilities, and children with autism and developmental disabilities. This includes BCBAs, teachers, professionals of all types, and anyone interested in teaching higher-level skills.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part 1: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Skyway 260, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don’t do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must register for all 3 parts (WPBID #20; WPBID #50; WPBID #80) and must attend all 3 parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Celeration Efficiency, Improvement Process, Organizational Performance, Pragmatism
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Use ABA to Sustain Leanand Six Sigma Results in Business and Industry
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall IJ, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: OBM/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael McCarthy, M.Ed.
MICHAEL MCCARTHY (www.SustainLeanGains.com)
Description: When companies adopt Lean or Six Sigma methods, they often conduct many “Rapid Improvement Events” also known as “Kaizen Events.” Although many of these activities are conducted, and many process improvements are discovered, only a small percentage survive as standard operating procedure for the company operations. This means the time spent on these process improvement activities are wasted because the new methods are not used. The improvement gains are not sustained. In the analytical ABC model of applied behavior analysis, these activities are “antecedents,” which last only a short time. In order to build these new methods into daily habits, consequences are needed, specifically positive reinforcement. This workshop gives OBM consultants and company managers an ABA “preventive maintenance” methodology for sustaining gains called “process behavior maintenance” (PBM). Participants learn three skills for sustaining lean gains. They can add these skills to their own leader standard work for maximum effectiveness.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) name 3 common causes for failure to sustain Lean & Six Sigma programs within companies and healthcare organizations; (2) complete an ABC analysis of one case study; (3) name 3 ABA skills that will enable supervisors in organizations to sustain the new process behaviors derived from a process improvement project using Lean or Six Sigma methodologies.
Activities: Lecture,small group break-out,guided practice of ABC analysis of case studies,group discussion
Audience: OBM practitioners, ABA students considering a career in OBM, managers and supervisors in healthcare, manufacturing, and service delivery, and ABA professors considering part-time consultation/projects with business, industry, and healthcare.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Physical Activity to Enhance Learning, Social Skills, and Self-Control With Autistic and Typical Populations
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 3, Swissotel
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eitan Eldar, Ph.D.
EITAN ELDAR (Kibbutzim College, Israel)
Description: The presented model (Eldar, 2006) emphasizes the uniqueness of movement and game as an ideal context enabling teachers and clinicians to design a challenging learning atmosphere for their students. The model is based on a series of scripts offering a simulation of real-life situations. It can support a specific clinical goal (such as developing self-control); support a school curriculum; serve as an extended behavioral program for individuals/groups. The model has recently been implemented with autistic children, supporting communication and social skills on an individual level and as a preparation for inclusion. The rationale behind developing the model (Eldar & Ayvazo, 2009) will be discussed and specific behavioral procedures and principles supporting the model will be cited (Eldar, 2008). The structure of the model will be described, followed by implementation examples. Components of the model, modified during the past 18 years, will then be portrayed. The workshop will conclude with recommendations and examples for utilizing the model in a variety of educational and clinical settings applicable to various populations. Attention will be devoted to using these procedures as a part of an individual program for autistic populations and for supporting their inclusion in the regular education system.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) explain the unique characteristics of physical activity and games as supportive learning contexts; (2) cite behavioral principles and procedures that enhance learning in these contexts; (3) present the general structure of the model and describe its components; (4) design various physical activities as clinical scripts, serving specific behavioral goals; (5) use and modify observation forms to evaluate students’ progress; (6) adapt the components of the model to different populations and programs; (7)explain the rationale of the model to parents and practitioners.
Activities: Activities will include: a presentation of the theoretical background of the model, defining the rationale behind it; an open discussion on how physical activity can serve as a learning context; a video presentation illustrating the implementation of the model in various settings and in different cultures; active demonstration of games involving the workshop's participants; planning trials involving the participants practicing activity and program design based on the model.
Audience: Behavior analysts, teachers,clinicians, psychologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Physical-Activity, Self-Control, Social-Skills
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Maximizing Your Behavior Analytic Results by Changing Others' Behaviors
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 3, Swissotel
Area: PRA/TPC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kent A. Corso, Psy.D.
KENT A. CORSO (NCR Behavioral Health, LLC)
Description: There are many ways for us to maximize our behavior analytic interventions. Certainly, behavior analysts have been trained to use various models of teaching to increase or decrease overt behaviors of those who they serve. But the magnitude of our impact sometimes depends on our ability to change others' behavior including caretakers, parents, and supervisors. Applying behavioral science to the behavior of those people who are not our direct client can be elusive. Even more challenging is applying operant principles to their inner behaviors. This workshop focuses on what the behavioral addictions literature calls motivational interviewing, an evidence-based method of helping others change their behaviors. In behavior analytic terms this means targeting another's antecedent inner behaviors which precede the overt behavioral changes in the individual's life. Attendees will learn the applications, nuts and bolts of motivational interviewing as this pertains to behavior analytic services and non-clinical professional responsibilities (e.g., management, supervision, collaboration). At the conclusion of the workshop, learners will be able to apply motivational interviewing to maximize the impact of their practice, particularly when their success relies on changing others' inner behavior - something which is very difficult for an "outsider" to do.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) explain the transtheoretical model of behavior change; (2) describe the mechanics and techniques of motivational interviewing; (3) apply the course material to your own challenges with changing others' behavior in clinical or non-clinical contexts; (4) demonstrate one motivational interviewing skill which may be applied to your job.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, discussion, video clips, and role plays in order to practice these skills. Learning objectives will be met through a combination of these activities.
Audience: The target audience is advanced practitioners who operate in clinical, supervisory, and other team-based roles. Anyone who has ever been frustrated by the challenges of having someone else implement a behavior plan or program that you created, would find this helpful.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): inner behaviors, motivational interviewing, operant conditioning, practice enhancement
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Ethics and Technology in BACB Supervision: Safe and Effective Practices
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Randolph, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dana R. Reinecke, Ph.D.
DANA R. REINECKE (Long Island University Post), CHERYL J. DAVIS (7 Dimensions Consulting/Endicott College)
Description: Current training and supervision requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) require prospective BCBAs to receive supervision from trained supervisors. After the initial 8-hour training, supervisors are required to earn 3 CEUs in supervision skills every cycle. This workshop addresses specific supervision skills related to the BACB's Compliance Code (implemented as of 2016), with particular attention to the use of technology in the implementation of evidence-based supervision practices. Distance supervision is a common practice in the field, and relies increasingly on various forms of technology, which may or may not meet ethical requirements for confidentiality, privacy, and effective teaching and training. Participants will learn about how the Compliance Code applies to their practice in providing supervision, and how they may use technology safely and effectively to facilitate both distance and face-to-face supervision. A variety of applications of technology will be discussed and practiced during the workshop. This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) discuss and implement the Compliance Code with regard to the use of evidence-based practices in supervision; (2) describe the ethical implications of using various forms of technology in supervision, as per the Compliance Code; (3) implement the use of at least two applications of technology to the practice of effective supervision.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, whole-group demonstrations of technology, and small-group breakouts to practice specific applications of technology. Objectives will be described through lecture and discussed and demonstrated with the group as a whole. Small groups will be formed based on common interests and needs, and workshop facilitators will work with each group to practice developing and using supervision strategies to meet learning objectives on an individual level.
Audience: Target audience is BACB supervisors who have completed an 8-hour supervision training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): ethics, supervision, technology
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Practicing Stimulus Equivalence Experiments With MTSLab Software
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall CD, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: TBA/EAB; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Celso Socorro Oliveira, Ph.D.
CELSO SOCORRO OLIVEIRA (UNESP - Sao Paulo State University)
Description: MTSLab is a simple software that uses ASCII text files to design matching-to-sample (MTS) sessions. It was first developed by the presenter during his doctorate in 2002 to attend sign language teaching of mentally retarded deaf students of a Brazilian special school. This workshop proposes to prepare MTS sessions using this software considering the graph theory approach. The software will be freely distributed. The theoretical part of the workshop aims to introduce the concept of MTS as an operator in stimulus equivalent classes, which includes the concepts of nodes, arcs, trees, nodal distance, and strength of the relations. The practice will be conducted preparing sample sessions based on papers usually taught within stimulus equivalence experiments in behavior analysis journals. The sample stimuli used will be available through a website. At the end of the workshop, the audience should be able to prepare different sessions with the software and analyze its data to decide if the equivalence emerged or not.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) review concepts of stimulus equivalence and MTS; (2) prepare MTS sessions with MTSLab software; (3) evaluate data resulted of the practice and registered by the software
Activities: Lecture of stimulus equivalence under graph theory approach and guided practice of sessions preparation using the software MTSLab.
Audience: Undergraduate professors;teachers of disabled people who want to use stimulus equivalence as a tool
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): matching-to-sample, MTS software, stimulus equivalence
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Applying the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts in Everyday Practice
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin/The Meadows Center)
Description: Ethics in behavior analysis is of utmost importance in today's world. Certified behavior analysts and applicants are now required to abide by the new compliance code (BACB, 2014). This newly approved document became enforceable on January 1, 2016. Changes to the document involve: supervisory volume by supervisors, multiple relationships, media presentations, advertising, and many more. Addressing the "real world" ethical dilemmas during implementation of behavior analysis can be a challenging endeavor especially for new professionals (Bailey & Burch, 2011). This workshop will actively engage participants in discussions surrounding ethical dilemmas that occur in the home, clinics, and within schools and other organizations. These examples will demonstrate the 10 guidelines that comprise the new professional and ethical compliance code (BACB, 2014). The instructors will quiz participants on their knowledge of each of the 10 guidelines, review each guideline, assist participants in identifying the appropriate ethical guideline related to case scenarios, foster conversation around appropriate actions to take, and revisit quiz questions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state the 10 guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014); (2) accurately identify ethical dilemmas presented in video and/or case examples; (3) accurately state which guideline addresses the dilemma; (4) correctly answer quiz questions related to ethics in behavior analysis.
Activities: Take pre/post quizzes regarding ethical behavior of behavior analysts. Lecture on the 10 Guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that became effective January 1, 2016. Lecture on Bailey and Burch (2011) viewpoints on ethical guidelines of behavior analysts. Watch and discuss video examples (or discuss written scenarios) for each of the 10 Guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. Discussion on how to respond to "real world" dilemmas that professionals in the field have encountered and shared with the group.
Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are seeking additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals/families, supervisors/supervisees, and other service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): compliance code, ethics, home/community
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Takin' It to the Zoo: ABA Solutions for Animals in Human Care
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Vevey 1, Swissotel
Area: AAB/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan G. Friedman, Ph.D.
SUSAN G. FRIEDMAN (Utah State University/Behavior Works ), STEVE MARTIN (Natural Encounters, Inc.)
Description: The window of opportunity is wider now than ever before to disseminate behavior analysis science and technology to new user groups. Professionals working with exotic zoo and aquarium animals and companion animals are increasingly interested and in need of ABA solutions. Although the fundamental principles and procedures in our field are universal, working with different species, individuals, and conditions poses different challenges that often require creative tailoring quite different than working with children with special needs. The issues run the gamut from responsibly managing the motivation to work for food to shaping new behavior without frustration lest a six-ton animal behave aggressively. This workshop is designed for all behavior analysts interested in learning more about the growing field of ABA with non-human animals. Topics include the relevance of the natural science of behavior change, incorporating different levels of analysis, operationalizing respectful and trusting relationships with animals (what it looks like and how to achieve it), creating motivation through distant and immediate antecedent arrangement, and a hierarchy of behavior change procedures based on the least intrusive effective alternative concept.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the different focuses and relevance of the ethological and behavioral models as they apply to solving behavior problems with zoological and companion animals; (2) describe 5 or more motivating operations to establish strong reinforcers working with non-human animals; (3) shape new behaviors without words or gestures.
Activities: Participants will operationalize common animal behavior labels, conduct ABC assessments from video observation, brainstorm strategies and new skills to replace problem animal behavior, and shape new behavior with participants without words or gestures.
Audience: This workshop is designed for all behavior analysts at any level of education or experience who are interested in learning more about the growing field of ABA with zoo and companion animals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Following a Safer and More Efficient Functional Analysis and Treatment Model
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Child Study Center), MAHSHID GHAEMMAGHAMI (Western New England University)
Description: Functional analysis is a powerful methodological tool that can provide an effective and humane treatment for problem behavior (Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Despite its growing empirical support, a recent survey (Oliver, Pratt, & Normand, 2015) suggests that the majority of practicing behavior analysts are not conducting functional analyses to inform treatment considerations. Practitioners may be avoiding functional analysis because of concerns that it places the patient or clinician in a dangerous environment and requires too much time or resources. The instructors will teach the audience how to conduct a safe functional analysis that takes an average of 25 min and as little as 5 min based on their research (e.g., Jessel, Hanley, & Ghaemmaghami, in press; Ghaemmaghami, Hanley, & Jessel, accepted) and collection of replications from clinical practice. The instructors will also discuss how to use the functional analysis results to design effective, function-based treatments that include teaching complex and developmentally appropriate functional communication skills, and skill-based delay tolerance procedures that increase other social behaviors (e.g., compliance, task engagement, and social interaction) to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires needed to be successful in contextually complex environments.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) conduct a functional analysis of problem behavior in 5 to 25 minutes; (2) teach a child complex functional communication skills; (3) teach a child how to tolerate delays and denials to reinforcement; (4) program for generalization and maintenance of these skills.
Activities: Workshop activities will include a lecture broken up with discussions and activities. Activities will include example vignettes where the audience will practice conducting interviews, videos where they will practice collecting data, and a workbook to be filled out throughout the lecture.
Audience: BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers who need to learn a fast and safe approach to assessing and treating problem behavior. This approach has been empirically validated for those with and without intellectual disabilities, with children as young as 1 and adults as old as 30, and can be conducted in multiple contexts such as classrooms, clinics, or homes.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): FCT, functional analysis, problem behavior, tolerance training
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Roosevelt, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jamie Siden Salter, Ed.S. (School Psychologist)
JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education), KATHARINE M. CROCE (Bucks County Intermediate Unit #22)
Description: This interactive and hands-on workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a “match” component will be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match System, a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically-supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. Additionally, participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. The Self & Match System has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional behavior disorders, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. The Self & Match System can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems or class-wide and school-wide management procedures as a part of school-wide positive behavioral intervention and supports. It has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings, including, but not limited to, public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring; (2) effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system; (3) identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system; (4) identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention; (5) identify the basic components of the Self & Match System; (6) systematically individualize an intervention based on collaborative and critical thinking; (7) create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace; (8) systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities.
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own Self & Match System. The format combines lecture, small group collaboration, whole group responding utilizing interactive digital polling software, and discussion. Core content will be taught through a combination of lecture, video examples, data analysis, and guided practice.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who primarily support individuals from pre-K to 21 in school, home, or clinic settings. This is a great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, behavior intervention, school, self-monitoring
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
From Assessment to Behavior Plan Implementation: Creating Comprehensive Interventions That Work
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall IJ, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mark P. Groskreutz, Ph.D.
MARK P. GROSKREUTZ (Southern Connecticut State University), NICOLE C. GROSKREUTZ (University of Saint Joseph)
Description: Effective BCBAs must be able to use principles of ABA to inform their assessment, intervention development, and training responsibilities. There are many sources available that describe various behavioral assessments and interventions, yet there are fewer resources that cover how ABA practitioners should select from among available options and individualize these interventions for a variety of clients and settings. This workshop will provide specific information on how to use various assessment strategies to inform decision making, including selecting and designing assessments, as well as using the results of those assessments to create effective interventions. Specific strategies and practical extensions will be discussed, such as preference assessment (e.g., Fisher et al., 1992; DeLeon et al., 1996), reinforcer assessment (e.g., Roscoe et al., 1999), and functional behavior assessment (e.g., Hanley, 2012; Iwata et al., 1982/1994). However, the primary goal of the workshop will be to identify when to use which assessments and how to use the outcomes to inform specific details within a developing intervention plan. Interventions will cover topics from imitation and chaining to differential reinforcement and stimulus control procedures, but again, the focus will be on how to select from the various well-researched intervention options.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify and state behavioral priorities in objective terms and identify relevant measures; (2) based on priorities, identify and design relevant assessments to inform intervention development; (3) select and plan assessments targeting identification of prerequisite skills, motivating operations, and maintaining variables; (4) use assessment results (prerequisite skills, MOs, and maintaining variables) to create comprehensive interventions for skill acquisition and behavior reduction priorities; (5) draft intervention guidelines (skill acquisition and behavior reduction) with content and format to improve treatment integrity.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, small group work, scenario-based instruction (i.e., videos, role playing) Workshop activities will generally use the following format for each subtopic area and last roughly 25-45 min each:short lecture, guided practice, small group or individual practice, review and relation of subtopic to overall topic (behavior intervention planning process). A variety of self-management tools will be provided throughout to help attendees identify the critical variables influencing assessment and intevention design, as well as to serve as a reference for later use in practice.
Audience: Early or intermediate level BCBAs who are looking to improve or expand their selection, use, and design of a variety of assessment and intervention paradigms.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavior Plans, Behavioral Interventions, Consultation, Functional Assessment
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Socially Savvy: An Assessment and Curriculum Guide for Young Children
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich B, Swissotel
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James T. Ellis, Ph.D.
JAMES T. ELLIS (Step By Step Behavioral Solutions), CHRISTINE ALMEIDA (Newton Public Schools)
Description: This workshop will introduce the “Socially Savvy Checklist,” which serves as a social-skills assessment and curriculum guide. Participants will learn how to use the checklist to determine appropriate and individualized social-skills targets, as well as to develop individualized education program objectives. Additionally, participants will become familiar with different evidence-based approaches to teaching social skills, including how to make decisions about the most appropriate approach given a child's skills and learning profile. Ideas for intervention will be provided for children of all levels of functioning, from those children who are developing basic social skills to those learning to navigate more complex social situations. A major emphasis in the workshop will be placed on developing and implementing social-skills groups, including determining appropriate skills for all group members, selecting activities and teaching strategies that can be employed to teach a variety of social skills, and developing and using practical data collection systems.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) determine target social skills for a child based on the Socially Savvy Checklist; (2) determine an appropriate context and teaching approach to teach targeted social skills; (3) describe a continuum of instructional approaches that promote the generalization of social skills to the natural environment; (4) implement at least three activities that facilitate the use of social skills; (5) and describe an appropriate structure for a social-skills group.
Activities: PowerPoint will be used to teach various parts of the assessment and intervention process, and videos and live modeling will be used to demonstrate examples of various intervention strategies and activities. Participants will be provided with examples of activities to teach social skills, sample data sheets, and curriculum. Participants will engage in a variety of hands-on activities, including using completed Socially Savvy Checklists to identify appropriate targets, playing games and activities that can be used to teach social skills, collecting data on multiple children in a group activity, and designing their own social-skills group.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts, psychologists, early childhood educators, special educators or anyone interested in starting or running a social-skills group.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Running Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Montreux 1, Swissotel
Area: AUT/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Hazel Baker, M.S.
HAZEL BAKER (Advances Learning Center and Endicott College), ASHLEY RODMAN (Advances Learning Center), MEGHAN GLADU (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: grouping students in effective clusters, using group contingencies, taking data on multiple students at once, and individualizing prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running effective activities that provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social stimuli. This workshop will teach specific learning activities that target skills in the domains of body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking. It will also provide training on how, when, and why to use group contingencies and give strategies for individualizing social instruction in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) use a variety of activities designed to provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social cues; (2) facilitate activities that teach body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking; (3) group students into effective learning clusters; (4) use several different group contingencies and identify the reasons behind using each type of contingency; (5) collect data on multiple students; (6) individualize prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students; (7) take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups to complete guided notes and case studies and participate in video-modeled activities and role plays.
Audience: The intended audience includes: BCBAs who train staff to run social skills groups; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors, or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional communication, generalization, pragmatics, social skills
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Mobile Technologies for Autism Intervention: Strategies for Communication and Visual Support, and Remediating Challenging Behavior
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich D, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mandy J. Rispoli, Ph.D.
OLIVER WENDT (Purdue University), MANDY J. RISPOLI (Purdue University), MATTHEW T. BRODHEAD (Purdue University), RAVI NIGAM (Governors State University)
Description: This workshop will focus on the use of mobile technologies to implement augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), functional communication training (FCT), and visual supports into behavioral services for individuals with severe autism. Approximately 25–50% of children on the autism spectrum have complex communication impairments resulting in a lack of functional speech and language and unresolved challenging behaviors. AAC augments or replaces spoken language through alternative means of communication. AAC can remediate challenging behaviors within a FCT approach. Graphic AAC materials such as photographs, symbols, and line drawings provide visual support to enhance comprehension and learning. Breakthroughs in contemporary mobile technologies offer new opportunities to provide these interventions in efficient yet motivating and engaging ways to learners with severe autism. This workshop will start with evidence-based AAC strategies for functional and social communication, as well as natural speech production. Subsequently, presenters will address FCT applications for remediating challenging behaviors, and showcase how to use visual activity schedules to promote independence, choice-making, and social interactions. Particular emphasis will be on suitable tablet and app solutions to support these intervention goals. Data and video-cases from recent single-subject experiments will illustrate successful implementation into daily activities in clinical and school settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) successfully apply principles of AAC and FCT to enhance behavioral programming for learners with severe autism; (2) effectively select technology solutions that are most suitable for a variety of AAC, FCT, and visual support applications; (3) effectively implement visual supports for a range of instructional and behavior modification activities; (4) distinguish well-designed from poorly-designed communication apps, and identify app features that are important to facilitate sensory-processing and prevent cognitive overload; (5) explain how single-subject research is used to evaluate the effectiveness of AAC and related interventions.
Activities: Workshop goals will be met through a balanced delivery of lecture, hands-on activities with follow-up discussion, and video case demonstrations. Infusion of empirical data will promote an evidence-based practice approach. Participants will learn the role of single-subject experimental designs for evaluating intervention efficacy for the presented strategies and approaches. Videotaped case studies will illustrate differences between AAC approaches and provide a better understanding of intervention components. Video cases will also demonstrate how to use AAC for facilitating natural speech development and remediating aggression and self-injury. Group discussion will evolve around the presentation of different types of app solutions and evaluation of app features; these will be examined in terms of ease of access and programming, suitability for ABA instruction, symbol iconicity, cost-efficiency, and ability to track progress. Finally, resources will be discussed that are available to practitioners seeking for further resources and treatment evidence. Attendees will be provided with supplemental materials and digital handouts of the information covered in the workshop.
Audience: Do you currently have learners with severe communication disorders and challenging behaviors such as aggression and self-injury? Are you finding your students are successful with manding but have difficulties with advanced communicative functions and complex language? Practitioners with motivation to implement evidence-based practices in AAC and particular interest in learning about mobile technology applications will find this workshop very suitable for their needs. This target audience includes applied researchers, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, licensed psychologists, special education teachers, speech-language pathologists, and graduate students in any of these disciplines. A basic understanding of single-subject research methodology is advantageous to fully benefit from this workshop, but not strictly necessary.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): challenging behavior, communication intervention, mobile technology, visual supports
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Evolving More Nurturing Societies Through Behavioral Science
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich A, Swissotel
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Anthony Biglan, Ph.D.
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
Description: This workshop is designed to assist behavior analysts in using their skills and knowledge to bring about significant improvements in prevalence of wellbeing. The workshop will explain the public health framework and the ways it relates to behavior analysts’ aspirations to improve wellbeing in society. A precise definition of wellbeing will be provided within that framework. The instructor will provide an overview of the prevention and treatment interventions that have been developed and tested over the preceding 40 years and the contextualist principles that underlie the success of these interventions. The instructor will show how the same contextualist principles are relevant to understanding how the larger social system of corporate capitalism affects wellbeing and how and why it has evolved in a problematic direction in recent years. The instructor will then describe successful efforts to change practices at the level of corporations. Finally, the instructor will assist participants in identifying specific outcomes that they would like to work toward and will help small groups plan to take specific steps toward their goals. The workshop will have ample opportunity for participants to interact with each other and with the instructor.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe at least five evidence-based family interventions; (2) describe at least five evidence-based school interventions; (3) describe the four principles that characterize nurturing environments; (4) describe the recent evolution of corporate capitalism and its impact on human wellbeing; (5) state at least one specific goal for improving human wellbeing that they plan to pursue; (6) describe a plan for pursuing their goals.
Activities: Workshop Activities will include: lecture, discussion, small group discussion and planning, presentations of the small groups to the entire workshop.
Audience: Professionals, including behavior analysts, health care providers, teachers, school administrators, and family therapists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): community development, cultural evolution, nurturing environments, prevention
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Verbal Behavior Development Protocols: The Foundations of Language Development From Imitation to Naming
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Montreux 3, Swissotel
Area: DDA/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Lin Du, Ph.D.
LIN DU (Teachers College, Columbia University), SUSAN BUTTIGIEG (Fred S. Keller School)
Description: This workshop will teach attendees about five different verbal behavior developmental cusps (generalized imitation, listener literacy, auditory matching, observational learning, naming) necessary to access a variety of contingencies in school and in life. The instructors will present assessment and intervention procedures (Greer & Ross, 2008; Greer & Speckman, 2009), sources of reinforcement, and appropriate candidates for these interventions. Skill and next steps once the cusps/capabilities are acquired will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) detail vocally how to probe for and induce five cusps/capabilities; (2) role play and run errorless instruction (probe and intervention); (3) list the change in the source of reinforcement once each cusp is induced; (4) describe a candidate for each intervention; (5) describe how they can teach the child differently once each cusp is induced.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BACB certificants and licensed psychologists, behavior analysts, speech therapists, supervisors, or paraprofessionals who are working with children with and without disabilities. Participants should be well-versed in the vocabulary of the science of behavior, including basic verbal operants.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral cusps, CABAS, conditioned reinforcement, developmental protocols
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Promoting Appropriate and Effective Sexual Education and Instruction for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Alpine, Swissotel
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Eden II Programs), SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
Description: Sexuality is a topic that is difficult, or at least uncomfortable, for many professionals and parents to discuss, but it is a topic that will often be an issue needing to be addressed for the many individuals with developmental disabilities and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Issues vary from individual to individual but may include social skills deficits impacting romantic relationships and interpersonal sexual relations, deficits in independence as related to personal hygiene, issues with masturbation, inappropriate sexual behaviors in public, sexual advances towards inappropriate people, and issues with perspective taking to name a few. Applied behavior analytic treatments can be highly effective in promoting appropriate sexual behaviors and sexual expression in adolescents and adults. This workshop will focus on behaviorally based strategies useful for individuals with developmental disabilities including individuals on all ends of the autism spectrum. This talk will begin with an overview of general issues regarding sexuality development as it relates to individuals with developmental disabilities. We will address the understanding of problem sexual behavior through functional assessment methods and discuss replacement treatment options based on function. We will discuss topics such as sexual development, sexuality knowledge, sexual behaviors both appropriate and inappropriate, issues regarding consent and common parent concerns. We will then move into more specific topics which could be included within a behaviorally-based sexual education curriculum designed for individuals with developmental disabilities and ASD. Treatment strategies discussed will include, but are not limited to, reinforcement-based procedures, video modeling, task analysis schedules, picture activity schedules, scripts and script fading, and social stories. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available. Although sexuality is an issue that often comes to the forefront in adolescence or early adulthood, information on sexuality is important for individuals of all ages. Topics related to ethical decision making will also be discussed. Audience questions and discussion will be welcomed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state common issues experienced by people with developmental disabilities and ASD as they relate to appropriate and satisfying sexual development and expression; (2) develop several teaching programs for skill acquisition of several sexual behaviors using techniques and theories consistent with applied behavior analysis; (3) conduct a functional assessment of problem behavior as it relates to sexual expression and develop a behavior intervention plan based on the function; (4) identify issues associated with consent.
Activities: The workshop will consist of the following activities: didactic instruction from the presenter; group discussion; presentation and review of teaching materials; role play and practice of presented teaching procedures.
Audience: The current workshop content is geared towards the following audience: (1) experienced behavior analysts who have a desire to learn how to apply behavioral principles and teaching methods to the subject of sexual behavior; (2) educators and related service professionals who have a behavioral background and work with children with developmental issues that have needs in the area of sexuality; (3) although not specifically geared towards parents and family members of individuals with needs, parents would be welcomed to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, developmental disabilities, sexual behavior, sexuality
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part 2: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Skyway 260, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don’t do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must register for all 3 parts (WPBID #20; WPBID #50; WPBID #80) and must attend all 3 parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Designing Sustainable Behavior Change with Habit Design
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Douglas A. Johnson, Ph.D.
MICHAEL KIM (Habit Design), DOUGLAS A. JOHNSON (Western Michigan University)
Description: Programs that “motivate behavior change” frequently fail to generate sustained engagement: over 80% of those who attempt to create new, healthy behaviors still fail at continuing their training after just the first 30 days. Corporate lifestyle management programs return only $0.50 for every $1 invested. The CDC attributes 80% of chronic conditions to this inability to form successful wellbeing habits, resulting in almost $1 trillion in lost productivity. The problem isn’t that people resist change, but they resist being changed. While health promotion may motivate episodic, temporary changes, when it comes to creating lasting results, learning the skill of creating habits is what is vital for long-term behavior change. The reason: While motivation may get you started, habit keeps you going. Developed by licensed, clinical psychologists from Yale and the University of Washington, this workshop covers best practices in the design of sustainable behavior change protocols that have led to the successful training of unconscious, daily habits, derived from more than eight years of clinical testing of evidence-based research from over 100 behavioral researchers. More than 500 companies and 100,000 employees helped to clinically test and refine the tools, methods, and techniques which serve as the focus of this session. Attendees should download the Poll Everywhere app before the workshop. It is available for iOS and Android.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify 4 key ingredients that must be present for creating successful behavior change; (2) differentiate and diagnose behavior change into 15 distinct classes; (3) define 3 key strategies that successfully harness motivation for sustainable behavior change; (4) translate 15 design principles and tactics to create winning recipes for training new habits, or “habit designs;” (5) apply 5 impactful tactics for creating lasting, self-perpetuating communities of practice.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, real-time mobile polling, and group discussion & exercises. Supplemental printed material will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: Individuals interested in developing long-term practices to sustain initial behavior change.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Contingency Management, Habits, Routinization, Social Contagion
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Behavior Analytic Supervision at Work: What Every Behavior Analyst Needs to Know About Delivering Effective Supervision
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Zurich C, Swissotel
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa N. Wilson, Ph.D.
ALYSSA N. WILSON (Saint Louis University), HEATHER LYNN LEWIS (Saint Louis University)
Description: The code for responsible conduct for behavior analysts clearly states the importance of effective supervision and supervisory activities. Behavior analytic research on supervision has identified the effectiveness of using behavioral applications (e.g., behavioral skills training) to teach competent trainees. Supervisors may need additional assistance with identifying evidence-based practices when it comes to implementing effective and competency-based supervision, particularly when supervising large groups of trainees. Therefore, the current experiential workshop seeks to assist supervisors who work with multiple trainees in a given period of time and collaborate with outside corporations, including universities, in order to provide attendees an opportunity to refine their supervision skill sets. The workshop will highlight 5 domains of the supervision process: (1) supervisor-trainee relationship during and after supervisory period; (2) delivering competency-based supervision; (3) successful tips for managing independent and group supervision; (4) organization strategies (e.g., evaluation rubrics, mapping clinical projects, goal setting, etc.); and (5) shaping professional behavior. Attendees will be provided supplemental materials during the workshop, to practice the skills presented. The workshop will use in-vivo training paired with problem-based learning paradigms to assist attendee’s with acquiring skills discussed during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) list important features and elements of supervision; (2) determine best-practices for supervision; (3) list aspects of appropriate supervisor-trainee relationship throughout various phases of supervision; (4) demonstrate competency-based supervision skills; (5) demonstrate skills for conducting individual and group supervision; (6) design and implement organization strategies; (7) demonstrate skills to shape professional behaviors.
Activities: The workshop will use lecture, discussion, video observation, in-vivo modeling, rehearsal, and feedback to assist trainees with achieving the learning objectives. Problem-based learning (e.g., small groups work through a supervision issue/problem) will be used to assist attendees with putting the discussed skills into practice. In-vivo and video demonstrations of strategies will be conducted with group discussions and role-play to ensure skill acquisition. Supplemental materials will be provided to support attendee learning during the workshop. Attendees will also be able to use the supplemental materials after the workshop, as an example/guide for the supervision process.
Audience: The nature of the workshop is geared towards behavior analysts who have had minimal supervision experience. The content of the workshop will be focused on more intermediate and advanced topics often faced by supervisors, and attendees with little to no (or basic) knowledge and/or experience with supervision might find themselves lost or unable to connect with content and other attendees.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): education, evidence-based training, service delivery, supervision
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Acting Out: Learning BACB Ethics and Problem-Solving Strategies Through Interactive Teams
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Randolph, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: PRA/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University), JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
Description: This workshop is designed primarily for practitioners who have some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) and wish to improve their skills to (a) identify and analyze ethical challenges, (b) develop strategies to resolve ethical challenges, (c) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, and (d) obtain CEUs in the ethics domain as required for BACB recertification. Others, including licensed psychologists, who are interested in applying BACB ethical guidelines to real-world ethical challenges in practice and research are also encouraged to attend. Participants should be prepared to describe and discuss real world ethics cases in a manner that protects the identity of those individuals involved in the ethics cases.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify and analyze ethical challenges; (2) identify and troubleshoot strategies to resolve ethical challenges; (3) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges.
Activities: This workshop will include very limited lecture content. Emphasis will be placed on small group activities and discussion, role plays, guided practice and fluency building exercises.
Audience: Intermediate level. This workshop assumes some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall KL, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This day-long workshop will focus on the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the issues that practicing behavior analysts should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments (FBAs), writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term “positive behavior supports” as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations (IEE) including FBAs. Information will be linked to the 2016 BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided. Please note: this workshop will apply to United States law only, but all are welcome to attend.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the major components of the IDEIA; (2) identify the areas of IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst; (3) identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may serve under IDEIA; (4) identify the legal requirements of an independent educational evaluation; (5) identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA; (6) identify when a behavioral intervention plan must be developed under the IDEIA; (7) identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA; (8) describe how the 2016 Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to special education law.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, case study analysis, question and answer.
Audience: Practicing behavior analysts, supervisors of practicing behavior analysts, school administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Special Education
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
BACB-Compliant, Multi-Media Supervisor Training
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Lucerne I, Swissotel
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc; TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: Hundreds of BCBAs have participated in this mixed-media, BACB-compliant supervision training workshop since 2013, with overwhelmingly positive feedback! This workshop prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional 2.5 hours online through www.TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost 9 hours of content while using only 6 hours of conference time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and interesting video situations, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Multiple populations and environments are represented, including child welfare, education, and in-home. Additionally, participant-trios will participate in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, an additional 3 CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. *This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the purpose of supervision, how to incorporate important features of supervision, their obligations regarding behavioral skills training, and methods to evaluate the effects of supervision; (2) demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback.
Activities: Participants will engage in: Didactic lecture, critiques of video supervision scenarios, and guided and directed discussions of professional and ethical responsibilities. Additionally, all participants will be divided into triads for multiple role play scenarios, taking turns as supervisor, supervisee and observer with each new scenario.
Audience: This workshop is for BCBAs who will be supervising pre-certification interns, BCaBAs, and Registered Behavior Technicians
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, supervision, Supervisor, supervisor training
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Best Practices and Ethical Considerations for Behavior Analysts in Public School Consultation
Saturday, May 28, 2016
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dena Shade-Monuteaux, Ph.D.
DENA SHADE-MONUTEAUX (Beacon ABA Services), DAVID M. CORCORAN (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: This workshop will provide educators and behavior analysts with strategies and frameworks for optimizing the role of the BCBA in a public school setting in an ethical, effective, and clinically sound manner. Beginning with an overview of the scope of practice for BCBA’s, the workshop will provide attendees with a basic understanding of the parameters in which they are expected to competently operate. These parameters include: the new BACB Professional and Ethical Conduct Code, BCBAs as consultants, functional behavioral assessments, instructional programming, data collection, staff/parent trainings, and on-going treatment efficacy monitoring. Finally, this workshop will teach providers how to translate this knowledge into effective and operationally defined applied behavior analytic and educational procedures. A primary focus of the workshop is on the establishment of effective collaboration between the BCBA and school personnel. The collaborations this workshop will focus on are in the areas of BCBA services in public schools; roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders; individualized education programs; the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act and special education law; understanding the role of BCBAs as school consultants; identifying some limitations of the application of ABA principles and technologies in public schools; and identifying the critical elements of a successful school-based ABA program. Participants will learn how to apply these elements in school settings with a focus on antecedent interventions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the types of BCBA services available in a public school; (2) identify roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders; (3) articulate the basics of IDEA and special education law and regulations; (4) understand the role of BCBAs as school consultants; (5) identify the application of ABA principles and technologies in the public school and the limitations; (6) identify the critical elements of a successful school-based ABA program; (7) understand applications of these elements in different school-based settings; (8) understand and identify antecedent and consequent interventions.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion, small group activities, exemplars of permanent products and competency and knowledge based evaluations.
Audience: Special education teachers, BCBAs, students in BCBA programs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Behavior Assessment, Ethics, School Consultation
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Extending Behavior Analysis in Zoos and Aquariums
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Lucerne I, Swissotel
Area: AAB/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lindsay Mehrkam, Ph.D.
LINDSAY MEHRKAM (Oregon State University), LANCE MILLER (Chicago Zoological Society - Brookfield Zoo)
Description: Today's accredited zoos and aquariums are held to high standards of animal welfare. This involves assessment, implementation, and evaluation of current animal husbandry practices across a wide range of species, a task for which behavior analysis is well suited. This workshop will provide attendees with an overview of how behavior analytic methods are being extended in zoo settings to evaluate enrichment and training effectiveness. Participants will learn how to successfully implement behavioral assessments using single-subject designs in a zoo setting. Participants will be guided through video demonstrations of preference assessments and positive reinforcement training with a variety of zoo species to observe the generalizability of these procedures. Attendees will also participate in discussions on future directions for behavior analysts in these nontraditional animal settings. This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings. On the day prior to the workshop (Friday), participants are invited to travel to world-renowned Brookfield Zoo and directly observe how behavioral principles are being used to guide animal care practices in zoos. The visit is planned from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, meeting at 12:00 pm and returning to the Hyatt Regency by 5:00 pm. For those interested, there will be an additional fee of $45, payable directly to the workshop presenters. (Please note: there are no more spaces available for the visit to Brookfield Zoo.)
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) operationally define environmental enrichment and identify ways in which enrichment strategies are evaluated and deemed effective; (2) identify, review, and critique applications of operant conditioning in behavioral husbandry practices for variety of species; (3) recognize and discuss variables to consider to ensure ethical and effective implementation and evaluation of behavioral assessments in zoos and aquariums using single-subject designs.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, direct observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies and procedures will be provided. Participants will be encouraged to participate in open discussions about content and future directions for practical application. Supplemental materials for reviewing training plans and ethograms will also be provided.
Audience: This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): environmental enrichment, preference assessment, single-subject, zoo
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessing and Teaching Functional Skills to Children With Autism in Home, School, and Community Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall IJ, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will describe the assessment and teaching of functional skills in individuals with autism. Functional skills will be discussed in terms of how they differ from basic conceptual skills on several levels that include when, where, and why functional skills are demonstrated, as well as the immediate benefit to the child. Children with autism require learning sequences and teaching curricula in various “everyday” aspects of their lives. These useful and necessary functional life skills are naturally clustered into: skills used at school, in the community, at home, and skills that impact all aspects of life. Within these broad skill cluster areas, 48 specific skill groupings have been identified. This workshop will present information on the assessment of these specific skill groupings. The results of the assessment of functional skills will be useful for understanding which skills are required to enable independence within any given skill area. Next, using the assessment results to establish teaching sequences for functional learning programs will be discussed. Finally, specific strategies for teaching certain functional skills will be taught.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the differences between functional and basic/conceptual skills; (2) identify 6 broad skill clusters of functional skills; (3) identify and assess 48 specific skill groupings of functional skills; (4) choose initial instructional skills for teaching functional skills; (5) identify methods to teach functional skills in various settings; (6) identify methods to measure and track progress of functional skills from initial assessment and throughout the teaching process.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, video review of teaching methods, handouts, and group discussions
Audience: Behavior analysts who work with individuals with autism or other developmental delays.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Social Skills in Learners With Autism Spectrum Disorders: From Assessment to Intervention
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 3, Swissotel
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mary Ellen McDonald, Ph.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (Hofstra University), ERIN ARCHIBALD (Eden II Programs/ The Genesis School), SANJA CALE (SUNY Old Westbury)
Description: Children with autism exhibit many deficits in the area of socialization. It is difficult for children with autism to respond to peers in social situations as well as to initiate to others. There are many other areas of socialization that children with autism have great difficulty with, such as ending a conversation, listening to another conversation to obtain information, and knowing how to join in a conversation. This workshop will discuss a variety of innovative strategies that have been successful for improving social skills in children with autism. Specific strategies to be discussed will include topics such as the use of behavioral rehearsal, role playing, using video modeling and video rehearsal, along with other technology-based interventions, and conducting ABC analyses of social situations. Carol Gray’s social stories will also be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify a minimum of three new methods for increasing social skills in children with autism; (2) operationalize advanced concepts such as friendship when teaching a child with autism; (3) use behavioral rehearsal with children with autism to improve social skills; (4) use self-monitoring for children with autism to help them to monitor their social skills.
Activities: Participants will watch video clips of a variety of strategies that can be used to increase social skills in individuals with autism. Specific activities will include writing a story about a social situation or a student, conducting an ABC analysis on a social situation, and operationalizing a variety of advanced social concepts.
Audience: Psychologists, special educators, social workers, speech pathologists, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Building Foundational Social Skills in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Montreux 2, Swissotel
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ian Melton, M.Ed.
IAN MELTON (Endicott College/Hopebridge Pediatrics ), LORRAINE OTTE (Endicott College), BRITANY MELTON (Endicott College), JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Autism Intervention Specialists), ASHLEY HUDSON (Hopebridge Pediatric Specialists)
Description: One of the most prevalent challenges for students with autism is in the area of social skills, including difficulty with observational skills, imitation, play interactions, joint attention, and social pragmatics. Consistent with recommendations in the literature (Gresham, et. al, 2001; Peters, et. al, 2007; and Quinn, et. al, 1999), the teaching of foundational skills is essential to effective social relationships. Effective social relationships can be defined as, “socially acceptable learned behaviors that enable a person to interact with others in ways that elicit positive responses and assist the person in avoiding negative responses.” (Elliott, Racine & Busse, 1995) As with all of what we do, these learned social responses are emitted over time in efforts to access reinforcement and to avoid punishment. The difficulty with children with autism is that they often cannot access these skills, and so become what many refer to as “withdrawn.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe evidence based teaching methodologies for effective social skills instruction; (2) identify assessment tools to identify foundational social skills deficits in learners of varying cognitive functioning; (3) implement teaching methodologies for foundational social skills.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and targeted reading. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture, and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials for identifying language and learning barriers will be provided in order to support participant learning. The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, and frequency building exercises.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BCBAs that train staff to run social skills groups; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; and anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Help! Successful Home Programs: A How-To for BCBAs
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Randolph, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: Many parents have access to home programs for students with autism via insurance, but the programs are challenging for BCBAs to manage effectively due to issues with challenging behaviors, treatment integrity, parental adherence, and lack of a full-proof curriculum. Unfortunately, without a proper plan in place, BCBAs are often managing home programs that are ineffective and frustrating to all and may inadvertently cause other side effects such as a lack of respect by outsiders for the science of applied behavior analysis. This workshop is a step-by-step simple curriculum to help a BCBA create a simple, effective program that all staff and parents can implement. This program teaches the student to perform a range of skills from simple directions to complex communication, and independent activities. Using positive behavioral supports, the student will learn to increase his attention span, markedly improve his direction-following skills, and decrease self-stimulatory behavior and other disruptive behavior including aggression and self-injurious behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) determine and make environmental changes that reduce the need for behavior analysis services; (2) identify the contingencies governing the behavior of those responsible for carrying out behavior change procedures and design interventions accordingly.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, hands-on tasks, small group breakouts, and videos.
Audience: Intermediate BCBAs, teachers, administrators, CST members
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavior management, parental adherence
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessing and Addressing Anxiety-Related Behavior in Students With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Roosevelt, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joanne Sgambati, Ph.D.
JOANNE SGAMBATI (Eden II/Genesis Programs), JAMIE OBRIEN (Eden II/Genesis)
Description: There is considerable evidence that children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are at increased risk of anxiety and anxiety disorders. Anxiety may worsen during adolescence, as young people face increasingly complex social situations. In some instances, individuals with ASD may become more aware of their differences and interpersonal difficulties and this in turn may lead to higher levels of anxiety. This workshop will address assessment of anxiety through multiple means. The role of functional assessment and functional analysis in the assessment of behavior related to anxiety will be discussed. This workshop will discuss the prevalence of anxiety, a description of anxiety based on the research, specific potential causes of anxiety, and clinical interventions. There will be a focus on the use of self-assessment and self-management. Clinical case examples will be provided throughout the session. Attendees will have an opportunity to work on cases of students with ASD during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe specific risk factors for anxiety in ASD; (2) select tools for assessment of anxiety-related behavior; (3) develop at least 2 proactive strategies to address anxiety-related behavior; (4) identify at least 2 self-management strategies to be used with students.
Activities: Participants will work on clinical cases provided in a case study format, watch videos of interventions and develop alternative strategies to be used, develop a proactive intervention based on a student case.
Audience: Psychologists, special education professionals, social workers, speech pathologists, parents
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Anxiety, ASD, Asperger's, Autism
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Treating Children With Behavioral and Emotional Disorders: Integrating Emotional and Moral Behaviors to Promote Generalization
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Michigan ABC, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Children that have been victims of abuse and/or neglect often exhibit behaviors that appear to be callous, unemotional, antisocial and immoral. Often, the learning histories of these children affect their emotional and moral behaviors and these behaviors can serve as motivational operations. Behavioral treatment facilities often use a contingency-based focus when teaching appropriate behavior that works well for managing children's behavior in a structured setting where individuals follow-through with predictable contingencies, but do not prepare these children to function in a generalized setting. The presenter will provide a behaviorally-based explanation of why these children lack a repertoire for appropriate emotional and moral behaviors. She will also discuss what environmental factors can encourage appropriate emotional and moral behaviors and ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that are relationship-based, focus on emotional and moral skills, and promote generalization.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe how the learning histories of children that have been victims of abuse and/or neglect effect their emotional and moral behaviors; (2) explain why these children lack a repertoire for appropriate emotional and moral behaviors and how those behaviors can serve as motivational operations; (3) describe the difference between contingency-based and relationship-based treatment approaches; (4) describe what environmental factors can encourage appropriate emotional and moral behaviors; (5) describe ways to develop effective behavioral treatments that are relationship-based and promote generalization.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools and community settings, take notes, ask questions, view a PowerPoint presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who typically-developing who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Stimulus Control and its Relationship to Teaching, Prompting, Error Correction, and Errorless Learning
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich B, Swissotel
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), ANTHONY CASTROGIOVANNI (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: Behavior analysis can be succinctly described as the study of “behavior under what conditions.” That is, while the emphasis on behavior per se is novel to many people, the most unique characteristic of behavior analysis is the emphasis on how environmental conditions systematically influence behavior. In the study of operant behavior, not only did Skinner place emphasis on the role of consequences but his work also emphasized how the three-term contingency brings about stimulus control. Furthermore, an in-depth understanding of stimulus control may reduce the likelihood of engaging in ineffective, ritualistic teaching strategies. The first section will introduce critical nuances in the establishment of stimulus control, using examples from discrimination training. We will note that the definition of “prompt” is just as dependent upon behavior as is the term “reinforcer.” Next, we will focus in detail on the critical distinction between prompts and cues. The content will then focus on a major current aspect of most lessons, the removal of the prompts. Finally, we will focus on stimulus control and error-correction as well as various errorless teaching formats. We will use a variety of didactic strategies to review common teaching errors and practice identifying stimulus control issues within various lessons.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe stimulus control as defined within the laboratory and applied situations; (2) describe how stimulus control related to applied definitions of prompt and cue; (3) describe a variety of teaching strategies in terms of changes in stimulus control; (4) describe simple rules associated with prompt inclusion and removal; (5) describe how stimulus control relates to both error-correction strategies and errorless learning strategies within their own lessons.
Activities: Review standard definitions of stimulus control including the dependency between discriminative stimuli and behavior, review operational distinctions between the terms prompt and cue, review a variety of lesson formats and identify critical stimulus control issues within each lesson type (e.g., least-to-most prompt hierarchy, time delay, etc.), review video and case descriptions of a variety of teaching errors in terms of poor stimulus control, review various strategies commonly grouped as errorless-learning strategies, and review the difference between error fixing and error correction.
Audience: Anyone arranging lessons for a variety of learners in which prompts or shaping play a prominent role. This may include behavior analysts, speech/language pathologists, teachers or others involved with communication training with children and adults with disabilities including ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Neurobehavioral Analysis of Epileptic Seizures
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich D, Swissotel
Area: DDA/BPN; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware of how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. In addition, persons with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These could be better managed, and important new life skills could be acquired, if their behavior analyst knew basic epileptology. This workshop will educate behavior analysts about epilepsy with a behavioral approach. The neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be briefly reviewed. The etiology, genetics, and classification of various seizure disorders will be reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be related to analog human studies. Many clients are incorrectly medicated for pseudo-seizures. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy, and participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with this test, without sedation or anesthesia. Epileptic seizures dynamically modulate an organism's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates the frequency, intensity and duration of epileptic seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about these relationships.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define an epileptic seizure; (2) describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures; (3) recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior; (4) objectively describe, count, and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions, (5) recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress; (6) recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures; (7) prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia; (8) discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures, (9) manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy.
Activities: Examples of epileptic and non-epileptic behaviors and state of the art ways of analyzing them with EEG and behavior analysis will be presented in lecture and video presentations. Audience questions and experiences regarding epilepsy are welcome.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts, special education teachers, psychologists and therapists who write behavior plans for individuals with developmental disabilities (autism, mental retardation, psychosis, cerebral palsy) and a history of seizures.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, behavior analysis, electroencephalography, seizures
 
Workshop #W80
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part 3: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Skyway 260, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don’t do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must register for all 3 parts (WPBID #20; WPBID #50; WPBID #80) and must attend all 3 parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Developing Applied Behavior Analysis Departments in Public School Systems
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich C, Swissotel
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Daniel Almeida, Ph.D.
DANIEL ALMEIDA (University of Massachusetts-Boston/Newton, MA Public Schools)
Description: This workshop will provide participants with an introduction to the steps required to develop an ABA department within a public school system. Development of quality ABA services within the bureaucratic and multi-disciplinary public school environment poses many regulatory, organizational, and ethical challenges for behavior analysts. This workshop will present the chronology of the development of a ABA department within a culturally diverse public school system of over 12,500 students. Over the course of 8 years, the department expanded from a single BCBA to 8 BCBAs. The development of organizational structures, service delivery models, and policies and procedures within the school district will be reviewed. Participants will conduct self-assessments of their current settings and use the workshop content to develop plans for expanding the ABA services within their work setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the challenges to providing quality behavioral analytic services in public school settings; (2) identify organizational structures, service delivery models, and policies and procedures that are effective in public school settings; (3) assess their work settings and develop plans for organizational growth.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be achieved by lecture, small group discussion, and review and completion written case study materials.
Audience: The workshop is directed to behavior analysts working in or are interested in working in public school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W83
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Molecular Functional Analysis: An Alternate Approach for Applied Settings
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich G, Swissotel
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, Ph.D.
MICHAEL WEINBERG (Innovative Learning), WILLIAM T. MARSH (Brevard Public Schools)
Description: Participants in this workshop will learn a new and unique method for functional assessment and functional analysis referred to as molecular functional analysis. This approach will offer a different view of functional analysis and assessment and offer practice opportunities for participants. Through the use of vignettes, role play, and practice exercises, as well as video clips in small groups during the workshop, participants will be actively engaged in learning processes throughout this workshop. Participants will practice use of the new functional assessment tools to aid in identifying concurrent reinforcement schedules affecting problem and functional behavior of a person such as in school, along with demonstrations via video vignettes. Participants will have opportunities to practice using the approach to quickly identify function and use the data to devise an initial functionally linked treatment intervention based on these tools. Utilizing vignettes, participants will practice applying molecular functional analysis design logic to determine single or multiple functions of problem behavior in-vivo while the motivating operation is in effect.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) complete and implement new descriptive assessment tools to identify function and replacement behaviors to incorporate in the behavior plan; (2) identify at least 3 primary differences in the functional analysis approach presented in this workshop relative to prevailing functional assessment logic; (3) use molecular functional analysis methods for the purpose of determining function based on a modified single-trial alternating treatments design procedure; (4) identify at least 3 situations in which these approaches can be applied, based on interactive practice opportunities during this workshop; (5) identify function of behavior when there are multiple functions, using the approaches practiced in this workshop.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include use of multimedia presentation of the concepts, principles and processes of Molecular Functional Analysis incorporating PowerPoint Slides, videos, lecture and group discussion, as well as small group practice activities during the workshop. Participants will be provided with vignettes in small groups during which each group will complete the contingency assessment form, devise a procedure to conduct single trial functional analyses to identify function, and practice use of the approach via role play in dyads to demonstrate the application of the procedure and potential results.
Audience: This workshop targets all audiences and will provide a review of basic principles of behavior involved in the identification of multiple functions and use of systematic manipulations and descriptive assessment of behavior. Review of the basic 4-term contingency, definition and identification of motivating operations, and the introduction of new terms needed to describe the process and concepts of this methodology will also be provided so that those at the entry level will be able to understand the principles involved. New terms will be defined to permit all participants to understand the concepts necessary for optimal use of this approach in their own practice settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W85
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Learning to Behave Well Using Mindfulness-Based Cognitive and Behavior Analytic Practices
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert Stromer, Ph.D.
ROBERT STROMER (George Brown College), ELISABETH KINNEY (Behavioral Learning and Leadership), MARK GEREN (QBS Inc)
Description: The instructors share the opinion that, “To enjoy life at any age one must view each difficulty as simply a problem to be solved” (Skinner & Vaughan, 1997). For many, “enjoying life” includes being the best practitioner one can be; and doing that may require being well self-managed and as stress-free as possible. For the instructors, being well self-managed meant retooling their existing problem-solving skills. They opted to add mindfulness practices to better manage life’s stressors and ongoing concerns of health and wellness. This approach resulted in improved ways of dealing with and replacing verbal behavior that often got in the way of enjoyment. So, this workshop is about supplementing one’s problem-solving skills to better cope with life’s challenges and to reduce the likelihood of disabling emotional states such as stress, anxiety, and depression. The mindfulness practices stem from evidence-based mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) that blends traditional meditative teachings and behavior therapy techniques. Williams and Penman’s (2011) self-help version of MBCT is introduced; its skills can be readily learned and generalized, if regularly practiced and used in real life. As a take-home practice, and to begin a little therapeutic self-change, attendees learn MBCT’s signature meditation, the “three-minute breathing space.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state potential benefits of mindfulness meditation as a supplement to one’s self-managed, problem-solving repertoire; (2) describe some of the key elements of the skill set involved in mindfulness practices common to mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and other “third wave” cognitive therapies; (3) demonstrate the recommended chair-supported sitting posture used during formal practices and the kinds of self-talk used to practice the three-minute breathing space; (4) identify exemplary digital and other resources for further mindfulness study and practice.
Activities: In a large-group format, we introduce mindfulness, describe its nature and relevant background and rationales for offering a workshop on it. We also provide guided opportunities to participate in several “warm-up” meditations. Then, during the bulk of the workshop, methods resembling aspects of behavioral skills training and interteaching (e.g., dyadic discussion, question-and-answer, feedback) are used to inform meaningful practice opportunities in a pivotal meditation of the Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy program, the Three-Minute Breathing Space. Activities include the use of (a) live and video demonstrations, (b) written rationales and scripts appropriate for the two roles to be rehearsed by pairs of attendees, facilitator or teacher, and meditative student, (c) dyadic rehearsal of scripted and unscripted guidance of the Breathing Space and evaluative discussions of experiences, and (d) informative feedback while the instructors oversee dyad rehearsals. Finally, a wrap up period addresses questions and comments from the entire group and we share knowledge of several digital resources found helpful in our ongoing practices and self-study.
Audience: The workshop is designed for all certified behavior analysts (full or assistant), those who already practice mindfulness, but especially those with little or no experience in mindfulness meditation.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond the Elementary Verbal Operants: Teaching Complex Generalized Verbal Behavior to Children With Autism
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Francesca Degli Espinosa, Ph.D.
FRANCESCA DEGLI ESPINOSA (ABA Clinic, UK), DAVID C. PALMER (Smith College)
Description: In this workshop we will review the concepts of multiple control, intraverbal control, and recall. For each topic to be addressed, we will firstly provide a conceptual analysis, and, consequently, illustrate how that analysis can be translated into applied procedures to establish flexible and contextually appropriate verbal behavior in children with autism. We will explore the following conceptual distinctions in both theory and practice: (a) divergent and convergent multiple control; (b) the intraverbal as an elementary operant and intraverbal control as a pervasive variable in the control of autoclitic frames; (c) recall as the endurance of stimulus control and recall as novel problem solving. We will demonstrate the generality of the analyses presented by showing applied examples from children in both Italy and the United Kingdom. In so doing, we will offer a conceptual and applied framework within which to sequence language objectives and that participants can directly adopt or modify for use in their own clinical practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define the role of convergent and divergent multiple control in the teaching of language objectives; (2) define the role of intraverbal control and autoclitic frames in the establishment of verbal conditional discriminations; (3) sequence language objectives along a continuum of stimulus control complexity.
Activities: The workshop theoretical and applied objectives will be achieved through a balanced use of spoken lecture and video demonstrations.
Audience: Advanced
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): autoclitic frames, conditional discriminations, intraverbal control, multiple control
 
Workshop #W92
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Derived Stimulus Relations: Understanding Equivalence and RFT
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Alpine, Swissotel
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Timothy M. Weil, Ph.D.
TIMOTHY M. WEIL (Tandem Behavioral Health & Wellness)
Description: Derived stimulus relations is a topic that has been around for awhile but is recently growing in interest with both scientists and practitioners of behavior analysis. There is a great deal of basic behavior analytic research supporting the emergence of derived relations which is currently extending into the applied research domain. Equivalence in particular has been accepted as a necessary topic for behavior analysts as can be seen with its inclusion in the fourth edition of the BACB Task List. Students and practitioners will benefit from this workshop in its basic level, and focus on providing a link from theory to practice. This workshop will gently start with the theoretical system of radical behaviorism/functional contextualism and move towards understanding through presentation on basic and applied research.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe basic characteristics of stimulus equivalence; (2) describe basic characteristics of RFT and contrast these with stimulus equivalence; (3) describe transformation of stimulus function as a process and identify its crucial outcomes; (4) diagram relational networks and identify transformation of function via myriad relations as a first step towards inclusion in their programming.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture and discussion of derived stimulus relations from theory to practice. Small group break out periods will occur as interteach sessions in an effort to facilitate understanding of the material.
Audience: This workshop will be focused on the basic level to ensure all who participate receive a solid foundation in understanding of derived stimulus relations and the implications of this approach. Although delivered at the basic level, this topic is seemingly a tough one for first timers, thus a concerted effort will be made to deliver the information in a consumable manner by those who know little to nothing of the topic.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Derived Relations, Equivalence, Relational Responding, RFT
 
Special Event #15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Opening Event and Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis Awards Ceremony
Sunday, May 29, 2016
8:00 AM–9:20 AM
Grand Ballroom, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Opening Event, SABA Awards
Chair: Linda J. Parrott Hayes (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Linda J. Parrott Hayes, Ph.D.
 

SABA Award for Distinguished Service: Behavior Analysis: A Consilient Future

Abstract:

Modern behavior analysis must be consilient to prosper as a discipline. E. O. Wilson wrote, "The love of complexity without reductionism makes art; the love of complexity with reductionism makes science." Necessarily our science will profit from integrating reductionistic and artistic elements in the service of answering significant questions about behavior and addressing behavioral and other psychological challenges facing humanity. Over his career Dr. Thompson has been fortunate to use such strategies for basic theoretical matters concerning the integration of behavior, as well as applied problems in pharmacology, architecture, development of children with autism, and making the lives of people with disabilities better.

 
TRAVIS THOMPSON (University of Minnesota)
Dr. Travis Thompson received his doctoral training in psychology at the University of Minnesota and completed postdoctoral work at the University of Maryland with Joseph V. Brady and at Cambridge University (UK) with Robert Hinde. His earliest work dealt with the relations among concepts from behavior analysis, ethology, and pharmacology. He was director of the John F. Kennedy Center for Human Development at Vanderbilt University and Smith Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Kansas Medical Center before returning to Minnesota in 2003. Dr. Thompson co-authored, with Charles R. Schuster, the first textbook in behavioral pharmacology and has done basic and applied interdisciplinary research in developmental disabilities, including genetics, pharmacology, and neuroscience. He was involved in developing one of the first large-scale behavioral intervention programs for individuals with intellectual disabilities, and for the past several years has directed home-based early intervention services for young children with autism in Minnesota. Dr. Thompson's publications include 225 articles and chapters and 29 books. A total of 48 doctoral students have completed their training under his mentorship. He has received numerous awards, including the APA Division 1 (Society for General Psychology) Ernest Hilgard Award, Division 25's Don Hake Award, and the Division 33 (Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities) Edgar Doll Award. He is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International.
 

SABA Award for International Dissemination of Behavioral Analysis: A Behavior-Analytic World View

Abstract:

What started in the late 1920s at Harvard University as a small research project of a young graduate student involving several rats, some Rube Goldberg-like apparatus, and a handful of home-made food pellets is quite different today. Behavior analysis has grown in numbers, knowledge, and impact, and we have changed in composition. We have become, and continue to become even more of an international movement. This presentation comprises a brief historical analysis of some of the variables that have contributed to this internationalization of behavior analysis. They include seminal individuals crossing the oceans in all directions to bring and take behavior analysis to the four corners of the earth; scientific, conceptual, and application developments within the discipline; broader cultural events and technological developments; and personal contacts and exchanges of ideas among behavior analysts from different countries. The breeching of obstacles such as economic and resource limitations, perceived cultural incompatibilities with a behavior-analytic world view, language barriers, entrenched competing world views, and physical distance has required persistence, dedication, commitment, and ingenuity, but our internationalization has great momentum. Indeed this internationalization is essential to our future well-being.

 
KENNON ANDY LATTAL (West Virginia University)
Andy is Centennial Professor of Psychology at West Virginia University, where he has taught and conducted research for the last 44 years, although his colleagues have suggested that it is really more like 5 years, he is out of the country so frequently! His sojourns include two sabbatical years at the University of Lille, France (including one as a Fulbright Research Fellow); appointments as a Fellow of the Japanese Society for the Promotion of Science, a Global Professor at Keio University in Tokyo, a Visiting Professor at the Jordan University of Science and Technology; and as a Visiting Scholar at the Universities of Brasilia and São Paulo in Brazil, the National Autonomous University and the University of Guadalajara in Mexico; and University College London. When he has been in Morgantown he has hosted and mentored sabbatical visitors and students from universities in Australia, Brazil, Colombia, France, Japan, and Mexico, and has been the doctoral advisor of several international students at WVU. One outcome of these collaborations has been some 30 co-authored research publications with international scholars. Another is service on the editorial boards of three international journals, including three terms as the English Language Editor of the Mexican Journal of Behavior Analysis. Through his many and diverse activities in the world arena, Andy has served as a behavior-analytic ambassador carrying in his portfolio outstanding teaching, scientific acumen, and good will in promoting the international development of our discipline.
 

SABA Award for Scientific Translation: Forty Years of Research: Doing a Lot, Learning a Little

Abstract:

Dr. Poling’s first publication appeared in 1976 and since that time he has conducted basic, translational, and applied research in several areas, resulting in publications in more than 50 different journals. This presentation will overview what he has learned regarding how to succeed as a researcher. Topics to be considered include selecting topics to study, being steadfastly pragmatic, persisting in the face of apparent failure, working successfully with other people, securing funds to support projects, writing well, publishing articles, and evaluating one’s own work.

 
ALAN D. POLING (Western Michigan University)
Dr. Alan Poling is Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University. He received his BA from Alderson-Broaddus College, his MA from West Virginia University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. A Fellow of Divisions 3, 25, and 28 of the American Psychological Association, Dr. Poling has published 12 books and roughly 350 articles and book chapters and served as the research advisor of 35 Ph.D. recipients. They, and he, have conducted research and done conceptual work in several areas, including behavioral pharmacology, clinical psychopharmacology (with special emphasis on the effects of psychotropic drugs in people with developmental disabilities), applied behavior analysis, gender issues, animal welfare, quantitative analysis, learning processes, and research methods. Dr. Poling was recognized as a Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Western Michigan University in 1996 and as a Distinguished Alumnus of West Virginia University in 1999. In 2003, he received the Western Michigan University College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Achievement in Research and Creative Activity Award. In 2016, he will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the California Association of Behavior Analysis, a Translational Research Award from the Association for Behavior Analysis International, and an International Humanitarian Award from the American Psychological Association.
 

SABA Award: Enduring Programmatic Contributions in Behavior Analysis: University of California, Santa Barbara, Koegel Autism Center

Abstract:

We begin with a video example of children with autism in the 1960s, chained to their beds, receiving electric shocks, etc.; and then move on to a video example from modern times showing a child receiving a motivational pivotal response treatment. The emphasis here is on the power of programmatic research, with successive scientific findings building on each other to accomplish extremely dramatic results for improving the symptoms of autism. We will also discuss areas that still are in desperate need of research and intervention, such as parent stress, co-morbid disabilities, sex education, and employment.

 
LYNN KERN KOEGEL (University of California, Santa Barbara), ROBERT L. KOEGEL (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Lynn Kern Koegel, Ph.D., is the Clinical Director of the Koegel Autism Center at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She has been active in the development of programs to improve communication in children with autism, including the development of first words, development of grammatical structures, and pragmatics. Dr. Koegel is co-author and co-editor of major textbooks on autism and positive behavioral support and is co-author of the bestselling book Overcoming Autism: Finding the Answers, Strategies, and Hope That Can Transform a Child’s Life (Penguin, 2004). In addition to her published books and articles in the area of communication and language development, she has developed and published procedures and field manuals in the area of self-management and functional analysis that are used in school districts throughout the United States and have been translated in most major languages used throughout the world. Dr. Lynn Koegel is actively involved in providing support and intervention services in school districts, both locally in California and throughout the United States. Dr. Koegel, and her husband Robert, were awarded the first annual recipient of the Sesame Street Children’s Television Workshop Award for brightening the lives of children. She has also been featured in news reports on television stations throughout the United States and has appeared on episodes of the internationally broadcast ABC television series Supernanny
 

SABA Award: Enduring Programmatic Contributions in Behavior Analysis: University of California, Santa Barbara, Koegel Autism Center

Abstract:

We begin with a video example of children with autism in the 1960s, chained to their beds, receiving electric shocks, etc.; and then move on to a video example from modern times showing a child receiving a motivational pivotal response treatment. The emphasis here is on the power of programmatic research, with successive scientific findings building on each other to accomplish extremely dramatic results for improving the symptoms of autism. We will also discuss areas that still are in desperate need of research and intervention, such as parent stress, co-morbid disabilities, sex education, and employment.

Robert Koegel, Ph.D., has focused his career on autism, specializing in language intervention, family support, and school integration. He has published more than 200 articles and papers relating to the treatment of autism. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions. Models of his procedures have been used in public schools and in parent education programs throughout California, across the United States, and in other countries. He has trained health care and special education leaders in the United States and abroad. Dr. Koegel and his wife, Dr. Lynn Kern Koegel, are the developers of Pivotal Response Treatment, which focuses on motivation. They were the recipients of the first annual Children’s Television Workshop Sesame Street Award for Brightening the Lives of Children and the first annual Autism Speaks Award for Science and Research. The University of California, Santa Barbara, received a $2.35 million gift to expand the physical space of its autism center, which was renamed the Koegel Autism Center in recognition of the Koegels’ work on behalf of children with autism, and a large gift from the Eli and Edythe L. Broad Foundation to start the Eli and Edythe L. Broad Asperger Center, which is now part of the Koegel Autism Center.
 

SABA Award for Effective Presentation of Behavior Analysis in the Mass Media: Why Doesn't the World Appreciate ABA?

Abstract:

Almost every major challenge in the world today can be seen as a failure to appropriately shape behavior, including chronic disease, economic inequality, violence and climate change. Why, then, isn't the proven science and practice of benignly shaping behavior widely embraced by the public and all our institutions? The problem is that the public clings to emotional appeal, and ABA bristles with data, evidence and rationalism. Therein lies a communications challenge on which rest not only the prospects for the field, but those for the human race.

 
DAVID H. FREEDMAN (Journalist)
David H. Freedman is a contributing editor at The Atlantic, a contributor to Scientific American, and a consulting editor for Harvard's Brigham & Women's Hospital, and has at various times written regularly for The New York Times, Science, Newsweek, Discover, Forbes and Inc. He is the author of five books, the most recent of which is WRONG, about the problems with the published findings of medical scientists and other experts. Much of his current work is related to the roles of policy, industry and journalism in addressing health-related behavior change, as well as to the improvement of healthcare systems globally. He has served as a consulting journalist to several major academic medical centers, including Johns Hopkins, NYU and McGill University, and is the founding editor of a forthcoming global healthcare information resource. He received a Bachelor's degree in physics from Oberlin College. 
 
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, BCBAs, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: Pending.
 
Keyword(s): Opening Event, SABA Awards
 
 
Invited Tutorial #23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
SQAB Tutorial: Reducing Impulsivity: Current Knowledge & Future Directions
Sunday, May 29, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Service Delivery
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Gregory J. Madden, Ph.D.
Chair: Amy Odum (Utah State University)
Presenting Author: GREGORY J. MADDEN (Utah State University), JILLIAN RUNG (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Steeply discounting the value of delayed outcomes is robustly correlated with addictions and poor health decision-making. Longitudinal studies suggest that this form of impulsivity precedes and predicts acquisition of substance use, and animal studies reveal a similar pattern. Despite the evidence that delay discounting is a trait, this tutorial will review studies that have discovered methods for decreasing impulsive choice. We will discuss procedures that produce acute, context-dependent effects (e.g., framing effects), and when these may prove useful in positively influencing human decision making. We will also discuss learning-based procedures that have proven effective in humans (e.g., delay fading and working memory training) and nonhumans (e.g., interval-timing or delay-exposure training) in reducing impulsive choice. Finally, we will discuss practicality issues that will need to be addressed if learning-based approaches are going to impact human behavior. We will not discuss effects of drugs or neurological manipulations on impulsive choice.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to: (1) define delay discounting and discuss why it is of relevance to health decision-making; (2) discuss the direction in which it is therapeutic to change delay discounting; (3) discuss the methods that have proven successful in changing delay discounting among humans and among non-humans.
 
GREGORY J. MADDEN (Utah State University), JILLIAN RUNG (Utah State University)
Dr. Madden received his training from the University of North Texas, West Virginia University, and the University of Vermont. Dr. Madden's research is largely focused on the behavioral economics of addiction and health decision-making. His early research documented extreme impulsivity in individuals addicted to illicit drugs and cigarettes. Later research revealed that impulsive decision-making predicted cocaine self-administration in rats. His current work explores methods that may be used to therapeutically reduce impulsivity. Dr. Madden's second, line of research explores game-based behavioral-economic approaches to influencing children's health decision-making. These research endeavors have been supported with more than $4 million in grants from the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the US Department of Agriculture. Dr. Madden frequently serves on NIH grant-review panels, he has published more than 70 papers in 25 different journals, and his peer-reviewed publications have been cited more than 4,500 times. From 2011 until 2015, he served as the Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He has edited two books including the two-volume APA Handbook of Behavior Analysis. He is currently co-writing an introductory behavior analysis textbook.
Jillian Rung completed her BA at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and is completing her third year of graduate training at Utah State University. Her previous work involved decision-making in dynamic environments, and her current research involves the environmental determinants of impulsivity and how processes, such as reward valuation, affect impulsive decision-making. Jillian has served as ad-hoc reviewer for the APA Graduate Student Association’s Basic Psychological Science Grant, and has also guest reviewed for several journals such as the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, and Cognition. When she finishes her Ph.D., she plans to continue her research on impulsive-decision making, with the goal of developing preventative behavioral training and treatment programs for addictions and related behavioral maladies.
Keyword(s): Delay disounting, Impulsivity
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

A Functional-Cognitive Framework for Cooperation Between Functional and Cognitive Researchers and Practitioners

Sunday, May 29, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: VRB; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Barbara E. Esch, Ph.D.
Chair: Barbara E. Esch (Esch Behavior Consultants, LLC)
JAN DE HOUWER (Ghent University), Dermot Barnes-Holmes (Ghent University), Yvonne Barnes-Holmes (Ghent University), Sean Hughes (National University of Ireland, Maynooth)
After receiving his PhD from the University of Leuven (Belgium) in 1997, Jan De Houwer was a Lecturer at the University of Southampton (UK) from 1998 to 2001. Since 2001, he works at Ghent University (Belgium) where he heads the Learning and Implicit Processes Laboratory. His research is related to the manner in which spontaneous (automatic) preferences are learned and can be measured. Regarding the learning of preferences, he focuses on the role of stimulus pairings (associative learning). With regard to the measurement of preferences, he developed new reaction time measures and examined the processes underlying various measures. Jan De Houwer (co-)authored more than 250 publications in international journals including Psychological Bulletin and Behavioral and Brain Sciences. He was co-editor of the journal Cognition and Emotion and is a member of the editorial board of several journals including Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Psychological Bulletin, and Personality and Social Psychology Review.
Abstract:

Functional (e.g., Skinnerian) and cognitive approaches in psychology are often seen as competing and mutually exclusive. We argue that although both types of approaches have fundamentally different aims, they are situated at different levels of explanation and can therefore be mutually supportive. More specifically, whereas functional research on the environmental determinants of behavior can help constrain cognitive theories about the mental processes that mediate environment-behavior relations, cognitive research can highlight new empirical phenomena that could help functional researchers to refine behavioral principles and their conceptual or theoretical analyses. We then highlight two implications of our framework for psychotherapy and research on human cognition. First, the framework clarifies the relation between behavior therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, and acceptance and commitment therapy. Second, it sheds new light on the study of rule-governed behavior.

Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) understand cognitive and functional psychology as fundamentally different but not mutually exclusive approaches in psychology; (2) understand the functional-cognitive framework for psychological research as a framework for interactions between cognitive and functional psychology; (3) identify potential benefits of a possible cooperation between cognitive and functional psychology.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #51
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
SQAB Tutorial: Philosophy of Science and the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior
Sunday, May 29, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Lewis A. Bizo, Ph.D.
Chair: Lewis A. Bizo (University of New England)
Presenting Author: RANDOLPH C. GRACE (University of Canterbury), Brian Haig (University of Canterbury)
Abstract:

Single-subject methodology and Skinner's caution against inferential statistics based on group averages have been very influential with researchers in behavior analysis. Here we review recent developments in the philosophy of science and methodology, including the "new statistics," and consider their implications for the quantitative analysis of behavior. We describe an account of scientific methodology—the Abductive Theory of Method (ATOM; Haig, 2005)—which details how empirical phenomena are detected and contribute to theory construction via inference to the best explanation, and show how it is relevant for behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation, participants should be able to: (1) describe and contrast important themes in the philosophy of science, including realism and empiricism, and how these relate to radical behaviorism; (2) describe the Abductive Theory of Method (ATOM) and how it relates to research and applied practice in the experimental analysis of behavior; (3) contrast current and historical conceptions of validity.
 
RANDOLPH C. GRACE (University of Canterbury), Brian Haig (University of Canterbury)
Randolph C. Grace is Professor of Psychology at the University of Canterbury (Christchurch, New Zealand).  He received his PhD from the University of New Hampshire in 1995 and has published over 120 articles and book chapters in a variety of basic and applied research areas including choice behavior and decision making, behavioural economics, methodology, comparative cognition, conditioning and learning, clinical/forensic psychology, tobacco control and neuropsychology.  He is past President of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. 
Keyword(s): Science
 
 
Invited Paper Session #52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Relation Between Academic Performance and Challenging Behavior

Sunday, May 29, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Regency Ballroom C, Hyatt Regency, Gold West
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Florence D. DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D.
Chair: Florence D. DiGennaro Reed (University of Kansas)
JENNIFER J. MCCOMAS (University of Minnesota)
Jennifer McComas is Professor of Special Education at the University of Minnesota. Dr. McComas was a special education teacher for students, grades 7-12, with high-incidence disabilities in rural Iowa before completing her Ph.D. at the University of Iowa. She went on to complete her post-doctoral training at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia/University of Pennsylvania and taught in the Psychology Department at Queens College/the City University of New York before joining the faculty at the University of Minnesota in 1999. Professor McComas holds the Rodney S. Wallace Professorship for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning and is head of the teacher licensure program in Emotional Behavior Disorders at the University of Minnesota. In addition, she co-directs the Urban Indian Education Partnership between the University of Minnesota and the Minneapolis Public Schools, a partnership aimed at improving outcomes for American Indian Youth. Dr. McComas teaches undergraduate, masters, and doctorate-level courses in emotional/behavior disorders, principles of behavior, and functional analysis of challenging behavior in academic and community-based settings. Her recently launched telepresence lab is a means by which to reach families of individuals with intellectual and development disorders and severe behavior problems across a wide geographic area and to conduct related research. Dr. McComas conducts translational research pertaining to the influence of principles of behavior on challenging behavior and using those principles to affect meaningful changes in behavior. She has published in several peer-reviewed journals including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. She is currently the Editor in Chief of the Journal of Behavioral Education, was an Associate Editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and continues to serve on the editorial board of several journals including the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and The Psychological Record.
Abstract:

Academic and behavior problems are highly co-morbid, yet little more is known about the relation between the two. Does one lead to the other? It is easy to imagine that as behavior problems persist and instructional time is lost to disciplinary procedures such as time-out and suspension, the lost instructional opportunities result in poor academic performance. However, it is also easy to imagine that as a young student's academic difficulties persist, school becomes increasingly aversive and socially reinforced behavior problems emerge. Effective interventions exist for both learning and behavior problems separately, but is it possible to implement intervention for one and achieve concomitant improvement in the other? If so, under what conditions is it possible to implement treatment that results in improvement in both academic performance and behavior? This presentation will begin with the question of the relation between learning and behavior problems and include data from several investigations of the influence of motivating operations, stimulus control, and reinforcement on academic performance and behavior.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) discuss influence of reinforcement on challenging behavior during academic tasks; (2) discuss the influence of motivating operations on challenging behavior during academic tasks; (3) consider a variety of approaches to the assessment and treatment for students who display poor academic performance and challenging behavior in school.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics

Designing Sustainable Behavior Change

Sunday, May 29, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Douglas A. Johnson, Ph.D.
Chair: Douglas A. Johnson (Western Michigan University)
MICHAEL KIM (Habit Design)
Michael Kim is Founder and CEO of Habit Design, the leading platform for crowdsourcing sustainable behavior change. Over 500 companies and 100,000 people have used Habit Design's behavior-change training to create successful daily habits that last beyond 100 days. Clinically tested by licensed, published clinical psychologists, Habit Design transforms training into automatic, habitual routines. Built on evidence-based research from over 100 behavioral scientists, the simple, easy, and effective training includes three main components: coaching, practice teams, and rewards.
Abstract:

Programs prioritizing ?motivating Behavior Change? frequently fail to generate sustained engagement: over 80% of employees who attempt to create new, healthy behaviors still fail at continuing their training after just the first 30 days, and corporate lifestyle management programs return only $0.50 for every $1 invested (RAND, 2015). The CDC attributes 80% of chronic conditions to this inability to form successful wellbeing habits, resulting in almost $1 Trillion in lost productivity alone (CDC, 2009). The problem is not that people resist change, but they resist being changed. While health promotion can motivate employees to make episodic, temporary changes, when it comes to creating lasting results, learning the skill of creating new habits is what is vital for long-term Behavior Change. The reason: While motivation may get you started, habit keeps you going. Developed by licensed, clinical psychologists from Yale and the University of Washington, this session covers best practices in the design of sustainable Behavior Change systems that have led to the successful training of unconscious, daily habits, derived from more than eight years of clinical testing of evidence-based research from over 100 behavioral researchers. Habit Design has trained more than 500 companies and 100,000 employees - from UnitedHealthcare, Humana, Aetna, Kaiser Permanente, Stanford Medical School, Boeing, Google, The White House, and many others.

Target Audience: Practitioners in the field.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) identify four key ingredients that must be present for creating successful behavior change; (2) differentiate and diagnose behavior change into fifteen distinct classes; (3) define three key strategies that successfully harness motivation for sustainable behavior change; (4) translate design principles and tactics to create winning recipes for training new habits, or "habit designs."
 
 
Invited Tutorial #72
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
SQAB Tutorial: Characterization of Delay Discounting Using Multiple Models and Effective Delay 50
Sunday, May 29, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Amy Odum, Ph.D.
Chair: Amy Odum (Utah State University)
Presenting Author: CHRISTOPHER FRANCK (Virginia Tech)
Abstract:

The study of delay discounting, or valuation of future rewards as a function of delay, has contributed to understanding the behavioral economics of addiction. Accurate characterization of discounting can be furthered by statistical model selection given that many functions have been proposed to measure future valuation of rewards. This tutorial will present a convenient Bayesian model selection algorithm that selects the most probable discounting model among a set of candidates chosen by the researcher. The approach assigns the most probable model for each individual subject using an asymptotic approximation to model probability based on the Bayesian Information Criterion. Importantly, effective delay 50 (ED50) functions as a suitable unifying measure that is computable for and comparable between several popular functions, including both one- and two-parameter models. Software to execute the combined model selection/ED50 approach is illustrated using empirical discounting data collected from a sample of 111 undergraduate students with five discounting models proposed between 1937 and 2006. The work this tutorial is based upon was published in the January, 2015, special issue of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior studying experimental manipulations of delay discountingand related processes.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the devaluation of future rewards as a function of delay in terms of delay discounting; (2) recognize several proposed models of delay discounting both mathematically and graphically, and state the computational approach to fit these models to observed data; (3) explain Effective Delay 50 (ED50); (4) execute approximate Bayesian model selection to choose among candidate models given observed data using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). Make informed decisions about the merits and caveats of choosing among candidate models on the basis of observed data.
 
CHRISTOPHER FRANCK (Virginia Tech)
Christopher Franck received his Ph.D. from the Department of Statistics at North Carolina State University in 2010. Dr. Franck is an Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Statistics at Virginia Tech, where he also serves as the assistant director of the Laboratory for Interdisciplinary Statistical Analysis (LISA). Dr. Franck collaborates with researchers from the Addiction Recovery Research Center (ARRC) in the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute studying a variety of psychological, behavioral economic, and statistical aspects of those who suffer from addiction and are successful in recovery. Dr. Franck's research interests include non-additivity in unreplicated studies with a focus on the identification of latent-groupings, predictive modeling of health outcomes, spatial modeling, and bioinformatics.
Keyword(s): Bayesian Model, Delay Discounting, Effective Delay50
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #73
CE Offered: PSY

The Surprising and Problematic Consequences of Exposure to Misinformation

Sunday, May 29, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Scott P. Ardoin, Ph.D.
Chair: Scott P. Ardoin (University of Georgia)
DAVID RAPP (Northwestern University)
David N. Rapp is Professor in the School of Education and Social Policy and the Department of Psychology at Northwestern University. His research examines language and memory, focusing on the cognitive mechanisms responsible for successful learning and knowledge failures. He investigates the ways in which prior knowledge, text materials, and learning goals influence memory and comprehension of discourse experiences. His recent projects examine how memory is influenced by the plausibility and importance of everyday events, the credibility of sources, and the collaborative nature of group discussions. These projects have been funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, and the National Institute on Aging. He received a McKnight Land-Grant Professor award from the University of Minnesota in 2006, the Tom Trabasso Young Investigator Award from the Society for Text & Discourse in 2010, was named a Charles Deering McCormick Professor of Teaching Excellence in 2015, and is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science. He recently finished serving as associate editor at the Journal of Educational Psychology, and is now editor of Discourse Processes.
Abstract:

Prior knowledge has been a key construct for theories of memory, comprehension, and learning. And traditionally prior knowledge has been identified as a resilient source of information, standing strong in the face of even the most compelling refutations and evidence. In the current talk I describe experiments that call into question this characterization of prior knowledge. Work from my lab shows that well-worn expectations appear malleable (and sometimes even non-existent) when people are confronted with contradictory arguments and facts. Across a variety of demonstrations involving the presentation of text content containing potential misinformation, people subsequently rely on encoded inaccuracies leading to problematic and surprising demonstrations of ignorance. Even obvious misinformation, which individuals should know better than to fall for, can influence subsequent problem solving and decision making behaviors. This talk will identify the consequences of exposure to misinformation, as well as highlight important boundary conditions for when and how people might be encouraged to engage in more critical evaluation in the service of successful comprehension.

Target Audience:

Educational researchers, practitioners

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the misinformation effect, specifically in terms of consequences for post-reading behaviors; (2) describe how experiments have used reading time and decision-based methodologies in attempts to evaluate reader comprehension; (3) identify potential instructional strategies and text features that can encourage more critical readings of text content.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #99
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
SQAB Tutorial: Associative Symmetry, Emergent Relations, and Stimulus Class Formation
Sunday, May 29, 2016
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Gregory J. Madden, Ph.D.
Chair: Gregory J. Madden (Utah State University)
Presenting Author: PETER URCUIOLI (Purdue University)
Abstract:

Associative symmetry is one of a number of derived relations that can emerge after explicit training on other conditional relations. Here, untrained but accurate B?A conditional discrimination performances arise from training A?B conditional relations, a finding indicative of stimulus class formation (i.e., the development of sets of disparate but interchangeable stimuli). Recent research shows that human language capabilities are not necessary for associative symmetry; it can also reflect basic reinforcement and stimulus control processes.This tutorial will describe the history of the now-successful search for symmetry in an animal other than humans (viz., the pigeon) and show how this important finding led to demonstrations of other rarely or never-before seen emergent relations in a non-human animal. Central to these demonstrations is the presenter's theory (Urcuioli, 2008) of the origin of stimulus classes in pigeons, specifically, the reinforcement contingencies of training, the nature of the functional stimuli, and the effect of common functional stimuli across different reinforced relations. The theory makes precise, testable and often confirmed predictions about the training conditions that should, and should not, yield emergent relations such as symmetry, transitivity, and reflexivity.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Licensed psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe associative symmetry and why it is an example of an untrained or “emergent” relation; (2) define a “stimulus class” and describe how stimulus classes develop and are demonstrated; (3) cite newly discovered emergent relations in non-human animals and outline a theory to explain these behavioral effects.
 
PETER URCUIOLI (Purdue University)
Peter Urcuioli is Professor of Psychological Sciences at Purdue University. He received his undergraduate degree in psychology at the University of New Hampshire where he worked with Tony Nevin, and his Master's degree and Ph.D. in experimental psychology at Dalhousie University (Nova Scotia, Canada) where he was a graduate student of Vern Honig. After a two-year postdoctoral research fellowship with Tony Wright at the University of Texas Health Sciences Center at Houston, Peter joined the faculty at Purdue University in 1981. Peter has made significant contributions to the areas of discrimination learning and stimulus control, differential outcome mechanisms, animal memory and cognition, and stimulus-class formation. His research has been continuously funded since 1983 by NIH and NSF, and he has over 70 peer-reviewed articles in journals such as Behavioural Processes, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, Learning and Behavior, Learning & Motivation, Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. His recent ground-breaking work on equivalence relations in pigeons reveals a wide range of never-before-seen emergent relations that are predicted by his innovative theory of stimulus-class formation that incorporates basic stimulus control and reinforcement assumptions.
Keyword(s): Emergent Relations, Reflexivity, Symmetry, Transitivity
 
 
Invited Paper Session #116
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Making a Difference With Applied Behavioral Science: Actively Caring for People

Sunday, May 29, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Montreux, Swissotel
Area: CSE; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Angela Sanguinetti, Ph.D.
Chair: Angela Sanguinetti (University of California, Davis)
E. SCOTT GELLER (Virginia Tech)
E. Scott Geller, Alumni Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech, is a senior partner of Safety Performance Solutions, Blacksburg, VA. He has authored or coauthored 33 books, 82 book chapters, 259 magazine articles, and more than 350 research articles addressing the development and evaluation of behavior-change interventions to improve quality of life. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, the Association for Psychological Science, the Association for Behavior Analysis International, and the World Academy of Productivity and Quality Sciences. He has received Lifetime Achievement Awards from the American Psychological Foundation and the International Organizational Behavior Management Network. In 2011, the College of Wooster awarded Scott an honorary degree: Doctor of Humane Letters.
Abstract:

From dawn to dusk, psychology affects every aspect of our lives. For example, success in educational settings, at the workplace, on the athletic field, and at home is influenced dramatically by interpersonal and intrapersonal communication. Are teachers facilitating motivation and learning among their students? Do supervisors empower workers to go beyond the call of duty to achieve organizational goals? Do coaches bring the best out of their players by enhancing self-motivation and cultivating interdependent teamwork? Do parents discipline their children so undesirable behaviors are not only eliminated but desirable behaviors and attitudes are promoted? This presentation will offer research-based principles and techniques teachers, coaches, supervisors, parents, and healthcare workers can use to instruct and inspire others to perform at optimum levels of effectiveness. Within this context, the vision of an Actively Caring for People Movement will be introduced � large-scale applications of behavioral science and leadership principles to cultivate cultures of compassion worldwide and thereby prevent interpersonal conflict, bullying and violence.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) explain self-motivation and research-based ways to increase an individual’s self-motivation or self-directed behavior; (2) explain how applied behavioral science can be used to improve quality of life on a large scale, beyond the clinic; (3) explain “humanistic behaviorism” and discuss similarities and differences with applied behavior analysis; (4) explain what it means to feel “empowered” to accomplish a worthwhile and challenging SMARTS goal.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #121
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Prospective and Retrospective Contingency in Operantly Conditioned Behavior

Sunday, May 29, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Suzanne H. Mitchell, Ph.D.
Chair: Suzanne H. Mitchell (Oregon Health & Science University)
CHARLES R. GALLISTEL (Rutgers University)
Charles Gallistel is a Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Behavioral and Systems Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology at Rutgers University. His research pursues a psychophysical approach to screening for memory malfunction in genetically manipulated mice; these behavioral screens look for distortions and increased noise in simple quantitative memories like interval duration, distance, and number.
Abstract:

Contingency is a fundamental concept in associative learning, but it has not been defined in such a way that it could be measured in most conditioning paradigms, particularly operant paradigms. A simple information-theoretic measure of contingency may be applied to most classical and operant associative learning paradigms. In applying it to assess the role of contingency in maintaining responding on variable interval schedules of reinforcement, we distinguish between prospective contingency—the extent to which one event (e.g., a response) predicts another (e.g., a reinforcement)—and retrospective contingency—the extent to which one event (e.g., a reinforcement) retrodicts another (e.g., a response). We find that the prospective contingency between response and reinforcement is un-measurably small, that is, the probability of reinforcement at any latency following a response does not differ from the probability of reinforcement following a randomly chosen moment in time. By contrast, the retrospective contingency is perfect. Degrading the retrospective contingency in two different ways, by delay of reinforcement or by partial non-contingent reinforcement, suggests that reinforcement is only effective when it falls within a critical time window, which implies that retrospective temporal pairing is critical, not retrospective contingency.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) define contingency; (2) explain the difference between prospective and retrospective contingency; (3) discuss the role of contingency in conditioning.
 
 
Special Event #125
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Presidential Scholar Address: Brain-Machine Interfaces: From Basic Science to Neurological Rehabilitation
Sunday, May 29, 2016
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Grand Ballroom, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Instruction Level: Basic
Chair: Martha Hübner (University of São Paulo)
CE Instructor: Martha Hübner, Ph.D.
 

Presidential Scholar Address: Brain-Machine Interfaces: From Basic Science to Neurological Rehabilitation

Abstract:

Dr. Nicolelis will describe how state-of-the-art research on brain-machine interfaces makes it possible for the brains of primates to interact directly and in a bi-directional way with mechanical, computational, and virtual devices without any interference of the body muscles or sensory organs. He will review a series of recent experiments using real-time computational models to investigate how ensembles of neurons encode motor information. These experiments have revealed that brain-machine interfaces can be used not only to study fundamental aspects of neural ensemble physiology, but they can also serve as an experimental paradigm aimed at testing the design of novel neuroprosthetic devices. Dr. Nicolelis will also describe evidence indicating that continuous operation of a closed-loop brain machine interface, which utilizes a robotic arm as its main actuator, can induce significant changes in the physiological properties of neural circuits in multiple motor and sensory cortical areas. This research raises the hypothesis that the properties of a robot arm, or other neurally controlled tools, can be assimilated by brain representations as if they were extensions of the subject's own body.

 
MIGUEL NICOLELIS (Duke University Medical Center)
Miguel Nicolelis, M.D., Ph.D., is the Duke School of Medicine Distinguished Professor of Neuroscience at Duke University, Professor of Neurobiology, Biomedical Engineering and Psychology and Neuroscience, and founder of Duke's Center for Neuroengineering. He is Founder and Scientific Director of the Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute for Neuroscience of Natal. Dr. Nicolelis is also founder of the Walk Again Project, an international consortium of scientists and engineers, dedicated to the development of an exoskeleton device to assist severely paralyzed patients in regaining full body mobility. Dr. Nicolelis has dedicated his career to investigating how the brains of freely behaving animals encode sensory and motor information. As a result of his studies, Dr. Nicolelis was first to propose and demonstrate that animals and human subjects can utilize their electrical brain activity to directly control neuroprosthetic devices via brain-machine interfaces (BMI). Over the past 25 years, Dr. Nicolelis pioneered and perfected the development of a new neurophysiological method, known today as chronic, multi-site, multi-electrode recordings. Using this approach in a variety of animal species, as well in intra-operative procedures in human patients, Dr. Nicolelis launched a new field of investigation, which aims at measuring the concurrent activity and interactions of large populations of single neurons throughout the brain. Through his work, Dr. Nicolelis has discovered a series of key physiological principles that govern the operation of mammalian brain circuits. Dr. Nicolelis’ pioneering BMI studies have become extremely influential since they offer new potential therapies for patients suffering from severe levels of paralysis, Parkinson’s disease, and epilepsy. Today, numerous neuroscience laboratories in the US, Europe, Asia, and Latin America have incorporated Dr. Nicolelis' experimental paradigm to study a variety of mammalian neuronal systems. His research has influenced basic and applied research in computer science, robotics, and biomedical engineering. Dr. Nicolelis is a member of the French and Brazilian Academies of Science and has authored over 200 manuscripts, edited numerous books and special journal publications, and holds three US patents. His award-winning research has been published in Nature, Science, and Scientific American and has been widely reported in national and international media. He is the author of Beyond Boundaries: The New Neuroscience of Connecting Brains with Machines and How It Will Change Our Lives; and most recently co-authored The Relativistic Brain: How it Works and Why it Cannot be Simulated by a Turing Machine.
 
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) explain the concept of the brain-machine interface and neuroprosthetic devices; (2) describe how brain-machine interfaces have influenced the development of a new generation of neuroprosthetics for treating neurological and psychiatric disorders; (3) discuss a new theory of brain function; (4) explain how a brain-machine interface can control an exoskeleton.
 
 
 
Invited Tutorial #168
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Being Part of the Solution: Antecedent Interventions for Students With Anxiety-Related Behaviors
Monday, May 30, 2016
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Crystal Ballroom B, Hyatt Regency, Green West
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
Chair: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
Presenting Author: JESSICA MINAHAN (Boston University)
Abstract:

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) reports that one in four thirteen-eighteen year olds has had an anxiety disorder in their lifetime. In 1998, Friman and colleagues encouraged behavior analysts to study anxiety but very few behavior analysts have done so. Anxiety creates a unique set of prior learning experiences, discriminative stimuli for reinforcement and punishment, and establishing operations. In this tutorial, a behavioral analysis of anxiety-related behaviors including the identification of: the effect of prior learning history of reinforcement and punishment for anxiety-related behaviors, discriminative stimuli that signal anxiety-related behaviors and establishing operations for anxiety-related behaviors will be provided. When anxiety-related behaviors are due to skill deficits, explicitly teaching coping skills, self-monitoring, and alternative responses is crucial. Using antecedent interventions with these children may be more effective than reward and punishment-based consequences from traditional behavior plans. The reduction of self-reported anxiety-related behavior by use of antecedent management and explicit instruction in self-regulation and self-monitoring strategies will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who are typically-developing who exhibit anxiety-related and challenging behaviors.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the tutorial, the participant will be able to: (1) explain why antecedent interventions for children with anxiety-related behaviors may be more effective than reward and punishment-based consequences from traditional behavior plans; (2) describe how to explicitly teach coping skills, self-monitoring, and alternative responses for anxiety-related behaviors; (3) describe how to implement antecedent strategies and interventions for reducing anxiety-related behaviors.
 
JESSICA MINAHAN (Boston University)
Jessica Minahan, BCBA, is an author and special educator with experience in both urban and suburban public school systems. She has worked with students who exhibit challenging behavior at home and in school; she specializes in creating behavior intervention plans for students who demonstrate explosive and unsafe behavior. She also works with students who have emotional and behavioral disabilities, anxiety disorders, or high-functioning autism. Jessica is currently an adjunct professor at Boston University and offers independent consultations to schools nationwide.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #174
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Final Fusillade

Monday, May 30, 2016
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Montreux, Swissotel
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Julie M. Slowiak, Ph.D.
Chair: Julie M. Slowiak (University of Minnesota Duluth)
BRADLEY E. HUITEMA (Western Michigan University)
Dr. Brad Huitema is professor of psychology, a member of the general faculty, and statistical consultant for businesses and several units of Western Michigan University. His 1980 text, The Analysis of Covariance and Alternatives, has been well received in the field. He is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the Journal of Behavioral Assessment. He is also a referee for several journals including The American Statistician; Behavioral Research Methods, Instruments, and Computers; the Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment; Psychological Bulletin and Psychometrika. His research interests include time series analysis, evaluation of preventitive health practices, and single organism and quasi-experimental design. His international travel includes teaching several short courses in Mexico.
Abstract:

A bevy of current methodological topics relevant to psychological researchers working in diverse areas is presented. Many of them are widely misunderstood. Among these topics are: (1) the recent efforts to ban null hypothesis significance tests (NHST), (2) interpretation problems surrounding both conventional (i.e., Fisher and Neyman-Pearson) and Bayesian statistical inference, (3) the relationship between p-values and replication, (4) unjustified hand wringing regarding effect declines (often claimed to cast doubt on scientific methods in general) that appear to occur in many or most areas of science, (5) the increasing salience of single-case research designs and associated analyses, and (6) the stunning effect of complex black-box statistical methods on judgment. The historical context for several of these topics is presented in order to facilitate an understanding how we have ended up in our current state.

Target Audience:

Behavioral researchers with a strong interest in research methodology.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe at least one reason that treatment effects tend to decline; (2) provide an example of a major public health problem solved with a very small n design; (3) identify a study in which a single-case design is very convincing.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #177
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Cognitive Consequences of Children's Exposure to Lead Revealed by Behavior Analysis

Monday, May 30, 2016
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: M. Christopher Newland, Ph.D.
Chair: M. Christopher Newland (Auburn University)
DEBORAH CORY-SLECHTA (University of Rochester Medical Center)
Dr. Deborah Cory-Slechta is a Professor of Environmental Medicine, Pediatrics and Public Health Sciences at the University of Rochester Medical School, Acting Chair of the Department of Environmental Medicine and PI of its NIEHS Core Center Grant. Her research, which includes both animal models and human studies, has focused largely on the behavioral consequences of developmental exposures to environmental chemicals. This work has examined the effects of developmental exposures to metals, pesticides and air pollutants in animal models and human cohort studies. Current efforts include development of animal models of behavioral toxicology that better simulate the context of the human environment, including assessment of behavioral consequences of the interactions of lead with prenatal stress, and with early behavioral adversity. A newer focus of the laboratory has been on the adverse impacts on the central nervous system of exposures to air pollution during development. These efforts have resulted in over 155 peer-reviewed publications. She previously served as Dean for Research at the University of Rochester Medical School, and as Director of the Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute of Rutgers University. Dr. Cory-Slechta has served on advisory panels of the NIH, the FDA, the Environmental Protection Agency, the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine, and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, and on the editorial boards of the journals Environmental Health Perspectives, Neurotoxicology, Toxicology, Toxicological Sciences, Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology and Neurotoxicology and Teratology.
Abstract:

Years of using lead in paint and gasoline resulted in widespread environmental contamination and human exposure. The particular vulnerability of the developing brain to lead puts children at particular risk for detrimental effects and numerous studies have documented the association of elevated blood lead in children with reduced IQ scores. Behavior analysis (BA)has been critical to the delineation of the specific cognitive deficits that underlie the IQ loss.BA hasrevealed deficits in learning/reversal learning that appear to result from increases in response perseveration and disruption of attention-related behaviors, particularly the ability to wait for reward. In the human environment, lead exposure occurs with many other risk factors for cognitive deficits, particularly in low socioeconomic status communities where lead levels are highest. Two such risk factors—high levels of maternal stress and early behavioral adversity in children—share pathways of brain mediation with lead, and thus could enhance or alter its behavioral toxicity. Indeed, studies in animal models show that lead-induced deficits in cognitive behaviors can be enhanced by, or even unmasked, in the presence of prenatal stress. Further, early behavioral adversity can further exacerbate the adverse effects of lead on learning.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the specific behavioral deficits that underlie the reductions in IQ associated with exposure to elevated levels of lead in children; (2) cite examples of the cumulative neuro- and behavioral toxicity produced by combined exposures to gestational lead exposure, prenatal stress and early behavioral adversity; (3) describe a biological algorithm for understanding the potential for the cognitive deficits produced by lead to be enhanced by other environmental risk factors for cognitive deficits.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #194
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Novel Behavioral Economic Approaches to Measuring Substance Abuse Severity and Motivating Change

Monday, May 30, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Crystal Ballroom B, Hyatt Regency, Green West
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Steven R. Lawyer, Ph.D.
Chair: Steven R. Lawyer (Idaho State University)
JAMES MURPHY (University of Memphis)
Dr. James Murphy is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Memphis and the Director of the Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program. He is also an Adjunct Associate Professor at the Brown University Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies. He completed his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Auburn University in 2003 and a clinical internship and NIAAA-sponsored postdoctoral research fellowship at Brown University. Dr. Murphy has published over 100 papers related to young adult drinking and drug use and behavioral economics. He has conducted numerous clinical trials of brief motivational interventions for young adult drinkers and drug users. He has also developed and evaluated a novel behavioral economic supplement to brief motivational interventions that attempts to increase engagement in constructive alternatives to drinking. His research also explores novel behavioral economic predictors of substance abuse problem severity, treatment outcome, and mechanisms of behavior change. Dr. Murphy’s research has been funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Alcohol Research Foundation. He is an Assistant Editor for the journal Addiction and a Consulting Editor for Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, and Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
Abstract:

Young adults report greater levels of drug and alcohol misuse than any other age or demographic group yet they rarely report significant substance dependence or any desire to participate in formal substance abuse treatment. Dr. Murphy's presentation will focus on novel behavioral economic approaches to understanding risk, quantifying severity, and motivating change in substance use in high-risk young adult populations. Dr. Murphy has developed and evaluated a brief behavioral economic intervention approach that attempts to increase engagement in patterns of goal-directed substance-free activities that are associated with delayed reinforcement and will describe the treatment elements and outcomes. He has also developed and evaluated demand curve and relative behavioral allocation indices of reward value and will present data on their clinical relevance in the prediction of substance abuse severity and treatment response.

Target Audience:

Undergraduate students, graduate students, and professionals in psychology and behavior analysis

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) develop familiarity with behavioral economic theories of addiction; (2) develop familiarity with demand curve and relative reinforcing efficacy assessment approaches based on behavioral economic theory; (3) develop familiarity with behavioral economic brief intervention approaches to reduce alcohol and drug misuse.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #197
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Neuroscience of Self, Mindfulness Meditation, and Neuropsychiatric Applications in Traumatic Brain Injury and Intellectual Disabilities

Monday, May 30, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Grand Ballroom EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Andrew W. Gardner, Ph.D.
Chair: Andrew W. Gardner (Northern Arizona University)
RANDALL BUZAN (Learning Services Neurobehavioral Institute)
Dr. Buzan graduated summa cum laude from the University of Michigan with a BS in Psychology, Alpha Omega Alpha from U-M Medical School, and completed his psychiatry residency at the University of Colorado and analytic training at the Denver Institute. He completed a fellowship in psychopharmacology at the University of Colorado and another mini-fellowship in electroconvulsive therapy at Duke. Randy had 6 additional years of training in psychotherapy at the Denver Institute for Psychoanalysis, and now serves on their faculty. He joined the psychiatry faculty at the medical school and did psychopharmacology and neuropsychiatry research for 9 years, also serving as Director of the Psychiatric Emergency Services at University Hospital, Co-Director of the Electroconvulsive Therapy service, and Director of Psychiatric Outpatient Services. Randy served as a peer reviewer for the Journal of Neuropsychiatry, is a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, and has published 25 papers and book chapters and presented nationally on treatment of brain injury and developmental disabilities. Randy consulted for 24 years at two Colorado’s Regional Centers for ID individuals, and continues to consult at Craig Hospital and Learning Services on TBI and spinal cord injury.
Abstract:

Western dualistic conceptions of "mind" and "self" create unrealistic behavioral expectations of patients for themselves, for their families, and for professionals alike. An alternative neuroscience-based conceptualization of the self allows a deeper and ultimately more forgiving model of human behavior. This lecture presents emerging perspectives on the neuroscience of self and reviews the accumulating data on the science of mindfulness meditation. Specific application of these concepts and of mindfulness training in traumatic brain injury and intellectual disorders is also discussed.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts and clinicians treating behavior issues in individuals with traumatic brain injuries or intellectual disabilities.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to: (1) discuss the Mind:Body dilemma in Western philosophy and the solution proposed by the Embodiment Theory; (2) understand the location of the default network and possible neuroanatomic location of the Self; (3) appreciate the growing empirical evidence supporting the utility of mindfulness meditation in a variety of disorders; (4) perform a brief Mindfulness, Metta, and gratitude meditation procedure.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #204
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Adaptive Memory: Remembering With a Stone-Age Brain

Monday, May 30, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Peter Urcuioli, Ph.D.
Chair: Peter Urcuioli (Purdue University)
JAMES NAIRNE (Purdue University)
James S. Nairne, Ph.D., is the Reece McGee distinguished professor of psychological sciences at Purdue University in West Lafayette, Indiana. He received his undergraduate training at the University of California at Berkeley and his PhD in psychology from Yale University. His original training was in Pavlovian conditioning, but his current research specialty is human memory. He is a fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the Association for Psychological Science, and the Midwestern Psychological Society. His editorial positions have included Editor-in-Chief of Memory & Cognition, Associate Editor for the Psychonomic Bulletin & Review and the Journal of Memory and Language, and he has served on numerous editorial boards. He was the recipient of the 2000 Excellence in Education Award from Purdue University and the 2001 Charles B. Murphy award. In 2003 Dr. Nairne was inducted into the Book of Great Teachers. He is also the author of a popular introductory textbook, Psychology: The Adaptive Mind (now in its sixth edition), as well as many influential articles and book chapters in his research specialty.
Abstract:

Human memory evolved subject to the constraints of nature's criterion: differential survival and reproduction. Consequently, our capacity to remember and forget is likely tuned to solving fitness-based problems, particularly those prominent in ancestral environments. Do the operating characteristics of memory continue to bear the footprint of nature's criterion? Are there mnemonic "tunings" rooted in the remnants of a stone-age brain? Work from the presenter's laboratory suggests that: (1) processing information for its survival relevance leads to superior long-term retention, better, in fact, than most known learning techniques; (2) animate (living) stimuli are remembered much better than matched inanimate (nonliving) stimuli; and (3) stimuli that have been potentially contaminated by disease are remembered especially well. Understanding how memory is used to solve adaptive problems relevant to fitness, the presenter argues, provides critical insight into how and why human memory systems formed, and why they work the way they do.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the end of the event, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the basic tenets of an evolutionary approach to human memory; (2) discuss whether "survival processing" is best characterized as an adaptation or an exaptation; (3) describe the empirical evidence that supports a mnemonic “tuning” for animacy and contamination.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #217
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Role of Nutrition in Medicine: Dietary and Other Behavioral Interventions for the Management of Significant Health Conditions

Monday, May 30, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: John M. Guercio, Ph.D.
Chair: John M. Guercio (Benchmark Human Services)
TOM CAMPBELL (University of Rochester Program for Nutrition in Medicine)
Thomas M. Campbell II, MD is the co-founder and clinical director of the University of Rochester Program for Nutrition in Medicine. A board certified family physician, he has an active primary care practice in Rochester, NY. In addition, Dr. Campbell is medical director of the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies, a leading provider, in partnership with eCornell, of online education in plant-based nutrition. A graduate of Cornell University, Thomas is author of The Campbell Plan and co-author, with his father T. Colin Campbell, PhD, of The China Study, a worldwide bestseller. Dr. Campbell got his medical degree from the University at Buffalo School of Medicine and completed residency training in Family Medicine at the University of Rochester, Highland Hospital. He has published in the Israel Medical Association Journal and in CME publications Primary Care Reports and Integrative Medicine Alert. He has completed several marathons.
Abstract:

Dr. Campbell has conducted extensive research into the influence of dietary and other behavioral interventions as they relate to cardiovascular health, longevity, cancer and diabetes prevention, and a host of other medical benefits. He is a leading scholar and authority on the role of diet and lifestyle changes in the prevention and treatment of disease. He and his father published The China Study in 2005. The book details the groundbreaking work that he has completed with his father in the area of the prevalence of cancer and its relation to our dietary habits.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) characterize a healthy, plant-based diet; (2) identify the most common diseases that are affected by nutrition; (3) understand the barriers and promises of integrating nutrition with behavior change in the traditional medical setting.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #218
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Should the FDA Reduce the Nicotine Content of Cigarettes? The Science and Potential Public Health Impact

Monday, May 30, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Christine E. Hughes, Ph.D.
Chair: Christine E. Hughes (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
ERIC C. DONNY (Univerisity of Pittsburgh)
Dr. Donny is a Professor of Psychology (primary), Psychiatry and Behavioral & Community Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh. His expertise includes behavioral pharmacology, biological and health psychology, addiction, and regulatory science. His research has included a wide range of topics and techniques including animal models of self-administration, human abuse liability of cocaine and heroin, functional neuroimaging, population-based surveys, and clinical trials of tobacco products. His current interests focus on regulatory approaches to reducing the health burden of tobacco. He co-directs the Center for the Evaluation of Nicotine in Cigarettes (CENIC), an NIDA/FDA-funded cooperative agreement involving 12 institutions that aims to increase understanding of how behavior and health might be affected in the vast majority of smokers who are either unable or unwilling to quit, if the nicotine content of combustible tobacco products is reduced.
Abstract:

In 2009, Congress gave the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) the authority to limit the nicotine content of combusted tobacco products. Decades of research suggest that nicotine is the primary cause of tobacco addiction and that reducing nicotine might reduce the rate and/or prevalence of smoking and have a dramatic impact on public health. This presentation will focus on recent clinical and preclinical data that addresses the potential benefits and risks of reducing nicotine as a regulatory approach. Clinical studies indicate that marked reduction in the nicotine content of cigarettes lead to fewer cigarettes smoked per day and reduced nicotine dependence with little evidence of compensatory smoking. Preclinical data from rat models of nicotine self-administration indicate that nicotine reduction would likely also decrease the initiation of use amongst nicotine na?ve adolescent users and that other non-nicotine constituents of tobacco smoke have little effect on behavior. The primary exception is MAO inhibition, which appears to shift the dose-response curve for self-administration to the left when the cost is low (i.e., low fixed ratio). Together, these data add to a growing literature that suggests that regulated reductions in nicotine may have a positive impact on behavior and health. Funding: Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and FDA Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) (U54 DA031659). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH or the Food and Drug Administration.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) determine the evidence as to whether reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes is likely to lead to compensatory smoking; (2) determine the evidence as to whether reducing the nicotine content of cigarettes is likely to lead to significant nicotine withdrawal or other negative effects such as depression; (3) determine if altering the nicotine content of cigarettes impacts price elasticity.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #237a
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Therapeutic Utility of Employment in Treating Drug Addiction

Monday, May 30, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: BPN; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Kenneth Silverman, Ph.D.
Chair: Paul L. Soto (Texas Tech University)
KENNETH SILVERMAN (Johns Hopkins University)
Kenneth Silverman is a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research has focused on developing operant treatments to address the interrelated problems of poverty and drug addiction. His primary research has focused on the development and evaluation of abstinence reinforcement interventions for the treatment of heroin and cocaine addiction in low-income, inner city adults; the development of the therapeutic workplace intervention and the use of employment-based reinforcement in the long-term maintenance of drug abstinence and adherence to addiction treatment medications; and the development of computer-based training to establish critical academic and job skills that chronically unemployed adults need to gain and maintain employment and escape poverty.
Abstract:

Research on a model Therapeutic Workplace has allowed for the rigorous evaluation of the use of employment in the treatment of drug addiction. Under the Therapeutic Workplace, adults with histories of drug addiction are hired and paid to work. To promote drug abstinence or adherence to addiction medications, participants are required to provide drug-free urine samples or take prescribed addiction medications, respectively, to gain access to the workplace and/or to maintain their maximum rate of pay. Research has shown that this intervention is effective in promoting and maintaining abstinence from heroin, cocaine and alcohol and in promoting adherence to naltrexone in heroin-dependent adults. This presentation will review research on the Therapeutic Workplace and summarize major lessons that have been learned in conducting this research. In addition, the presentation will describe three models that could be used to maintain employment-based reinforcement in the treatment of drug addiction: A Social Business model, a Cooperative Employer model, and a Wage Supplement model. Overall, this program of research suggests that employment could be useful as a means of arranging and maintaining therapeutic reinforcement contingencies in the treatment of drug addiction.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts interested in the application of operant conditioning to the long-term treatment of drug addiction.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the features and key parameters of abstinence reinforcement interventions used in the treatment of drug addiction; (2) describe the features the therapeutic workplace intervention and employment-based reinforcement; (3) describe the effects of employment-based reinforcement in promoting abstinence from heroin and cocaine and adherence to addiction medication.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #245
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Don Baer Invited Presentation: Taking EIBI to School: A Review of School-Based Early Intensive Behavioral Interventions

Monday, May 30, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Ilene S. Schwartz, Ph.D.
Chair: Mark D. Shriver (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
ILENE S. SCHWARTZ (University of Washington)
Dr. Ilene Schwartz is a professor in the Area of Special Education at the University of Washington and the Director of the Haring Center for Research and Training in Education at UW.  She earned her Ph.D. in child and developmental psychology from the University of Kansas and is a board certified behavior analyst (BCBA-D).  Dr. Schwartz has an active research and professional training agenda with primary interests in the area of autism, inclusive education, and the sustainability of educational interventions.  She has had consistent research funding from the U.S. Department of Education since 1990 and serves on a number of editorial review boards including the Topics in Early Childhood Special Education and the Journal of Early Intervention.  Dr. Schwartz is the director of Project DATA, a model preschool program for children with autism that has been in operation since 1997; and is currently involved in research projects examining the efficacy of the Project DATA model with toddlers and preschoolers with autism. 
Abstract:

It is well documented that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) benefit from early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI). The majority of programs for toddlers with ASD have been conducted in children's homes. Although there are some benefits to working in homes, there are a number of drawbacks such as isolation, cost, and lack of appropriate social and communicative models. The purpose of this presentation is describe the current state of knowledge about early intervention for children with ASD, including the results of two recently completed randomized clinical trials on school-based services. Implications of these results will be discussed as they apply to the basic dimensions of applied behavior analysis.

Target Audience:

Students, family members, researchers, school administrators, private practitioners providing EIBI to children with ASD.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the benefits of school based EIBI services; (2) describe characteristics of high quality EIBI services; (3) discuss how the concept of social validity can be used to evaluate the effectiveness and sustainability of behavioral programming for young children with ASD and their families.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #261
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Sleep Problems of Children With Autism: Prevalent, Relevant, and Treatable by Behavior Analysts

Monday, May 30, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Grand Ballroom EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Jessica L. Thomason-Sassi, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica L. Thomason-Sassi (New England Center for Children)
GREGORY P. HANLEY (Western New England University)
Gregory P. Hanley, Ph.D., has been applying the principles of learning to improve socially important behaviors of children and adults with and without disabilities for more than 20 years. He worked and trained at the Spurwink School, the Groden Center, and the Kennedy Krieger Institute; earned his Ph.D. at the University of Florida; and was tenured at the University of Kansas. He is currently a professor of psychology and director of the Behavior Analysis Doctoral Program at Western New England University and an adjunct professor of psychiatry at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Hanley has published more than 80 articles in peer-reviewed journals in areas such as the assessment and prevention of problem behavior, teaching tactics for young children, and evidence-based values. Dr. Hanley is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Division 25), past editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP), and a past associate editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Behavior Analyst, and BAP.
Abstract:

Sleep problems are prevalent among children, especially children with autism. Sleep problems negatively impact the wellbeing of both the child and their family. The good news is that most sleep problems of children are treatable by applied behavior analysts. Critical features of empirically supported behavioral intervention for sleep problems will be described along with ideas for teaching consumers about the prevalence and relevance of applied behavior analysts for addressing children's sleep problems.

Target Audience:

Applied Behavior Analysts, BCBAs, intermediate

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the assessment process that allows for the identification of likely causes of persistent delayed sleep onset and night awakenings in young children; (2) describe aspects of nighttime routines, schedules, and dependencies that promote or inhibit healthy sleep; (3) describe the various function-based treatments for nighttime problem behavior that interferes with sleep onset or the resumption of sleep.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #261a
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Unraveling Brain Circuits for Drug Seeking and Demand

Monday, May 30, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: BPN; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Matthew W. Johnson, Ph.D.
Chair: Matthew W. Johnson (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)
GARY ASTON-JONES (Rutgers University)
Gary Aston-Jones is the Inaugural Director of the Brain Health Institute at Rutgers University and Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, and the Murray and Charlotte Strongwater Endowed Chair in Neuroscience and Brain Health. He earned his Ph.D. in Neurobiology from the California Institute of Technology with James Olds and Floyd Bloom, and was a Postdoctoral Fellow with Bloom at the Salk Institute. Dr. Aston-Jones’s research focuses on the neural mechanisms of reward-motivated behavior, and examines the roles of ascending brain monoamine and peptide systems in addiction and cognitive processes. His studies use neurophysiology, neuroanatomy and behavioral neuropharmacology techniques in anesthetized and behaving rats. Recently his lab has also implemented optogenetics, DREADD synthetic designer receptors, and behavioral economics methods to advance the study of these systems in behavior. He and his colleagues have described a role for the brain noradrenergic locus coeruleus system in arousal, decision and behavioral flexibility, as well as a key role for the neuropeptides orexin/hypocretins in motivation and addiction. Dr. Aston-Jones has directed a well-funded lab for more than 25 years, chaired the Neurobiology of Motivated Behavior study section at NIH, and received a MERIT award for his addiction research from NIDA. He has been a keynote speaker at many national and international meetings, and was recently a Presidential Lecturer at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) meeting. He serves as the Deputy Editor-in-Chief for the journal Brain Research, and co-organized (with Karl Deisseroth) the annual Brain Research Conference in October 2013 on Optogenetics and Pharmacogenetics in Mental Health and Disease as a satellite meeting before the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting. He has published more than 240 journal and review articles, and has trained 45 postdoctoral fellows and graduated 17 Ph.D. students, many of whom now hold faculty positions including department and endowed chairs.
Abstract:

Drug addiction is a pernicious and prevalent problem with little available for clinical treatment. This presentation will review the presenter's recent studies that show roles for the ventral pallidum (VP), ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA), and orexin/hypocretin brain systems in cocaine seeking and demand. A within-session behavioral economic paradigm revealed potent contributions of the VTA DA system to demand for cocaine. The presenter used designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs) to show that the projection from VP to VTA DA neurons is critical for cocaine seeking. Additional pharmacologic studies reveal that orexin inputs to VTA interact with glutamate inputs and those from VP to augment cocaine seeking elicited by cocaine-associated cues. The presentation concludes that DREADDs are a promising avenue for novel therapies to treat drug abuse.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe within-session behavioral economics procedures for measuring drug demand in animals; (2) describe roles of orexin, dopamine, and ventral palladium brain systems in cocaine addiction; (3) describe potential use of DREADD designer receptors to treat human addiction.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #269
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Science Needs Experiments, but Experiments Are Not Enough to Get People and Institutions' Consensus About Science: How to Spread Behavior Analysis in Italy

Monday, May 30, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Montreux, Swissotel
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Douglas A. Johnson, Ph.D.
Chair: Douglas A. Johnson (Western Michigan University)
FABIO TOSOLIN (Italian Scientific Society of Behavior Analysis (AARBA))
Since the 1980s, Fabio Tosolin has been introducing and spreading organizational behavior management (OBM) and performance management (PM) in Italy. In the 1990s, he applied Lindsley's precision teaching (PT) and fluency building approach to the rapidly growing e-learning applications: developing PT in a software application for the first time in Italy. From 2009 to 2012, he has been the leader of the Italian Cluster in the European ManuVAR Consortium that adopted Precision Teaching method in the operators' training through Virtual and Augmented Reality learning machines. Further, he led many Italian and European industries in their implementation of behavior-based Safety (B-BS) processes. He is currently professor of health, safety, environment, and quality at the Milan Polytechnic, Faculty of Engineering of the Industrial Processes. He has been the chair of the last seven editions of the European Behavior-Based Safety Conference and led the scientific committee for the certification of B-BS process and professionals. He is author of more than 100 scientific communications, experimental studies, articles and books on psychology of learning, didactic communication, learning technologies, behavior management and B-BS. He is the president of the Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis, the Italian Chapter of ABAI, and adviser of the Cambridge Center for Behavior Studies.
Abstract:

Behavior analysis expiates unfair preconceptions in Italy because of the lack of scientific culture and the psychoanalytic approach, both well spread in several clinical, educational, institutional, political and academic environments. Further, there are common misconceptions of our principles themselves and their applications. ABA Chapter of Italy (AARBA) has been committed to disseminating our science since its founding in 2001 and we have challenged all those prejudices. As professionals and members of the ABA community, we tried many ways before getting partially successful: AARBA tried to influence institutions and academics first, but the evidence provided by our experiments was not enough to move them forward their conflicts of interests. So, we changed the direction of our efforts, from top-down (from institutions to clients) to bottom-up (from clients to institutions). The efficacy of our application, especially in organizational settings, developed a community that got benefit from behavior analysis and that yearly have been gathering in our annual conference, since 2004. Invited institutions to our conference could not ignore the audience and have been obliged to endorse us, sometimes under negative reinforcement. It has been a hard work but worth it. This presentation will show the results of our successful applications and experiments and the impact they had on clients in terms of benefits and on institutions, in terms of consensus.

Target Audience:

Students and practitioners interested in reviewing a possible application of behavior analysis to business and e-learning, and in understanding how to nurture and value OBM in the civil society.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) avoid common errors in disseminations of science; (2) list the marketing activities to promote and sell behavior analysis to clients and institutions; (3) list the variety of business results and environments which behavior analysis may apply to, from sales to safety, from hospitals to industries.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #289
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Observing Behavior and Discrimination Processes in Children and Adults

Monday, May 30, 2016
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DEV; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Gerson Yukio Tomanari, Ph.D.
Chair: Iver H. Iversen (University of North Florida)
GERSON YUKIO TOMANARI (Universidade de São Paulo)
Dr. Gerson Yukio Tomanari is a full professor at the University of São Paulo (USP), Brazil, institution in which he has completed the Bachelor degree in Psychology (1993), as well as the master (1995) and doctoral (1997) degrees in Experimental Psychology - the latter in collaboration with the University of Massachusetts Medical School - Shriver Center. At the University of São Paulo, Dr. Tomanari coordinates the Laboratory of Experimental Analysis of Behavior. From a comparative perspective involving humans and non-humans, his main interests have been: Behavioral and learning processes, attention, observing behavior, eye movements, visual discrimination, symbolic behavior and concept formation. On these topics, Dr. Tomanari has published more than 60 papers in peer-reviewed journals, books and chapters, and supervised more almost 30 master and doctoral students. He has lectured and taught in the United States, France, Norway, Peru, Japan, and served as “ad hoc” reviewer for the main journals in the field. Dr. Tomanari is the current dean of the Institute of Psychology, USP, as well as the adjunct coordinator of the National Psychology Graduate System of CAPES, an agency of the Ministry of Education in Brazil.
Abstract:

Observing behavior is an operant behavior that has the production of discriminative stimuli as consequence. This presentation will review the main course of the scientific production in this field, from early investigations up to some of the most recent works. To analyze this quite numerous and diverse literature, the speaker will identify and describe the basic observing-response procedures that employed humans as participants, especially children and adults. The maintenance of observing behavior by discriminative stimulus of extinction (that is, S-) compared to discriminative stimulus of reinforcement (that is, S+) will be addressed and two sets of empirical works involving adults and children with typical and atypical development will be presented. The first work will present the current advances in the study of observing behavior by tracking the participants' eye movements. The second work will focus on the role of observing responses in conditional discrimination processes that lead to the formation of equivalence classes. Based on these recent findings, the speaker will discuss how discrimination is established as the product of the main three-term contingency interlocked with the observing-response contingency.

Target Audience:

Basic and applied researchers interested in mechanisms of behavior change. Additionally, it should be of great interest to practitioners in a variety of applied settings.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) define and conceptualize observing behavior in theoretical and methodological terms; (2) describe different studies that investigated observing behavior in children and adults, comparing and discussing their results; (3) expand the role of observing behavior to a variety of learning contexts, including the formation of symbolic classes.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #292a
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

What is Secular Humanism?

Monday, May 30, 2016
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: TPC; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Edward K. Morris, Ph.D.
Chair: Edward K. Morris (University of Kansas)
PHIL ZUCKERMAN (Pitzer College/Claremount Graduate University/University of Aarhus, Denmark)
Phil Zuckerman is a professor of Sociology and Secular Studies at Pitzer College in Claremont, California. He is also a regular affiliated professor at Claremont Graduate University, and he has been a guest professor for two years at the University of Aarhus, Denmark. He is the author of several books, including The Nonreligious (Oxford, 2016), Living the Secular Life (Penguin, 2014), Faith No More (Oxford, 2012), and Society Without God (NYU, 2008) and the editor or several volumes, including Atheism and Secularity (Praeger, 2010) and The Social Theory of W.E.B. Du Bois (Pine Forge, 2004). His research has also been published in various scholarly journals, such as Sociology CompassSociology of ReligionDeviant Behavior, and Religion, Brain, and Behavior.  In 2011, Phil founded the first Secular Studies department in the nation. Secular Studies is an interdisciplinary program focusing on manifestations of the secular in societies and cultures, past and present. Secular Studies entails the study of non-religious people, groups, thought, and cultural expressions. Emphasis is placed upon the meanings, forms, relevance, and impact of political/constitutional secularism, philosophical skepticism, and personal and public secularity. Phil is also currently the series editor of the Secular Studies book series with New York University Press. He blogs for Psychology Today and the Huffington Post. He lives in Claremont, California, with his wife and three children.
Abstract:

Back in the 1950s, fewer than 5% of Americans were non-religious. Today, nearly 30% define themselves as such. And in many other nations, rates of irreligion are even higher. This recent increase of people who describe themselves as "none" in terms of religious identification is one of the most significant demographic shifts in recent history. Who are these non-religious individuals? Are they all atheists? Agnostics? Secular Humanists? And more importantly: what do these various designations even mean? In this lecture, secular typologies and taxonomies will be covered, and secular humanism -- as a growing worldview, existential orientation, and group identification -- will be defined, explored, and explained. For as the number of non-religious men and women continues to dramatically rise both in the USA and abroad, it is more important than ever to understand those men and women who choose to live without religious affiliation or beliefs, and yet still maintain core values, morals, and convictions which influence and direct so many aspects of their lives.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts and graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) discuss sociological knowledge concerning the growing rate of non-religious Americans; (2) define a variety of terms, labels, and typologies developed for describing and defining various types of irreligious people and identities; (3) discuss the meaning and core components of secular humanism.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #305
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Cusps: Twenty Years Later
Monday, May 30, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DEV; Domain: Theory
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Ph.D.
Chair: R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Presenting Author: JESÚS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Rosales-Ruiz and Baer first wrote about the concept of behavioral cusps in 1996. However, it wasn't until the publication of a JABA article the next year (Rosales-Ruiz and Baer 1997) and a follow-up article by Bosch and Fuqua (2001) that the idea begins to spread throughout behavior analysis. A behavioral cusp is a special type of behavior change because it brings the organism in contact with new contingencies that have even more far-reaching consequences. The concept of the cusp has been both theoretically and pragmatically useful for the field of behavior analysis. In practice, the concept of the cusp helps guide the selection of target behaviors. In theory, it contributes significantly to our understanding of the way that behavior changes. This presentation will illustrate the concept of the cusp and distinguish it from other types of behavior change, such as generativity, and types of behavior, such as pivotal behaviors. It will also highlight some of the developments that have helped advance the concept of the cusp over the last 20 years and discuss the theoretical importance of the cusp concept.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

This tutorial will be of interest to basic and applied researchers interested in mechanisms of behavior change and to practitioners who work in a variety of applied settings.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to: 1) Describe the difference between behavioral cusps and other types of behavior change. 2) Identify cusps in teaching situations in applied settings. 3) List possible behaviors that could be cusps.
 
JESÚS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas)
Jesús Rosales-Ruiz is an associate professor at the University of North Texas in the Department of Behavior Analysis. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas in 1995, under the mentorship of two pioneers in the field of behavior analysis, Donald M. Baer and Ogden R. Lindsley. Jesús is one of the few scientists in the world studying animal training from both the theoretical and applied perspectives. He, along with his students, has greatly contributed to the understanding of the science and practice of animal training. Jesús also studies the antecedent control of behavior, generalization, behavioral cusps, fluency-based teaching, treatment of autism, teaching of academic behavior, rule-governed behavior and contingency-shaped behavior. He has served on several editorial boards, including the Journal of Precision Teaching, the European Journal of Behavior Analysis, and the International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy. He has also served as a reviewer for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, the Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Behavioral Processes, and PLOS ONE. Jesús is a fellow of the Eastern Psychological Association, a trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and a member of the Association for Behavior Analysis International.
Keyword(s): Behavior change, Behavioral cusps, Generativity, Pivotal response
 
 
Invited Paper Session #309
CE Offered: PSY

Quantitative Modeling in Behavioral Analysis, Part 1: Why?

Monday, May 30, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Federico Sanabria, Ph.D.
Chair: Blake A. Hutsell (Virginia Commonwealth University)
FEDERICO SANABRIA (Arizona State University)
Dr. Sanabria is an associate professor of psychology at Arizona State University and principal investigator at the Basic Behavioral Processes laboratory. He is also affiliated to the neuroscience program in Arizona State University. Dr. Sanabria received his professional degree in psychology from the Universidad de los Andes en Bogotá (Colombia), where he spent a few years as marketing research analyst. He received his doctoral degree in experimental psychology in 2004 from Stony Brook University, where he worked on self-control under the guidance of Dr. Howard Rachlin. He was a postdoctoral research associate under the supervision of Dr. Peter Killeen (2004–2008) and Dr. Janet Neisewander (2008) in Arizona State University. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed publications in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB), Behavioural Brain Research, Psychopharmacology, and other journals. He is the president-elect of the International Society for Comparative Psychology, board member of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, and associate editor of JEAB and Learning and Behavior. His research is primarily concerned with the development and evaluation of quantitative models of basic behavioral processes (learning, timing, choice, and regulation) in psychiatric disorders (mainly, substance abuse and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder).
Abstract:

Quantitative modeling is increasingly common in behavior analysis. Performance on concurrent schedules, timing, delay discounting, behavioral momentum, schedule and stimulus control, variability of inter-response times, and many other aspects of behavior, are often characterized in terms of mathematical equations and computational algorithms. This presentation outlines the advantages, challenges, and pitfalls of a quantitative analysis of behavior. In particular, this presentation is focused on identifying the outcomes that quantitative models may and may not deliver, the assumptions and pre-requisites for quantitative modeling, the risks involved in this strategy, and the tactics that minimize such risks. The presentation will introduce the concepts of model-based inference, parameter estimation, stochastic vs. deterministic models, likelihood vs. probability, parsimony vs. goodness-of-fit, Bayesian modeling, and model selection. This introduction will set the stage for the practical implementation of some of these concepts.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists and those interesed in quantitative modeling.

Learning Objectives: At the end of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the advantages and challenges associated with a quantitative analysis of behavior, relative to conventional approaches to behavior analytic research; (2) identify and appropriately use the concepts of model-based inference, parameter estimation, stochastic and deterministic models, likelihood and probability, parsimony and goodness-of-fit, Bayesian modeling, and model selection.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #326
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Big Rats, Big Opportunities, and Big Challenges: HeroRATS and Me

Monday, May 30, 2016
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Alan D. Poling, Ph.D.
Chair: Christy A. Alligood (Disney's Animal Kingdom and Florida Institute of Technology)
ALAN D. POLING (Western Michigan University)
Dr. Alan Poling is Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University. He received his B.A. from Alderson-Broaddus College, his M.A. from West Virginia University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. A Fellow of Divisions 3, 25, and 28 of the American Psychological Association, Dr. Poling has published 12 books and roughly 350 articles and book chapters and served as the research advisor of 35 Ph.D. recipients. They, and he, have conducted research and done conceptual work in several areas, including behavioral pharmacology, clinical psychopharmacology (with special emphasis on the effects of psychotropic drugs in people with developmental disabilities), applied behavior analysis, gender issues, animal welfare, quantitative analysis, learning processes, and research methods. Dr. Poling was recognized as a Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Western Michigan University in 1996 and as a Distinguished Alumnus of West Virginia University in 1999. In 2003, he received the Western Michigan University College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Achievement in Research and Creative Activity Award. In 2016, he will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the California Association of Behavior Analysis, a Translational Research Award from the Association for Behavior Analysis International, and an International Humanitarian Award from the American Psychological Association.
Abstract:

For more than a decade, APOPO, a Belgian NGO headquartered in Tanzania, has used scent-detecting giant African pouched rats (Cricetomys) to detect landmines and other explosive remnants of war and to detect human tuberculosis. APOPO has also explored other potential humanitarian applications of the rats. For several years, my students and I have worked with other APOPO personnel to ascertain how well the rats perform in detecting landmines and in finding tuberculosis, to devise strategies to increase the rats' effectiveness and efficiency, and to extend the range of valuable services they can provide. This presentation summarizes what we have learned.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists, certified behavior analysts, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) specify how pouched rats are trained and used operationally to detect target scents, such as though associated with landmines and human tuberculosis; (2) specify how the rats are currently used for humanitarian purposes, their value in these applications, and potential future uses of the rats; (3) specify challenges associated with conducting high quality scent detection research in general and in conducting such research under the auspices of a humanitarian organization that works under difficult conditions in resource poor areas.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #336
CE Offered: PSY

Quantitative Modeling in Behavioral Analysis, Part 2: How?

Monday, May 30, 2016
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Blake A. Hutsell, Ph.D.
Chair: Federico Sanabria (Arizona State University)
BLAKE A. HUTSELL (Virginia Commonwealth University)
Blake Hutsell received his doctoral training in experimental psychology at Southern Illinois University under the direction of Dr. Eric Jacobs. Subsequently he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Auburn University under the direction of Dr. Chris Newland and currently holds a postdoctoral position in the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine under the direction of Dr. Matt Banks. He was the 2011 recipient of the APA Division 25 Basic Behavior Analysis Dissertation Award and his publications have appeared in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, Drug and Alcohol Dependence and other journals. His research interests include novel applications of quantitative models to socially-relevant behavioral phenomena such as drug addiction and neurotoxicant exposure to target underlying behavioral mechanisms that mediate these phenomena.
Abstract:

While quantitative modeling has become increasingly common in the behavior analytic literature, many researchers have received little formal training in the practical implementation of these methods. The purpose of this presentation is to encourage quantitative analyses of behavior by providing an introduction to modeling in Microsoft Office Excel. Excel represents an advantageous platform due to its wide availability to researchers in various settings and relative ease with which prominent quantitative models may be implemented. This presentation has three major aims: (1)to provide an overview of how to simulate quantitative models commonly encountered in the literature for the purposes of gaining an understanding of the model's behavior; (2) demonstrate how to set up a workbook to perform regression analyses and basic visual analyses to assess the goodness of a model's fit to data; (3) provide an accessible introduction to model selection techniques comparing nested and non-nested models to aid the identification of candidate behavioral mechanisms.

Target Audience:

Licensed pschologists and those interested in quantitative modeling.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) set up workbooks for model simulation and visualization to understand model behavior; (2) perform regression and implement model selections techniques.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #337
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Designing Courses Based on Research and Theory in Behavior Analysis and Psychology

Monday, May 30, 2016
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Regency Ballroom C, Hyatt Regency, Gold West
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Advanced
CE Instructor: Henry D. Schlinger, Ph.D.
Chair: Nicole Luke (Surrey Place Centre)
HENRY D. SCHLINGER (California State University, LA)
Henry D. (Hank) Schlinger Jr. received his Ph.D. in psychology (applied behavior analysis) from Western Michigan University under the supervision of Jack Michael. He then completed a two-year National Institutes of Health-funded post-doctoral fellowship in behavioral pharmacology with Alan Poling. He was a full tenured professor of psychology at Western New England University in Springfield, MA, before moving to Los Angeles in 1998. He is now professor of psychology and former director of the M.S. Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Schlinger has published numerous scholarly articles and commentaries in 25 different journals. He also has authored or co-authored three books, Psychology: A Behavioral Overview (1990), A Behavior-Analytic View of Child Development (1995) (which was translated into Japanese), and Introduction to Scientific Psychology (1998). He is a past editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and The Behavior Analyst, and on the editorial boards of several other journals. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies.
Abstract:

There is currently widespread concern for effective teaching at all levels of education. A defining feature of teaching—perhaps more than any other profession—is the range of variability in styles and approaches. Unlike the practice of medicine, for example, teaching is still seen as an art. Moreover, few college professors are ever taught how to teach; their only qualification is a Ph.D. and expertise in their subject matter. But nowadays when colleges and universities are struggling to attract and then retain students, it is imperative that instructors take more responsibility for the success of their students. They can do this by designing their courses and classrooms according to existing research and theory in behavior analysis and psychology. This presentation describes (a) the purpose and goals of assessment; (b) the principles of a high-feedback instructional system; (c) the role of assessment in a high-feedback system; and (d) one model of a high-feedback system.

Target Audience:

Educators and teachers of applied behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) understand the purpose and goals of assessment in college teaching; (2) understand the principles of a high-feedback instructional system; (3) understand the role of assessment in a high-feedback system.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #393
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Implementing an Evidence-Based Intervention Worldwide: Collaboration as the Core of Sustainable Fidelity

Tuesday, May 31, 2016
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Per Holth, Ph.D.
Chair: Per Holth (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
MARION FORGATCH (Oregon Social Learning Center)
Marion Forgatch’s professional interests blend basic research, intervention, and wide-scale implementation. She joined the group that would become Oregon Social Learning Center in 1970. Her intervention work includes families of youth referred for problems ranging from childhood aggression to chronic delinquency and parents referred for child abuse/neglect. She has designed and tested preventive interventions for at-risk families based on Parent Management Training – Oregon Model (PMTO). Dr. Forgatch founded Implementation Sciences International Inc. in 2001 to disseminate PMTO. Forgatch and her team have conducted large-scale PMTO implementations including: statewide in Michigan and Kansas; nationwide in Norway, Iceland, the Netherlands, and Denmark; countywide in Detroit/Wayne County; and citywide in New York City and Mexico City. Forgatch’s program Parenting through Change (PTC) has been adapted and tested with diverse populations: Spanish-speaking Latinos in the US, mothers living in homeless shelters and supportive housing, parents with severely emotionally disturbed children, parents whose children have been placed in care, military families reintegrating after war, and war-displaced mothers in Uganda. Forgatch has co-authored journal articles, book chapters, books, and audio and video tapes. A fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, her awards include Friend of the Early Career Prevention Network and the Award for International Collaborative Prevention Research from Society for Prevention Research, and the Distinguished Contribution to Family Systems Research Award, from the American Academy of Family Therapy.
Abstract:

Parent Management Training–Oregon Model (PMTO) is an evidence-based intervention that prevents and treats child and adolescent behavior problems by teaching parents strategies that reduce coercion and increase positive parenting practices (Forgatch & Patterson, 2010; Patterson, 2005). The intervention, which was developed by the group of colleagues led by Gerald Patterson, has emerged over several decades with a programmatic focus on families with youngsters with externalizing problems such as aggression, antisocial behavior, and delinquency. PMTO's staying power over nearly five decades is likely tied to the continuing integration of theory, science, and practice with a focus on improving outcomes at every level. In the last fifteen years, PMTO has been implemented internationally. Reliable and valid data using multiple method and agent assessment from U.S. and international PMTO implementations illustrate the challenges of making empirically-supported interventions routine practice in the community. Technological advances that break down barriers to communication across distances, the availability of efficacious programs suitable for implementation, and the urgent need for high quality mental health care provide strong rationales for prioritizing implementation. The next challenge is to reduce the prevalence of children's psychopathology by creating science-based delivery systems to reach families in need, everywhere.

Target Audience:

This lecture will be of interest to applied researchers interested in mechanisms of behavior change and of implementation of evidence-based programs, and to practitioners who work in a variety of applied settings, particularly those who work with children with aggressive and other antisocial behavior.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe basic elements of parents' strategies that reduce coercion and increase positive parenting practices; (2) describe important challenges of making empirically supported interventions routine practice in the community; (3) describe some ideas regarding how to create science-based delivery systems to reach families in need, everywhere.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #394
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

The Syncretic Analysis of Behavior (SAB)

Tuesday, May 31, 2016
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: EAB; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Peter R. Killeen, Ph.D.
Chair: Eric S. Murphy (University of Alaska Anchorage)
PETER R. KILLEEN (Arizona State University)
Dr. Peter Killeen is professor of psychology at Arizona State University, and has also been visiting scholar at the University of Texas, Cambridge University, and the Centre for Advanced Study, Oslo. He is a Fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, has held a Senior Scientist Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, has been president of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior (from which organization he appropriately received the Poetry in Science Award in 2002), held the American Psychological Association F. J. McGuigan Lectureship on Understanding the Human Mind, and received the Ernest and Josephine Hilgard Award for the Best Theoretical Paper (Killeen & Nash, 2003). Dr. Killeen has made many highly innovative and fundamental contributions to the experimental and quantitative analysis of behavior. His major work includes the development of incentive theory, culminating in the mathematical principles of reinforcement (Behavioural and Brain Sciences, 1994), and the behavioral theory of timing (Psychological Review, 1988). He is the author of 80 peer-reviewed papers, many of which have been heavily cited. He has served on the boards of editors of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Behavioural Processes, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Psychological Review, Brain & Behavioral Functions, and Comparative Cognition & Behavior Reviews. Dr. Killeen's quantitative and conceptual developments have enriched behavior analysis and the world beyond.
Abstract:

Any perturbation of the stream of behavior has numerous effects. Delivery of a food reinforcer will activate approach and alimentary responses, elicit search modes, and instigate species typical foraging or predation repertoires. Any correlated stimuli will become conditioned--as an occasion-setter, conditioned stimulus, discriminative stimulus, or conditioned reinforcer. If the correlation is positive those stimuli will be approached; if negative avoided. Theories of conditioning have focused on one or another of these factors; that is called analysis. Synthesis requires understanding the development of these processes, each at its own rate, and as each interacts with the others. The resulting system is complex, in that it involves dynamic networks of interactions. The degree to which responses support or compete with each other, and each with higher-level organizations, may be described with the Price Equation. The evolution of dynamic and average steady states requires other models. This lecture provides an introduction to this next step in the evolution of the experimental analysis of behavior, toward the Syncretic Approach to Behavior, SAB.

Target Audience:

Researchers in both basic and applied behavior analysis who are wondering "where next?".

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) outline in a few sentences the syncretic approach to behavior; (2) apply the syncretic approach to situations of interest to them, in laboratory or classroom; (3) discuss with peers how the syncretic approach unifies the various threads of learning theory; (4) relate the price equation to field theories such as Kantor's.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #426
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Relational Frame Theory, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: What Are the Connections?

Tuesday, May 31, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: TPC; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.
Chair: Yvonne Barnes-Holmes (Ghent University)
DERMOT BARNES-HOLMES (Ghent University, Belgium; National University of Ireland, Maynooth), Yvonne Barnes-Holmes (Ghent University)
Dr. Dermot Barnes-Holmes graduated from the University of Ulster in 1985 with a B.Sc. in Psychology and in 1990 with a D.Phil. in behavior analysis. His first tenured position was in the Department of Applied Psychology at University College Cork, where he founded and led the Behavior Analysis and Cognitive Science unit. In 1999 he accepted the foundation professorship in psychology and head-of-department position at the National University of Ireland Maynooth. In 2015 he accepted a life-time senior professorship at Ghent University in Belgium. Dr. Barnes-Holmes is known internationally for the analysis of human language and cognition through the development of Relational Frame Theory with Steven C. Hayes, and its application in various psychological settings. He was the world's most prolific author in the experimental analysis of human behavior between the years 1980 and 1999. He was awarded the Don Hake Translational Research Award in 2012 by the American Psychological Association, is a past president and fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, is a recipient of the Quad-L Lecture Award from the University of New Mexico and most recently became an Odysseus laureate when he received an Odysseus Type 1 award from the Flemish Science Foundation in Belgium.
Abstract:

Relational frame theory (RFT) is sometimes said to provide a foundation in basic behavior analysis for acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), and ACT is said to be part of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) writ large. This lecture will consider the potential role that RFT could play in grounding ACT, and perhaps some CBT concepts, in more functionally based theorizing. The first part of the lecture will argue that the so-called “middle-level terms” employed in ACT, such as acceptance, defusion, values, and self-as-context, may be seen as lacking the (functional) analytic precision that many concepts in traditional CBT also lack. This lack of functional precision is entirely understandable for CBT, given its explicitly mentalistic origins, but it could be seen as placing a question mark over the functional-analytic “credentials” of ACT. The second part of the lecture considers the argument that RFT can “rescue” ACT from its apparent lack of functional precision, and concludes that it cannot do so without additional substantive conceptual development of the theory itself. A brief outline of how this conceptual development might be realized is presented in the form of a multi-dimensional, multi-level (MDML) framework for analyzing the dynamics of relational framing as generalized relational operant behaviors.

Target Audience:

Individuals with an interest in conceptual issues pertaining to translational research, particularly in the domains of clinical behavior analysis, and human language and cognition.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) articulate why relatively functionally imprecise "middle-level" terms are employed in acceptance and commitment therapy; (2) understand some of the similarities and differences between middle-level terms and mentalistic concepts employed in traditional cognitive behavioral therapy; (3) appreciate the need for relational frame theory to develop conceptually in order to provide increased functional-analytic precision in some of the concepts employed by both ACT and CBT.
 
 
Invited Panel #427
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
VBSIG Award Winners Discuss Jack Michael's Influence on Theory, Research, and Practice
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Grand Ballroom EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Theory
Chair: Caio F. Miguel (California State University, Sacramento)
CE Instructor: Caio F. Miguel, Ph.D.
Panelists: MARK L. SUNDBERG (Sundberg and Associates), DAVID C. PALMER (Smith College), HENRY D. SCHLINGER (California State University, LA)
Abstract:

Among the behavior analysts who first appreciated the scope and power of Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior, Jack Michael has been by far the most influential. In addition to having trained many of the most prominent figures in the field, Jack relentlessly refined and sharpened Skinner's analysis over the course of five decades. In honor of his unparalleled contributions, the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group annually acknowledges a prominent figure in the field with the Jack Michael Award. The first three winners of the award will speak about Jack's influence on their work and on the field as a whole. Among the topics they will discuss are multiple control, establishing operations, automatic reinforcement, recall, and private events.Dr. Jack Michael was born in 1926 in Los Angeles and entered UCLA in 1943, majoring in chemistry. He served two years in the US army and returned to UCLA in 1946 as a psychology major. He obtained a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. at UCLA, finishing in 1955. As a graduate student, his main interests were statistical methodology, physiological psychology, and learning theory. During his first teaching job (Kansas University), he was much influenced by B. F. Skinner’sScience and Human Behaviorand, throughout his teaching career, he was primarily involved in teaching behavioral psychology (Kansas University, University of Houston, Arizona State University, and from 1967, at Western Michigan University). In 1957, as a result of influence by the rehabilitation psychologist, Lee Meyerson, Jack Michael began to apply Skinner’s approach to individuals with developmental disabilities, mental illness, and physical disabilities. During the next several years, “behavior modification” was in a period of rapid expansion and Dr. Michael contributed with his teaching, writing, and public presentations. He spent much of his academic career concerned with the technical terminology of behavior analysis, basic theory regarding motivation, and verbal behavior. He contributed to the founding of the Association for Behavior Analysis (International) in 1974 and served as its President in 1979. Among his many awards are: 1989 Western Michigan University’s Distinguished Faculty Scholar; 2002 Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis: ABAI; 2008 The Murray Sidman Award for Enduring Contributions to Behavior Analysis: Berkshire Association for Behavior Analysis and Therapy; 2009 Ellen P. Reese Award: Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies; 2012 Victor Laties Lifetime of Service Award: Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (SEAB); and in 2012, he was the first recipient of the award named in his honor: The Jack Michael Outstanding Contributions in Verbal Behavior Award from the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group at ABAI.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Behavior analysts and others interested in Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior, its theory, research, and practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the panel, the participant will be able to: (1) discuss several topics related to Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior, which Jack Michael has refined and sharpened; (2) describe how a single stimulus change can have multiple effects on verbal, nonverbal, and respondent behaviors; (3) discuss how the concept of automatic reinforcement can explain the rapid shaping of verbal behavior in children even in environments in which explicit instruction by caregivers is rare.
MARK L. SUNDBERG (Sundberg and Associates)
Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D., BCBA-D, received his doctorate degree in Applied Behavior Analysis from Western Michigan University (1980), under the direction of Dr. Jack Michael. He is the author of the Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP), and the initial developer and co-author of the ABLLS and the book Teaching Language to Children with Autism or Other Developmental Disabilities. He has published over 50 professional papers and 4 book chapters. He is the founder and past editor of the journal The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, a twice past-president of The Northern California Association for Behavior Analysis, a past-chair of the Publication Board of ABAI, and has served on the Board of Directors of the B. F. Skinner Foundation. Dr. Sundberg has given hundreds of conference presentations and workshops nationally and internationally, and taught 80 college and university courses on behavior analysis, verbal behavior, sign language, and child development. He is a licensed psychologist with over 40 years of clinical experience who consults for public and private schools that serve children with autism.  His awards include the 2001 “Distinguished Psychology Department Alumnus Award” from Western Michigan University, and the 2013 “Jack Michael Outstanding Contributions in Verbal Behavior Award” from ABAI’s Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group.
DAVID C. PALMER (Smith College)
With undergraduate degrees in geology and English, Dave Palmer knew nothing about behaviorism until he stumbled on Skinner’s Walden Two. He was electrified and soon became a public nuisance trying to persuade all and sundry of the merits of a behavioral interpretation of human problems. After a decade of fruitlessly attempting to start an experimental community, he turned to graduate school. He studied inter-response times and conditioned reinforcement in pigeons at the University of Massachusetts under John Donahoe in the early 1980s. Upon graduation, he took a job teaching statistics and behavior analysis at Smith College, where he remains today. His interests in behavior analysis are broad, but his main contributions have all been attempts to extend Skinner's interpretive accounts of human behavior, particularly in the domains of language, memory, problem solving, and private events. Together with John Donahoe, he authored the text, Learning and Complex Behavior, which attempts to offer a comprehensive biobehavioral account of such phenomena. He still thinks Skinner was right about nearly everything.
HENRY D. SCHLINGER (California State University, LA)
Henry D. (Hank) Schlinger Jr. received his Ph.D. in psychology (applied behavior analysis) from Western Michigan University under the supervision of Jack Michael. He then completed a two-year National Institutes of Health-funded post-doctoral fellowship in behavioral pharmacology with Alan Poling. He was a full tenured professor of psychology at Western New England University in Springfield, MA, before moving to Los Angeles in 1998. He is now professor of psychology and former director of the M.S. Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Schlinger has published numerous scholarly articles and commentaries in 25 different journals. He also has authored or co-authored three books, Psychology: A Behavioral Overview (1990), A Behavior-Analytic View of Child Development (1995) (which was translated into Japanese), and Introduction to Scientific Psychology (1998). He is a past editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and The Behavior Analyst, and on the editorial boards of several other journals. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies.
 
 
Invited Tutorial #439
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavioral Treatments When Extinction is Not an Option
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Grand Ballroom EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
PSY/BACB CE Offered. CE Instructor: Eric Boelter, Ph.D.
Chair: Eric Boelter (Seattle Children's Hospital)
Presenting Author: TIMOTHY R. VOLLMER (University of Florida)
Abstract:

The research on treatment of behavior disorders shows clearly that treatments are more effective when they contain an extinction component. However, clinical situations arise wherein the extinction component is not an option. Some examples of situations in which the extinction component is not an option include but are not limited to: a) the client is too large, fast, or strong to guide through a task in the case of escape behavior, b) the behavior is too dangerous to "ignore" in the case of attention-maintained behavior, and c) the specific source of reinforcement is unknown in the case of some automatically reinforced behavior. In addition, factors such as poor treatment integrity and dangerous extinction bursts at times compromise the extinction component even when it is prescribed as a part of the intervention. The presenter will review some of his own research and other literature on concurrent reinforcement schedules, differential reinforcement, and noncontingent reinforcement in order to suggest partial solutions to the extinction problem.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts and Behavior Psychologists

Learning Objectives: 1.At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to identify at least two situations in which the use of extinction may not be a viable option as a treatment component. 2.At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to identify at least two dimensions of reinforcement that can be manipulated during differential reinforcement to partially overcome the absence of an extinction component. 3.At the conclusion of the event, the participant will be able to identify at least two variations of noncontingent reinforcement that may temporarily render the need for an extinction component moot.
 
TIMOTHY R. VOLLMER (University of Florida)
Timothy R. Vollmer received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1992. From 1992 until 1996 he was on the psychology faculty at Louisiana State University. From 1996 to 1998 he was on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. He returned to the University of Florida in 1998 and is now a Professor of Psychology. His primary area of research is applied behavior analysis, with emphases in autism, intellectual disabilities, reinforcement schedules, and parenting. He has published over 130 articles and book chapters related to behavior analysis. He was the recipient of the 1996 B.F. Skinner New Researcher award from the American Psychological Association (APA). He received another APA award in August, 2004, for significant contributions to applied behavior analysis. He is also currently the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and is the Principal Investigator for the Behavior Analysis Research Clinic at the University of Florida.
Keyword(s): differential reinforcement, extinction, noncontingent reinforcement
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #440
CE Offered: PSY

Self-Recognition in an Ecological Context: Lessons From Avian Host-Parasite Interactions

Tuesday, May 31, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Mark Hauber, Ph.D.
Chair: Elizabeth Kyonka (West Virginia University)
MARK HAUBER (Hunter College, City University of New York)
Dr. Mark E. Hauber is professor and director of the Animal Behavior and Conservation program in the Department of Psychology at Hunter College of the City University of New York. He is a native of Hungary, a graduate of Yale and Cornell Universities, and received postdoctoral training as a Miller Fellow at UC Berkeley. Previously Mark taught at the University of Auckland's School of Biological Sciences. A recipient of NSF and Human Frontier Science grants, Dr. Hauber has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles, and penned the University of Chicago Press' The Book of Eggs (2014).
Abstract:

The development of the recognition of self-like individuals, including relatives and conspecifics, often relies on critical experience with parents, siblings, and other predictable referents during early life. For example, in birds, exposure to conspecifics in the nest reliably cues species-recognition for flocking and mating. How then so brood parasitic birds, that lay their eggs in other species' nest, develop conspecific referents when raised by foster parents? And how do hosts recognize and reject foreign eggs and chicks in the nest if they have not yet laid a clutch before? The presenter’s research focuses on the experimental analysis of self-recognition in both parasites and hosts through phenotypic manipulation of the available cues for species recognition during development. The results reveal how a long-hypothesized mechanism, namely self-referenced phenotype matching, enables the evolution of brood parasitism in birds, and perhaps contributes to the ecological flexibility of recognition systems under socially unpredictable conditions in general.

Target Audience:

Licensed Psychologists

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) define the terms "conspecific" and "heterospecific"; (2) name at least two species of brood parasitic birds; (3) state at least two parallels between the reproductive and communicative behaviors of birds and humans.
 
 
Invited Panel #443
CE Offered: PSY
The Real Evolutionary Psychology: Nature-Nurture, Behavior Analysis, and the Systems Approach
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: TPC/DEV; Domain: Translational
Chair: Susan M. Schneider (University of the Pacific)
CE Instructor: Susan M. Schneider, Ph.D.
Panelists: SUSAN M. SCHNEIDER (University of the Pacific), TIMOTHY D. HACKENBERG (Reed College), HENRY D. SCHLINGER (California State University, LA)
Abstract:

Nature and nurture always work together. Genetic determinism in any form is not a viable concept. Evolution is a continuous process. Do contemporary "evolutionary psychologists" give these facts more than lip service? Some talk as if human behavior is determined (somehow) by genes that were selected 10,000 years ago and unchanged since then. Many evolutionary psychology observations can be explained more parsimoniously by the principles of behavior, mediated by a nervous system, that have been selected for just such plasticity. Indeed, behavior is both a product and a driver of evolution. Then, there are the implications of the immense flexibility in the larger biobehavioral system. The "systems" approach offers an evidence based alternative encompassing everything, including the many complex, nonlinear interactions across all levels of behavior and its development. This panel discussion compares the typical views of evolutionary psychologists with the systems approach and explores where behavior analysis fits in.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts and others interested in evolutionary psychology.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) describe scientific weaknesses in typical evolutionary psychology claims; (2) explain how systems theory encompasses the entire biobehavioral system, including complex, nonlinear interactions across all levels; (3) describe how behavior principles influence and are influenced by the other system variables; (4) describe the similarities between behavior analysis and the systems approach.
SUSAN M. SCHNEIDER (University of the Pacific)
Schneider's involvement in behavior analysis goes back to high school when she read Beyond Freedom and Dignity and wrote B. F. Skinner, never dreaming that he would reply.  They corresponded through her master's degree in mechanical engineering at Brown, her engineering career, and her stint in the Peace Corps.  At that point Schneider bowed to the inevitable and switched careers, obtaining her Ph.D. in 1989 (University of Kansas).  A research pioneer, she was the first to apply the generalized matching law to sequences and to demonstrate operant generalization and matching in neonates.  Her publications also cover the history and philosophy of behavior analysis and the neglected method of sequential analysis.  Schneider has championed the inclusive "developmental systems" approach to nature‑nurture relations, culminating in reviews in JEAB and The Behavior Analyst, and she has served on the editorial boards for both of those journals.  Her book, The Science of Consequences: How They Affect Genes, Change the Brain, and Impact Our World, summarizes the field of operant behavior, its larger nature-nurture context, and its full range of applications.  It earned a mention in the journal Nature, was a selection of the Scientific American Book Club, and won the 2015 SABA Media Award.
TIMOTHY D. HACKENBERG (Reed College)
Tim Hackenberg received a B.A. degree in Psychology from the University of California, Irvine in 1982 and a doctorate in Psychology from Temple University in 1987, under the supervision of Philip Hineline. He held a post-doctoral research position at the University of Minnesota with Travis Thompson from 1988-90. He served on the faculty in the Behavior Analysis program at the University of Florida from 1990-2009, and is currently a Professor of Psychology at Reed College in Portland Oregon. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, as Associate Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, as President of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, as the Experimental Representative to the ABAI Council, and as the Director of the ABAI Science Board. His major research interests are in the area of behavioral economics and comparative cognition, with a particular emphasis on decision-making and social behavior. In work funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health, he and his students have developed procedures for cross-species comparisons of behavior. He is blessed with a talented cadre of students, and has the good fortune to teach courses he cares about.
HENRY D. SCHLINGER (California State University, LA)
Henry D. (Hank) Schlinger Jr. received his Ph.D. in psychology (applied behavior analysis) from Western Michigan University under the supervision of Jack Michael. He then completed a two-year National Institutes of Health-funded post-doctoral fellowship in behavioral pharmacology with Alan Poling. He was a full tenured professor of psychology at Western New England University in Springfield, MA, before moving to Los Angeles in 1998. He is now professor of psychology and former director of the M.S. Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Schlinger has published numerous scholarly articles and commentaries in 25 different journals. He also has authored or co-authored three books, Psychology: A Behavioral Overview (1990), A Behavior-Analytic View of Child Development (1995) (which was translated into Japanese), and Introduction to Scientific Psychology (1998). He is a past editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior and The Behavior Analyst, and on the editorial boards of several other journals. He also serves on the Board of Trustees of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies.
Keyword(s): Evolution
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #455
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Behavioral Science and Zoo Animal Welfare

Tuesday, May 31, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Lucerne, Swissotel
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Lindsay Mehrkam, Ph.D.
Chair: Lindsay Renee Mehrkam (University of Florida)
LANCE MILLER (Chicago Zoological Society–Brookfield Zoo)
Lance J. Miller, Ph.D., is currently the Senior Director of Animal Welfare Research for the Chicago Zoological Society – Brookfield Zoo. He received his graduate training in Experimental Psychology from the University of Southern Mississippi. Previously, he held positions as a Research Manager at Disney’s Animal Kingdom and Scientist for the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. Dr. Miller focuses on animal welfare in the areas of validating positive and negative indicators, the impact of unnatural social settings, holistic monitoring, and scientific assessment of environmental enrichment. Dr. Miller currently holds adjunct faculty status through the University of Chicago, Western Illinois University, the University of Southern Mississippi and Arizona State University. He is currently a member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Research and Technology Committee, Chair of the AZA Animal Welfare Committee, and a steering committee member for the AZA Behavioral Scientific Advisory Group.
Abstract:

Zoos and aquariums strive to provide the highest levels of welfare for the animals under their care. This goal is achieved through evidence-based management where research, animal care and veterinary services work together to answer questions regarding animal welfare and turn findings into practice. Behavioral data is one of the many tools used within zoos and aquariums used to make informed management decisions. Historically, zoos primarily utilized negative indicators of welfare such as stereotypic or abnormal behavior. However, the absence of negative indicators of welfare does not suggest that an animal is thriving. The presentation will highlight the many different ways behavior data can be utilized within a zoo environment to ensure high levels of welfare. Examples include behavioral monitoring of the collection, asking specific questions regarding animal behavior, and preference assessments. Ultimately, behavioral data combined with many other positive and negative indicators of animal welfare can help ensure each individual animal within a zoo has the opportunity to thrive.

Target Audience:

The target audience should have a basic understanding of animal behavior and preferably some experience with environmental enrichment and animal welfare.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) understand the difference between animal welfare and animal rights; (2) identify three different ways behavioral