Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Program by Invited Events: Saturday, May 23, 2020


 

Invited Paper Session #23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
A Search for Efficiency in Teaching Basic Skills to Implement Autism Intervention: Research on Technology-Based Training in Brazil
Saturday, May 23, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207A
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University)
CE Instructor: Romariz Barros, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ROMARIZ BARROS (Federal University of Pará-Brazil; National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition, and Teaching)
Abstract:

The efficiency of behavior analytic intervention to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) increases when it is early, intensive, comprehensive, and long-lasting. This is particularly true for children with moderate to severe impairment. The above-mentioned key elements make behavior analytic intervention often inaccessible for most of the affected population in developing countries, such as Brazil. The main causes for that are: the shortage of trained professionals and the absence of specialized public services. Some of the families have the profile to be trained to participate in the intervention plan. Parental implementation may be an important tool for behavior analysts to deliver interventions with the required intensity, comprehensiveness, and extension. On the other hand, training technicians efficiently is another challenge. In this scenario, research focusing on the advancement of training procedures to develop implementation skills in parents of children diagnosed with ASD and also technicians is helpful. This presentation describes some of our applied research on teaching basic skills to implement behavior-analytic intervention to ASD. We describe our results with instructional video-modeling to teach parents to implement structured teaching and its impact on their respective children. We also compare results of implementation by parents to results of implementation by technicians. Research on training basic skills to implement incidental teaching is also reported, along with data on self-video-monitoring to prevent drifting in implementation by technicians. This research line as a whole is dedicated to developing useful tools for behavior analysts to quickly bring others to help in an intervention plan.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Students and professionals interested in the dissemination of Applied behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the challenge of implementing large-scale, high-quality intervention to ASD in developing countries; (2) understand the importance of teaching technology to overcome such challenge; (3) analyze data concerning to the use of instructional video-modeling and video-monitoring as part of the solution.
 
ROMARIZ BARROS (Federal University of Pará-Brazil; National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition, and Teaching)
Romariz S. Barros is was born in Brazil in 1971. He is a Psychologist graduated at the Federal University of Pará-Brazil and Ph.D. on Experimental Psychology at the University of São Paulo. He has worked as a college professor at the Federal University of Pará-Brazil since 1997. He is currently a Full Professor at the Graduate Program on Theory and Research on Behavior. He is a Behavior Analyst accredited by the Brazilian Association of Psychology and Behavioral Medicine (ABPMC) and a member of the National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior Cognition and Teaching.
 
 
Invited Panel #37
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: Strategies and Challenges in Recruitment
Saturday, May 23, 2020
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: DEI/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Carol Pilgrim, Ph.D.
Panelists: SARAH BLOOM (University of South Florida), MICHAEL PERONE (West Virginia University), JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

This invited panel is sponsored by ABAI’s new Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Board; it represents the first of an annual series of program events highlighting topics identified as central to success in DEI achievements. After a brief review of the Board’s activities this year by Carol Pilgrim, the panel discussion will focus on the critical issue of recruitment efforts in DEI. Dr. Jomella Watson-Thompson will address recruitment strategies and challenges within practice and field settings, Dr. Sarah Bloom will discuss recruitment of university students, and Dr. Mike Perone will speak to recruitment practices targeting university faculty and administrators. Time for questions and comments from the audience will be included to allow for sharing relevant experiences and lessons learned. Future panels in the DEI series will target themes including retaining individuals once recruited, mentoring programs, inclusion and equity strategies at the organization level, inclusion and equity strategies at the individual level, and others.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe examples of strategies and challenges in DEI recruiting within practice and field settings; (2) describe examples of strategies and challenges in DEI recruiting for graduate and undergraduate students; (3) describe examples of strategies and challenges in DEI recruiting for university faculty and administrators.
SARAH BLOOM (University of South Florida)
Sarah Bloom received her PhD in Psychology at the University of Florida in 2008. She was an assistant professor in the Applied Behavior Analysis area of the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University from 2008 to 2013. She is currently an associate professor in the Department of Child and Family Studies at the University of South Florida. Dr. Bloom is a former President of the Utah Association for Behavior Analysis. She serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and has been a guest reviewer for Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Research in Developmental Disabilities, Journal of Behavioral Education, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Journal of Early Intervention, Children and Youth Services Review, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and a guest associate editor for Education and Treatment of Children. Dr. Bloom’s research interests include assessment and treatment of problem behavior and translational approaches to reinforcer efficacy. Dr. Bloom has been involved in the modification of functional analysis methodology into a trial-based format in order to facilitate its use in educational and other settings.
MICHAEL PERONE (West Virginia University)
Mike Perone earned his Ph.D. in 1981 at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He was an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington before joining the faculty at West Virginia University in 1984, where he is a professor of psychology and an associate dean. His research is concerned with developing laboratory models of behavioral processes involved in problem behavior such as failures of self-control. In 2018 he received the Award for Scientific Translation from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis and the Distinguished Contributions Award from the Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Special Interest Group. Mike is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Behavior Analysis International. He has served the field of behavior analysis as an associate editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and as president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International. He currently serves as coordinator of the Association’s Behavior Analysis Accreditation Board.
JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)

Dr. Jomella Watson-Thompson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science, and the Director of the Center for Service Learning at the University of Kansas. She is also an Associate Director with the Center for Community Health and Development. She attained a Ph.D. in Behavioral Psychology and a Masters of Urban Planning from the University of Kansas. She applies behavioral science methods and interventions to improve how communities address issues related to community health and development. Her research has focused on behavioral-community approaches to neighborhood development, substance abuse prevention, and youth and community violence prevention. Dr. Thompson supports community-engaged scholarship using participatory approaches to address social determinants or factors that may contribute to disparities, particularly for marginalized groups and communities. She has researched the effects of community-based processes and behavioral-community interventions to promote mobilization and change in communities. Dr. Thompson has co-authored articles on community capacity-building, youth development, and prevention and received numerous federal, state and local funding awards. She is as an Associate Editor with Behavior and Social Issues. Dr. Thompson has extensive experience providing training, technical support and evaluation for coalitions and community-based initiatives.

 
 
Invited Panel #49A
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Obtaining Federal Funding for Behavior Analytic Research: A Panel Discussion With Program Directors
Saturday, May 23, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 3/4
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: M. Christopher Newland (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: M. Christopher Newland, Ph.D.
Panelists: ALAN TOMKINS (National Science Foundation), EMILY DOOLITTLE (Institute of Education Sciences)
Abstract:

This event, coordinated with the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences, will feature program directors (to be announced later) from federal funding agencies relevant to behavior analysis (e.g., NIH, IES, NSF). Program directors will briefly discuss funding priorities of relevance to behavioral scientists, suggest ways to better align behavior analytic proposals with these priorities, and take questions from the audience.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify potential funding agencies for behavioral work.; (2) describe current federal funding priorities; (3) identify resources to better advocate their research in proposals; (4) identify resources to write more competitive grant proposals.
ALAN TOMKINS (National Science Foundation)
Dr. Tomkins is deputy division director, NSF Social and Economic Division, Directorate of Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences. He has served on the editorial boards of American Psychologist, Behavioral Sciences & the LawExpert Evidence: The International Digest of Human Behaviour Science and LawLaw and Human Behavior, and American Journal of Community Psychology.
EMILY DOOLITTLE (Institute of Education Sciences)
Dr. Doolittle is the National Center for Education Research Team Lead for Social Behavioral Research. She takes a lead role in writing NCER’s requests for applications and works closely with a wide-variety of researchers to provide technical assistance both individually and through webinars and workshops on IES grant writing and the application process. She received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Chicago. 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #54
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
TRAUMA: Behavioral and Neurological Perspectives on Trauma
Saturday, May 23, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Chair: Carla H. Lagorio (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)
CE Instructor: Carla H. Lagorio, Ph.D.
Presenting Authors: PATRICK C. FRIMAN (Boys Town), K. MATTHEW LATTAL (Oregon Health)
Abstract: Non-scientifically oriented clinicians and counselors have coopted the concept of trauma, established a related dogma, and attempted with some success to keep behaviorally oriented professionals at bay. This is tricky territory. The concept has been used to label and/or describe so many different types of human experience that it has become almost meaningless. It has no operational definition, at least not one widely accepted. Yet on closer inspection, regardless of its definition, the concept would seem perfectly suited for a behavioral analysis. In the simplest of terms, trauma appears to refer to aversive events that dramatically increase the negative reinforcement associated with avoidance of events that are topographically and/or functionally related to those events. The amount of avoidance exhibited by afflicted individuals impairs their diurnal and nocturnal functioning. The most effective approach would almost certainly involve escape extinction. However, because of the highly politicized nature of the concept, language describing that approach would almost certainly have to have more colloquial features in order to recruit any acceptance outside the field of behavioral analysis. This presentation will discuss trauma from that perspective.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss approaches to PTSD and addiction; (2) discuss the persistent effects of trauma; (3) discuss ways to suppress fearful behaviors and drug-seeking behaviors; (4) discuss the neurobiological changes associated with trauma.
 
Trauma Drama: A Behavior Analytic Perspective on Trauma
PATRICK C. FRIMAN (Boys Town)
Abstract: A common finding from rodent studies of drug abuse is that acute or chronic stress can reinstate drug-seeking behavior after extinction. In most of these studies, the stressor occurs during the reinstatement test; very little is known about the effects on drug-seeking behaviors long after the stressor has occurred. We have developed a behavioral approach in which an acute stressor in one context causes persistent effects on drug-seeking behaviors in a different context. This approach models some of the persistent effects of trauma on relapse that often occur in patients with a diagnosis of comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder (PSTD) and substance use disorder. I will describe some of the basic characteristics of this approach, including applications to different drugs of abuse and natural rewards, some of the underlying neurobiology, and how we have used this approach to evaluate potential treatments. These treatments focus on promoting extinction by pairing nonreinforced presentations of a stimulus or response during extinction with delivery of a drug that promotes epigenetic mechanisms that are involved in long-term memory. This leads to a persistent suppression of behavior that appears to resist environmental manipulations that cause relapse (such as exposure to cues or contexts previously associated with drugs of abuse). Implications of this approach for animal models of PTSD and addiction will be discussed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss approaches to PTSD and addiction; (2) discuss the persistent effects of trauma; (3) discuss ways to suppress fearful behaviors and drug-seeking behaviors; (4) discuss the neurobiological changes associated with trauma.
 
Trauma, Extinction, and the Problem of Relapse
K. MATTHEW LATTAL (Oregon Health)
 
 
Invited Panel #55
CE Offered: BACB/NASP
Computer Technology and the Future of Behavior Analysis: A Panel With Discussion
Saturday, May 23, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Jonathan W. Pinkston (Western New England University)
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
Panelists: CASEY J. CLAY (University of Missouri), DARLENE E. CRONE-TODD (Salem State University), AARON J. FISCHER (University of Utah)
Abstract:

This panel will be a discussion of Dr. Ellie Kazemi’s SQAB Tutorial on the utility of computer technologies in behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe contemporary applications of computer technologies in behavior analysis; (2) describe the research questions to be addressed by computer technologies; (3) describe resources to leverage computer technologies in behavior analysis.
CASEY J. CLAY (University of Missouri)
DARLENE E. CRONE-TODD (Salem State University)
AARON J. FISCHER (University of Utah)
 
 
Invited Paper Session #69
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Recent Advances in Relational Frame Theory: Implications for Education and Clinical Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 23, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: CBM; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Amy Murrell (University of North Texas)
CE Instructor: Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: YVONNE BARNES-HOLMES (Ghent University)
Abstract:

The first book-length treatment of RFT was published almost 20 years ago in 2001. In recent years, a number of conceptual advances have been made in the theory that have implications for its application in both educational and clinical domains. The first of these is the emergence of a type of periodic table for conceptualizing derived relational responding, known as the multi-dimensional, multi-level framework (the MDML). The presentation will explain how this framework provides opportunities for conceptualizing and remediating the core skills required for basic and advanced language and cognition in educational contexts. The second of these is a recent extension to the MDML framework, called the hyper-dimensional, multi-level framework (the HDML), that incorporates the orienting and evoking functions of stimuli that participate in derived relations. The presentation will explore how this recent extension connects basic research in RFT to clinical behavior analysis. Overall, the case will be made that although RFT should be seen as a work in progress, the theory continues to offer insights that will potentially improve functional-analytic methods for assessing and treating behavioral problems.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts with an interest in development and clinical behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss recent developments in relational frame theory (RFT), including the MDML and the HDML frameworks; (2) discuss RFT’s implications for education and remediation; (3) discuss RFT’s implications for clinical behavior analysis.
 
YVONNE BARNES-HOLMES (Ghent University)
Yvonne Barnes-Holmes is Associate Professor in Behavior Analysis and Senior Research Fellow at the Department of Clinical, Experimental, and Health Psychology at Ghent University, Belgium, although she is a native of Northern Ireland. She completed her Ph.D. at the National University of Ireland Maynooth in 2001 on developmental studies in Relational Frame Theory (RFT). She took up her first academic post at the same university in 2003 and worked there until 2015, when the research team she shares with her husband Dermot Barnes-Holmes moved to Belgium as part of a multi-million Euro research award to study the implications of RFT for psychotherapy. Professor Barnes-Holmes has published several books and over 150 scientific articles and book chapters. She has authored or given over 400 presentations and workshops. She is a World Trainer in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and has had a private clinical ACT practice for 22 years, providing global individual therapy and clinical supervision.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #79
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
TRAUMA: Effects of Trauma on Risk and Protective Factors
Saturday, May 23, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Jessica Singer-Dudek, Ph.D.
Presenting Authors: JEANNIE GOLDEN (East Carolina University), MARLA BRASSARD (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract: Trauma in the form of child abuse and neglect at the hands of parents or caregivers has devastating psychosocial and neurological effects on children that may last throughout their lifespan. Children who have experienced maltreatment often fail to learn attachment to their parents or caregivers and this impairs their ability to form healthy attachments and experience reciprocal and caring relationships with others. Lack of attachment is associated with a lack of moral behavior, heightened processing of threat-related information, emotional dysregulation, depression, anxiety, dissociation, maladaptive coping strategies, risky sexual behaviors and increased risk for substance abuse. This presentation will provide a behavioral explanation of why maltreated children often do not learn attachment behaviors and receive negative reinforcement in the form of avoiding or escaping negative emotions. This explanation has several implications for treatment including why and how attachment behaviors can be learned.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: (1) state several examples of behaviors related to lack of attachment; (2) state several of the devastating effects of maltreatment and lack of attachment; (3) explain why maltreated children often do not learn attachment behaviors; (4) describe how maltreated children receive negative reinforcement in the form of avoiding or escaping negative emotions; (5) describe how attachment behaviors can be learned; (6) identify which of the following are causally affected by maltreatment in childhood and which are not, using data from genetically sensitive studies: cognitive deficits, psychopathology, educational outcomes, personality disorders, hearing impairments, and adult height; (7) list five areas where PM is more harmful that other forms of maltreatment and three mechanisms that likely account for its harmful effects; (8) identify behavioral parenting programs that are effective in improving the quality of observed parenting of children in preschool to adolescence but harmful for infants and toddlers; (9) describe the developmental context that likely accounts for the difference and the characteristics of programs that are effective with parents of very young children; (10) describe three research-supported prevention programs for PM and describe a public health approach for addressing PM and other forms of child maltreatment.
 
The Effects of Trauma on Attachment: A Behavioral Perspective
JEANNIE GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Dr. Jeannie A. Golden is a licensed psychologist who received her Ph.D. in school psychology from Florida State University in 1981. Dr. Golden has taught in the psychology department at East Carolina University for 38 years and became the first national board certified behavior analyst in North Carolina in 2000. Dr. Golden received ECU teaching awards in 2001 and 2009, the FABA Honorary Lifetime Membership Award in 1994, the NCABA Fred S. Keller Excellence in Behavior Analysis Award in 2005, the ECU Scholarship of Engagement Award in 2012, the NCABA Do Things Award for Outstanding and Sustained Contributions in 2013, the ECU Psychology Department Award for Distinguished Service in 2015, and the ECU Psychology Department Faculty Appreciation Award for Mentoring in 2017. Dr. Golden and colleagues received grants from Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust (2008-2011) and the Department of Health and Human Services (2011-2016) to provide school-based mental health services in two rural, impoverished counties in North Carolina. In March of 2018, Dr. Golden and colleagues were awarded the Creating New Economies Fund Grant by Resourceful Communities for the Greene County Community Advancement Project.
Abstract: United States state statutes demonstrate a clear hierarchy in how harmful the different forms of child maltreatment are perceived (Baker & Brassard, 2019), but research does not support prioritizing of one form of child maltreatment over another. This presentation presents the evidence (briefly) for considering psychological maltreatment (PM) the equal of child sexual abuse, physical abuse, and physical neglect in contributing to adverse outcomes across the lifespan. Because PM, like corporal punishment, is so common, it challenges traditional short-term, narrowly focused, post-trauma reactive intervention practices, toward more sensitive and effective child protection and increased emphasis on primary prevention and good caregiving to achieve child well-being. Interventions with the greatest likelihood of success are presented – those consistent with ABA practice and those that may require shift in thinking.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: (1) state several examples of behaviors related to lack of attachment; (2) state several of the devastating effects of maltreatment and lack of attachment; (3) explain why maltreated children often do not learn attachment behaviors; (4) describe how maltreated children receive negative reinforcement in the form of avoiding or escaping negative emotions; (5) describe how attachment behaviors can be learned; (6) identify which of the following are causally affected by maltreatment in childhood and which are not, using data from genetically sensitive studies: cognitive deficits, psychopathology, educational outcomes, personality disorders, hearing impairments, and adult height; (7) list five areas where PM is more harmful that other forms of maltreatment and three mechanisms that likely account for its harmful effects; (8) identify behavioral parenting programs that are effective in improving the quality of observed parenting of children in preschool to adolescence but harmful for infants and toddlers; (9) describe the developmental context that likely accounts for the difference and the characteristics of programs that are effective with parents of very young children; (10) describe three research-supported prevention programs for PM and describe a public health approach for addressing PM and other forms of child maltreatment.
 
Interventions to Address Psychological Maltreatment, a Common and Harmful Form of Childhood Trauma
MARLA BRASSARD (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Marla R. Brassard, Ph.D., is a Professor in the School Psychology Program at Teachers College, Columbia University. For 37 years her research has focused on parenting, especially psychological maltreatment (PM) of children by parents, a non-physical form of abuse and neglect, that research shows is the equivalent in adverse causal impact to other forms of maltreatment and the most related to depression and suicidal behavior. Recently her work has expanded to include parenting in other high stress contexts, specifically parenting a young child with autistic spectrum disorder, with a focus on interventions that enhance parental well-being and increase quality of parenting. She is a fellow of the American Psychological Association and past president of the Council of Directors of School Psychology Programs.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #105
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Effective Leadership and Supervision
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Corina Jimenez-Gomez (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Ellie Kazemi, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

Behavior analysts are expected to lead treatment teams by training and supporting staff. However, many behavior analysts were not formally trained for such leadership positions. In this talk, I will address some of the common barriers supervisors face in their leadership roles and provide practical tips for efficient, effective leadership and supervision of staff.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the primary functions of effective supervision; (2) explain how to give tough feedback effectively; (3) describe the importance of performance feedback in supervision.
 
ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)

Dr. Kazemi is a Professor at California State University, Northridge (CSUN) where she has developed and teaches undergraduate and graduate coursework in behavior analysis for the past 10 years. She founded the Masters of Science Program in Applied Behavior Analysis in 2010 and has collaborated with the CSUN community to provide graduate students high quality supervision experiences. She currently has two different lines of research. Her applied research interests involve identification of efficient, effective strategies for practical training, supervision, and leadership. Her laboratory research involves leveraging technology (e.g., robotics, virtual or augmented reality) for efficient training and feedback using simulations. She is currently working on several nationwide large projects (e.g., with FEMA and NASA) with a focus on effective training and behavioral outcomes. She has received several mentorship awards including the ABAI Best Mentor Award, the Outstanding Faculty Award, the Outstanding Teaching Award, and the Outstanding Service Award.  She has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, staff turnover, and the use of technology in behavior analysis. She is the leading author of a handbook written for both supervisors and supervisees that is titled, Supervision and Practicum in Behavior Analysis: A Handbook for Supervisees.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #110
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
TRAUMA: Prevention of Traumatic Events: Use of Antecedent and Generalization Strategies
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Chair: Kelly M. Schieltz (University of Iowa)
CE Instructor: Kelly M. Schieltz, Ph.D.
Presenting Authors: RON VAN HOUTEN (Western Michigan University), RAYMOND MILTENBERGER (University of South Florida)
Abstract: Pedestrian crashes have been on an increasing trend in recent years. Reasons possibly include increased levels of distracted driving, increased speeding behavior, and increased walking. Behavioral science has contributed to ways to increase driving yielding behavior on a community wide basis and the development on antecedent interventions that have been documented to increase reduce unsafe behavior and crashes. This presentation will focus on discussing some of the more important techniques as well as why antecedent interventions are effective without obvious sources of reinforcement.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the validity of different approaches to the assessment of safety skills; (2) describe behavioral skills training and its limitations for teaching safety skills; (3) describe in situ training for teaching safety skills; (4) describe strategies for promoting generalization of safety skills; (5) list several important variables used to change cultural safety practices; (6) discuss why interventions that rely on antecedents so effective, and how to further increase their efficacy; (7) discuss how the effect of behavioral safety methods on crashes is evaluated.
 
Reducing Pedestrian Injuries and Deaths
RON VAN HOUTEN (Western Michigan University)
Dr. Van Houten received his BA from SUNY at Stony Brook and his MA and Ph.D. from Dalhousie University, where he received training in the experimental analysis of behavior. He is currently professor of psychology at Western Michigan University. Dr. Van Houten has published extensively in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) on a wide variety of problems, such as the education of inner city youth and children with “learning disabilities,” the treatment of children and adults with developmental delays, the treatment of clinical problems in children, traffic safety, energy conservation, and aviation safety. Currently Dr. Van Houten is a member of the Transportation Research Board and a member of the National Committee for Uniform Traffic Control Devices. He is a past associate editor for JABA and a Fellow of ABAI. Dr. Van Houten is also an avid pilot of power aircraft and gliders and a flight instructor.
Abstract: This presentation will discuss research on teaching safety skills to children. It will describe different approaches to assessment of safety skills and the validity of these approaches. It will describe research on the effectiveness of interventions for teaching safety skills with an emphasis on active learning approaches including behavioral skills training and in situ training. The presentation will discuss the issue of generalization, the limits of behavioral skills training for promoting generalization, and strategies that can be used to enhance generalization. The presentation will discuss the issue of accessibility and strategies for increasing accessibility of effective interventions.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the validity of different approaches to the assessment of safety skills; (2) describe behavioral skills training and its limitations for teaching safety skills; (3) describe in situ training for teaching safety skills; (4) describe strategies for promoting generalization of safety skills; (5) list several important variables used to change cultural safety practices; (6) discuss why interventions that rely on antecedents so effective, and how to further increase their efficacy; (7) discuss how the effect of behavioral safety methods on crashes is evaluated.
 
Teaching Safety Skills: What Does It Take to Get Children to Do the Right Thing?
RAYMOND MILTENBERGER (University of South Florida)
Dr. Raymond G. Miltenberger received his Ph.D. from Western Michigan University and currently is professor of psychology and director of the Applied Behavior Analysis Master’s Program at the University of South Florida. He is the author of a highly regarded textbook on behavior modification, which is used at many universities across the country in both undergraduate and graduate courses. Dr. Miltenberger is most well known for having conducted a long-standing and
systematic series of studies on clinical (habit) disorders, prevention of abduction, and firearms safety. In particular, his research in the latter two areas has been characterized by the highly creative use of simulations and generalization testing, and by the careful development of task-analysis-based instruction described as “behavioral skills training.” In recognition of this work, he has received the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Applied Research from the
American Psychological Association (Division 25), and he has served as president of ABAI. 
 
 
Invited Panel #130A
CE Offered: BACB
Advocating, Lobbying, and Disseminating: Advice for Behavior Analysts From Relevant Stakeholders and Experts
Saturday, May 23, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 3/4
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Peter R. Killeen (Arizona State University)
CE Instructor: Peter R. Killeen, Ph.D.
Panelists: JULIANE BARON (Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences (FABBS)), ERIN HEATH (American Association for the Advancement of Science)
Abstract:

Behavior analysts frequently opine on the lack of funding available for research, not having a seat at the proverbial table of policymakers, and being ignored by mass media and other affiliated sciences. In this special panel event, panelists from outside behavior analysis will offer insight on ways to best advocate to their discipline. Specifically, the panel will be comprised of a Washington lobbyist, a university-based government relations expert, and representatives from the Federation of Association in Behavioral & Brain Sciences (FABBS; of which ABAI is a member organization). Attendees will learn how to access resources to help advance their own work, obtain federal funding, better interface with policymakers, and contribute science to inform public policy efforts. Question and answer periods will follow. This special panel event is co-hosted by the Federation of Association in Behavioral & Brain Sciences (FABBS).

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify resources to help advance their own work; (2) identify resources to help obtain federal funding; (3) identify resources to better interface with policymakers; (4) identify resources to better contribute science that informs public policy efforts.
JULIANE BARON (Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences (FABBS))
Juliane Baron is the Executive Director of the Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences. In this role she supports the FABBS mission to promote human potential and well-being. FABBS furthers this goal by advancing the sciences of mind, brain, and behavior; promoting scientific research and training in these fields; educating the public about the contributions of research to the health and well-being of individuals and society; fostering communication among scientists; and recognizing scientists who have made significant contributions to building knowledge.   Previously Baron served as the Director of Government Relations at the American Educational Research Association. She leads AERA’s education and advocacy efforts on Capitol Hill and with federal agencies, and plays a strategic role with committees and coalitions that deal with research funding, research policy, and education. From 2006 to 2014, Baron served as deputy director of government and public affairs for the Population Association of America and the Association of Population Centers. Prior to that, she was deputy director of the Social Policy Action Network from 2001 to 2004 and director of the Population Resource Center from 2005 to 2007. For three years, Baron worked as a legislative staffer in the Texas House of Representatives, followed by a two-year stint as associate research scientist and project manager of Welfare, Children, & Families: A Three City Study, a multi-investigator study housed at Johns Hopkins University. Baron received her BA from the University of Wisconsin–Madison and her MPA from the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas.
ERIN HEATH (American Association for the Advancement of Science)
Erin Heath is the Associate Director of Government Relations at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science. She has worked at AAAS since 2006. The Office of Government Relations provides timely, objective information on science and technology issues to lawmakers, and it assists scientists in understanding and getting involved in the policy process. Erin handles a range of policy issues of interest to the scientific community and is heavily involved in efforts to empower scientists and engineers to engage with policymakers, the media and the public. She co-chairs the Coalition for National Science Funding, the Engaging Scientists and Engineers in Policy Coalition, and the steering committee of the Golden Goose Award.
 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #134
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
TRAUMA: Flexibility After Trauma: Exploring Vitality Through ACT and Feldenkrais Method
Saturday, May 23, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Chair: Amy Murrell (University of North Texas)
CE Instructor: Amy Murrell, Ph.D.
Presenting Authors: MIRANDA MORRIS (DC ACT Consortium; Private Practice), CHRISH KRESGE (Private Practice)
Abstract: Trauma can have profound and lasting effects on the lives of survivors. The impact on psychological functioning can be particularly severe and may have interpersonal, professional, and health consequences. While not all survivors experience long term problems, those who do can find their lives ruled by the experience of trauma. Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT) holds that the long-term negative sequelae of trauma are primarily driven by two processes: avoidance and cognitive fusion (excessive, ineffective attempts to control unwanted private experiences). That is, survivors’ attempts to “not have” the memories, thoughts and feelings associated with the trauma may account for much of the distress associated with traumatic experiences. Together, avoidance and cognitive fusion function to increase psychological inflexibility and limit behavioral repertoires, costing survivors vitality, connection and engagement in valued living. The aim of ACT is to undermine these processes in order to increase psychological flexibility, defined in ACT as “the ability to contact the present moment more fully as a conscious human being, and to change or persist in behavior when doing so serves valued ends.” In working with trauma survivors, the ACT therapist focuses on helping survivors reconnect with their values and move towards what they care about. In this talk, I will review the relationship of psychological (in)flexibility to post traumatic symptomatology. In addition, I will discuss how to use ACT to help clients come to terms with traumatic events and to build meaningful lives that are defined not by the past, but by what matters.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain how avoidance and fusion maintain post traumatic problems; (2) define psychological flexibility as used in ACT; (3) explain how to help clients clarify values and take committed action in the service of those values; (4) to operationally define ABMN Essential #1: Movement with Attention; (5) recognize ABMN Essential #7: The Learning Switch; (6) recognize ABMN Essential #6: Flexible Goals; (7) identify when ABMN and the Feldenkrais Method may be useful and complementary treatments in cases of trauma and its recovery.
 
In the Wake of Trauma: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Cultivate Valued Living
MIRANDA MORRIS (DC ACT Consortium; Private Practice)

Miranda Morris, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist in private practice in Bethesda, MD. She treats a broad range of difficulties and specializes in trauma and anxiety. Miranda is a Peer Reviewed ACT Trainer and the founder of DC ACT, a organization with two primary objectives: 1) the dissemination of contextual behavioral therapies in the DC region and beyond, 2) the provision of support and training opportunities for aspiring ACT trainers. Miranda conducts regular workshops in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and related contextual behavioral therapies including Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) and Clinical RFT. She currently serves on the Executive Board of the the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS) and is President Emeritus of the the Mid Atlantic Chapter of ACBS (MAC-ACBS).

Abstract: Trauma can be defined in many ways; the two most common interpretations of the word are a physical injury or a deeply emotionally upsetting event. In both cases, trauma can result in neurological and physiological as well as psychological damage and change. This damage often occurs early in life, either as a result of a genetic condition, birth-related injury, illness during infancy, or early childhood abuse or neglect. The negative consequences of trauma are often addressed in clinical psychology and sometimes specifically through clinical behavior analysis. However, in these methodologies, key effects on the child's somatic functioning may be neglected. This presentation will propose that the Anat Baniel Method of Neuromovement® (ABMN), based on the work of Dr. Moshe Feldenkrais, may be used to address neurological, physiological, and movement limitations associated with childhood trauma. Further, the presentation will explicitly outline the overlap between applied behavior analysis and these methods through educating the audience on essential principles associated with ABMN and Feldenkrais Method® movement practices.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain how avoidance and fusion maintain post traumatic problems; (2) define psychological flexibility as used in ACT; (3) explain how to help clients clarify values and take committed action in the service of those values; (4) to operationally define ABMN Essential #1: Movement with Attention; (5) recognize ABMN Essential #7: The Learning Switch; (6) recognize ABMN Essential #6: Flexible Goals; (7) identify when ABMN and the Feldenkrais Method may be useful and complementary treatments in cases of trauma and its recovery.
 
From Fixing to Connecting Through Movement With Awareness
CHRISH KRESGE (Private Practice)

Chrish is a Feldenkrais® practitioner (1998) who works with people of all ages and backgrounds, using movement as a primary tool for improving self-awareness, posture, thinking, voice, and overall health and wellness.  Chrish is also an actor, producer and director. She is passionate about using her diverse skills and background to help people find their optimal selves, innate dignity and composure. Chrish has been teaching the Feldenkrais Method® across the world for over 21 years in places such as the U.S., Ghana, Morocco, France, and Nepal.  During her teaching of the Feldenkrais Method, Chrish offers her students an enriching experience consisting of mental and physical improvement through natural, easy, and pleasurable ways of moving, using the brain’s amazing capacity to reorganize the body. In addition to working with performing artists and business executives alike, Chrish specializes in working with children with disabilities and trauma, and is a graduate of the Anat Baniel Neuromovement® Method for Children. Her studies with Ruthy Alon (Movement Intelligence) have also informed her work in many ways. Chrish has served three terms on the national Board of Directors of the Feldenkrais Guild® of North America and has chaired numerous annual Feldenkrais Method® conferences in North America.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #152
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Diversity submission The First Carbon Based Valley to Create Community, Social and Sustainability: Using Behavior Sciences for Population Level Change
Saturday, May 23, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Thomas G. Szabo (Florida Institute of Technology)
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: DENNIS EMBRY (PAXIS Institute)
Abstract:

The Wright Brothers first powered flight by a human lasted 12 seconds in 1903. A year later—using processes of variation, testing in the real world, and selection—the Wright brothers had an airplane that flew for 90 minutes—an improvement of 450 times. Today, a Boeing 787 Dreamliner—my favorite aircraft with nearly 3 million air miles between American, United and the deceased Pan Am in my life—can fly straight up during takeoff and fly from New York to Sydney non-stop. The aircraft improved a million times over since the first powered flight, and a result of continuous variation, testing and selection.

Applied Behavior Analysis, as conceived by Don Baer, Mont Wolf, and Todd Risley, was a technical methodology to achieve greater good that philosophers of many stripes posited. The contingencies of reinforcement on behavior analysts, determine how well and thoughtful the behavioral technology gets selected to achieve the vision conceived my dissertation advisors.

Reading through the older Journals of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), it is clear that many of the second-generation grad students, like me, were thinking and testing ABA for improving all manner social and behavioral ills. If you flip through those JABA’s, you can find all sorts of studies that could have been turned into commercial, real-world products and services that could have made an enormous beneficial change in our precious blue water and green jewel in space and for its inhabitants. That said, most of the contingencies, were and still are, for publications and grants, rather than real-world change. Outside of that, today, the major employment is for behavioral specialists working with children with Autism or other disorders.

Only a few ABA “products” are true large-scale enterprises, one of those being the PAX Good Behavior Game® and Triple P Parenting both touching millions of people. Both PAX GBG and Triple P have deep roots in the original science, but are both sold, trained, and supported around the world to very diverse customers.

My talk is about how to build the First Carbon Based Valley of behavioral scientists (mimicking the Silicon Valley) to develop, test and disseminate practical, proven, cost-effective strategies rooted in behavioral science to be scaled up, sold, implemented well with sustainable effects on human wellbeing for whole populations—not just private practice clients or persons with diagnoses. I will use examples of the population-level strategies I’ve built my career on: working with Sesame Street, Implementing a National Safety Program in New Zealand, state-level multiple baseline on tobacco control, parenting interventions, mission readiness involving military families, reducing county-wide meth use, and, of course, the Good Behavior Game. All of this has been done in the context of a for-profit business engaging in continuous improvement based on the principles of applied behavior analysis.

My call to the audience is to create the First Carbon Valley—linking early career and established career behavioral scientists to better the world with commercialized, continuously-proven behavioral science. I am willing to help start and support this effort, which we have already begun to do informally.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

 
DENNIS EMBRY (PAXIS Institute)

Dennis D. Embry received his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas, focused on using ABA for population-level efforts with Sesame Street and the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety—ultimately implementing that work throughout New Zealand. Dr. Embry is president/senior scientist at PAXIS Institute in Tucson, and co-investigator at both Johns Hopkins Center for Prevention and the Manitoba Centre for Health Policy.  Founded in 1998, PAXIS Institute is an international prevention science company, focused on preventing mental, emotional, behavioral and related physical disorders at population-level. He is a SAMHSA/CMHS National Advisory Council member, the board of the National Federation of Families for Children’s Mental Health, and the scientific advisory board of the Children’s Mental Health Network. In the 1990s, he implemented the first RCT at population-level to reduce youth violence (PeaceBuilders) using ABA principles. In 1999, he began replicating the longitudinal Hopkin’s studies of the Good Behavior Game. Today Dr. Embry’s prevention efforts affecting more than one million children in 38 states, multiple provinces of Canada, and EU countries with multiple studies showing population-level reduction of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders using PAX GBG and evidence-base kernels. As grad student, Dr. Baer (his advisor) asked Dennis why he wanted to study ABA having a political and history background, the answer: “I want to use science to make our world a better place for children.”

 
 
Invited Panel #163
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Quantitative Theories of Relapse to Improve Functional Communication Training: A Panel With Discussion
Saturday, May 23, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Christopher A. Podlesnik (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Christopher A. Podlesnik, Ph.D.
Panelists: JENNIFER J. MCCOMAS (University of Minnesota), JOEL ERIC RINGDAHL (University of Georgia), TIMOTHY A. SHAHAN (Utah State University)
Abstract:

This panel will be a discussion of Dr. Brian Greer’s SQAB Tutorial on using quantitative theories of relapse to improve FCT.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe contemporary applications of computer technologies in behavior analysis; (2) describe the research questions to be addressed by computer technologies; (3) describe resources to leverage computer technologies in behavior analysis.
JENNIFER J. MCCOMAS (University of Minnesota)
JOEL ERIC RINGDAHL (University of Georgia)
TIMOTHY A. SHAHAN (Utah State University)
 

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