Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

CE by Content: Ethics


 

Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Pica: From Research to Practice
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich B, Swissotel
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Deborah L. Grossett, Ph.D.
DON E. WILLIAMS (Don E. Williams, Ph.D., BCBA-D), PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York), DEBORAH L. GROSSETT (The Shape of Behavior)
Description: Pica is the consumption of non-nutritive items. Although observed in other populations and contexts, pica is common among individuals with profound intellectual disabilities and is sometimes dangerous and even lethal. Functional analyses have almost always identified the function of pica as automatic positive reinforcement, hence, it is difficult to treat and manage pica without resorting to positive punishment. This workshop will describe methods for conducting functional assessment and analysis of pica, describe non-punishment interventions and the ethical role of positive punishment, describe other treatments and environmental management strategies, describe the evidence for effective treatment of pica,and finally, describe issues related to staff training, management, supervision and organizational behavior management.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state the definition of pica and describe its associated risks; (2) describe methods for conducting functional assessments and analyses of pica; (3) describe strategies to prevent pica; (4) describe strategies to teach alternate behaviors; (5) describe the situations in which positive punishment may be ethically justified; (6) name evidence-based practices for pica; (7) describe issues related to staff training, management, supervision and organizational behavior.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lectures, reading case studies, small group break out, and discussion and feedback.
Audience: BCBAs in training; BCBAs; other professional staff and administrators working with clients with pica; applied researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, evidence-based practice, functional assessment, pica
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
ABA for Adult Managed Care: Building a Clinical Package That Works and Passes Audits
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 1, Swissotel
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elizabeth McKee, M.S.
RISHI CHELMINSKI (Services for the UnderServed), VIVIAN A. ATTANASIO (Services for the UnderServed), ELIZABETH MCKEE (Services for the Underserved, Inc.)
Description: Implementing applied behavior analysis (ABA) based services within a managed care setting can be a daunting task. In these settings, Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) work within interdisciplinary teams, alongside clinicians from other disciplines who may have different clinical standards and practices. Their work is scrutinized by auditors, accreditors, and funders who require varying degrees of procedural rigor. Finally, their work must ultimately be implemented by direct support professionals who have a wide variety of learning histories and proficiencies with clinical services. The facilitators of this workshop will present a standardized, yet flexible clinical package that meets the needs of all of these various stakeholders, while remaining true to the standards and practices recommended by the field of ABA. This clinical package has been honed for over three years at a New York City-based agency providing adult residential services, and has proven robust through many audits, while streamlining the inputs required of BCBAs. The facilitators' discussion of their design process may prove helpful to attendees who wish to implement similar packages within their own agencies.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify some essential components of behavior support plans; (2) identify some fundamental clinical standards common to many regulatory environments (examples will be drawn from the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, an international accreditation agency, and the New York State Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities); (3) identify ways in which required inputs of BCBAs can be minimized, while still meeting the needs of multiple stakeholders.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, targeted reading, and breakout practice.
Audience: Clinicians and administrators tasked with creating and overseeing agency policies, procedures, standards, and practices.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Compliance, Implementation, Organizational Management, Systems
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Applying the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts in Everyday Practice
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin/The Meadows Center)
Description: Ethics in behavior analysis is of utmost importance in today's world. Certified behavior analysts and applicants are now required to abide by the new compliance code (BACB, 2014). This newly approved document became enforceable on January 1, 2016. Changes to the document involve: supervisory volume by supervisors, multiple relationships, media presentations, advertising, and many more. Addressing the "real world" ethical dilemmas during implementation of behavior analysis can be a challenging endeavor especially for new professionals (Bailey & Burch, 2011). This workshop will actively engage participants in discussions surrounding ethical dilemmas that occur in the home, clinics, and within schools and other organizations. These examples will demonstrate the 10 guidelines that comprise the new professional and ethical compliance code (BACB, 2014). The instructors will quiz participants on their knowledge of each of the 10 guidelines, review each guideline, assist participants in identifying the appropriate ethical guideline related to case scenarios, foster conversation around appropriate actions to take, and revisit quiz questions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state the 10 guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014); (2) accurately identify ethical dilemmas presented in video and/or case examples; (3) accurately state which guideline addresses the dilemma; (4) correctly answer quiz questions related to ethics in behavior analysis.
Activities: Take pre/post quizzes regarding ethical behavior of behavior analysts. Lecture on the 10 Guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that became effective January 1, 2016. Lecture on Bailey and Burch (2011) viewpoints on ethical guidelines of behavior analysts. Watch and discuss video examples (or discuss written scenarios) for each of the 10 Guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. Discussion on how to respond to "real world" dilemmas that professionals in the field have encountered and shared with the group.
Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are seeking additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals/families, supervisors/supervisees, and other service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): compliance code, ethics, home/community
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Acting Out: Learning BACB Ethics and Problem-Solving Strategies Through Interactive Teams
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Randolph, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: PRA/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University), JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
Description: This workshop is designed primarily for practitioners who have some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) and wish to improve their skills to (a) identify and analyze ethical challenges, (b) develop strategies to resolve ethical challenges, (c) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, and (d) obtain CEUs in the ethics domain as required for BACB recertification. Others, including licensed psychologists, who are interested in applying BACB ethical guidelines to real-world ethical challenges in practice and research are also encouraged to attend. Participants should be prepared to describe and discuss real world ethics cases in a manner that protects the identity of those individuals involved in the ethics cases.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify and analyze ethical challenges; (2) identify and troubleshoot strategies to resolve ethical challenges; (3) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges.
Activities: This workshop will include very limited lecture content. Emphasis will be placed on small group activities and discussion, role plays, guided practice and fluency building exercises.
Audience: Intermediate level. This workshop assumes some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 28, 2016
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Columbus Hall KL, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This day-long workshop will focus on the Individuals With Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the issues that practicing behavior analysts should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments (FBAs), writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term “positive behavior supports” as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations (IEE) including FBAs. Information will be linked to the 2016 BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided. Please note: this workshop will apply to United States law only, but all are welcome to attend.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the major components of the IDEIA; (2) identify the areas of IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst; (3) identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may serve under IDEIA; (4) identify the legal requirements of an independent educational evaluation; (5) identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA; (6) identify when a behavioral intervention plan must be developed under the IDEIA; (7) identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA; (8) describe how the 2016 Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to special education law.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, case study analysis, question and answer.
Audience: Practicing behavior analysts, supervisors of practicing behavior analysts, school administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Special Education
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Best Practices and Ethical Considerations for Behavior Analysts in Public School Consultation
Saturday, May 28, 2016
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dena Shade-Monuteaux, Ph.D.
DENA SHADE-MONUTEAUX (Beacon ABA Services), DAVID M. CORCORAN (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: This workshop will provide educators and behavior analysts with strategies and frameworks for optimizing the role of the BCBA in a public school setting in an ethical, effective, and clinically sound manner. Beginning with an overview of the scope of practice for BCBA’s, the workshop will provide attendees with a basic understanding of the parameters in which they are expected to competently operate. These parameters include: the new BACB Professional and Ethical Conduct Code, BCBAs as consultants, functional behavioral assessments, instructional programming, data collection, staff/parent trainings, and on-going treatment efficacy monitoring. Finally, this workshop will teach providers how to translate this knowledge into effective and operationally defined applied behavior analytic and educational procedures. A primary focus of the workshop is on the establishment of effective collaboration between the BCBA and school personnel. The collaborations this workshop will focus on are in the areas of BCBA services in public schools; roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders; individualized education programs; the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act and special education law; understanding the role of BCBAs as school consultants; identifying some limitations of the application of ABA principles and technologies in public schools; and identifying the critical elements of a successful school-based ABA program. Participants will learn how to apply these elements in school settings with a focus on antecedent interventions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the types of BCBA services available in a public school; (2) identify roles and responsibilities of key stakeholders; (3) articulate the basics of IDEA and special education law and regulations; (4) understand the role of BCBAs as school consultants; (5) identify the application of ABA principles and technologies in the public school and the limitations; (6) identify the critical elements of a successful school-based ABA program; (7) understand applications of these elements in different school-based settings; (8) understand and identify antecedent and consequent interventions.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion, small group activities, exemplars of permanent products and competency and knowledge based evaluations.
Audience: Special education teachers, BCBAs, students in BCBA programs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Behavior Assessment, Ethics, School Consultation
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Extending Behavior Analysis in Zoos and Aquariums
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Lucerne I, Swissotel
Area: AAB/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lindsay Mehrkam, Ph.D.
LINDSAY MEHRKAM (Oregon State University), LANCE MILLER (Chicago Zoological Society - Brookfield Zoo)
Description: Today's accredited zoos and aquariums are held to high standards of animal welfare. This involves assessment, implementation, and evaluation of current animal husbandry practices across a wide range of species, a task for which behavior analysis is well suited. This workshop will provide attendees with an overview of how behavior analytic methods are being extended in zoo settings to evaluate enrichment and training effectiveness. Participants will learn how to successfully implement behavioral assessments using single-subject designs in a zoo setting. Participants will be guided through video demonstrations of preference assessments and positive reinforcement training with a variety of zoo species to observe the generalizability of these procedures. Attendees will also participate in discussions on future directions for behavior analysts in these nontraditional animal settings. This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings. On the day prior to the workshop (Friday), participants are invited to travel to world-renowned Brookfield Zoo and directly observe how behavioral principles are being used to guide animal care practices in zoos. The visit is planned from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm, meeting at 12:00 pm and returning to the Hyatt Regency by 5:00 pm. For those interested, there will be an additional fee of $45, payable directly to the workshop presenters. (Please note: there are no more spaces available for the visit to Brookfield Zoo.)
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) operationally define environmental enrichment and identify ways in which enrichment strategies are evaluated and deemed effective; (2) identify, review, and critique applications of operant conditioning in behavioral husbandry practices for variety of species; (3) recognize and discuss variables to consider to ensure ethical and effective implementation and evaluation of behavioral assessments in zoos and aquariums using single-subject designs.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, direct observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies and procedures will be provided. Participants will be encouraged to participate in open discussions about content and future directions for practical application. Supplemental materials for reviewing training plans and ethograms will also be provided.
Audience: This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): environmental enrichment, preference assessment, single-subject, zoo
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Neurobehavioral Analysis of Epileptic Seizures
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich D, Swissotel
Area: DDA/BPN; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware of how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. In addition, persons with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These could be better managed, and important new life skills could be acquired, if their behavior analyst knew basic epileptology. This workshop will educate behavior analysts about epilepsy with a behavioral approach. The neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be briefly reviewed. The etiology, genetics, and classification of various seizure disorders will be reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be related to analog human studies. Many clients are incorrectly medicated for pseudo-seizures. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy, and participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with this test, without sedation or anesthesia. Epileptic seizures dynamically modulate an organism's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates the frequency, intensity and duration of epileptic seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about these relationships.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define an epileptic seizure; (2) describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures; (3) recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior; (4) objectively describe, count, and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions, (5) recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress; (6) recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures; (7) prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia; (8) discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures, (9) manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy.
Activities: Examples of epileptic and non-epileptic behaviors and state of the art ways of analyzing them with EEG and behavior analysis will be presented in lecture and video presentations. Audience questions and experiences regarding epilepsy are welcome.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts, special education teachers, psychologists and therapists who write behavior plans for individuals with developmental disabilities (autism, mental retardation, psychosis, cerebral palsy) and a history of seizures.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, behavior analysis, electroencephalography, seizures
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Developing Applied Behavior Analysis Departments in Public School Systems
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich C, Swissotel
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Daniel Almeida, Ph.D.
DANIEL ALMEIDA (University of Massachusetts-Boston/Newton, MA Public Schools)
Description: This workshop will provide participants with an introduction to the steps required to develop an ABA department within a public school system. Development of quality ABA services within the bureaucratic and multi-disciplinary public school environment poses many regulatory, organizational, and ethical challenges for behavior analysts. This workshop will present the chronology of the development of a ABA department within a culturally diverse public school system of over 12,500 students. Over the course of 8 years, the department expanded from a single BCBA to 8 BCBAs. The development of organizational structures, service delivery models, and policies and procedures within the school district will be reviewed. Participants will conduct self-assessments of their current settings and use the workshop content to develop plans for expanding the ABA services within their work setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the challenges to providing quality behavioral analytic services in public school settings; (2) identify organizational structures, service delivery models, and policies and procedures that are effective in public school settings; (3) assess their work settings and develop plans for organizational growth.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be achieved by lecture, small group discussion, and review and completion written case study materials.
Audience: The workshop is directed to behavior analysts working in or are interested in working in public school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Will Work for Reinforcement: Creating Organizational Alignment to Enable Robust Management Across Systems, Processes, and Behaviors
Saturday, May 28, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adam E. Ventura, M.S.
ADAM E. VENTURA (World Evolve, Inc.), DENNIS URIARTE (Florida Intstitute of Technology), MANUEL RODRIGUEZ (ABA Technologies, Inc.)
Description: The driving force behind every business is its employees. Too often, we forget that just like the individuals we serve and provide services to, employees are products of their environment. Unfortunately, many businesses today are afflicted with common issues such as poor mission statements and misaligned job responsibilities and roles, all of which amount to a detrimental work environment for employees. Organizational behavior management (OBM) provides the fundamental principles of behavior analysis applied to business, offering the business leader steps to creating organizational alignment from mission statements, balanced scorecards, to job matrices and performance management systems. This hands-on workshop will instruct attendees on how to create an organizational mission statement based on both behavior and results, align job responsibilities and roles in part to help ABA supervisors provide ethical supervision with this mission statement, and design employee scorecards based on objective measures to help create a performance pay system for your organization. This workshop will also address how the ethical considerations involved in assigning job responsibilities can be addressed using OBM. In addition to receiving feedback for their performance in the workshop, attendees will also receive supplemental materials to carry on what they have learned about OBM.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define a mission statement; (2) describe the features of a mission statement; (3) create a mission statement based on behavior and results; (4) define a behavior-based pinpoint; (5) create behavior-based pinpoints based on objectives measures; (6) develop scorecards and job matrices.
Activities: Lecture and discussion: Instructions and examples provided on how to identify the organization and individual job missions using both behavior and results. Instructions and examples on how to create balanced scorecards and develop performance matrices. Video presentations will be provided to compliment traditional direct instruction. Small group breakout: Guided practice sessions will be conducted where small groups will be able to develop their own mission, measures, and pinpoints. Feedback will be provided to each group based on their performance. Group presentation: Each group will present their work to the class for feedback. Supplemental material: Each learner will be provided with materials to take with them to continue their education on OBM concepts and specific material presented during the workshop.
Audience: The workshop level is Intermediate. This workshop will target BCBA-level business owners, administrators, and behavior analysis entrepreneurs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Mission statements, Performance matrices, Performance Pay, Scorecards
 
Symposium #18
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism: A Latin America Case
Sunday, May 29, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Roosevelt, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Mapy Chavez Cueto (Alcanzando)
Discussant: Mapy Chavez Cueto (Alcanzando)
CE Instructor: Mapy Chavez Cueto Cueto, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Alcanzando is a not for profit organization that provides educational services based on the principles of applied behavior analysis to children with autism around the Spanish speaking world. This Symposium is meant to share the data from their services over the last 7 years.

Keyword(s): autism, early intervention, latin america, spanish
 

Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism Services in Latin America

ANTUANETE CHAVEZ (Alcanzando), Mapy Chavez Cueto (Alcanzando), Sandra Granados (Alcanzando)
Abstract:

This presentation will discuss the Ethical and Cultural considerations that should be in place when providing early intervention behavioral services to children with autism in various Spanish speaking countries.

 

Strategies to Promote Appropriate Play Skills in Children Within the Autism Spectrum

SILVIA ESCOBAR (Alcanzando), Patricia Rojas (Alcanzando), Belen Rodriguez (Alcanzando), Elizabeth Rojas (Alcanzando), Jarume Angulo (Alcanzando)
Abstract:

Play and Social Skills are key necessary components to lead successful adult lives. This presentation will provide information regarding strategies that were found to be successful in teaching these skills to young children diagnosed in the Autism Spectrum in Peru.

 
 
Symposium #21
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Ethics of Social Media: Regulations, Research, and Recommendations
Sunday, May 29, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Vevey 1 & 2, Swissotel
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Michael F. Dorsey (Endicott College)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth C. Nulty, M.S.
Abstract:

In the age of the internet, organizations and business rely on a web presence for advertising. Companies post information on their websites including the type of services provided, the credentials of their owner and employees, and their contact information. Behavior analytic organizations are no different than any other business utilizing websites and social media websites (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, blogs), in an effort to boost referrals. There is no harm in behavior analytic organizations and business in maintaining websites for advertising purposes unless the rights of consumers are violated with regards to confidentiality, disclosures, and a misrepresentation of practice. The Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB), the American Psychological Association (APA), and HIPPA all have codes of conduct and/or regulations for professional behavior; however, many behavior analytic websites are in violation of these codes. Crucial changes in social media content are required in order for the consumers of behavior analysis to be protected. This symposium reviews the regulation from the BACB, APA, & HIPPA related to confidentiality and social media. A review of behavior analytic websites is discussed with regards to ethical violations based on the BACBs Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis, followed by recommendations for avoiding future violations on behavior analytic websites.

Keyword(s): ethics, public policy, regulations, social media
 

A Review of the BACB, APA, and HIPPA Regulations Related to Social Media

SOLANDY FORTE (Endicott College/CCSN)
Abstract:

It is essential for behavior analyst to understand the regulations that guide our profession and ethical practices with regards to social media including organizational and business websites, Facebook and Twitter accounts, and blogs. Many businesses and organizations use social media as a means to increase advertising for client referrals through the use of testimonials. A major concern with the use of testimonials is the lack of confidentiality related to testimonials. The Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB), the American Psychological Association (APA), and HIPPA all have codes of conduct and/or regulations for professional behavior. While many of the regulations are comparable, subtle variations across each exist. This presentation compares and contrasts the regulations of BACB, APA, and HIPPA regarding professional behavior and the use of social media, as well as examines our obligation to follow such codes of conduct. A review of confidentiality standards is included, particularly around the use of written and video testimonials on websites.

 
A Review of Behavior Analysis Websites: A Research Project
ELIZABETH C. NULTY (Endicott College/CCSN)
Abstract: The Behavior Analysis Certification Board’s (BACB) Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis goes into effect on January 1, 2016. The BACB’s new code includes several regulations that are applicable to social media sites including professional websites for behavior analysis organizations and their corresponding Facebook account, Twitter account, and blogs. The 15 specific BACB compliance codes that may apply to social media accounts are reviewed. This presentation includes an analysis of over 50 behavior analytic websites for organizations from across the country. Each website was reviewed for ethical violations on the 15 compliance codes (i.e., boundaries of competence, integrity and reputation of the profession, patient/therapist relationship or professional boundaries, multiple relationships and conflict of interest exploitative relationships, confidentiality, disclosures, behavior analytic assessment, affirming principles, avoiding false or deceptive statements, intellectual property, statements by others, media presentation, testimonials and advertising, confidentiality and BABC intellectual property, discouraging misrepresentation). The results of this study revealed that over half of the websites reviewed were found to have at least one ethical violation.
 
Recommendations for Prevention of Ethical Violations on Social Media Sites
KARI ANNE DUNLOP (Endicott College/HMEA )
Abstract: Although behavior analysts are responsible for understanding their ethical obligations from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB), many behavior analyst violate codes of professional conduct. A concern is the rate of ethical violation related to confidentiality and disclosures on the websites of behavior analytic organizations. With an increased use of web based advertising on social media (i.e., websites, Facebook and Twitter accounts, and blogs), behavior analysts must understand the how do develop social media sites without violating ethical standards. In a review of over 50 behavior analytic websites, over half were found to have at least one ethical violation according to the BACB’s Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis. This presentation includes recommendations for those behavior analysts responsible for social media content on websites (i.e., organization and business websites, Facebook and Twitter Accounts, and blogs). Suggestions are also included for the BACB’s consideration: the development of social media guidelines that include specific continuing education on the subject of social media content in an effort to provide better guidance to behavior analytic community.
 
 
Panel #24
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
An Inquisition of Facilitated Communication
Sunday, May 29, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Regency Ballroom A, Hyatt Regency, Gold West
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Jason Travers, Ph.D.
Chair: Jason Travers (University of Kansas)
JAMES T. TODD (Eastern Michigan University)
GINA GREEN (Association of Professional Behavior Analysts)
CHRISTOPHER HURLEY (Hurley McKenna & Mertz, P.C.)
Abstract: Facilitated communication, also known as "supported typing" and "rapid prompting method”, are becoming increasingly popular. To date, no evidence exists for the validity of either of these methods and facilitated communication remains clearly refuted. Despite proclamations to the contrary, no person has become an independent author of thoughts via these methods. Nonetheless, both methods have been endorsed by various professionals, parents, advocacy groups, government agencies, and university faculty. A growing anti-ABA sentiment stems largely from allegations made by users of these methods and have been disseminated by academic journals, professional and research conferences, and online media. Given facilitated communication is classified as potentially harmful, simply listing it (and others) as a method for professionals to avoid appears only a partially effective prophylactic. Professional behavior analysts may better adhere to their ethical obligation to abstain from unproven practices if prepared to recognize and respond to arguments from proponents of pseudoscientific and disproven interventions. Accordingly, an inquisition of panelists will be conducted to reveal common tactics used by proponents of facilitated communication. Panelists will respond to unrehearsed lines of questioning to demonstrate ways to respond to arguments for this and other disproven or controversial interventions.
Keyword(s): Autism, Communication, Developmental Disabilities, Ethics
 
 
Panel #48
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
ABA: Addressing the Needs in Neurorehabilitation
Sunday, May 29, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Crystal Ballroom B, Hyatt Regency, Green West
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Michael P. Mozzoni, Ph.D.
Chair: Michael P. Mozzoni (Mozzoni Associates LLC)
DIXIE D. EASTRIDGE (Learning Services)
ANNEKA HOFSCHNEIDER (Centre for Neuro Skills)
MICHAEL P. MOZZONI (Mozzoni Associates LLC)
Abstract:

The Brain Injury Association of America has reported CDC estimates of 2.4 million Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) each year. Of those injuries 3-5% will result in chronic impairments of mood, function and cognition. ABA offers a significant addition to neurorehabilitation in terms of accountability, quantification and effectiveness. This panel will cover some of the more frequently encountered challenges and demonstrate the effectiveness of the behavioral approach within a multidisciplinary team. This panel will review effective treatment procedures and strategies that increase an individual's quality of life and reduce the burden for caregivers. The panelists will cover topics including: bowel and bladder training using an auditory cue vs. scheduled toileting, anger management utilizing massed practice of relaxation using cue card training, and timely intervention for adjustment problems including depression and anxiety that lead to improved participation and engagement in rehabilitation, which allow individuals to better accept their "new normal."

Keyword(s): Anger-Management, Continence training, Neurorehabilitation, TBI
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics

Designing Sustainable Behavior Change

Sunday, May 29, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Grand Ballroom AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Douglas A. Johnson, Ph.D.
Chair: Douglas A. Johnson (Western Michigan University)
MICHAEL KIM (Habit Design)
Michael Kim is Founder and CEO of Habit Design, the leading platform for crowdsourcing sustainable behavior change. Over 500 companies and 100,000 people have used Habit Design's behavior-change training to create successful daily habits that last beyond 100 days. Clinically tested by licensed, published clinical psychologists, Habit Design transforms training into automatic, habitual routines. Built on evidence-based research from over 100 behavioral scientists, the simple, easy, and effective training includes three main components: coaching, practice teams, and rewards.
Abstract:

Programs prioritizing ?motivating Behavior Change? frequently fail to generate sustained engagement: over 80% of employees who attempt to create new, healthy behaviors still fail at continuing their training after just the first 30 days, and corporate lifestyle management programs return only $0.50 for every $1 invested (RAND, 2015). The CDC attributes 80% of chronic conditions to this inability to form successful wellbeing habits, resulting in almost $1 Trillion in lost productivity alone (CDC, 2009). The problem is not that people resist change, but they resist being changed. While health promotion can motivate employees to make episodic, temporary changes, when it comes to creating lasting results, learning the skill of creating new habits is what is vital for long-term Behavior Change. The reason: While motivation may get you started, habit keeps you going. Developed by licensed, clinical psychologists from Yale and the University of Washington, this session covers best practices in the design of sustainable Behavior Change systems that have led to the successful training of unconscious, daily habits, derived from more than eight years of clinical testing of evidence-based research from over 100 behavioral researchers. Habit Design has trained more than 500 companies and 100,000 employees - from UnitedHealthcare, Humana, Aetna, Kaiser Permanente, Stanford Medical School, Boeing, Google, The White House, and many others.

Target Audience: Practitioners in the field.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) identify four key ingredients that must be present for creating successful behavior change; (2) differentiate and diagnose behavior change into fifteen distinct classes; (3) define three key strategies that successfully harness motivation for sustainable behavior change; (4) translate design principles and tactics to create winning recipes for training new habits, or "habit designs."
 
 
Panel #75
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Issues in Rural Behavior Analysis: Ethical Practice, Tele-Practice, and Remote Supervision
Sunday, May 29, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Columbus Hall CD, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/CSE; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Cheryl A. Young-Pelton, Ed.D.
Chair: Robert C. Pennington (University of Louisville)
CHERYL A. YOUNG-PELTON (Montana State University in Billings)
MICHAEL WEINBERG (Orlando Behavior Health Services, LLC)
CECILIA KNIGHT (Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD))
Abstract:

Rural behavior analysts face many issues. This panel will bring together three practitioner-researchers who are working within the scope of these issues. Panelists will present issues pertinent to ethical practice in small communities, reviewing telehealth and telepractice constraints, and issues related to remote supervision of behavior analysts, assistants, students, and RBTs.

Keyword(s): remote supervision, rural ethics, tele-practice
 
 
Symposium #76
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethics for the Rest of Us: Impact of Cultural Differences in the Practice of Ethics
Sunday, May 29, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Karen Chung (Special Learning, Inc. )
Discussant: Jon S. Bailey (Florida State University)
CE Instructor: Jon S. Bailey, Ph.D.
Abstract: How do cultural differences affect the practice of ethics? How do Board Certified Behavior Analysts who practice outside the U.S. define ethics? Are there country-specific challenges that arise and how can we handle these challenges? What about cultural and religious differences? In an era where access to someone living across the world is literally only a click away, subtle and not-so-subtle boundaries exist, particularly as it pertains to what is considered culturally acceptable. Even among countries that may seem homogenous (i.e. America and Canada), significant differences do exist that can and should affect how behavior analysts practice and make decisions in the field. The most common challenge faced by behavior analysts across borders, in both developed and developing countries, are related to misrepresentation and unethical practices. In some cases, the “right” answer appears straightforward, however, the cultural norms of different regions make doing the “right” things more challenging for behavior analysts practicing outside the U.S. The group will begin our discussion by talking about the implications of cultural differences in the practice of ethics by sharing their own experiences. The group will also engage in a group discussion to begin to construct a high level framework that behavior analysts can use as a tool to help them make practical, ethically correct decisions independently.
 
Talking About Ethics, eh? A Canadian Perspective on Multicultural Issues
ROSEMARY A. CONDILLAC (Brock University)
Abstract: There are different ethical challenges that arise in different parts of Canada, including our work with individuals from first nations communities, remote locations where direct supervision becomes a significant challenge, etc. Canada self-defines itself as multi-cultural, and as such, encourages New Canadians to stay true to their culture of origin and bring their traditions with them with the caveat that they not contravene Federal, Provincial, or Municipal Law or the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. There is an expectation of cultural acceptance, and typically training is provided to practitioners to increase their cultural sensitivity. Some aspects of the Ethical Code for Behaviour Analysts are inconsistent with cultural norms, and in some cases tediously so. As an example, small token gifts of appreciation are inherent in many cultures and professions, but completely forbidden in ABA practice. Language barriers often require the use of interpreters in the delivery of services; unfortunately, some interpreters bring cultural biases and put a cultural spin on the discussion that can impact service delivery. Further, the lack of professional designation for Behaviour Analysts in regulatory bodies makes them subject to institutional rules and policies that may conflict with our Code of Conduct. During this session, content will be covered through discussion of ethical dilemmas and how to deal with “tricky” situations in a manner that is consistent with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts yet is practical in application.
 
Ethics in Third World Countries
MOLLY OLA PINNEY (Global Autism Project)
Abstract: It is common knowledge that there is an acute shortage of qualified behavior analysts in the world. According to the most recent numbers from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB), there are approximately 20,000 Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) in the world; of those, only 8% live outside the U.S. With an estimated 70 million people around the world with Autism, this means that there are only 1/3 of 1% qualified experts available to meet this growing need. As more and more organizations spring up that attempt to overcome this issue by putting in place systemic methods that can be self-sustaining, we must acknowledge that important culture and language differences significantly hamper the way behavior analysts are able to do their jobs in a manner that is consistent with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. As an example, when dealing with developing countries where commonly held belief is that a child with autism is “possessed,” questions arise regarding how must time a behavior analyst can and should spend educating parents and educators on non-technical skills when their primary “job” is to use their skills to change the lives of as many children with autism as possible and “every moment is priceless.” Other growing dilemma is to determine what happens after the fact. Within a very compressed period of time, there is only so much training one can impart to people who will be actually doing the work. In the U.S. we are beginning to see standards and qualifications put in place for people who implement ABA. However, given the relative “prevalence” of qualified behavior therapists capable of supervising cases, ongoing training and case supervision is a means that we can use to maintain quality control. Outside the U.S., even developed countries do not have sufficient number of behavior analysts to make this model feasible. How do we solve this global dilemma in a manner that can generate immediate results while we look for a long-terms solution? During this session, we will bring to light not only ethical situations facing the profession of behavior analytics but also begin a dialogue to create a paradigm shift that can affect global, long-term, sustainable change.
 
 
Symposium #97
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Examining Diversity in Behavior Analysis
Sunday, May 29, 2016
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Vevey 1 & 2, Swissotel
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Fielding Graduate University and Multicultural Alliance of Behavior Analysts)
Discussant: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Fielding Graduate University and Multicultural Alliance of Behavior Analysts)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Hughes Fong, M.A.
Abstract: This symposium explores the application of applied behavior analysis to diverse populations. Specifically, how interventions and diversity may be inter related. The first paper will review the perception and access to ABA treatments to diverse populations. This paper will focus on understanding how Autism is perceived across different cultures and learning about the challenges faced by applied behavior analysis (ABA) service providers as they work to improve the lives of individuals on the spectrum as well as continuously improving perceptions and acceptance of treatments of those in areas that are under served The second paper examines the lack of diversity within the practice of Behavior Analysis. Specifically, how the diversity in practioners of ABA do not reflect the diversity of clients. For behavior analysis to maintain continued growth and interest with all populations, board certified behavior analysts have to actively recruit multicultural populations to be in the field to maintain relevance in the changing demographics of the United State of America.
Keyword(s): diversity, ethics, multicultural, social validity
 
Autism Perceptions and Access to Applied Behavior Analysts Treatment Across Diverse Populations
LILA AYYAD-ALHARSHA (Academic & Behavior Consultants of Illinois)
Abstract: In recent years, there has been an increase in autism awareness which is due to the significant increase in the number of children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. As numbers increase, we must ensure that children diagnosed with the disorder have access to interventions based on applied behavior analysis (ABA) which will help to improve the lives of those diagnosed. Access to ABA services is critical to the growth of and development of children on the spectrum, however global access to these services is limited. Additionally, although there is an increase in autism awareness, the disorder continues to be understood and treated differently cross culturally. This portion of the symposium will focus on understanding how autism is perceived across different cultures and learning about the challenges faced by ABA service providers as they work to improve the lives of individuals on the spectrum as well as continuously improving perceptions and acceptance of treatments of those in areas that are underserved.
 
Why Are There Not More Multicultural Board Certified Behavior Analysts?
SEANA FICKLIN (Trinity Behavior Consulting)
Abstract: Behavior analysis is a field that is a significant part of the health service profession with continued interest and growth. The field has added more clinicians to keep up with the increasing demand of areas of need. Although a significant amount of clinicians have been added to the field, the diversity in board certified behavior analyst clinicians have been slowed to keep up with the increase in multicultural populations. The increase in multicultural populations in United States of America are becoming a necessity for the field of behavior analysis to adapt to this change. It is a matter for the field to adhere to this change and not be known as a field that does not adhere to change by losing relevance to multicultural populations. Behavior analysis is a proven field that has the capability to work with all populations. With the changing demographics of America, it is imperative that there are more clinicians who reflect the increasing multicultural populations who can relate the value of behavior analysis by taking cultural norms into consideration. For behavior analysis to maintain continued growth and interest with all populations, board certified behavior analysts have to actively recruit multicultural populations to be in the field to maintain relevance in the changing demographics of the United States of America.
 
 
Symposium #189
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Planning for the New BACB Compliance Code: Exploring How Ethical Behavior is Taught Across Different Behavior Analytic Training Programs
Monday, May 30, 2016
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Zurich E, Swissotel
Area: TPC/EDC; Domain: Translational
Chair: Shawn Patrick Quigley (University of New Mexico Medical Group)
Discussant: Matthew T. Brodhead (Purdue University)
CE Instructor: Shawn Patrick Quigley, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) has recently announced a change in the ethical guidelines for credentialed behavior analysts. Specifically, a new enforceable compliance code (i.e., Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts) was developed and will take effect in January 2016. The new Code is intended to more clearly present ethical expectations and expand the range of professional conduct (BACB, 2014). Given the new Code and its intent for creation, it seems reasonable that the new Code would affect pre-service training of behavior analysts to ensure newly credentialed behavior analysts have the prerequisite skills to understand and follow the Code. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an overview of four different training programs and how each program is providing pre-service training specific to the new Code. Presenters are from varied training programs that provide training on campus, online, hybrid (online and on campus) and within community-based practicums.

Keyword(s): Compliance Code, Ethics, Supervision, Training
 
Developing Ethical Behavior Analysts in a New BCBA Program
JEFFREY MICHAEL CHAN (Northern Illinois University)
Abstract: Much emphasis is placed on ethical behavior of practitioners and researchers within the field of behavior analysis. Programs across the globe face the challenge of training and supporting behavior analysts to make ethically sound decisions. The formation of a new Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) approved course sequence at Northern Illinois University will be discussed, including the development of a course devoted to ethical behavior against the backdrop of a state with a long history of well-publicized malfeasance. Our program primarily recruits school-based practitioners. As such, our approach focuses on applying ethical principles in school settings, where the multiple interests of students, families, teachers, administrators, and various service providers often come in conflict, and interventions with little or no research base are used regularly with students with disabilities. An overview of the course will be described, as well as student feedback from the course.
 
Ethics and Applied Behavior Analysis in Online Education
SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (Ball State University), Laura Bassette (Ball State University)
Abstract: Correct application of our ethical standards to every day practice requires a thorough and fluent knowledge of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and consistent vigilance. In addition, skilled practitioners are able to “unpack” complex cases and separate personal views from ethical concerns. Fine discrimination between similar yet meaningfully different environmental conditions and behaviors is never more important than in ethical practice. In order to achieve our goal of highly ethical practice, professors must teach using methods that help students develop their knowledge, vigilance, and capacity to make fine discriminations when confronted with complex cases. Given the sensitive nature of many ethical concerns, professors need to create a classroom climate that encourages intense engagement in the learning process and participation in robust discussion. Online professors must take particular care to use innovative methods to create this climate. This presentation discusses how online professors can teach ethics courses in a manner that achieves these goals.
 

Ethical Behavior in Behavior Analysis: Ensuring Code Compliance for Individuals and Organizations

Mary Jane Weiss (Endicott College), LORRAINE OTTE (Endicott College)
Abstract:

The BACB's New Ethical and Professional Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts is the standard for the professional behavior of behavior analysts. It is also our compass- the main source for information about navigating ethical challenges and inculcating the values of the profession into students and trainees. Information on how this can be approached from a teaching/training perspective will be shared. In particular, strategies for teaching ethical decision-making will be described. Specific strategies for helping young professionals to adhere to the code and to reduce their risk of noncompliance will be discussed. The need for signal detection skills and resource management skills will be highlighted. In addition, considerations for the promotion of ethical behavior will be discussed at both the individual and organization levels.

 
What Would You Do? Making Real Life Ethical Dilemmas Learning Opportunities for Practicum Students
JESSICA E. FRIEDER (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: Students completing practicum and community based training are faced with a myriad of ethical dilemmas that may vary based on client population, setting, and behavior analytic services being trained and delivered. Preparing students for the wide array of ethical quandaries they may encounter in supervised experiences and beyond can seem like an enormous task in and of itself especially when balancing this with the many other direct service skills students need to be able to proficiently demonstrate. This talk will focus on strategies for embedding exercises that engage ethical problem solving into practicum and community based training practices. A variety of examples and resources will be highlighted including mechanisms for coordination of activities and teaching opportunities with community sites.
 
 
Panel #203
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysts as Designers: Success Stories of International, Interdisciplinary Collaboration to Expand Our Services and Research
Monday, May 30, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/CSE; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Robyn M. Catagnus, Ed.D.
Chair: Robyn M. Catagnus (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
JANE YIP (Purdue University)
MARI URAMOTO (Children Center Inc.)
SAKURAKO SHERRY TANAKA (Mutlicultural Alliance of Behavior Analysts)
Abstract:

Training programs for pre-service behavior analysts, and common arrangements of clinical practices, too often result in ABA being siloed from other disciplines. If we are to succeed with our mission of facilitating change globally, in all meaningful domains of our lives and environments, we must successfully integrate services and research with those in different fields. Behavior analysts might also have an ethical obligation to shed light on how we might design and re-design our "contextual fit" to meet our cultural standards. Presenters from multiple disciplines: academia, linguistics, special education, and neurology, will explore how they introduce ABA into new cultures, teach pre-service professionals to program for research and collaboration with non-behavioral providers, expand their own interdisciplinary relations, and are changed personally and professionally by the experience. Panelists will also discuss their research and efforts to integrate ABA with art therapy, ceremonial and cultural participation, and religious studies while giving consideration to scientific as well as ethical dimensions that define the field of behavior analysis. We invite professionals working in medicine, psychology, business, ecology, anthropology, religious and cultural studies, sociology, and more to share their challenges and strategies. How are you creating interdisciplinary connections, opportunities, and collaboration that strengthen relationships and result in behavior analysis being integrated in larger initiatives and with other fields?

Keyword(s): cultural standards, interdisciplinary, international, service delivery
 
 
Symposium #206
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Ethics of and Alternatives to Traditional Escape Extinction in Education and Home Settings
Monday, May 30, 2016
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Columbus Hall CD, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Translational
Chair: Robert Schramm (Knospe-ABA)
Discussant: Wayne Fuqua (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Behavior analysts recognize the importance of incorporating motivation and reinforcement within service delivery. Additionally, behavior analytic treatment programs incorporate effective function based procedures to increase compliance with demands and decrease escape maintained challenging behavior. These procedures often include forced physical prompting and paced prompts that may increase the occurrence of challenging behavior or reduce acceptance of the procedures by caregivers and staff. This symposium explores potential ethical alternatives to traditional escape extinction using 7 Steps to Earning Instructional Control, wait-outs, and conditioning work as a reinforcer that address the problems behavior analysts face with traditional escape extinction procedures in discrete trial programming.

Keyword(s): Escape Extinction, Ethical Practice, Instructional Control
 

Ethical Considerations and Exploration of Alternatives to Forced Prompting

MEGAN MILLER (FSU CARD/Navigation Behavioral Consulting)
Abstract:

Behavior analytic intervention programs frequently include the use of forced prompting to earn compliance with demands and reduce escape maintained challenging behavior. This approach is effective but can result in an increase in challenging behavior if the challenging behavior is also maintained by attention or can be difficult to implement with clients who are larger in size. Additionally, caregivers and staff may not accept the use of forced prompting and may not implement the procedure during the naturally occurring routine, which also reduces the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this presentation is to explore ethical considerations regarding the use of forced prompting by drawing from the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct and Van Houten et al. (1988). Additionally, the presentation will explore how the 7 Steps to Earning Instructional Control addresses these ethical considerations and whether research in the basic or applied areas supports alternatives to forced prompting such as the 7 Steps as viable options for reducing escape maintained challenging behavior.

 
Developing Learner Cooperation through the 7 Steps to Earning Instructional Control
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Knospe-ABA)
Abstract: The ABA/VB Autism Intervention Institute Knospe-ABA GmbH (based in Germany), which serves over 350 children throughout Europe, prioritizes the research and procedural recommendations of Verbal Behavior. Robert Schramm, Knospe-ABA's lead supervising Behavior Analyst has developed an approach to earning instructional control that encapsulates ABA/VB and brings motivated learning to its fullest potential. Over 95% of the providers using these techniques have been able to demonstrate greatly improved instructional control with their learners. The 7 Steps to Earning Instructional Control are based on sound behavioral principles and practice. This approach to instructional control does not rely on basic escape extinction techniques such as escape blocking, forced physical prompting or repeating SD's. In addition to offering a more simple way to develop instructional control with most learners, it also is easy to teach to adults and therefore valuable in reproduction with less trained caregivers and therapists. Preliminary data will be presented to demonstrate that instructional control can be earned with the 7 Steps. Additionally, an integrity checklist for training on the 7 steps, which has demonstrated the benefits of training providers on this technique in order to decrease non-compliance of learners with autism, will be presented.
 

The Use of Wait Outs and Task as a Reinforcer as an Ethical Alternative to Traditional Escape Extinction

STEVEN J. WARD (Whole Child Consulting LLC)
Abstract:

Escape-avoidance behavior is a common impediment to skill acquisition and a frequent maintaining variable for a variety of behavioral excesses. While a great number of antecedent interventions (e.g., demand fading, student choice, errorless teaching) can decrease problem behavior levels, escape- avoidance behaviors do not immediately drop to zero levels, and reactive measures invariably account for some part of the behavior intervention plan. Among potential reactive treatments, escape extinction has the greatest empirical support and is typically recommended. This presentation will demonstrate the efficacy of an alternative to escape extinction in 3 studies across 5 participants. In this procedure, task resistance is followed by a temporary withdrawal of that task and a substantial limit upon student options until the task has been completed. Though counter-intuitive (because escape-maintained behavior produces temporary escape), this procedure, colloquially known as a wait out, tends to not only decrease escape-maintained behavior, but also to improve a number of qualities of student participation. Participants will learn the rationales behind the use of wait and will see examples of how to implement the procedure.

 
7 Steps of Instructional Control to Decrease Maladaptive Behaviors and Increase Skill Acquisition: A Case Study
HEATHER GILMORE (Autism Centers of Michigan), Leasa Androl (Autism Centers of Michigan)
Abstract: A case study was conducted to address maladaptive behaviors, including severe self-injurious behaviors (head banging, chin hitting, and scratching) and whining/crying behaviors, as well as limited skill acquisition in a four year old child with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder. The intervention was conducted in a center-based setting. A functional analysis was conducted which identified both escape from demands and access to tangibles as the function of maladaptive behaviors. This study involved evaluating the effectiveness of the "7 Steps of Instructional Control" developed by Robert Schramm, MA, BCBA. The "7 Steps" were used as a replacement for the previous maladaptive behavior reduction plan. The previous plan (baseline) included escape extinction procedures. Reliability was strengthened by providing Behavior Technicians with extensive training and continuous monitoring of procedural fidelity by the BCBA using a treatment integrity checklist developed by Megan Miller, PhD, BCBA, LBA. The results indicated that maladaptive behaviors decreased and skill acquisition increased for this child.
 
 
Panel #286
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Licensure of Behavior Analysts: Ethical Considerations, Lessons Learned, and Next Steps
Monday, May 30, 2016
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Montreux, Swissotel
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda N. Kelly, Ph.D.
Chair: Amanda N. Kelly (Hawaii Association for Behavior Analysis)
KRISTEN E. KOBA-BURDT (Hawaii Association for Behavior Analysis)
CHARNA MINTZ (Imagine)
KAREN KELLUM (University of Mississippi)
Abstract:

Requests for the regulation of the practice of behavior analysis is ever increasing with the adoption of insurance coverage for ABA services. Developing licensure for practitioners of behavior analysis might be possible and could produce benefits for consumers as well as practitioners. In certain cases however, pursuing licensure can be a risky undertaking. This panel consists of individuals from three states in the US, that have recently adopted Licensure laws. Our panelists will describe the pitfalls and pivotal moments along the way. Finally, the panelists will discuss and suggest strategies that may be helpful for other states also seeking to regulate (or redefine) behavior analytic practices.

Keyword(s): ABA Licensure, Hawaii Licensure, Mississippi Licensure, Washington Licensure
 
 
Panel #302
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethics Cases That Will Drive You Crazy
Monday, May 30, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Vevey 1 & 2, Swissotel
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Zane, Ph.D.
Chair: Mary Jane Weiss (Endicott College)
JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
VALBONA DEMIRI (Hopewell Valley Regional School District/Endicott)
THOMAS L. ZANE (Institute for Behavioral Studies, Endicott College)
Abstract:

Behavior analysis has grown in popularity over the past 20 years, to the point of being a high-demand service in the area of autism and developmental disabilities. Our field has an ethical code that governs our professional behavior. However, there are an increasing number of incidents of behavior analysts behaving in ways that are in conflict with ethics and best practice. Section 7 of the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code obligates behavior analysts to approach behaviorists who are drifting from our ethical code, in an attempt to rectify potentially unethical situations. The panel members will start this session by briefly describing some cases where behavior analysts were engaging in ethically questionable practices and how they were resolved. The bulk of this session will provide opportunities for dialog between the audience and panel members to discuss questions of practice by audience members, and strategies to resolve these potential ethical situations. Participants will be given decision-making strategies and role-play various scenarios to better prepare them for improving the behavior of behavior analysts who may be drifting from ethical practice.

Keyword(s): ethics, practice, service delivery
 
 
Panel #417
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Risky Business Part Deux: Ethics and Applied Interventions in the Area of Sexuality
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Vevey 1 & 2, Swissotel
Area: CSE/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Brigid McCormick, M.A.
Chair: Brigid McCormick (Precision ABA, LLC)
SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
BOBBY NEWMAN (Room to Grow)
RACHEL LOFTIN (AARTS Center, Rush University Medical Center)
Abstract:

In general, when we as Applied Behavior Analysts carry out behavioral interventions, we must look carefully to address or eliminate potential ethical concerns. When working with sexual behaviors in particular, potential ethical concerns abound, especially when those we work with have intellectual or developmental disabilities. There are also legal implications of which we must be cognizant when working in the delicate domain of sexual behavior. Using research and clinical case examples to illustrate their points, members of this panel will address some of the legal and ethical concerns and themes that commonly arise when clinicians are called upon to address issues related to sexual behavior in applied settings. Panelists will also discuss reasons why behaviors that are sexual in nature may warrant targeted behavior change efforts through empirically verified sex education curricula and behavior reduction programming, as well as situations in which it would be unethical to target such behaviors.

Keyword(s): community, ethics, safety, sex ed
 
 
Symposium #433
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Discussing the New Behavior Analyst Certification Board's Compliance Code
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
St. Gallen, Swissotel
Area: TPC/PRA; Domain: Translational
Chair: David J. Cox (University of Florida)
Discussant: Gina Green (Association of Professional Behavior Analysts)
CE Instructor: Steven Woolf, Ph.D.
Abstract: The Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) has recently announced a change in the ethical guidelines for credentialed behavior analysts. Specifically, a new enforceable compliance code (i.e., Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts) was developed and will take effect in January 2016. The new Code is intended to more clearly present ethical expectations and expand the range of professional conduct (BACB, 2014). Given the new Code and its intent for creation, it seems reasonable that the new Code would affect current behavior analytic services in various settings. For example, do previously trained behavior analysts have the prerequisite skills to understand and follow the Code. The purpose of this symposium is to provide an overview of four different behavior analytic service programs and how each program is handling implementation of the new Code. Presenters are from varied service programs specializing in early intervention and challenging behavior in community and university-based clinics.
Keyword(s): Compliance Code, Ethics, Supervision, Training
 
University Early Intervention Practitioner Training and Management Under the New BACB Ethical Compliance Code
TYRA P. SELLERS (Utah State University)
Abstract: Preparing and managing Early Intervention Practitioners requires some specific considerations related to establishing professional and ethical behavior. Specifically, families may develop close ties to professionals providing services to their young children. This is likely due, in part, to the frequency of services (up to 40 hours per week) and that services may occur (to varying degrees) in the home setting. This discussion will address some of the important aspects of training and managing EI clinicians, teachers, and therapists. Special attention will be paid to preparing training sites and provider agencies to address relevant changes in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that the BACB will being enforcing January, 2016.
 

Applied Ethics for Current Behavioral Practitioners

STEVEN WOOLF (Beacon ABA Services)
Abstract:

The funding and monitoring sources for behavior analysts have changed over the last five with the introduction of behavior analyst licensure and health care coverage for families affected by ASD. Additionally, the number of BACB certificants continues to grow nationally. Due to the high number of new BACB certificants, new licensing laws, and increased health-care funding sources for ABA treatment, behavior analysts must be responsive to pertinent field based ethical issues associated with the practice of behavior analysis in homes and communities. This discussion will introduce the topic of applied ethics as to identify the common ethical issues encountered by practicing proving home/communizing based ABA services. Furthermore, the discussion will address cross reference these identified ethical concerns with the BACB compliance code and behavior analysts licensing regulations across the country. Finally, the presenter will recommend the best course of action based on established case law when behavior analysts encounter these ethical dilemmas.

 

Ethical Considerations in Behavior Analysis: Analysis of "the Code" for Unique and Challenging Circumstances

ABRAHAM GRABER (Western Illinois University), Matthew O'Brien (The University of Iowa)
Abstract:

Effective January of 2016, the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (the Code) outlines the expectations of professional and ethical behavior for individuals practicing in the field of behavior analysis. Despite its intentions, behavior analysts are likely to encounter ethical dilemmas that may not be fully resolved with application of the Code. For example, based upon the Code, behavior analysts are obligated to tailor behavior-change programs to the uniquegoals of each client. However, with nonverbal adult patients there is a unique challenge in determining their goals. New, but similarly complex ethical dilemmas are likely to develop as a result of changes to the landscape of fee-for-service models. For example, accountable care organizations, which have been established under the auspices of the Affordable Care Act, employ a pay-for-performance reimbursement model that may compel behavior analysts to develop performance metrics for behavioral interventions. This talk explores ethical questions for behavior analysts that may challenge the Code and provides a breakdown of such questions from the perspective of an ethicist and a practicing behavior analyst.

 

Ethical Considerations for Providing Services in Rural Settings With Diverse Populations

ANDREW W. GARDNER (Northern Arizona University)
Abstract:

BCSNA currently offers services based on Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) principles including: skill acquisition for young children with ASD and other neurological disabilities and disorders, functional behavior assessments and analyses for individuals demonstrating challenging behavior, parent training, school consultation, supervision services, etc. One of the recent services requested of BCSNA by the state of Arizona (motivated by cost containment issues) includes a Placement Stability Package (PSP) to assess, treat/stabilize children and adults in their home settings prior to transferring them to an inpatient facility in another state. The PSP is a program where parent and care provider training is vital to keeping the individual stable and abate the need to send them out of state. As licensed Behavior Analysts in Arizona (under the Board of Psychological Examiners), BCBAs are held to both the APA and BACB ethical guidelines. Issues and challenges surrounding how services are provided to rural culturally and linguistically diverse minority health populations will be discussed.

 
 
Symposium #438
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethics in Transition Programming
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Vevey 1 & 2, Swissotel
Area: CSE/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Laura Bassette (Ball State University)
CE Instructor: Laura Bassette, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Achieving the best outcomes for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities in adulthood begins with an early interdisciplinary teamwork including multiple types of activities related to transition. Practical and ethical considerations should include who should be involved, what skills should be taught, where these services should be offered, when they should be delivered, how services should be delivered, and why they should be taught. This symposium will address ethical considerations involving interagency collaboration across the lifespan, creating a balance in teaching academic, functional, and self-determination skills, the need to consider community settings and programming for generalization across settings, and how technology can facilitate skill acquisition across settings. There is a need for practitioners to consider these areas when working with children as they transition through various services with a mindful approach about factors related to adult outcomes including quality of life, sustainability of naturally occurring contingencies, resources allocated, and both individual and societal benefits. The symposium will present the various ethical considerations associated with selecting skills that are most relevant to long-term goals, precursory skills, and environmental factors related to the utilization of those skills.

Keyword(s): ethics, self-determination, technology, transition
 
Ethical Concerns, Applications, and Contrast in Transitional Programming Scenarios
FRITZ KRUGGEL (Indiana Mentor)
Abstract: Early, on-going, conscientious effort must be taken to ensure that the individuals being served remain at the forefront of any transitional programming effort. Appropriate support delivered in a collaborative, interpersonal and interagency approach is critical to ensuring successful transition outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in intensive clinical and post-secondary settings. The efficacies promoted as a consequence of these factors can be enhanced via programming and skill development strategies that balance concerns related to “dignity of risk”, organizational regulations, and contingencies both present and absent in the terminal transition environment. Furthermore, the 2016 Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts emphasizes, among other concerns, the need for interagency collaboration. This presentation will discuss how behavior analysts can uphold and advance their ethical obligations through interagency collaboration, programming for generalization, focusing on the sustainability of naturally occurring reinforcement, and how these will ultimately benefit both the individuals’ served and their surrounding community.
 
The Practical and Ethical Considerations for Using the FITT Model to Promote Independence in Transition
EVETTE A. SIMMONS-REED (Ball State University), Jennifer Marie Cullen (Ball State University)
Abstract: Using technology to empower students with intellectual and developmental disabilities to become self-determined adults starts with a good match. Successful transition outcomes for young adults with disabilities can be enhanced through universal and assistive technology. The long and short-term benefits of the Self-determined Learning Model of Instruction (SDLMI) include: providing a self-directed process to facilitate assessment, teaching, and evaluating how supports promote independence for students with disabilities. Universal and assistive technology was used to help students acquire skills (e.g., academic, employment); however, environmental factors (e.g., specific job, course content) frequently determine the technology selected and used. The Facilitating Independence through Technology (FITT) model encompasses the SDLMI and outlines the process of matching appropriate tools and apps. Specifically, the FITT model identifies how to find the right technology based on individual preferences, interests, needs, strengths, and overall daily activities. Through facilitating assessment, instruction on use of the process in employment settings, trying it on for size, and tweaking, students are able to maximize the tools to facilitate independence across settings and activities. This presentation will discuss the FITT model, how it can be implemented, and follow-up steps to enhance independence that result in successful employment and educational outcomes.
 
Ethical Considerations in Skill Selection for Transition-Aged Students
LAURA BASSETTE (Ball State University)
Abstract: Individuals with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (e.g., autism) continue to face significant challenges in independent living, employment, and community access as they transition from school-based entitlement services into eligibility-based adult service systems. It is critical for behavior analysts to consider the types of skills being taught to students and the behaviors addressed to ensure relevancy in inclusive real-world settings. While the question of what to teach should be individualized with the client at the center, it is critical to find a balance between functional (e.g., activities of daily living), meaningful (e.g., recreational activities), and academic (e.g., mathematics) skills during instruction to ensure the best possible post-school outcomes. The purpose of this presentation will be to review instructional strategies to effectively address these skills. Additionally, an example of a behavioral-based intervention that utilized technology to teach safety skills to students with a moderate intellectual disability during community-based instruction using a multiple probe across participant will be reviewed. The ability to efficiently, effectively, and economically identify and teach skills to assist individuals with I/DD in achieving ideal quality of life outcomes will be discussed.
 
 
Symposium #447
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Advances in the Functional Analysis and Treatment of Problem Behavior
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Grand Ballroom CD South, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DDA/PRA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Javier Virues-Ortega (The University of Auckland)
Discussant: Brian A. Iwata (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: Javier Virues-Ortega, Ph.D.
Abstract: This symposium presents a series of original studies featuring functional analysis methodology and function-based interventions for a variety of problem behaviors in individuals with and without disabilities. S. Taylor’s study introduces a novel approach to the functional analysis of feeding disorders among children with nasogastric tube dependency. She conducted a series of gradual antecedent manipulations of volume, texture, feeding method, and other important antecedent dimensions. This assessment strategy is aimed at identifying an optimal start point for treatment. The initial phases of functional communication training (FCT) often use dense schedules followed by a schedule thinning procedure. The study by N. Nuhu features an experimental analysis of schedule-thinning procedures following FCT among individuals with problem behavior maintained by escape from demands. The current analysis compared the effects of two schedule thinning procedures: chained schedules and multiple schedules. K. A. Benhart examined the effect of reinforcement delay during the differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) of automatically maintained food stealing. The authors evaluated the latency to the alternative response and food stealing across progressively increasing reinforcement delays. Finally, A. Cox presents a series of extended side-by-side functional analyses conducted before and after psychotropic prescription changes among individuals with intellectual disability and problem behavior. Medication changes provided the opportunity to conduct analogues to parametric and reversal experimental analyses using medication changes as a secondary independent variable.
Keyword(s): feeding disorders, food stealing, psychotropic medication, schedule thinning
 

An Antecedent-Based Assessment Model for Children With Severe Feeding Disorders

SARAH LEADLEY (The University of Auckland), Javier Virues-Ortega (The University of Auckland)
Abstract:

There is increasing use of antecedent-based treatments in the treatment of pediatric feeding disorders, but limited reporting of systematic assessment of antecedent manipulations. In the current study, we developed an experimental assessment method to evaluate the effects of varied antecedent manipulations (e.g., changes to liquid or food properties) on acceptance or mealtime problem behaviour. Conditions showing the most improvement are matched to an individualized treatment protocol for each child. This study is conducted in family homes in New Zealand, with children that are dependent on some degree of tube feeding to meet their nutritional needs. Preliminary results from five participants have shown that this assessment may identify effective treatment protocols to increase oral nutrition in the absence of escape extinction.

 
Schedule Thinning Following Functional Communication Training: A Comparison of Chained Schedules and Multiple Schedules
NADRATU NUHU (Auburn University), Sacha T. Pence (Auburn University)
Abstract: Functional communication training (FCT) is used to reduce rates of problem behavior by teaching communicative responses that access functionally equivalent reinforcers. During the initial phases of FCT, the communicative response is typically placed on a dense schedule of reinforcement that is not likely to be maintained in the natural environment. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of two schedule-thinning procedures (chained schedules and multiple schedules) following the implementation of FCT with problem behavior maintained by escape from demands. In Experiment 1, a reversal design was used to demonstrate experimental control over the effects of FCT on rates of problem behavior with three participants. A multielement design was used to compare the chained schedule and multiple schedule thinning procedures on rates of compliance, the communicative response, and problem behavior. In general, participants engaged in similar levels of problem behavior in the chained and multiple-schedule conditions as they progressed through schedule thinning. For some participants, higher rates of compliance were observed during the chained-schedule conditions. Following the completion of schedule thinning, preferences for the two schedule thinning conditions will be assessed in Experiment 2 with a modified concurrent-chain preference assessment.
 
The Effects of Delayed Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior on Food Stealing
KELLY ALEXANDRA BENHART (New England Center for Children), Jason C. Bourret (New England Center for Children)
Abstract: A series of assessments were conducted to determine whether an alternative response could be taught to replace food stealing. Three students in a residential school for children with autism participated. We examined the durability of the alternative response by measuring the latency to the alternative response and food stealing across progressively increasing delays. Results of a functional analysis indicated that food stealing was automatically maintained for all participants. A DRA with immediate reinforcement decreased food stealing, but, once a delay to reinforcement was introduced, food stealing increased for all participants. The reinforcement schedule was successfully thinned for all three participants, however, the effective treatment varied slightly for each individual. Delay fading with praise was effective for one participant, and a ratio fading procedure was effective for the other two participants. Interobserver agreement was calculated for 33% of sessions for all participants and averaged over 95% for all dependent measures, and for all participants.
 

Long-Term Dynamics of Automatically- and Escape-Maintained Problem Behavior Exposed to Antipsychotic Medication: A Quasi-Experimental Analysis.

ALISON COX (University of Manitboa), Javier Virues-Ortega (The University of Auckland)
Abstract:

Psychopharmacological and behavioral interventions are used to treat challenging behaviors in individuals with intellectual disability (ID), often in combination. However, little is known about the interaction between medication pharmacodynamics and behavior function. A better understanding of these mechanisms could serve as the conceptual foundation for combined interventions. We conducted extended functional analyses to assess the impact on behavior function of various dosages of primarily antipsychotic medications. We explored the relation between the changes in medication (i.e., new prescription, dosage change in an existing prescription) and problem behavior by conducted a very long series of functional analysis sessions. Four individuals with ID and challenging behavior who were also receiving psychotropic medications participated. Behavior function remain the same after a change in medication in 14 out of the 21 medication manipulations examined.

 
 
Symposium #453
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Evidence-Based Practice for ABA Practitioners: Strategies, Ethical Obligations, and Challenges
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Translational
Chair: Wayne Fuqua (Western Michigan University)
Discussant: Susan Wilczynski (Ball State University)
CE Instructor: Wayne Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a multi-component process in which practitioners select, refine and deliver clinical services based on a) the best available scientific evidence, b) unique client and contextual features and c) ongoing clinical progress monitoring and decision making. Developed initially in medicine, EBP has been extended to the delivery of applied behavior analysis (ABA) services and is considered an essential feature of ethical and high quality (ABA) service delivery. This symposium reviews the defining features of EBP as applied to ABA service delivery and provides a synopsis of the challenges encountered in implementing the EBP process in ABA. This symposium will offer practical advice for ABA practitioners and supervisors who are interested in improving the quality and accountability of ABA and clinical behavior analysis service delivery. Additionally, it will offer guidance for instructors and researchers who are interested in the dissemination of ABA technology and quality assurance.

 
What is the “Best Available Evidence” to Guide Clinical Practice?
TIMOTHY A. SLOCUM (Utah State University)
Abstract: The concept “best available evidence” is one of three pillars of evidence-based practice. A nuanced understanding of this concept is necessary for evidence-based practice to be compatible with the conceptual and ethical tenets of Applied Behavior Analysis and clinical effectiveness. This paper outlines a multifaceted understanding of “best available evidence” and demonstrates its clinical utility.
 

Is Standardization of ABA Eroding Our Scientific Foundations?

KIMBERLY A. SCHRECK (Penn State Harrisburg), Jonathan W. Ivy (Mercyhurst University)
Abstract:

As Applied Behavior Analysis principles and procedures have been shown to be effective, many ABA practices have become standardized with non-individualized procedures. The idiosyncratic practices of some of these standardized programs' have eroded their ABA scientific foundations. These practices often ignore the research supported principles and application procedures of ABA creating possible ethical violations. This symposium will present examples of ABA practices which have possibly eroded and compromised the efficacy of ABA. We will also discuss the possible ethical implications of these trends.

 

Sometimes It Works, But Is It Worth It?

PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) has typically evaluated its outcomes using reliable and valid observational data of increases in adaptive behavior, decreases in maladaptive behavior, generalization, maintenance and social validity and more recently systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Despite the evidence for effectiveness, wide spread adoption, beyond adoption of simple contingency management has been scarce. Once important and neglected aspect of evidence-based practice is economic evaluation. This paper highlights opportunities for promoting ABA by demonstrating economic benefit of ABA.

 

Detecting and Troubleshooting Treatment Failures: Guidelines for ABA Practitioners

WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Sometimes the best-intentioned practitioners implement ABA interventions that fail to produce behavior change of sufficient magnitude, generality and durability to resolve the presenting problem. This presentation will review the ethical obligation to incorporate clinical benchmarks and clinical progress monitoring in a manner that allows for early detection of treatment failures and shortcomings. It also reviews seven practical strategies for troubleshooting treatment failures.

 
 
Panel #462
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
International Application of Educational Technology: Practical and Cultural Challenges and Solutions
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Regency Ballroom B, Hyatt Regency, Gold West
Area: EDC/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Yulema Cruz, Ph.D.
Chair: Yulema Cruz (Nova Southeastern University)
JENNIFER WILKENS (Rethink)
ROZ PRESCOTT (Rethink)
LOUISE KENNETT (Danecourt School)
Abstract:

The field of Applied Behavior Analysis continues to expand its reach to many around the world. With 41 non-US chapters, the Association for Behavior Analysis International illustrates the geographical reach of our science. The advent of technology has assisted professionals in connecting across vast distances which previously were impenetrable. With this international reach, many behavior analysis products, therapists and consultants find themselves working across significant distances and with colleagues, clients and customers who do not share the same cultural norms and life experience, often with people whom theyve never had the benefit meeting in-person. Providing applied behavior analytic service internationally is rewarding, yet challenges unique to cross-cultural service delivery often present themselves. Technology provides new opportunities for some countries whom quality ABA service and supports were previously unavailable. This panel presentation, includes professionals using technology to provide services in multiple countries across four continents. Learn about the challenges faced in providing quality and ethical services across multiple geographic regions through technology. Success stories achieved will be shared as well as challenges that continue to exist.

Keyword(s): cross-cultural, education technology, international
 
 
Symposium #480
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Sexual Behavior: Research and Practice SIG Symposium 1 of 3: Behavioral Treatment for Individuals With Concomitant Intellectual Disabilities and Problematic Sexual Behaviors
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Vevey 1 & 2, Swissotel
Area: CSE/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kimberly E. Church (Human Development Center)
CE Instructor: Kimberly E. Church, Psy.D.
Abstract:

Adults and children with intellectual disabilities and problematic sexual behavior (IDPSB) can pose serious risks to themselves, as well as to others. While results from studies vary, the general consensus is that individuals with IDPSB are over-represented in the criminal justice system. In addition, specialized treatment options in the community are often limited. This symposium focuses on community-based treatment strategies designed to reduce problematic sexual behavior. The first study evaluates a multi-component residential treatment program for children who have engaged in sexually harmful behavior. The second and third presentations both provide case examples of longer-term treatment for adults with forensic involvement, and specific, individualized treatment strategies are presented. Challenges related to treatment provision in real world settings with this high risk population will be discussed. The importance of individualized treatment and probes to measure success were identified as critical factors in all three presentations.

Keyword(s): Community-based, Data-based, Problematic sexual, Sexually harmful
 

Evaluation of a Residential Treatment Program for Children With Intellectual Disabilities Who Present Harmful Sexual Behaviour

DUNCAN PRITCHARD (Aran Hall School), Nicola Graham (Aran Hall School), Heather Penney (Aran Hall School), F. Charles Mace (Nova Southeastern University)
Abstract:

A multi-component behavioral intervention (MCBI) was associated with a reduction in harmful sexual behaviour in children attending a residential program. The MCBI was comprised of a points and levels system, sex and relationships education, cognitive behaviour therapy, counselling and behavior contracts. Successful adherence to the program (e.g., safe and respectful behaviour, attendance in school, compliance with the therapy program etc.) earned the children access to high tariff activities and access to the internet and social media contingent on achieving the relevant level. Those who earned high level status attended college and work experience with staff support. Staff support was systematically faded out for those young people who graduated from the program. Inadvertent probes demonstrated that harmful sexual behaviour relapsed in a number of children.

 

Case Example of Support Fade for an Individual With Forensic Involvement for a Sexual Offense

KIMBERLY E. CHURCH (Human Development Center), Stephani Fauerbach (Human Development Center), Ashley Tomaka (Human Development Center/ ABA Masters USF)
Abstract:

Human Development Center (HDC), inc., is a non-profit organization that provides behavior analytic treatment to consumers with intellectual disabilities in a variety of community-based settings. HDC specializes in assessing and treating behaviors that interfere with the consumers ability to live successfully and safely in the community. Assessment involves extensive reviews of records and data on target and replacement behaviors, along with ongoing interviews, observations, and probes. The treatment approach includes the design and implementation of individualized behavior plans with skill programs designed to increase pro-social behaviors and decrease challenging behaviors, and an emphasis on teaching societal rules for sexual behavior, increasing appropriate avoidance behaviors and strengthening coping skills. Behavior analysts work closely with each consumer to develop a rapport and build a collaborative relationship in order to help each person achieve his identified goals. Ongoing assessment, twenty-four support, open communication, probes and data-based program changes along the way are designed to contribute to success. While highlighting one individuals successful journey from intensive residential supports to his own home, this presentation will provide a customized overview of a treatment package for an individual with forensic involvement as a result of sexual offending behavior.

 

Treatment Fade-Out for an Adult With Intellectual Disabilities and Problematic Sexual Behavior

STEPHANI FAUERBACH (Human Development Center), Kimberly E. Church (Human Development Center), Ashley Tomaka (Human Development Center/ ABA Masters USF)
Abstract:

Ethical considerations require that all interventions include plans to fade out treatment once intermediate goals are achieved. This is particularly challenging when the target behaviors are related to problematic sexual behavior or illegal practices. Our agency provides services to adult males diagnosed with intellectual disabilities with forensic involvement, including registered sexual offenders, predators, or consumers that have been referred to residential treatment as part of their parole agreement. A summary of assessment, long term individualized interventions and results for an individual with a substance abuse history and forensic involvement as a result of sexual offending behavior will be presented. Specific instruction will be provided regarding using consequence avoidance strategies to help treat behaviors that occur or are observed less frequently, and how to conduct probes to evaluate the use of skills in situ. This individual was able to successfully transition from intensive residential habilitation to supported living, maintain success while living independently, and achieve major life goals, such as getting married.

 
 
Symposium #504
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Current State of Social Validity on Aversive Control, What We Know, What We Don’t Know, What’s Next?
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
2:00 PM–3:50 PM
St. Gallen, Swissotel
Area: TPC/PRA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Jill Marie Harper (Melmark New Englnad)
Discussant: Saul Axelrod (Temple University)
CE Instructor: Michael F. Dorsey, Ph.D.
Abstract: This symposium will present a brief history of the definition and use of punishment, raise terminological questions regarding the use of the word “punishment”, ethical missteps in the application of punishment procedures, and the social validity of continuing to use aversive procedures without proper evidence of effectiveness. Current research on punishment will be reviewed, as well as a discussion on the use of punishment procedures utilized in the field today. Preliminary results indicate that 80% of current BCBA’s utilize punishment procedures in their current practice. The ethical issues included with utilizing punishment procedures will be highlighted through a review of several missteps observed in the field of applied behavior analysis or behavior modification. Based upon the lessons learned from these occurrences, considerations for practice will be proposed. Additionally, rarely is social validity conducted when utilizing these effective procedures. A recent review of 2014 JABA demonstrated that only 10% of experimental studies conduct social validity assessments and a review of punishment studies in JABA yielded only 9.5% reported treatment integrity or social validity data. Additional data will be reported on a complete review JABA studies, 2000-present day and the authors reports of social validity and treatment integrity.
 
Punishment: A Systematic Review
AMANDA COLLINSWORTH-COFFEY (Endicott College), Bryan J. Blair (Endicott College), Michael F. Dorsey (Endicott College)
Abstract: Few literature reviews have been completed on punishment studies with humans. Given this relative lack of information on research studies that employed punishment procedures, a systematic review seemed warranted. The following is a review of published literature on punishment (from 1968-2014, across 32 journals), including a categorization of punishment procedures by type, setting, diagnosis and behavior. In addition, punishment studies were categorized according to whether functional assessment procedures or reinforcement procedures were used in conjunction with punishment, whether other procedures were used, whether generalization/maintenance procedures were implemented, and whether the magnitude or schedule of the punisher was systematically assessed. These results are summarized and presented. Finally, publication rates for punishment studies are compared to the publication rates for other procedures (e.g., reinforcement, extinction etc.). The results suggest specific areas in the literature that lack clarity regarding the efficacy and applicability of punishment procedures. Recommendations are made regarding future areas of study and how those areas can and will contribute to applied interventions.
 

Punishment: Is It Conceptually Systematic?

BRYAN J. BLAIR (Cape Abilities/Endicott College), Cheryl J. Davis (7 Dimensions Consulting/Endicott College), Paul Mahoney (Amego Inc/Endicott College), Michael F. Dorsey (Endicott College)
Abstract:

A conceptual analysis of punishment will be presented. A brief history of the word punishment (both in vernacular usage, and in clinical usage) is presented. Writings from B.F. Skinner, Jack Michael and Murray Sidman are reviewed, summarized, and compared. Given the significant departure that these writings take from traditional descriptions of the effects of punishment on behavior, two competing analyses of punishment are presented. These two analyses, punishment as a direct procedure and punishment as an indirect procedure, are explained and directly compared. Data from previously published studies supporting both conclusions will be presented and analyzed. In addition, the effects of reinforcement and motivating operations on punishment and learning are explored. Finally, recommendations are made to refine how aversive control procedures are conceptualized, researched, trained, and implemented. Recommendations are made regarding how behavior analysts talk about punishment, how they describe procedures, and how to better understand a seemingly simple, yet ultimately complex phenomenon.

 
The Current State of Social Validity in Applied Punishment Research
MICHAEL F. DORSEY (Endicott College), Cheryl J. Davis (7 Dimensions Consulting/Endicott College), Bryan J. Blair (Cape Abilities/Endicott College), Paul Mahoney (Amego Inc/Endicott College)
Abstract: The current state of social validity in applied research is rarely assessed in punishment studies with as demonstrated by a recent review of 1968 to present day JABA where only 9.5% of experimental studies conducted social validity assessments. Ensuring social validity within the applied world is the basis for the field of ABA (Risley, 1997). The challenge with social validity is that it is difficult to objectively measure and the field is not typically concerned with private events (Skinner, 1953). However, social validity cannot be ignored as feedback from the participant or people around them regarding behavioral treatment matters in regards to implementation; people will not use the technology if they do not like the process (Wolf, 1978). Wolf (1978) urged the field of ABA to view social validity as an attempt to determine acceptable practices. Adkins (1997) actually aligned social validity with ethics, making the point that scientists may need to be satisfied with societies report on procedures and not actual certainty of the data. This presentation will discuss data from applied behavioral journals and rates of assessing social validity, as well as the ramifications for not assessing this in the field of ABA especially in regards to punishment procedures. Additionally, survey data will be presented regarding BCBA’s current use of punishment procedures.
 

Ethical Blunders in the Application of Punishment Procedures

PAUL MAHONEY (Amego Inc; Endicott College), Michael F. Dorsey (Endicott College)
Abstract:

The use of aversive consequences has resulted in several instances of questionable ethical behavior that has severely affected the field of applied behavior analysis throughout its relatively short history. This component of the symposium will provide a review of the role of behavioral principles in the implementation of punishment procedures in the development and perpetuation of unethical and abusive behavior demonstrated by clinicians and staff in programs such as Willowbrook, Sunland Developmental Center, Behavior Modification Units in prison settings, etc.. Survey data provided by Behavior Analysts on abuse investigations, conclusions, and recommendations will be presented with the purpose of validating or invalidating the purported commonalities among the conditions present at the programs reviewed above. Recommendations and considerations will be provided on how to better prevent such missteps from occurring in the future. It is imperative to remember the past ethical issues in order to progress as a field and not repeat history.

 
 
Symposium #510
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Sexual Behavior: Research and Practice SIG Symposium 2 of 3: Lessons Learned: Sex Research and the Science of Changing Sexual Behavior
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Vevey 1 & 2, Swissotel
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Deric E. Toney (University of Nevada, Reno)
Discussant: Sorah Stein (Partnership for Behavior Change)
CE Instructor: Deric E. Toney, M.A.
Abstract: What is it like to research human sexuality using a single-subject research approach? How is targeting sexual behavior in a clinical setting similar to, and unique from, work in other areas of ABA? The purpose of this symposium is to present perspectives of those who have worked in the areas of sexuality, gender, and relationships, including valuable lessons that has been learned, common obstacles tackled, and professional recommendations for research and practice in the area of sexual behavior.
Keyword(s): families, sex education, sex research, sexuality
 

Working in the Fields of Autism Spectrum Disorder and Socio-Sexual Behavior: Professional, Practical, Ethical, and Legal Issues Discussed

FRANK R. CICERO (Eden II Programs)
Abstract:

On a gradient, the majority of individuals consider themselves to be sexual beings. Individuals with developmental disabilities are no exception. Socio-sexual behavior includes responses characteristic of sexual acts as well as social behaviors associated with gender identity, romantic relationships and perspective taking. As behavior analysts, we are well aware of the power of behavior analytic principles on the shaping of behavior. Through behavior analysis we can increase socially significant behavior to address behavioral deficits while decreasing behavioral excesses that lead to social and developmental problems. Although they are potentially sensitive, target behaviors included within the realm of sexuality should be no exception. In this presentation, the author will discuss common issues encountered when behavior analysts target socio-sexual behaviors with individuals diagnosed on the autism spectrum. Topics covered will include practical issues such as where and when to provide instruction; professional issues such as how to assess behavioral needs and select behavior analytic teaching techniques; ethical issues such as how to effectively work alongside guardians while respecting the desires of the individual; and legal issues such as consent laws. Issues will be discussed through a review of the literature along with experience gained through real life case studies.

 
The Naked Truth: Researching Sexual Behavior, Gender, and Romantic Relationships as a Behavior Analyst
FAWNA STOCKWELL (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract: Our gender identities, sexual orientations, and romantic and sexual relationships with others are critical parts of how we experience the world, but only a small subset of the field of Applied Behavior Analysis focuses on these topics. In this presentation, the author will present anecdotes, discoveries, challenges, and recommendations specific to their experiences researching sexuality, gender, and relationship topics as a behavior analyst. Topics covered will include how to select a research topic, how to design research that is inclusive of people of all gender and sexual identities, exploring one’s own biases as a sex researcher and how they impact decisions made throughout the research process, discovering and utilizing research studies and other resources that exist outside the field of ABA, handling IRB challenges, using deception ethically in research, measurement of sexual behaviors in ways that are as unobtrusive as possible, and navigating assumptions that others make about those who work within the realm of sexuality, gender, and relationship research. It is the author’s hope that this presentation will equip other behavior analysts with useful guidelines and considerations as they apply the science of behavior analysis to sexuality, gender, and relationships.
 
 
Symposium #535
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Special Ethical Issues in Intrusive Programming
Tuesday, May 31, 2016
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Columbus Hall CD, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Translational
Chair: Bruce Linder (Pryor, Linder & Associates/Safe Management Group Inc.)
CE Instructor: Bruce Linder, Ph.D.
Abstract: This symposium presents three special ethical issues in intrusive programming. First, the importance of insuring a meaningful stimulating environment will be discussed that focuses on Daily Activity Scheduling (DAS). Six years of research of six groups homes serving adults with acquired brain injury will be presented that gives the results of a House Manager DAS Training Program to improve the quality and implementation consistency of DAS. Second, the importance of adequate Crisis Intervention Training (CIT) will be discussed that focuses on Safe Management Group’s Program which meets several important criteria of CIT for intrusive programming – individualization, documentation, and specification. Staff training outcome data for initial and refresher training that focuses on knowledge and performance competency assessment will be presented and will highlight the special techniques of teaching and maintaining effective preventative verbal de-escalation skills. And third, the necessity of “hands-on” assessment by supervising clinicians of non-intrusive and intrusive programming will be discussed. A “One-Day” programming assessment protocol will be presented with outcome data for 10 adults with developmental disabilities that shows the assessment of “Safe Extinction” in treating severe aggressive escape behaviour.
Keyword(s): Behavior Assessment, Ethics, Intrusive Programming, Staff Training
 

The Effectiveness of Manager Training in Programming and Monitoring Activity Schedules for Residential Group Homes

JACKLYN NOBRE PERES (Pryor, Linder & Associates), Bruce Linder (Pryor, Linder & Associates)
Abstract:

Despite studies demonstrating that predictable activity schedules improves challenging behavioural among developmentally disabled children under experimental conditions, very little is known about the level of consistency with which residential staff provide daily activity schedules (DAS) in naturalistic adult group home settings and how to improve such consistency. Four years of research will be summarized. Study 1 of 6 group home settings servicing 35 adults with acquired brain injuries found, using six 2-week probes over three years, that written DASs were implemented on average only 37% of the time. A second intervention study in two of the group homes over a 12 month period found that DAS implementation could be substantially improved to 80% or higher with a 47% reduction in group home negative behavioural incidents with a DAS training program that focused on supervisor training in on-the-floor DAS supervision. In addition, the positive preventative components of Behaviour Support Plans were implemented significantly more consistently than in 5 comparison group homes which had not received DAS training. Study 3 demonstrated that DAS training conducted for 4 different agencies servicing adults with developmental disabilities improved quality and implementation of DASs, and quality of life. Implications for quality of care will be discussed.

 

The Effectiveness of Safe Management Group's Crisis Intervention Training for Staff Serving Adults With Acquired Brain Injury or Developmental Disabilities

BRUCE LINDER (Pryor, Linder & Associates/Safe Management Group Inc.)
Abstract:

Despite the importance of crisis intervention training (CIT) for insuring staff and client safety, no peer-reviewed published data are available for the effectiveness of CIT on performance competencies. Safe Management Groups CIT will be described especially in relation to proposed standards for intrusive programming including Individualization of techniques for client and staff; written Documentation for accountability; and Specification and approval of technique in Behaviour Support Plans supervised by behavior analysts. Knowledge and Performance Competency outcome data for 2-day initial training and 1-day refresher training will be presented that shows greater success and retention in teaching physical intervention skills than verbal de-escalation skills. The outcome of a specialized enriched verbal de-escalation program will be presented which illustrates the need for specialized CIT.

 

An Assessment Protocol and Outcome Data for "Safe Extinction" With Adults With Severe Behavioural Disorder and Developmental Disabilities

JOANNE SALAMEH (Pryor, Linder & Associates), Bruce Linder (Pryor, Linder & Associates)
Abstract:

A substantial research literature has established the prevalence of escape-motivated aggressive behaviour in children, adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities. A small subgroup of adults, perhaps about 3-5 percent, can be defined as severe, in that there is substantial daily risk with limited effectiveness of so-called positive programming only and psychopharmacologic treatments. This talk will introduce a form of escape-extinction called safe extinction (SE) in which contingent physical interventions and preventative mechanical restraints are used in combination with typical differential reinforcement of alternative and incompatible behaviour to produce substantial reductions in aggressive behaviour and increases in complaint and productive behaviour. A one-day assessment protocol will be presented that enables rapid and efficient assessment of the effectiveness of SE, a critical feature of intrusive programming. Data for ten adult cases of 1-day SE will be presented illustrating the extinction and generalization process.

 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE