Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Program by Invited Events: Sunday, May 24, 2020


 

Invited Paper Session #201
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Current Dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis in China: A Reflection of Twenty Years of Dissemination and Progress
Sunday, May 24, 2020
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence A-C
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Lin Du (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Lin Du, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum)
Abstract: In the West, the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) evolved from experimental analysis of behavior. In this evolutionary process, seven dimensions of ABA emerged: applied, behavioral, analytic, technological, conceptual, effective, and generality. On the other hand, ABA was introduced into mainland China 20 years ago and has been developing since then as a direct result of the rise of autism spectrum disorder. Therefore, the level of acceptance of, and interest in, the aforementioned seven dimensions varied in China. The different development of ABA dimensions in the West and in China can also be attributed to cultural and societal variables as well. This presentation will provide an overview of what I observed in the past two decades regarding the practice and research of ABA in China. Equipped with personal experience and relevant literature both in English and in Chinese, I will describe efforts and milestones of disseminating ABA in China. Based on this anthropological description, I will also share with participants my assessment of the current dimensions of ABA in China as well as recommendations to further elevate ABA practices and research in China.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Practitioners and researchers who are interested in diversity-related issues in general; providers and educators who are interested in providing programs to Chinese populations.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the main difference of evolutionary courses of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) in the West and in China; (2) list seven core dimensions of ABA in general and describe at least four of the current dimensions of ABA in China in particular (as presented by the speaker); (3) identify at least two cultural and societal variables that have influenced the development of ABA in China.
 
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum)
 
 
Invited Paper Session #235
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Multiple Exemplar Training: Illustrations, Limitations, and Preliminary Guidelines
Sunday, May 24, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Chair: David C. Palmer (Smith College)
CE Instructor: Per Holth, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: PER HOLTH (OsloMet -- Oslo Metropolitan University)
Abstract:

Through a set of exemplars that sample the range of stimulus and response topographies, multiple exemplar training aims to produce the full range of performances. The principle has been widely acknowledged and used in experimental psychology, in the experimental analysis of behavior, and in behavior-analytic applications. Behavior analysts have often referred to a history of multiple exemplar training to account for different generalized performances. Examples of such generalized performances are abstraction and concept learning, responding to relations, identity matching, rule following, behavioral variability, responding to wh-questions, describing past events, learning sets, and continuous repertoires. There is convincing evidence for the usefulness of multiple exemplar training with respect to many types of performances, even performances that involve relations between objects or events. Yet, there appear to be at least two important exceptions, where direct multiple exemplar training does not work well: (1) when there are no physical dimensions at all along which generalized performances can emerge, and (2) when the relation between antecedents and an effective response is complex. General limitations of multiple exemplar training as well as an interpretation of exceptions in terms of behavior-mediated generalization are discussed. Guidelines for more effective training for generalized skills are outlined.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation participants will be able to: (1) describe different procedures that have been named ‘multiple exemplar training’; (2) describe at least five different behavioral phenomena that require some kind of multiple exemplar training; (3) specify some limits to what can result from direct multiple exemplar training.
 
PER HOLTH (OsloMet -- Oslo Metropolitan University)
Professor Per Holth received his license to practice psychology in 1983, and his Ph.D. in 2000, with a dissertation on the generality of stimulus equivalence. His clinical work has been in services for people with autism and developmental disabilities, in psychiatric units, and in the military services. His research activities span basic research, on stimulus equivalence and joint attention, as well as applied work and management of large research projects. Per Holth has taught classes in behavior analysis and learning principles at the University of Oslo and Oslo and Akershus University College (OAUC) since 1982, and joined the faculty of OAUC and the Program for learning in complex systems, as an associate professor in 2004 and as full professor in 2006. He teaches classes in all behavior-analytic education programs at OAUC. He has written for peer-reviewed publications on basic research, applied work, and philosophy of science; served on several editorial boards; and he has a member of the editorial troika of the European Journal of Behavior Analysis for 15 years. He has been a program co-coordinator of the TPC area of ABAI, is currently a program co-coordinator for the development area, and he is on the board of directors of the B. F. Skinner Foundation. His current research interests have drifted in the direction of basic experimental work with animals and humans.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #260
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Relational Skills Training for Enhancing Intelligence: The Science of Destabilizing Stable Traits
Sunday, May 24, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
CE Instructor: Jonathan J. Tarbox, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: BRYAN ROCHE (National University of Ireland, Maynooth)
Abstract:

Part of the mission of radical behaviorism is to increase control over behavioral variability in all domains of human activity, and perhaps especially those in which activity is seen as constrained by invariant traits. One such “invariant trait” is intelligence, a concept long understood to represent a mentalism. However, it is only recently that behavior analysts have made progress in providing a functional-analytic model of intelligence that was sufficiently progressive to produce targeted interventions that can increase intellectual skill fluency to the point where large and reliable gains are observable on standardised tests of intelligence. In this talk Dr. Bryan Roche of Maynooth University, Ireland, will outline the rationale behind one such intervention method, known as SMART training (Strengthening Mental Abilities with Relational Training), which has emerged from a Relational Frame Theory account of derived stimulus relations. The talk will also outline evidence of the positive effects on intellectual functioning of the SMART intervention, and argue that for pragmatic, ethical, and now empirical reasons, psychologists’ traditional conceptualization of intelligence needs to be revised.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define a derived stimulus relation and outline the usual laboratory procedures for generating them; (2) describe the main differences between a stimulus equivalence and a Relational Frame Theory account of derived stimulus relations; (3) provide and generate their own examples of common IQ test items that clearly assess a small set of relational framing skills; (4) discuss the relevance of relational skill fluency to everyday intellectual skill proficiency; (5) interpret findings from several studies that have claimed to increase IQ scores using relational skills training interventions.
 
BRYAN ROCHE (National University of Ireland, Maynooth)
Dr. Bryan Roche has been a member of academic staff at MU since 2000.  His early work was on the development of Relational Frame Theory, a post-Skinnerian account of human language and cognition, the first text for which has been cited over 1000 times in the academic literature.  He is author of over 100 peer reviewed papers and book chapters.  Dr. Roche has developed an online intervention, based on Relational Frame Theory, that is the only intervention currently known by psychologists to increase IQ by clinically significant degrees (around 15 points) for many or most users.  This method is known as SMART (Strengthening Mental Abilities with Relational Training), and is offered online by the MU campus company RaiseYourIQ.com of which Dr. Roche is a co-director.  Dr. Roche also conducts research into fear and avoidance as part of wider interest in anxiety, and has developed a new implicit test, built from first learning principles, called the FAST (Function Acquisition Speed Test), also available online as a test and in modified form as a therapeutic intervention to  enhance psychological flexibility in the context of troubling emotional issues. 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #262
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Systemic Behavior Analysis: A Therapeutic Approach for Optimizing Best Practices for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Families
Sunday, May 24, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207A
Area: PRA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Bobby Newman (Proud Moments)
CE Instructor: Angeliki Gena, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANGELIKI GENA (University of Athens, Greece)
Abstract:

This presentation will address the question of effective practices for the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorder, from both an epistemological and a therapeutic perspective, and suggest the importance of a synthesis of two paradigms—behavior analysis and general systems theory—as a means of optimizing our assessment of the needs and the services provided to people with disabilities. Despite the development and the use of a wide array of behavior analytic practices that help all children with ASD to reach their full potential, a question that remains under-researched has to do with the effort expected from the child and his/her family and whether this effort can be somehow lessened without compromising the benefits. The answer to that question led to investigating the properties of another epistemological paradigm—general systems theory—its merits, its compatibility, and its complementarity to the discipline of behavior analysis. This presentation aims to demonstrate that the two paradigms are compatible and complementary and that their combination may lead to optimizing the therapeutic and pedagogical outcomes of behavior analytic practices. If we are to adapt a systemic perspective, according to which the joining of two or more systems leads to an outcome that exceeds by far the additive effects of those systems, it will be interesting to assess the potential emergent benefits of the synthesis of two compatible and complementary epistemological paradigms and how those translate into therapeutic outcomes.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Researchers and therapists in the field of autism spectrum disorder.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation the participants will be able to: (1) utilize the main principles of Systemic Behavior Analysis to evaluate a treatment program for people with ASD; (2) assess whether the breath of a Systemic Behavior Analytic treatment program is feasible and appropriate for the population of people with ASD of his/her interest; (3) plan for changes in the development of a behavior analytic intervention that incorporate systemic elements.
 
ANGELIKI GENA (University of Athens, Greece)

Angeliki Gena is Professor at the School of Philosophy, Department of Philosopsy-Pedagogy-Psychology at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece (EKPA). She received her BA in Psychology and Sociology, her Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology and her Ph.D. from the “Learning Processes” program of the Psychology Department of the City University of New York. She conducted her Doctoral Dissertation at the Princeton Child Development Institute, in Princeton, New Jersey. She worked in various institutes in the USA and became the director of the Alpine Learning Group, a prominent center for children with autism in Alpine, New Jersey. She also taught as an adjunct professor at the City University of New York. In Greece she started her teaching career at the University of Thessaly, was elected at the University of the Aegean, and since 1998 teaches at the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens. Her research is predominantly in the area of Behavior Analysis and its applications for early intervention in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Was general secretary of the Association of Behavioral Research for 11 years, is an associate of the Institute of Behavioral Research and Therapy, and a founding member and current president of the Institute of Systemic Behavior Analysis. She has served as an elected member of the Senate of EKPA, since 2016 she is a member of the board of trustees of IKY – National Organization of Scholarships, Greece – has been appointed to national committees of the Greek Ministry of Education, and has served on the board of various non-for-profit organizations. She has received several scholarships and awards for distinguished research and clinical practices addressing children with autism and grands from the European Commission and various Greek organizations. She has published numerous books, empirical and theoretical articles in peer-reviewed journals, as well as book chapters. The main focus of her research is in systemic behavior analysis and its applications for children with ASD and their families.  

 
 
Invited Paper Session #277
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Building Effective Teams: An Interdisciplinary Task
Sunday, May 24, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Area: CSS; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Thomas G. Szabo (Florida Institute of Technology)
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: NORA RANGEL (Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico)
Abstract:

In terms of an interbehavioral point of view, Ribes (1990) proposed a conceptual formulation and a methodological approach to identify consistent modes of people interaction with different situations, distinguishing individuals. He suggested that these particular and idiosyncratic modes of interaction, denominated interactive styles, could be modulated by the imposed criteria in a particular situation. But it also seems feasible that the criteria compliance could be modulated by the individuals’ interactive style. While this asseveration has proved relevance in the context of individual task performance, we propose to transpose it to the teamwork level. Nowadays, most of the tasks demanded in educational, academic, and occupational contexts involve teamwork. However, teams do not always perform successfully even when members have the proper disciplinary knowledge and the required skills to achieve the assigned goal. In collaboration with Muñoz, Mejía, Peña & Torres, we conformed an interdisciplinary group interested in the identification of the factors that participate in the establishment of effective teams for software development. The result has been a model in which, besides the disciplinary knowledge and individual skills to achieve products of high quality, it is necessary to take into account the way in which each individual faces situations and how these interactive styles complement with the others. Additionally, we have considered that this model could be applied in other areas.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Students and people interested in building effective teams in applied contexts.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the three elements that conform the model for building effective teams; (2) list possible areas in which the proposed model can be applied; (3) list the advantages of using the concept of interactive style to refer to the consistent and idiosyncratic modes of an individual's interaction; (4) describe how this interactive styles could be affecting the interactions among the members of a team.
 
NORA RANGEL (Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico)
Nora Rangel is a Research Professor at the Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones en Comportamiento (CEIC) at the University of Guadalajara since 2003. She received a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Occidente, a master’s degree and a doctor’s degree in Behavioral Sciences from University of Guadalajara, México in 2003 and 2008 respectively. From 2006 she joined as a teacher in the program of Behavioral Science at the University of Guadalajara. She has published a book, several chapters and research articles in national and international indexed journals, and she has presented her work in national and international forums. She is a member of the Mexican System of Researchers (SNI) since 2009, and her interests are the experimental analysis of social behavior and recently, the establishment of high-quality teams.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #286
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Don Baer Lecture: Gains and Losses on the Balance Sheet: ABA 1964–2020
Sunday, May 24, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Shahla Susan Ala'i (University of North Texas)
CE Instructor: Sigrid Glenn, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SIGRID GLENN (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

One might say that the treatment that launched applied behavior analysis began with a commitment to help little Dicky, a 3 ½ year old boy with autism (Wolf, Risley & Mees, 1964). The treatment was an amazing story of a successful marriage of science and clinical wisdom. Now, over 50 years later, it is evident that applied behavior analysis has both expanded and shrunk. Expansion is seen in the 2018 Annual Report of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board: 35,286 professionals certified to practice behavior analysis and 51,507 technicians registered to assist them. Most of the recipients of these practices are children and adults with autism and developmental disabilities. Among the costs of taking behavior analysis to scale has been the shrinking of what it means to be an applied behavior analyst. Both science and clinical wisdom seem to have moved to the margins and other considerations have taken center stage. We will examine some of the changes that appear to have occurred, including ossification of protocols, training and supervision in decontextualized environments, and a focus on structural rather than functional approaches to treatment. We will also examine what appears to be a misunderstanding or misapplication of what constitutes evidence-based practice. Finally, we will consider contingencies at work in the current culture that may account for many of these changes; and we will offer some observations on how the field might recapture what has been lost as it continues moving forward.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: PENDING
 
SIGRID GLENN (University of North Texas)
Sigrid Glenn is Regents Professor Emeritus at the University of North Texas.  She was the founding chair of UNT’s Department of Behavior Analysis and the founder and former director of UNT’s Behavior Analysis Online program. Her published research includes work in conceptual, experimental and applied areas; current interests are primarily conceptual and philosophical, especially as these pertain to culturo-behavioral systems. Dr. Glenn is past president of ABAI and a founding fellow of the Association. She was the 2015 recipient of the Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis. Other awards include TxABA Award for Career Contributions to Behavior Analysis in Texas; CalABA’s Award for Outstanding Contributions to Behavior Analysis; the Michael Hemingway Award for Advancement of Behavior Analysis; the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies Ellen P. Reese Award in Recognition for Significant Contributions to Communication of Behavioral Concepts; and--most important to her--the ABAI 2008 Student Committee Award for Outstanding Mentorship of students.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #311
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
A Dog’s Life: Using Behavior Analysis to Investigate the Human-Dog Relationship and Address Behavioral Issues
Sunday, May 24, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Nathaniel Hall (Texas Tech University)
CE Instructor: Erica Feuerbacher, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ERICA FEUERBACHER (Virginia Tech)
Abstract:

Dogs are described as “man’s best friend” and dog ownership is at an all-time high. Nevertheless, the nature of the human-dog bond has only recently been explored and much work in this field focuses on the structure of the relationship. While this might describe what the relationship looks like, it does not address what maintains the relationship nor does it identify the variables we can manipulate to produce, maintain, or enhance that relationship. Taking a behavior analytic approach, our research has sought to identify the functions maintaining human-dog interactions from the dog’s perspective. This talk will highlight our work investigating dogs’ preference for different human interactions, what stimuli typically function as reinforcers for dog behavior, and how we can use those to address behavioral issues, such as separation-related problem behavior in owned dogs and kennel reactivity in shelter dogs. Audience members will learn about the current state of knowledge of dog social behavior, how behavioral science can help enhance the human-dog relationship by taking the dogs’ perspective through preference and reinforcer efficacy tests, and how that knowledge can be applied to solve common behavioral issues in companion and shelter dogs.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts, applied animal behaviorists, graduate students, dog owners and enthusiasts.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify typically preferred human interaction in dogs, and the effect of population, context, and familiarity on preference; (2) identify common, effective reinforcers in dogs; (3) discuss how a behavior analytic approach to the human-dog relationship can help us enhance it; (4) discuss how identifying effective reinforcers is essential for addressing behavioral concerns in domestic dogs.
 
ERICA FEUERBACHER (Virginia Tech)

Dr. Feuerbacher is an Assistant Professor of Companion Animal Behavior and Welfare at Virginia Tech and director of the Applied Animal Behavior & Welfare Lab in the Department of Animal & Poultry Science. She earned her Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of Florida in the UF Canine Cognition and Behavior Lab and her Masters in Behavior Analysis at the University of North Texas in the Organization for Reinforcement Contingencies with Animals. Prior to joining Virginia Tech, she was an Assistant Professor at Carroll College in Helena, MT, where she led the canine program in which students trained foster dogs during the academic year. She has worked as a shelter behavior consultant, offered group dog training classes and private behavior consultations, and is co-founder of the Shelter Dog Institute. She is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and a Certified Professional Dog Trainer. Her research at Virginia Tech focuses on understanding dog behavior and learning from a behavior analytic perspective, using applied behavior analysis to solve behavioral issues, and identifying interventions that improve shelter dog welfare. She has earned several awards for her behavior analytic research and her dedication to the theoretical foundations of behavior analysis. She is passionate about humane, effective animal training, and working with owners, trainers, and shelter staff to improve our interactions with animals through behavior analysis.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #321
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission SUSTAINABILITY: Of Immediate Consequence: A Strategic Plan for Expanding Behavioral Science Research on Climate Change and Multi-Level Community Action
Sunday, May 24, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Domain: Theory
Chair: Criss Wilhite (California State University Fresno )
CE Instructor: Julia Fiebig, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JULIA FIEBIG (Ball State University; ABA Global Initiatives LLC)
Abstract:

The role of human behavior in climate change is well established—as is the core mission of behavior analysis—to impact behavior of social significance. Despite overwhelming evidence, an exhaustive review of the literature has shown that only a small portion of the published research topically related to climate change included an experimental evaluation of strategies to reduce emissions-producing behavior. Even if, “we reduce GHG emissions...consequences for people and their livelihoods will still be challenging but potentially more manageable…” (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 2019 p.1). These findings call for effective, scalable strategies for impacting climate-relevant policy and behavior at all levels of community and organization. The promise of behavior analysis can be realized through unified mobilization of our efforts. This talk will provide overview of a strategic plan for greatly increasing collaborative efforts within and across behavioral science organizations. Actions that ABAI members can take as researchers, practitioners, and citizens will be pinpointed and listeners can identify how they might contribute to these efforts in collaboration with the task force. A subsequent symposium and panels will give additional insight into the efforts of the Climate Change Task Force for a coalition of behavior science organizations.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe a proposed strategic plan on increasing behavior science research to reduce carbon emissions; (2) identify behavioral strategies for changing behavior related to climate change; (3) identify strategies for conducting interdisciplinary research and application related to climate change; (4) to identify and commit to an action that they will take to increase the research and application of behavior science to the reduction of carbon emissions.
 
JULIA FIEBIG (Ball State University; ABA Global Initiatives LLC)
Dr. Fiebig has been applying the science of behavior analysis to optimize school, community, and organizational environments and improve individual well-being for two decades. Though initially convinced she would change the world with music, incidentally, it was her music composition studies at the University of Florida that paved the road to behavior analysis. She completed her graduate training in behavior analysis at The Florida State University and her PhD in Organizational Leadership at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, with emphasis on organizational behavior management and relational frame theory applied to climate change communication. Her work has taken her across the US and Europe and is focused on impacting organizational sustainability, leadership development and team performance, and prosocial, consensus-based community practices. She is an Assistant Teaching Professor in the Department of Applied Behavior Analysis at Ball State University, co-founder of ABA Global Initiatives Consulting Group, and a director of LPC International. She is a founding member and chair of ABAI’s Behavior Analysis for Sustainable Societies (BASS) SIG and serves on the Coalition for Behavior Science Organization’s Climate Change Task Force.
 
 
Invited Symposium #333
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Siegfried Engelmann’s Direct Instruction: Faultless Communication, Measurably Superior Learning, and the Quest for Widespread Adoption
Sunday, May 24, 2020
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence A-C
Area: EDC; Domain: Theory
Chair: William L. Heward (Ohio State University)
Discussant: Patrick C. Friman (Boys Town)
CE Instructor: Patrick C. Friman, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Siegfried “Ziggy” Engelmann (1931-2019) dedicated his life to developing and refining Direct Instruction (DI), a powerful teaching system that combines logical selection and sequencing of examples and high rates of responding by students. Countless children and adults owe their literacy to teachers who skillfully presented DI programs developed by Engelmann and colleagues. This symposium will review Engelmann’s achievements as a pioneering scientist, examine the DI research base, show how DI's theory of instruction is harmonious with behavior analysis, and discuss factors that impede the widespread implementation of DI in schools.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe two examples of how Siegfried Engelmann was a pioneer in modern cognitive psychology and two examples of how he advanced the field of instructional design; (2) describe the overall findings of a recent meta-analysis of over 300 studies on Direct Instruction and two suggestions for extending and improving the research base; (3) describe three Direct Instruction components that combine to communicate one logical interpretation by the learner; (4) describe why modifying Direct Instruction programs often undermines its effectiveness; (5) describe three reasons why many educators find Direct Instruction aversive.
 

Science in the Service of Humanity: The Astonishing Contributions of Siegfried Engelmann

SHEPARD BARBASH (Author)
Abstract:

A pioneering scientist and educator for more than 50 years, Siegfried ‘Zig’ Engelmann was among the first to apply the scientific method to the design and delivery of instruction. He stood alone for his ability to create programs that accelerate learning in even the hardest to teach children and that most teachers can learn to use. He wrote more than 100 curricula, covering the major subjects from preschool to high school. As a professor of education at University of Oregon and founder of the National Institute for Direct Instruction, he attracted students from around the world. No one did more to help the underdog. Millions of poor children learned when taught by teachers trained in his methods, often when nothing else worked. He never gave up on a child or blamed children for the failings of adults. He lived by his motto: If the student hasn’t learned, the teacher hasn’t taught. More scientific evidence validates DI’s effectiveness than any other mode of teaching. I will present an overview of Zig’s life and achievements.

Shepard Barbash has been a writer for forty years. His work has appeared in The New York TimesWall Street JournalWashington PostSmithsonian MagazineCity JournalEducation Next and other publications. He is former bureau chief of the Houston Chronicle in Mexico City and is the author of five books, including Clear Teaching, published in 2012 by the Education Consumers Foundation. He and his wife, photographer Vicki Ragan, have published an alphabet book of limericks and three illustrated books (including one for children) on the folk-art wood carvers of Oaxaca, Mexico. He has advised the Georgia Governor’s Office and the Atlanta Public Schools (APS) on curricular issues and has organized teacher training programs and written grants for APS. He has also worked for E.D. Hirsch at the Core Knowledge Foundation. He is a graduate of Harvard University.

 

Factors in Education and ABA That Work Against Adoption and Maintenance of Direct Instruction

TIMOTHY SLOCUM (Utah State University)
Abstract:

A great deal of evidence demonstrates that Direct Instruction can be extremely effective for efficiently building academic repertoires in a wide variety of learners including those with disabilities. However, Direct Instruction is not widely implemented in schools or ABA service settings. This presentation explores the interaction of features of Direct Instruction and the resources and contingencies in potential implementation settings that account for the under-utilization of this powerful technology that addresses a high-priority need. First, Direct Instruction must be well-implemented to have the powerful effects it is capable of producing. Second, implementing Direct Instruction well requires a good deal of expertise, on-going support, and ongoing effort by educators. Third, few schools or ABA service providers understand how and why Direct Instruction is powerful; therefore, they often undermine its effectiveness when making modifications, fail to generalize its powerful features, and select less effective programs for reasons that are irrelevant to student achievement. Fourth, many educators find some features of Direct Instruction aversive because of verbal relations surrounding those features, in spite of the fact that Direct Instruction could help them achieve highly-valued outcomes.

Dr. Timothy A. Slocum earned his doctorate in Special Education at the University of Washington in 1991 and has been a faculty member at Utah State University (USU) in the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation since that time. He has been involved in behavior analysis and reading research for more than 25 years. He has conducted research on phonological skills, vocabulary, and school-wide implementation of research-based reading instruction, and evidence-based practice. He teaches courses at the undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral levels on topics including evidence-based reading instruction, single-case research methods, statistics, advanced topics in behavior analysis, and verbal behavior. Dr. Slocum was recognized as 2011 Teacher of the Year by the USU College of Education; received the 2011 Fred S. Keller Behavioral Education award from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association; was inducted into the Direct Instruction Hall of Fame in 2013; and was named 2018 Mentor of the Year by UtABA.
 

What’s the Evidence for Direct Instruction?

JEAN STOCKARD (University of Oregon)
Abstract:

More than fifty years and 300 studies document DI’s effectiveness. A recent meta-analysis found that the average effect size for DI was over .50, substantially larger than the level typically found in studies of other programs. Estimated effects were similar across time, methodologies, student characteristics, settings, outcome variables, and comparison programs. However, they were larger when students were exposed for longer periods of time and with greater fidelity, surpassing the effect associated with the average achievement gap between advantaged and disadvantaged students. Future research might most effectively focus on ways to improve implementation fidelity and understand resistance to the programs.

Jean Stockard has Bachelor of Arts degrees in mathematics and sociology, a Masters of Arts in Sociology, and a Ph.D. in Sociology. She taught at the University of Oregon from 1974 to 2011 and currently holds the rank of Professor Emerita. She has published eight books and over seven dozen articles in a wide variety of areas, including sociology of gender, urban sociology, sociology of education, sociology of health and demography. She has taught a variety of courses related to these areas as well as numerous classes on methodology and quantitative analysis. Professor Stockard was President of the Pacific Sociological Association in 2008, the regional association serving the western United States, Canada, and Mexico; served as co-editor of Sociological Perspectives, a general sociological journal; and was employed for nine years as Director of Research and Evaluation at the National Institute for Direct Instruction, a nonprofit organization devoted to helping schools in disadvantaged areas better serve their students.

 

Faultless Communication: The Heart and Soul of DI

JANET TWYMAN (blast)
Abstract:

Engelmann and colleagues realized that a scientific analysis of learning needed to control for one of two variables: either the learner or the instruction. As no two learners are alike, they focused on controlling instruction—in the form of logical, “faultless communication.” For most novice learners, normal instruction is riddled with confusion and ambiguity. To reduce misinterpretation and maximize learning, DI's instructional components (such as content analysis, explicit teaching, judicious example selection, and structured sequencing) are designed communicate one logical interpretation. The effects on the learner's performance are then observed, and the communication redesigned until faultless. DI's “Theory of Instruction” is harmonious with behavior analysis and beneficial to anyone interested in the heart and soul of good instruction.

Janet Twyman received her Ph.D. from Columbia University. She currently holds the positions of Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and Director of Innovation and Technology for the Center on Innovations in Learning, having served previously as Vice President of Instructional Development, Research, and Implementation for Headsprout. Dr. Twyman is widely recognized as an authority on instructional design, fully informed by behavior analytic research and conceptualization. Her leadership contributions at Headsprout were pivotal in managing a project of more than $6 million, which reached more than a million children with effective reading instruction. Similarly impressive were her contributions and her leadership at the Fred S. Keller School, where she served as executive director for eight years, arranging a behavioral approach to every aspect of the school’s functioning and inspiring many students, staff members, and parents in doing so. Dr. Twyman has also provided significant service to the field, with leadership roles within the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Research and for ABAI, where she served as president, Executive Council member, and chair of several important boards and task forces.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #342
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Evidence-Based Supervision and the Use of Technology as an Effective Tool for Training Values-Driven Professionals Across Cultures
Sunday, May 24, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 5
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau (Seattle Children's Hospital)
CE Instructor: Katerina Dounavi, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: KATERINA DOUNAVI (Queen's University Belfast)
Abstract:

Supervision of trainees and service providers is crucial in guaranteeing that clients receive quality services that match their needs and respect their wishes and preferences. This presentation will focus on evidence-based strategies for the effective training and supervision of service providers across cultures. Emphasis will be put on the importance of protecting supervisee’s well-being as a means to achieve optimal outcomes for the clients they serve. An outline of how technology can enhance the process of disseminating our science internationally, in particular in countries where there is a dearth of behaviour analysts and training opportunities, will be offered.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Students and entry-level professionals who wish to improve their cultural competence and knowledge of how technology can improve client outcomes; clinicians and researchers with intermediate and advanced understanding of evidence-based practice who wish to increase their cultural awareness and knowledge of how technology can facilitate access to quality services.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define effective supervision; (2) name at least two evidence-based strategies that effective supervisors use with trainees; (3) describe why cultural competence is important; (4) incorporate the use of technology for the supervision of service provision.
 
KATERINA DOUNAVI (Queen's University Belfast)
Dr. Dounavi is a Senior Lecturer in Behaviour Analysis and Autism at Queen's University Belfast, where she serves as the MScABA Director (includes an ABAI VCS) and supervisor of Ph.D. students. Her research focuses on behaviour analysis, developmental delays including autism, values-driven professional training, verbal behaviour, evidence-based education and wider behavioural applications for improving health and well-being. Dr. Dounavi has extensive clinical experience across numerous countries overseeing services offered to children and their families, supervising professionals and conducting research with the aim to improve educational outcomes. She is the Founder and Clinical Director of Magiko Sympan (Greece), the Clinical Director of Melody Learning Centre (Germany), the Senior Supervisor of Futuroschool Centre (France) and the Coordinator and Associate Supervisor of at-distance practice for ABA Spain (Spain and Spanish speaking countries). Her overall aim, which she seeks to achieve through a number of activities internationally, is to improve the delivery of services offered to families of children with autism and other developmental or learning disorders internationally through the provision of highly trained professionals and empowered parents.
 
 
Invited Symposium #346
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission SUSTAINABILITY: Growing the Behavioral Biome: Putting a Strategic Plan into Action
Sunday, May 24, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Domain: Translational
Chair: Thomas G. Szabo (Florida Institute of Technology)
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The first presentation will give an integrated analysis of behavioral science research on climate change and greenhouse gas emissions. The second presentation will provide an overview of the research programs, organizations providing funding, and community interventions that have been compiled by the Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations Climate Change Task Force. The third presentation will provide an overview of the resources required to accomplish the goals of the task force and how to expand the efforts.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify types of research that have the potential to advance policy action related to climate change; (2) navigate the resources that have been created by the task force; (3) identify effective methods for recruiting and coordinating volunteer participation.
 
Diversity submission Identifying the Need for Expansion of Behavioral Research on Climate Change
(Theory)
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
Abstract: This paper will present a thorough and integrated analysis of existing behavioral science research on climate change and greenhouse gas emissions. It will begin by contrasting the amount of money being invested in physical science research relevant to climate change with the much smaller amount being invested in behavioral science research, despite the fact that addressing the problem is almost entirely a matter of changing human behavior. This discrepancy in funding that supports behavioral science research translates to a gap in policy solutions based in behavioral science. Additionally, we will provide a review of the extent to which research is identifying effective and scalable strategies for affecting climate-relevant policy and behavior. We will then describe the kind of experimental research that is most likely to result in scalable change. Finally, we will present a strategic plan for greatly increasing funding for large-interdisciplinary programs of experimental analysis of strategies for affecting climate-relevant policy and behavior.
Anthony Biglan, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute. He is the author of The Nurture Effect: How the Science of Human Behavior Can Improve our Lives and Our World.   Dr. Biglan has been conducting research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 30 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use both through school-based programs and community-wide interventions. And, he has evaluated interventions to prevent high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure.   In recent years, his work has shifted to more comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent the entire range of child and adolescent problems. He and colleagues at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences published a book summarizing the epidemiology, cost, etiology, prevention, and treatment of youth with multiple problems (Biglan et al., 2004). He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which released its report in 2009 documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions that can prevent multiple problems. As a member of Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission, he is helping to develop a strategic plan for implementing comprehensive evidence-based interventions throughout Oregon.
 
Diversity submission We’re All in This Together: The Road to Research Collaboration, Funding, and Community Interventions
(Theory)
HOLLY SENIUK (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Abstract: Since 2018, the Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations Climate Change Task Force (BSC-CCTF) has been reviewing the behavioral research on climate change, as described in the previous paper. In addition to reviewing the literature the task force is working to create resources that will aid in pushing the needle forward on behavior science research related to greenhouse gas emissions and policy change. Through a network of volunteers, the task force’s committees have assembled an evolving collection of research institutions, funding sources, and examples of community interventions addressing the development of policies and strategies to reduce carbon emissions. The goal of these collections is to establish a database that will help propel the work of the task force forward by identifying potential funding sources, collaborators, and community intervention models that could benefit from experimental evaluation. This paper will provide audience members with a roadmap of the work thus far and an overview of the research programs, foundations/institutions providing funding, and the community level interventions that have been compiled in this process.

Holly Seniuk, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LBA is the Ethics Disciplinary Manager at the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Dr. Seniuk graduated with her doctorate from the University of Nevada, Reno in 2013 under the mentorship of Dr. Larry Williams and has been a Board Certified Behavior Analyst since 2010. Dr. Seniuk has previously worked as an Assistant Professor at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton where she developed an undergraduate level behavior analysis program and as the Project Coordinator for the Nevada PBIS Technical Assistance Center, working on the Facility-Wide PBIS Project providing behavioral systems support to residential juvenile corrections and youth mental health facilities as well as youth parole. She has over 13 years of experience working in a variety of clinical settings including early intervention, schools, mental health, and intellectual disabilities. Dr. Seniuk has served on numerous boards and committees including the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis, Atlantic Provinces Association for Behavior Analysis, Behaviorists for Social Responsibility, and the Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations Climate Change Task Force.

 
Diversity submission Building a Network: What It Takes to Make It Happen
(Theory)
ANDREW BONNER (University of Florida )
Abstract: One of the greatest challenges in moving forward the work on behavioral science research on climate change and related community interventions and policy involves coordinating efforts in an efficient and systematic way without losing momentum. This presentation will provide an overview of the resources and effort required to accomplish the goals of the task force by sharing the model that has been developed and implemented. This includes recruitment of volunteers to support research endeavors, as well as, committee work related to the development of searchable databases for research institutions, funding agencies, and community interventions that aim to address issues related to greenhouse gas emissions. The BSC-CCTF has made significant progress in the last two years that would not be possible without the collective effort of many. We will share the process for recruiting, training, and retaining volunteers. Finally, next steps for expanding and scaling up this work will be explored

Andrew is a doctoral student in behavior analysis at the University of Florida. He is also a member of the Behavior Sciences Coalition Climate Change Task Force. His primary research interests are in the areas of developing community interventions to reduce greenhouse gas emission. To that end, he evaluates the determinants for pro-environmental behavior at the individual level, develops interventions, and then evaluates their effects always with an eye toward scalability and widespread adoption.

 
 
Invited Panel #348
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Behavioral Economics: A Panel Discussion on Its Past, Present, and Future
Sunday, May 24, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Derek D. Reed (University of Kansas)
CE Instructor: Derek D. Reed, Ph.D.
Panelists: WARREN BICKEL (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and Department of Psychology, Virginia Tech), STEVEN HURSH (Institutes for Behavior Resources, Inc.), AMY ODUM (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Behavioral economics is the intersection of operant psychology and micro-economic principles. The subfield of behavioral economics began as a novel means of interpreting drug administration studies in behavioral pharmacology and the experimental analysis of behavior. Over time, the translational utility of behavioral economics—especially in the domains of delay discounting and operant demand—has become apparent in nearly all facets of behavior analysis (e.g., OBM, treatment of severe problem behavior, substance use, education). Decades of research on the topics of discounting and demand have thereby led to the development of efficient yet psychometrically sound measures that permit generality to nearly any setting or research question. Recent critiques of behavioral economics, however, suggest it is antithetical to the dimensions of behavior analysis due to the use of self-report and quantitative analyses. This panel discussion will feature three of the most impactful luminaries in behavioral economics; collectively, the group will discuss the behavior analytic origins of behavioral economics, contemporary applications in behavior analysis, and suggestions for future research and development.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Any behavior analyst.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define behavioral economics in behavior analytic terms; (2) describe the behavior analytic origins of behavioral economics; (3) identify behavioral economic principles that are omnipresent in behavior analytic practices.
WARREN BICKEL (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and Department of Psychology, Virginia Tech)
Dr. Warren Bickel is a leading figure in behavioral pharmacology, with an outstanding record of scientific and professional contributions to experimental and applied behavior analysis. His work on the applications of behavioral economic principles derived from basic research with nonhuman organisms to drug abuse in humans has opened an exciting and productive new approach to this area with implications for treatments and science-based drug abuse policies. Dr. Bickel's work has contributed to the expanded use of methadone for the treatment of opioid dependence and the development and approval of buprenorphine, the newest agent for opioid-dependent treatment. He has received numerous awards and positions for his accomplishments, including a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse, University Scholar Award from the University of Vermont, editor of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology, president of Division 28 of the American Psychological Association, and president of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence. He has published four books and more than 200 journal articles and book chapters.
STEVEN HURSH (Institutes for Behavior Resources, Inc.)
Dr. Steven R. Hursh received his BA from Wake Forest University in 1968 and his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego in 1972. He is the president of the Institutes for Behavior Resources and adjunct professor of Behavioral Biology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Hursh has over 40 years' experience as a researcher and is author of over 80 articles, book chapters, and books. He is a former associate editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. His seminal article on economic concepts for the analysis of behavior is considered one of the most significant articles in the history of the journal. Dr. Hursh has been a key figure in the establishment of behavioral economics as a major conceptual area. His research papers have introduced into the behavioral vocabulary a number of "household terms" in behavioral psychology: open and closed economies, demand curves and demand elasticity, unit price, substitution and complementarity, Pmax, Omax, and recently essential value based on exponential demand that has broad generality across species and reinforcers. His extensions to drug abuse and the framing of drug abuse policy have had a major impact on the direction of research on substance use disorders. 
AMY ODUM (Utah State University)

Amy Odum is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Utah State University. Her research interests are in basic behavioral phenomena, such as response persistence, sensitivity to delayed outcomes, conditional discriminations, and environmental influences on drug effects. Her work has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Mental Health. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Vermont’s Human Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory after earning her Ph.D. and M.A. in Psychology, specializing in Behavior Analysis, from West Virginia University. She received a B.S. in Psychology from the University of Florida. Dr. Odum served as Editor in Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. She has been President of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and President of Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of the American Psychological Association. She is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #360
CE Offered: BACB
Scientist-Practitioners in Action: Cultivating Clinical and Academic Careers With Behavior Analytic Roots
Sunday, May 24, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207A
Area: DDA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Kelly M. Schieltz (University of Iowa)
CE Instructor: Kelly M. Schieltz, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: GREGORY REED (Howard University)
Abstract:

Balancing clinical and academic careers can be challenging, but also rewarding. The current presentation focuses on the career trajectory of scientist-practitioners, with specific emphasis on ways in which research, teaching, and practice can be successfully merged and leveraged to cultivate a reinforcing career that not only allows one to practically impact children and families, but also expand that impact towards future generations (trainees), and the broader scientific community. Attendees will gain an understanding of: (a) what it means to be a scientist-practitioner, (b) ways in which to leverage their expertise in both academic and clinical arenas, and (c) ways in which to benefit the public at large, while also establishing multiple streams of income.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Graduate students in school psychology, applied behavior analysis, and related disciplines; early career professionals with backgrounds in applied behavior analysis

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss diverse careers in psychology and applied behavior analysis; (2) discuss what it means to be a scientist-practitioner; (3) discuss ways in which to leverage expertise in academic and clinical arenas, as well as for establishing multiple streams of income.
 
GREGORY REED (Howard University)
Dr. Reed is a native Washingtonian. He received his Bachelor’s in Psychology from Bowie State University in 1996, and his doctorate in School Psychology from The University of Iowa in 2002. He completed his pre-doctoral internship in Behavioral Pediatrics at the Children’s Hospital of Iowa, and his post-doctoral fellowship at the Kennedy Krieger Institutes and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Reed currently holds joint appointments as an Associate Professor of School Psychology and as an Associate Dean within the School of Education at Howard University. He is a licensed Behavior Analysts and School Psychologist. Dr. Reed’s research and clinical interests are in the areas of: Pediatric Feeding Disorders, Assessment and Treatment of Severe Behavior Problems of Childhood, Developmental Disabilities, and Culturally Competent Assessment; he has served on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and on the Executive Board of the Maryland School Psychology Association. He also illustrates children’s books in his spare time.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #361
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
The Interaction Between Development and Instruction
Sunday, May 24, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon C
Area: DEV; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Kieva Hranchuk, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: KIEVA HRANCHUK (St. Lawrence College)
Abstract:

The difference between curricula and pedagogy is highlighted best when we consider what we teach versus how we teach it. There exists an interaction between development and instruction such that instruction can only be effective if the educator considers the learner’s level of verbal development. The ways in which we teach must cater to the current verbal developmental cusps found within the learner’s repertoire. While the progression of instructional objectives targeted within a curriculum will change as the learner acquires the necessary prerequisite skills to move forward, attention should be placed on modifying the ways in which we teach those subsequent objectives. Research in the field of verbal behavior development has proven time and time again that the acquisition of skills can be accelerated if the method of teaching is consistent with the capabilities that the learner exhibits, i.e. the presence of verbal developmental cusps within their repertoire.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Educators, Practitioners, and Researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss verbal developmental cusps; (2) identify how verbal development relates to pedagogy; (3) modify instruction to better suit the learner.
 
KIEVA HRANCHUK (St. Lawrence College)

Kieva is both a certified special education teacher and a doctoral-level board certified behavior analyst. She specializes in teacher training as well as in supervision of evidence-based service delivery to students with and without disabilities. Her interests include effective delivery of instruction, analyzing rates of learning in young children, inclusion/integration, kindergarten readiness, verbal behavior development, and the CABAS® model. Her research focuses on how teaching procedures can be effectively modified to accelerate student learning. Kieva received her undergraduate degree in Psychology from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, and a Behavioural Science Technician post-graduate certificate from George Brown College in Toronto, Ontario. She then worked at both Surrey Place Centre in Toronto and at the CHEO Autism Program in Ottawa before making the big move to New York City. There, she earned her M.A. in Teaching as Applied Behavior Analysis and her Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis at Columbia University. She has taught at both Columbia University and Arizona State University as an Adjunct Assistant Professor. Additionally, Kieva helped to pioneer the Scottsdale Children’s Institute, an integrated kindergarten readiness program in Arizona where she then served as the Clinical Director for two years before moving back to Canada to begin her career as a full-time Professor at St. Lawrence College.

 
 
Invited Panel #365
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission SUSTAINABILITY: Coordinating Interdisciplinary Sustainability Research: What We’ve Learned About Community Intervention Research
Sunday, May 24, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Domain: Translational
Chair: Thomas G. Szabo (Florida Institute of Technology)
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
Panelists: ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute), LISA COYNE (Harvard Medical School; Suffolk University; McLean Hospital), JESSICA GHAI (Boston University)
Abstract:

This panel will serve as a follow-up to the previous events on “A Strategic Plan for Expanding Behavioral Science Research on Climate Change”. It is the first of a two panel discussion on coordinating efforts of the behavior science community to increase research and community intervention to reduce carbon emissions. This panel includes experts from the fields of prevention science, clinical psychology, environmental education, and behavior analysis. The panelists will discuss coordinating efforts of individuals with diverse expertise in the development, execution, and data analysis of interdisciplinary sustainability research and make suggestions for immediate and pragmatic actions at the individual, community and societal levels. Audience members will have the opportunity to participate in real-time work to expand and scale up research and application needed in this area. We invite participants to dialogue and identify the opportunities and barriers to doing this work and commit to taking actions to increase the contributions of the behavior analysis community toward mitigating the effects of climate change.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify gaps in research related to climate change policy; (2) state strategies to increase research and community intervention related to climate change; (3) identify committed actions that they can take towards reducing carbon emissions.
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
Anthony Biglan, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute. He is the author of The Nurture Effect: How the Science of Human Behavior Can Improve our Lives and Our World.   Dr. Biglan has been conducting research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 30 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use both through school-based programs and community-wide interventions. And, he has evaluated interventions to prevent high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure.   In recent years, his work has shifted to more comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent the entire range of child and adolescent problems. He and colleagues at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences published a book summarizing the epidemiology, cost, etiology, prevention, and treatment of youth with multiple problems (Biglan et al., 2004). He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which released its report in 2009 documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions that can prevent multiple problems. As a member of Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission, he is helping to develop a strategic plan for implementing comprehensive evidence-based interventions throughout Oregon.
LISA COYNE (Harvard Medical School; Suffolk University; McLean Hospital)
Dr. Coyne is the Founder and Senior Clinical Consultant of the McLean OCD Institute for Children and Adolescents at McLean Hospital, and is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. She is the Founder and Director of the New England Center for OCD and Anxiety (NECOA), and is on the Faculty of the Behavior Therapy Training Institute (BTTI) of the International OCD Foundation.  She is also a licensed psychologist and a peer-reviewed ACT trainer. She has authored multiple articles and chapters on ACT with children and adolescents, and is a co-author of the books Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: The Clinician’s Guide for Supporting Parents (Elsevier), and The Joy of Parenting (New Harbinger).  Her new books, The ACT Guide to Teen Anxiety and OCD, Guilford Press, and Stuff That’s Loud: A Teen’s Guide to Unspiralling When OCD Gets Noisy (New Harbinger & Little Brown), are expected in 2020.
JESSICA GHAI (Boston University)

Jessica Ghai, M.Ed. BCBA, LABA(MA) is a doctoral candidate at the Boston University: Wheelock College of Education and Human Development (anticipated completion: Spring 2020) and a Volunteer Coordinator for the Behavioral Science Coalition: Climate Change Task Force. In additional to extensive teaching experience and animal-related dissertation research, Jessica’s academic background includes a B.S. in Natural Resources from The Ohio State University: College of Food, Agriculture, and Environment Sciences. Following completion of her doctoral program, she hopes to pursue a career in research. Research interests include: human-animal interactions through a behavior analytic lens, animal well-being and management of maladaptive behaviors in zoological settings, visitation behaviors of patrons at zoological facilities, and the effectiveness of behavior change interventions related to species biodiversity and conservation of natural resources. Jessica also volunteers as a keeper’s aide at a zoological facility and is a member of ABAI’s Applied Animal Behavior SIG. 

 
 
Invited Paper Session #382
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Designing Instruction for All Learners: How Verbal Development Informs Curriculum
Sunday, May 24, 2020
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon C
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Jo Ann Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Jennifer Weber, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JENNIFER WEBER (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

Research findings from our CABAS® and Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) schools and laboratories have demonstrated that instruction for all learners is best arranged with a focus on verbal development. The Early Learner Curriculum and Achievement Record (ELCAR, previously known as the C-PIRK) provides an inventory of repertoires and verbal developmental cusps that are the foundation for children to excel in Kindergarten. Our AIL objectives and new STEM curricula serve more advanced learners. However, knowing what to teach is only half the battle. Instruction must take place within the context of the learner’s verbal development. Once students have the necessary foundational repertoires and verbal behavior developmental cusps that will allow learning to occur, it is crucial to identify the proper instructional objectives. In this talk, I will provide academic teaching sequences aligned to both State and Common Core standards to instruct all students. I will also provide an overview of how to arrange instruction for all learners, from students at the pre-foundational level to those who are independent readers and writers.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Individuals interested in verbal behavior, or verbal behavior developmental theory in relation to instructional design.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the foundational verbal behavior developmental cusps that allows for learning to occur; (2) describe how to arrange academic instruction based on verbal behavior developmental cusps; (3) provide detailed descriptions of academic teaching sequences for students at different levels of verbal behavior; (4) discuss best instructional practices to accelerate learning for all learners.
 
JENNIFER WEBER (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Dr. Jennifer Weber is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at both Teachers College, Columbia University and Nicholls State University. She received her Master’s, M.Phill, and Ph.D., in Applied Behavior Analysis from Teachers College, Columbia University. Dr. Weber is a doctoral level-board certified behavior analyst and holds a CABAS® Senior Behavior Analyst rank. She specializes in training teachers to utilize a Strategic Science of Teaching in both Special Education and General Education settings. Her research interests include verbal behavior development, instructional design, and teacher training.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #383
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
What Your Future Self Wants You to Know Now
Sunday, May 24, 2020
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: EAB; Domain: Theory
Chair: Erik Arntzen (Oslo Metropolitan University)
CE Instructor: Amy Odum, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: AMY ODUM (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Although the behavior of humans and other animals can show exquisite sensitivity to consequences, under some circumstances, we act as if important variables are irrelevant. Why is that? How can we learn to act now, to avoid regret later? I will discuss common end-of-life regrets and work backwards to the present, reverse engineering the path we will wish we had taken. Delay discounting, the decline in the present value of temporally remote rewards, can contribute to the understanding and thus prevention of regret. I will discuss the factors that give rise to our disregard of our future preferences. These include the shape of discounting curves, aspects of the rewards in consideration, and organismic influences. I will discuss research from the basic laboratory to the clinic, and apply it to individual, societal, and global decision-making levels. Within these factors are the keys to changing our own decision making now to prevent regret later.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Practitioners, basic, applied, and clinical behavior analysts.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define delay discounting; (2) discuss how delay discounting contributes to regret; (3) describe the shape of delay discounting curves and how this contributes to impulsivity; (4) describe the contribution of reward type to delay discounting; (5) describe the organismic contribution to delay discounting.
 
AMY ODUM (Utah State University)

Amy Odum is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Utah State University. Her research interests are in basic behavioral phenomena, such as response persistence, sensitivity to delayed outcomes, conditional discriminations, and environmental influences on drug effects. Her work has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Mental Health. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Vermont’s Human Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory after earning her Ph.D. and M.A. in Psychology, specializing in Behavior Analysis, from West Virginia University. She received a B.S. in Psychology from the University of Florida. Dr. Odum served as Editor in Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. She has been President of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and President of Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of the American Psychological Association. She is a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis International.

 
 
Invited Panel #387
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission SUSTAINABILITY: Behavior Analysis and Sustainability: Designing Community Interventions, Collaboration and Outreach, and Obtaining Funding
Sunday, May 24, 2020
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Domain: Translational
Chair: Thomas G. Szabo (Florida Institute of Technology)
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
Panelists: HOLLY SENIUK (Behavior Analyst Certification Board), JULIA FIEBIG (Ball State University; ABA Global Initiatives LLC), TIFFANY DUBUC (University of Nevada, Reno), ANDREW BONNER (University of Florida)
Abstract:

An extension of the panel on “Coordinating Interdisciplinary Sustainability Research”, this panel is composed of experts in behavior analysis who will share perspectives on coordination and outreach, research institutions and foundations, and collaboration with others to design community-level interventions to curb the effects of greenhouse gases. This panel aims to foster an open dialogue on how the behavioral community can move this work forward through addressing complex questions, sharing new ideas, and collaborative problem-solving. Audience members will have the opportunity to ask questions of the panelists and offer ideas for collaboration and expansion of the work of the task force. We invite participants to lean in to the complex nature of behavioral science work on climate change and explore new relationships and collaborations that build a community of researchers, practitioners, and activists that are committed to the health and long term survival of our planet and the important role that behavior science plays in making that happen.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify methods for finding potential collaborators; (2) identify barriers to initiating interdisciplinary collaborations; (3) state strategies for building relationships and collaborations with researchers, practitioners, and activists working in the area of climate change.
HOLLY SENIUK (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Holly Seniuk, PhD, BCBA-D is the Ethics Disciplinary Manager at the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. Dr. Seniuk graduated with her doctorate from the University of Nevada, Reno in 2013 under the mentorship of Dr. Larry Williams and has been a Board Certified Behavior Analyst since 2010. She has previously worked as an Assistant Professor at the University of New Brunswick, Fredericton where she developed an undergraduate level behavior analysis program and as the Project Coordinator for the Nevada PBIS Technical Assistance Center, working on the Facility-Wide PBIS Project providing behavioral systems support to residential juvenile corrections and youth mental health facilities as well as youth parole. Dr Seniuk has over 13 years of experience working in a variety of clinical settings including early intervention, schools, mental health, and intellectual disabilities. She has served on numerous boards and committees including the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis, Atlantic Provinces Association for Behavior Analysis, Behaviorists for Social Responsibility, and the Coalition of Behavioral Science Organizations Climate Change Task Force. Her professional  and research interests include behavioral systems analysis, applications of the matching law to sports, and environmental sustainability.
JULIA FIEBIG (Ball State University; ABA Global Initiatives LLC)
Dr. Fiebig has been applying the science of behavior analysis to optimize school, community, and organizational environments and improve individual well-being for two decades. Though initially convinced she would change the world with music, incidentally, it was her music composition studies at the University of Florida that paved the road to behavior analysis. She completed her graduate training in behavior analysis at The Florida State University and her PhD in Organizational Leadership at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, with emphasis on organizational behavior management and relational frame theory applied to climate change communication. Her work has taken her across the US and Europe and is focused on impacting organizational sustainability, leadership development and team performance, and prosocial, consensus-based community practices. She is an Assistant Teaching Professor in the Department of Applied Behavior Analysis at Ball State University, co-founder of ABA Global Initiatives Consulting Group, and a director of LPC International. She is a founding member and chair of ABAI’s Behavior Analysis for Sustainable Societies (BASS) SIG and serves on the Coalition for Behavior Science Organization’s Climate Change Task Force.
TIFFANY DUBUC (University of Nevada, Reno)
Tiffany is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst, from Ontario, Canada.  She received her Master’s Degree in Applied Behaviour Analysis in 2011 from Northeastern University and in 2015 she began completing doctoral requirements for a PhD in Applied Behaviour Analysis from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology.  Tiffany has extensive clinical experience developing, evaluating, supervising and consulting on educational and behavioural programs for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders.  Her clinical contributions have spanned an excess of five countries, including those within the Middle East, as well and India. Tiffany’s research interests include the conceptual analysis of cultural discrimination and implicit bias, using a relational frame theory account, as well as the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) interventions to increase psychological flexibility as it pertains to cultural competency. Tiffany is passionate about the power of behaviour science to create meaningful and sustained change, and is interested in its application to issues of broad-scale social significance (racism, sustainability). In line with her penchant for fascinating contexts, Tiffany presently resides in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia as BCBA Fieldwork Supervisor for the University of Nevada, Reno in collaboration with the King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Center.
ANDREW BONNER (University of Florida)
Andrew is a doctoral student in behavior analysis at the University of Florida. His primary research interests are in the areas of developing community interventions to reduce greenhouse gas emission. To that end, he evaluates the determinants for pro-environmental behavior, develops interventions, and then evaluates their effects always with an eye toward scalability and widespread adoption.
 

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Modifed by Eddie Soh
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