Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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43rd Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2017

CE by Content: Supervision


 

Workshop #W19
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Using Applied Behavior Analysis in K-12 Teacher Supervision, Training, and Professional Evaluation: Practice and Hands-on Application of ObserverWare Software
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 5
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (Educational Consulting, Inc.; ABA Therapy Solutions, LLC), JOHN KOPERWAS (Educational Consulting, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide hands on application of a data supported set of procedures for the description, analysis, feedback and goal-setting activities necessary to effective teacher supervision, evaluation, and training in K-12 teaching settings, and also in postsecondary professional practice environments. Workshop activities include (a) introduction to the importance of a behavior systems approach to teacher education, (b) hands-on observation system construction, and (c) data collection, analysis, and feedback activities designed for instructional and on-site practicum supervision purposes. Additionally, explanation and hands-on interaction with procedures designed for logically sequenced training activities are provided, including (a) classroom video observations, (b) on-site data-based assessment and immediate feedback and goal-setting, and (c) research and development into effective educational practice. Workshop participants will leave with a familiarity with behavior systems educational procedures designed for effective ongoing teacher supervision and professional education practice. Participants will be provided with a complimentary downloadable copy of the complete software tools,MS Wordfiles of all necessary illustration materials, and a PDF file of a summary copy of a compatible methodology textbook in relation to the procedures discussed as a function of workshop participation. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in the study or application of findings, procedures, practices, and theoretical concepts. It is recommended that workshop participants bring their own IBM compatible laptop and/or aniPad to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: Workshop participants will exit with skills in the area of applied behavioral teacher supervision and professional teacher training. Skills include the ability to design observation systems that match with training objectives, construct video-based observational learning laboratory experiences, implement on-site data-based feedback and goal-setting experiences to determine if supervision and educational objectives have been met, and for those engaged in postsecondary professional education, develop a set of applied research activities to document the relative effectiveness of professional training activities. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the principles and practice of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to teacher supervision and professional teacher training; (2) construct observation systems relevant to their particular professional teacher supervision and teacher training objectives; (3) design and implement video-based observational learning activities in relation to educational objectives for professionals in training and professional in practice; (4) understand and apply a range of computer-based data collection and analysis techniques in relation to recommended data-based on-site feedback and goal setting procedures; (5) develop applied research activities in relation to teacher supervision and professional teacher training objectives to determine the relative effectiveness of those efforts.
Activities: Workshop format combines lecture, small group and individualized activities, guided practice, and competency building exercises. Specific activities include: (1) Review of applied behavior systems analysis in relation to teacher supervision and professional training activities; (2)Hands on application of observation system construction designed as compatible with teacher supervision and professional training objectives; (3)Hands-on application of observational laboratory development in relation to the classroom instruction of relevant behavior analytic professional training objectives; (4)Hands-on application of data-based on-site feedback and goal-goal setting procedures in relationship to teaching practices of teachers on the job and teachers in training; (5) Introduction and review of recommended research activity development in relation to determining the relative effectiveness of recommended supervision and professional training activities.
Audience: K-12 lead teachers and administrators engaged in the ongoing supervision and evaluation of teachers on the job. Advanced graduate students and behavior analysts working in the area of professional teacher education in specific, and in the area of postsecondary training for professional competencies in general. Those working in postsecondary educational settings where focus is on the education, on-site training, and assessment of professional practice competencies, and who are challenged with how to teach, describe, and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions that characterize education settings should find the workshop experience and complimentary materials particularly appealing to a wide range of professional training, assessment, and applied research applications.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part One: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz B
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don’t do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must complete all three parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): celeration efficiency, improvement process, organizational performance, pragmatism
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Ethics and Technology in BACB Supervision: Safe and Effective Practices
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall A
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dana R. Reinecke, Ph.D.
DANA R. REINECKE (Long Island University Post; SupervisorABA), CHERYL J. DAVIS (Dimensions Consulting; SupervisorABA)
Description: Current training and supervision requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) require prospective BCBAs to receive supervision from trained supervisors. After the initial 8-hour training, supervisors are required to earn 3 CEUs in supervision skills every cycle. This workshop addresses specific supervision skills related to the BACB's Compliance Code (implemented as of 2016), with particular attention to the use of technology in the implementation of evidence-based supervision practices. Distance supervision is a common practice in the field, and relies increasingly on various forms of technology, which may or may not meet ethical requirements for confidentiality, privacy, and effective teaching and training. Participants will learn about how the Compliance Code applies to their practice in providing supervision, and how they may use technology safely and effectively to facilitate both distance and face-to-face supervision. A variety of applications of technology will be discussed and practiced during the workshop. This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) discuss and implement the Compliance Code with regard to the use of evidence-based practices in supervision; (2) describe the ethical implications of using various forms of technology in supervision, as per the Compliance Code; (3) implement the use of at least two applications of technology to the practice of effective supervision.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, whole-group demonstrations of technology, and small-group breakouts to practice specific applications of technology. Objectives will be described through lecture and discussed and demonstrated with the group as a whole. Small groups will be formed based on common interests and needs, and workshop facilitators will work with each group to practice developing and using supervision strategies to meet learning objectives on an individual level.
Audience: Target audience is BACB supervisors who have completed an 8-hour supervision training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): ethics, supervision, technology
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Developmentally Appropriate Applied Behavioral Analysis: How to Accelerate Progress
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Matthew A.T. Lehman, M.S.
LAUREN ELDER (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing), MATTHEW A.T. LEHMAN (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing), KAT CHAPMAN (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing)
Description: When ABA is delivered using developmentally appropriate treatment targets, and delivered with developmentally appropriate strategies treatment progress is accelerated. Generalization is easy, and children are motivated to learn. Research supporting the use of developmentally appropriate ABA will be reviewed, as well as practical strategies for agencies and providers. Strengths and limitations of the approaches will be covered. Specific treatment model examples such as ESDM, PRT and JASPER will be used as illustrations of the principles. Information on typical learning sequences and curriculum will be provided. Examples will include infants through adults. Resources for additional training and information will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State the advantages of developmentally appropriate ABA; (2) List relevant treatment models, the age range for which they are appropriate and how to access training in those models; (3) Provide examples of developmentally appropriate strategies and treatment targets for infants through adults; (4) Explain the empirical support behind developmentally appropriate ABA.
Activities: The workshop format combines lecture, small group discussion, video review, small group activities such as practice writing treatment objectives, and role play to practice treatment strategies.
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, other treatment providers, agency owners
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): developmental ABA, early intervention, ESDM, PRT
 
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part Two: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz B
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees' performance, just like their clients' performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must complete allthree parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Practicing Stimulus Equivalence Experiments With MTSLab Software
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PCH/EAB; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Celso Socorro Oliveira, Ph.D.
CELSO SOCORRO OLIVEIRA (UNESP - Sao Paulo State University)
Description: MTSLab is a simple software that uses ASCII text files to design matching-to-sample (MTS) sessions. It was first developed by the presenter during his doctorate in 2002 to attend sign language teaching of mentally retarded deaf students of a Brazilian special school. This workshop proposes to prepare MTS sessions using this software considering the graph theory approach. The software will be freely distributed. The theoretical part of the workshop aims to introduce the concept of MTS as an operator in stimulus equivalent classes, which includes the concepts of nodes, arcs, trees, nodal distance, and strength of the relations. The practice will be conducted preparing sample sessions based on papers usually taught within stimulus equivalence experiments in behavior analysis journals. The sample stimuli used will be available through a website. At the end of the workshop, the audience should be able to prepare different sessions with the software and analyze its data to decide if the equivalence emerged or not.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) review concepts of stimulus equivalence and MTS; (2) prepare MTS sessions with MTSLab software; (3) evaluate data resulted of the practice and registered by the software.
Activities: Lecture of stimulus equivalence under graph theory approach and guided practice of sessions preparation using the software MTSLab.
Audience: Undergraduate professors; teachers of disabled people who want to use stimulus equivalence as a tool
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Graph Theory, matching, software, stimulus equivalence
 
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Supervision
BACB-Compliant Multi-Media Supervisor Training
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite B
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (TheBehaviorAnalyst.com; Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc )
Description: Hundreds of BCBAs have participated in this mixed-media, BACB-Compliant Supervision Training workshop since 2013! This workshop prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors, including new BCaBA supervision responsibilities. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional 2 1/2 hours online through www.TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost 9 hours of content while using only 6 hours of conference time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and interesting video situations, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Multiple populations and environments are represented, including child welfare, education and in-home. Additionally, participant-trios will participate in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, an additional 3 CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. Note: This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB. The additional online CE credits are not sponsored by ABAI.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the purpose of supervision; (2) demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback; (3) describe their obligations regarding behavioral skills training; (4) discuss methods to evaluate the effects of supervision.
Activities: Participants will engage in: Didactic lecture, critiques of video supervision scenarios, and guided and directed discussions of professional and ethical responsibilities. Additionally, all participants will be divided into triads for multiple role play scenarios, taking turns as supervisor, supervisee and observer with each new scenario.
Audience: This workshop is for BCBAs who will be supervising pre-certification interns, BCaBAs, and Registered Behavior Technicians, as well as BCaBAs who will be supervising RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Multi-Media, Supervisor, Supervisor Training
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Supervision Training for Supervisors of ABA Staff
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall A
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William Tim Courtney, M.S.
WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), VINCENT LAMARCA (Little Star Center)
Description: This training content is designed to train supervisors and aspiring supervisors in evidence-based methods of supervising staff who provide applied behavior analysis (ABA) services for people with autism. The content is based on over four decades of ABA research on staff training and supervision as well as the authors’ hands-on experience. The content includes critical supervision knowledge and skills coinciding with the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB©) task list for effective supervision. The content is relevant for supervisors of staff providing comprehensive and/or focused ABA services across a variety of settings, including center-based programs, homes, schools, and clinics. An additional 2 hours of supervision training will be available online to meet the 8 hour requirement of the BACB. Note: the online continuing education is not sponsored by ABAI.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify and describe the purpose of supervision ; (2) Identify how to pinpoint the responsibilities of one’s supervisees; (3) Demonstrate how to assess the performance of supervisees; (4) Demonstrate how to establish, change, and maintain the behaviors of supervisees; (5) Demonstrate how to address behavior problems of supervisees.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, and small group breakouts
Audience: For BCBA practitioners who provide supervision to ABA staff (including Registered Behavior Technicians, paraprofessionals, teaching assistants, etc).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Supervision
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Behavior Analysts: Behavioral Flexibility Training Within Your Scope of Practice
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom E
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
THOMAS G. SZABO (Florida Institute of Technology), JONATHAN J. TARBOX (FirstSteps for Kids; University of Southern California ), EMILY KENNISON SANDOZ (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
Description: Have you ever wondered how applied behavior analysts might respond to an individual's private events while staying within our scope of practice and maintaining the highest levels of scientific rigor? How to go about saving the world with behavior analysis? For example, how do you help a parent mediate ABA services when she feels ashamed and has difficulty focusing? Help client deal with bigoted behavior, traumatic events, sexual violence, or bullying? Do you have the professional skills to handle such conversations with compassion and caringly bring your client's focus under the control of relevant contingencies of reinforcement? Applied behavior analysts have developed potent, evidence-based technologies for igniting socially significant behavioral change in a variety of settings. This workshop brings to behavior analysts new tools with which to establish the need for, occasion, and reinforce responding that is sensitive to changes in the prevailing contingencies of reinforcement. We will examine the practical tools and basic science undergirding acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and how you might be able to make use of ACT strategies in your practice, while staying close to the BACB Task List 4th edition and our scope of practice as outlined by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Examine data from investigations on treating child and adult behavioral rigidity; (2) Engage in (or observe) experiential exercises designed to promote flexibility; (3) Discuss these exercises within the context of basic behavior analytic principles.
Activities: Activities will include - Lecture on basic research that led to this practice, including stimulus equivalence, relational framing, rule insensitivity, and delay discounting - Practical small- and large- group training on how to develop your own ACT procedures to help people spend less time struggling with private events and more time engaging in behavior that accomplishes - Group discussion pertaining to the focuses of ACT that are appropriate for behavior analysts versus those that are better left to those in psychotherapy and counseling fields Note: this workshop is not about treating psychological disorders. It is about helping behavior analysts address a fuller range of human behavior and, in doing so, help clients, clients' parents, and behavior analysts themselves, to be more effective in achieving their daily goals.
Audience: This workshop does not require previous training in basic principles of learning or ACT. It is geared to be an introductory level workshop that anyone can attend. However, there is a significant amount of new material here that will be of value to those that are well trained in conceptual, experimental, applied research, and practice domains of the science. Therefore, we strongly encourage intermediate and advanced learners to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Behavioral flexibility, Delay Discounting, Relational Framing, Stimulus Equivalence
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Getting the Most out of Supervision: Using Behavioral Techniques to Enhance Supervision
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall F
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa N. Wilson, Ph.D.
ALYSSA N. WILSON (Saint Louis University), HEATHER LYNN LEWIS (Saint Louis University)
Description: Behavior analytic research on supervision has identified the effectiveness of using behavioral applications (e.g., behavioral skills training) to teach competent trainees. Supervisors, however, may need additional assistance with identifying and implementing evidence-based practices when it comes to effective and competency-based supervision. Therefore, the current experiential workshop seeks to assist supervisors who a) work with multiple trainee's, and b) are looking to expand their supervision repertoire to enhance their supervision practice. The workshop will highlight (1) supervisor-trainee relationship during and after supervisory period, (2) delivering competency-based supervision, (3) successful tips for managing independent and group supervision, (4) organization strategies (e.g., evaluation rubrics, mapping clinical projects, goal setting, etc.), and (5) shaping professional behavior. Attendees will be provided supplemental materials during the workshop, to practice the skills presented. The workshop will use in-vivo training paired with problem-based learning paradigms to assist attendees with acquiring skills discussed during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) List important features and elements of supervision; (2)Determine best-practices for supervision; (3)List aspects of appropriate supervisor-trainee relationship throughout various phases of supervision; (4)Demonstrate competency-based supervision skills; (5)Demonstrate skills for conducting individual and group supervision; (6)Design and implement organization strategies; (7)Demonstrate skills to shape professional behaviors.
Activities: The workshop will use lecture, video, discussion, and modeling, rehearsal, and feedback to assist trainees with achieving the learning objectives. Problem-based learning (e.g., small groups work through a supervision issue/problem) will be used to assist attendees with applying the discussed skills. In-vivo and video demonstrations of strategies will be conducted in conjunction with group discussions and role-play to ensure attendee skill acquisition. Supplemental materials will be provided to support attendee learning during the workshop. Attendees will also be able to use the supplemental materials after the workshop, as an example/guide for the supervision process.
Audience: The nature of the workshop will be geared towards behavior analysts who have had minimal supervision experience. The content of the workshop will be focused on more intermediate and advanced topics often faced by supervisors, while attendees with little or advanced knowledge and/or experience with supervision will also be challenged to think outside of the box when it comes to delivering effective supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Behavior Analysis, Organizational-behavior management, Supervision
 
Workshop #W79
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Guidelines for the Establishment of a University-Based Practical Training System
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Molly Dubuque, M.A.
MOLLY DUBUQUE (University of Louisville), ERICK M. DUBUQUE (University of Louisville)
Description: Individuals interested in applying to sit for a Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) examination are required to accumulate a predetermined number of experience and supervision hours under the BACB Experience Standards. Currently, the BACB allows students to accumulate these hours while enrolled in a higher education training program that contains a BACB Approved Course Sequence (ACS). There are numerous professional and financial benefits for programs offering practical training opportunities to students. However, creating a viable practical training system requires careful planning and organization. The purpose of this workshop is to provide some guidelines and recommendations for establishing one type of university-based practical training system using community-based sites.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1)Identify the roles and responsibilities of all parties involves in practical training; (2)Write policies and procedures that support the creation and maintenance of a university-based practical training system that is compliant with the Behavior Analyst Certification Board's experiential standards; (3)Implement strategies for establishing and maintaining practical training relationships with community partners; (4)Logically sequence practical training learning objectives across semesters.
Activities: The format combines lecture, discussion, small group activities, and choral responding.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop are faculty and administrators interested in establishing or updating a practical training component into their program.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): practical training, supervision
 
 
Workshop #W80
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part Three: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Quartz B
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees' performance, just like their clients' performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must complete allthree parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W84
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Software Tools for Direct Observation: Hands-On Learning of ObserverWare for Services Providers and Researchers
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (Educational Consulting, Inc.; ABA Therapy Solutions, LLC), JOHN KOPERWAS (Educational Consulting, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide hands on application of a user friendly software package designed to collect and analyze discrete and time-based behavioral data for evaluation and feedback applications in direct observation client settings. Workshop information is useful to direct services providers, graduate students, behavioral psychologists, CBA professionals, and researchers -- all interested in analyzing complex configurations of behaviors emitted at high rates, oftentimes overlap in time, and which are context dependent. Discussion includes (a) recommended procedures when collecting time-based data in the live setting and from videotape records, and (b) computer generated behavior descriptions, graphic displays, statistical analyses and reliability comparisons of data files when engaged in data analysis, data based feedback, and assessment of data integrity. Participants will be provided with all workshop presentation materials and a complimentary downloadable copy of the complete software package along with a .pdf file summary copy of a compatible research methods text published by Sage Publications. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in study and application of findings, procedures, practices, and theoretical concepts. Workshop participants will need to bring an IBM compatible laptop and/or an iPad to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) construct and apply systemic observation systems;(2) generate a time-based behavioral record using an inclusive overlapping category system; (3)construct graphic representations; (4)perform traditional and sequential analyses using multiple measurement methodologies; (5)edit graphic data representations and apply relevant visual and statistical analyses; (6) conduct reliability and treatment fidelity analyses; (7) apply a variety of data record, edit, and merge functions when operating with complex multiple event category systems; (8) discuss the principles and practice of discrete and sequential behavior analysis methods; (9) apply a range of computer-based data collection, data analysis, data based feedback, and reliability procedures to their particular behavior analysis interests; (10) understand and apply a range of computer-based descriptive and statistical data analysis techniques in relation to discrete and sequential data sets; (11) construct a variety of behavior graphs and apply appropriate analysis and client feedback techniques to the graph types covered, and in relation to direct wervices and applied research application examples.
Activities: Activities include: (1) review of traditional behavior analysis recording methods; (2) introduction to, and hands on application of, a computer-based package designed to enhance behavior analyses of complex interactive settings; (3) detailed hands-on demonstration of data collection features, discrete and sequential analysis capabilities, within and across data-file graphic representations, and a variety of reliability, treatment fidelity, and data manipulation and editing functions; all designed to facilitate applied activities in behavior planning, assessment, treatment, feedback, and ongoing observation of a variety of settings and environments. The format combines lecture, small group and individualized activities, guided practice, and competency facilitating exercises.
Audience: Direct services providers, graduate students, behavior analysts, CBA and related therapists working in a variety of applied and experimental settings who are interested in the interactive nature of behavior in situations where study of multiple behaviors and events, multiple participants, and changing setting variables are present. Those working in educational and social science settings and who are challenged with how to describe and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary software particularly appealing to a wide range of research and assessment applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W86
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Competency Building Through Performance Planning: Applications of ABA for the Development of Professional and Clinical Skills in Pre-Certification BCBA and BCaBA Trainees
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Rachel N.S. Cavalari, Ph.D.
RACHEL N.S. CAVALARI (Institute for Child Development; Binghamton University)
Description: Trainees pursuing the BCBA and BCaBA credentials are required to be supervised by certified professionals who have completed training based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline. This outline cites responsibility for improving and maintaining effective repertoires of the trainee, specifying the importance of behavioral skills training along with ongoing objective assessment of specified performance criteria. Although targeted behavior analytic skills are clearly an area of focus, evaluation of supervisee performance per the BACB Experience Supervision Form requires emphasis on the development of a number of general professional skills, including self-awareness of weaknesses for further development. This workshop will review evidence-based approaches to supervision (Reid & Parsons, 2006; Reid, Parsons, & Green, 2012) to support pre-certification trainees in pursuit of their BCaBA or BCBA credential. Specific examples of implementation of these approaches to build both task list content mastery and better clinical and professional skills will be provided, including the development of self-awareness of strengths and weaknesses. This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and describe the six areas of supervision outlined in the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline; (2) develop an outline for pre-certification trainee supervision that involves application of evidence-based strategies to required parameters of BACB supervision; (3) apply a template outline to an initial individual training plan for a hypothetical pre-certification trainee to assess strengths and weaknesses of the template.
Activities: This workshop will involve didactic review of the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline and evidence-based strategies for supervision (60 minutes; Objective 1). Resource materials and template forms for translating these concepts and strategies into a training outline will be circulated and participants will be asked to create an outline template packet for their own use. This will be accomplished through a combination of guided discussion and small group breakout (45 minutes; Objective 2). Finally, participants will be given a hypothetical pre-certification trainee description and asked to apply their selected template to the supervisee's training plan to determine strengths and weaknesses of their template in small group breakouts (45 minutes; Objective 3). The final portion of the workshop will involve a period for discussion and questions (30 minutes). Participants will be provided with two additional hypothetical trainee scenarios to take with them to continue assessing the effectiveness of their template for use in their practice setting.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BCBA and BCBA-D intermediate-level certificants who are developing their supervision skills in preparation for supervising pre-certification trainees.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): competence, skill-building, supervision
 
 
Workshop #W88
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: The Apprentice: An Innovative Approach to Meet the BACB’s Supervision Standards
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William Tim Courtney, M.A.
WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), MARY ROSSWURM (Little Star Center)
Description: Increased standards for supervision are needed for the betterment of the field. However, it is a challenge for organizations to meet these standards. Throughout the ages, experts in all trades have passed along their wisdom through apprenticeship opportunities. An apprenticeship model to mentor, educate, and train students on the science of human behavior will be discussed, including a summary of the model, typical supervision activities, and meeting schedules. In addition, the presentation will include billing considerations and general logistical issues associated within an apprenticeship model. The content of this workshop is based upon the article, "The Apprentice: An Innovative Approach to Meet the Behavior Analysis Certification Board's Supervision Standards," published in Behavior Analysis in Practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the key responsibilities in an apprenticeship model for BCBA supervisors; (2) Identify the key responsibilities of the supervisees to gain fieldwork experience to become BCBAs; (3) Create performance-based objectives relevant to what the supervisee will both experience and accomplish through the apprenticeship model; (4) Identify and manage logistical and billing considerations that are part of the apprenticeship model; (5) Pinpoint key objectives to measure the apprentice's performance on a monthly basis.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, and small group breakout
Audience: For BCBA practitioners who provide supervision under the Behavior Analysis Certification Board's requirements.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
 
Workshop #W89
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Ethical Issues in Training and Supervising RBTs, BCaBAs, and Candidates for the BCBA Credential
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: Many practicing BCABAs and BCBAs have a responsibility of supervising front-line therapists and RBTs. Some BCBAs have an additional responsibility of supervising BCaBAs or Candidates for the BCBA credential. This session will identify the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that relate to this job duty which is only one of many duties of practicing behavior analysts. Participants will use case studies to practice recognizing and describing potential ethical violations as well as how to address them. Participants will learn several strategies for preventing subsequent violations, and finally they will discuss steps for re-training implementers to prevent future violations. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the new supervision requirements; (2) describe the reasons for effective, evidence-based supervision; (3) describe the potential outcomes of ineffective supervision; (4) describe or demonstrate components of effective, evidence-based supervision; (5) identify potential ethics violations for front-line therapists and other non-certified implementers; (6) recognize and describe possible ethical violations; (7) list 5 strategies for preventing subsequent violations; (8) discuss three methods for providing training or re-training implementers to prevent future ethical violations; (9) describe methods for his/her ongoing professional development as a supervision; (10) describe methods for the ongoing professional development of the supervisee.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study, Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts, Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Supervision
 
 
Workshop #W95
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Leading by Example: Keys to Effective Behavior Analytic Supervision
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite A
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training (IBT)), CECILIA KNIGHT (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: As more individuals enter the field of Behavior Analysis, defining parameters for appropriate supervision to those seeking BCBA, BCaBA and RBT certification is an important topic of discussion. Providing effective, behavior analytic supervision requires utilizing effective instructional techniques such as Behavioral Skills Training, shaping appropriate professional and ethical behaviors of supervisees, and promoting independence and generalization of skills into the natural setting with clients. This workshop will focus on specific keys to effective supervision, most importantly the practice of leading by example as supervisors. Specific topics will include how to model best practice strategies within supervision, adjusting to the individual needs of each supervisee, providing effective performance feedback, and adhering to ethical guidelines at all times. Additional discussion will focus on specific ethical considerations that arise within supervisory practices and ways to address them, particularly issues with supervising employees, supervising long distance via remote on-line contact, and handling subpar performance of supervisees.
Learning Objectives: Identify and review BACB guidelines for effective, evidence based supervisory practices, including implementing Behavioral Skills Training, delivering effective performance feedback, and individualizing supervision based on the candidate's specific needs. Identify several key strategies for effective supervision, including modeling target behaviors in training sessions, overlap in the natural environment, promoting independent problem solving, and tracking/monitoring supervisee progress. Identify several ethical issues which commonly arise within supervision of BCBA/BCaBA candidates and RBTs, including confidentiality, dual relationships, scope of expertise and ensuring quality of service
Activities: Workshop activities will include a combination of lecture, video demonstration, small group practice activities and large group discussion.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for BCBAs providing behavior analytic supervision to individuals seeking BCBA/BCaBA certification, or ongoing supervision to BCaBAs and RBTs. It would also be appropriate for any therapist, educator, administrator, or professional who is supervising and managing the performance of staff, parents, instructional aides, or others.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BCBA Supervision, Effective Supervision, Supervisory Practices
 
Symposium #42
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Reducing Problem Behavior With Functional Communication Training: Two Case Studies
Saturday, May 27, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 3B
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sigmund Eldevik, Ph.D.
Chair: Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
Discussant: Tara A. Fahmie (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

The two studies used functional communication training on separate individuals with autism spectrum disorder. One of the studies described a synthesized analysis and treatment, where the analysis was based on an open-ended interview and the treatment was functional communication- and delay-tolerance training, on a child with severe problem behavior (Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, & Hanratty, 2014). The second study described a traditional functional analysis(Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1994) including a precursor analysis as basis for FCT, on an adult with severe problem behavior . The first study was conducted in an early intensive behavior intervention program EIBI in the USA, and the second study was conducted in a residential facility for adults in Norway. Both studies resulted in a considerable reduction in problem behaviors and an increase in appropriate requests. The findings suggest that functional communication training can be used over age range and settings, and lead to meaningful improvements in problem behavior.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Communication Training, Differential reinforcement, Functional analysis
 
Improvements in Problem Behavior with Synthesized Analysis and Treatment: A Systematic Replication in an EIBI Home Program
REBEKKA STRAND (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sc), Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
Abstract: A recent study described a synthesized treatment where a functional analysis was based on an open-ended interview and combined with functional communication and delay-tolerance training (Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, & Hanratty, 2014). The treatment resulted in a reduction in problem behaviors and an increase in appropriate requests. Most of the analysis and intervention were done in a clinic setting and required weekly visits by the family. The present study is a systematic replication, where we conducted the same synthesized treatments, with a young child with Autism Spectrum Disorder ASD enrolled in a home based Early Intensive Behavior Intervention program EIBI. Outcomes were similar with a marked reduction in problem behaviors and an increase in appropriate requests. These findings suggest that it is possible to conduct this intervention in a home setting, with weekly consultations with parents. Our study show the utility of the synthesized treatment in an EIBI program in a home setting and how this can contribute to client time and costs.
 
Reduction in Restraints Following a Functional Analysis of Severe Problem Behavior and Communication Training
PETUR | I PETURSSON (Agency for Social and Welfare Services, Support Se), Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
Abstract: We combined functional analysis of problem behavior and precursors and subsequent communication training in an attempt to reduce the time in restraint of an adult male with severe and persistent problem behavior. The highest frequencies of problem behavior were seen in the demand conditions, but the frequencies of precursors were less differentiated across conditions. We applied functional communication training to establish an alternative response to escape demands. This resulted in a reduction in problem behavior, and some reduction in precursors. Restraint reduction followed because of the reduction in problem behavior. Treatment gains, also in terms of restraint reduction were maintained in the client’s natural environment over one year from the initial treatment. Functional analysis and functional communication training are discussed as an option for reducing the use of restraint for adults with severe and persistent problem behaviors.
 
 
Panel #49
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
We're Not Too Cool for School: How to Establish and Maintain School- and Community-Based Practicums
Saturday, May 27, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1E/F
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D.
Chair: Stephanie M. Peterson (Western Michigan University)
MICHAEL KRANAK (Western Michigan University)
REBECCA KOLB (Western Michigan University)
NATHAN VANDERWEELE (Western Michigan University)
NICOLE HOLLINS (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

In order to deliver services to clients and the serve the community at large, it is imperative for behavior analysts to develop collaborative partnerships with various entities such as school districts, community mental health agencies, departments in higher education, and private clinics or programs. Moreover, collaborating and creating practicum sites with those agencies can serve as valuable placements for training opportunities for individuals receiving learning applied training in behavior analysis. However, developing these partnerships and collaborations is not always easy, and there can be many obstacles to address along the way. This panel discussion will discuss and present strategies for effective partnership and practicum development on behalf of several different practicums through their various stages of their existence, as well as share experiences resolving various obstacles and hurdles faced during creation and maintaining of the partnerships. Audience members will also have an opportunity to pose questions to the panelists regarding any presentation material or issues they are facing themselves.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): practicum development, service delivery, supervision practices, training opportunities
 
 
Symposium #100
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Using Telepractice to Coach Parents and Students in Japan on Naturalistic Teaching
Saturday, May 27, 2017
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center 304
Area: TBA/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ee Rea Hong, Ph.D.
Chair: Ashley Labay (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Discussant: Ee Rea Hong (University of Tsukuba)
Abstract:

Telepractice refers to using technology to deliver training from a distance. Telepractice can allow Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) to access more students and families and teach applied behavior analytic (ABA) to more people. For example, Wacker et al., 2013 revealed that it is feasible for parents to conduct functional communication training (FCT) when being coached by BCBAs that were within 200 miles via telepractice. While there is developing literature supporting the use of distance technology to disseminate ABA, there is limited support for the use of this technology in global dissemination. These studies aim to extend the telepractice literature base by evaluating the use of telepractice to disseminate naturalistic instruction on a global level. Naturalistic instruction involves teaching in one's natural environment and reinforcing behavior with natural contingencies. The authors will speak on their research done on using telepractice to coach parents and students on naturalistic teaching in Japan.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): communication, naturalistic teaching, supervision, tele-practice
 

Dissemination of Applied Behavior Analysis Through Global Telepractice

ILEANA UMANA (The University of Texas at San Antonio), Leslie Neely (The University of Texas at San Antonio), Ee Rea Hong (University of Tsukuba), Sawako Kawaminami (University of Tsukuba)
Abstract:

We investigated the effects of a global telepractice training package on participants implementation of incidental teaching. The supervisor was a BCBA-D in the United States while the supervisees worked at a community based clinic in Japan. The supervisor worked with one bi-lingual coach to master incidental teaching via videoconferencing and delayed video-based feedback. The coach then taught three subsequent therapists. Impacts of this global telepractice training program will be discussed in terms of therapist fidelity of implementing incidental teaching, impact on child mands, and social validity of the training program.

 

Fostering Parent-Delivered Tele-Home Practice in Naturalistic Communication Teaching for Three Japanese Children With ASD

LIYUAN GONG (University of Tsukuba), Ee Rea Hong (University of Tsukuba), Liyuan Gong (University of Tsukuba), Sawako Kawaminami (University of Tsukuba), Leslie Neely (The University of Texas at San Antonio), Jennifer Ganz (Texas A&M University)
Abstract:

Both naturalistic communication and parent-delivered interventions are considered evidence-based practices for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, it is not well known how much this delivery model may actually be efficient in terms of cost, time, and effort for parents. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a training on parent implementation of naturalistic communication teaching procedures and on childs communication skills using a tele-home practice. This study used a self-training manual that included written and video instructions to provide parent training in participants home environments. A changing criterion design was utilized. Three mother-child dyads with children ages 4-6 years with a diagnosis of ASD participated in this study. In addition to the self-training manual, the mother participants were asked to complete a self-checklist of the instructional procedures after each session. Based on the participants performances, written feedback was provided. Pre- and post-training and follow-up data collection are still under way.

 
 
Panel #200
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Issues Regarding Graduate Training in Behavior Analysis: Practicum and Supervision
Sunday, May 28, 2017
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kyle E Rowsey, M.S.
Chair: Kyle E Rowsey (University of Southern Mississippi)
KRISTEN LENAE PADILLA-MAINOR (Baylor University)
MICHAEL E. ROHR (Behavioral and Counseling Services, LLC)
NOELLE NEAULT (Simmons College)
Abstract:

Dixon et al. (2015) ranked graduate programs in behavior analysis per the publication rates of their faculty. While controversial, this established the contention that research productivity may be a vital component of graduate training. Conversely, Malott (1992) argued that graduate programs should focus less on researcher skills and more on developing practitioners. At ABAI 2016, Wilder, Reeve, and Dixon offered a panel to discuss the importance of research in graduate ABA training. The purpose of this panel is to continue and expand that discussion, particularity with respect to the practicum and supervision graduate programs provide to students. Participants will take part in an open discussion regarding the role and integration of research into practice experiences. Should supervisors encourage or even require students to take a case-driven research model, such as the one proposed by Reid (1992)? Should practicum and supervision experiences focus more on the delivery on services without attention to specific research issues? Can ABA practice truly be separated from a research-based orientation and still uphold the seven dimensions of ABA as outlines by Baer, Wolf, and Risely (1968)? These questions and many others will be discussed in an open forum. This is part two of a two part panel.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Supervision
 
 
Symposium #223
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Measuring and Evaluating Treatment Integrity
Sunday, May 28, 2017
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1A/B
Area: DDA/PRA
CE Instructor: Claire C. St. Peter, Ph.D.
Chair: Brittany LeBlanc (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee)
Discussant: Florence D. DiGennaro Reed (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

Treatment integrity refers to the extent to which a procedure is implemented as it was designed. Recent research about treatment integrity has evaluated the extent to which variations of measurement procedures affect obtained integrity values, and the extent to which reduced integrity affects treatment outcomes. In this symposium, we will describe recent studies that have further advanced these two areas of enquiry. Our studies include both aspects of contemporary integrity research. Halbur et al. describe the extent to which variations in measurement systems may lead to different perceived levels of integrity in published studies. This line of research is furthered by Smothermon et al., who show that similar variations can over- or underestimate the performance of staff. Because integrity levels are often low without ongoing feedback, our final two studies evaluate the impact of reduced integrity on intervention outcomes. Brand et al. review the published literature in which treatment integrity was experimentally manipulated, and Mesches et al. describe a study in which integrity was manipulated during differential reinforcement of other behavior. Results across all studies continue to suggest that treatment integrity should be an important consideration for applied researchers and practitioners.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Measurement, Procedural Fidelity, Staff Training, Treatment Integrity
 

Procedural Integrity Data Collection and Analysis When Training Paraprofessionals to Implement Discrete-Trial Training

(Applied Research)
STEPHANIE SMOTHERMON (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Dorothea C. Lerman (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Kally M Luck (University of Houston - Clear Lake), Taylor Custer (University of Houston Clear Lake), Brittany Zey (University of Houston Clear Lake)
Abstract:

Collecting data on the integrity with which staff and caregivers implement prescribed treatments is a critical component of program evaluation. However, it can be challenging to collect data accurately on multiple procedural components in fast-paced instructional contexts. One possible approach is to evaluate performance across an entire session (e.g., whether the individual delivers prompts correctly during all trials of an observation) versus on a trial-by-trial basis (e.g., whether the individual delivers prompts correctly on each trial). In this study, we examined the sensitivity of data collected in this manner by comparing whole-session data to trial-by-trial data on the procedural integrity of 16 paraprofessionals who received training on how to implement discrete-trial teaching (DTT). We also compared the outcomes when data were collapsed across all procedural components versus individual components. Results suggested that whole-session data had adequate sensitivity but, in general, underestimated the performance of the individual implementing DTT. At the same time, trial-by-trial data were more likely to overestimate performance unless we examined the integrity of individual DTT components. Findings have important implications for assessing procedural integrity and selecting an appropriate mastery criterion during caregiver training.

 

An Examination of Treatment Integrity Criteria: Comparison of Training Outcomes Using Different Mastery Criteria

(Applied Research)
MARY HALBUR (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee), Tiffany Kodak (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Brittany LeBlanc (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee), Samantha Bergmann (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee ), Mike Harman (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
Abstract:

Treatment integrity refers to the extent to which a treatment is accurately implemented according to the treatment plan (Gresham, 1989). There are multiple methods for collecting and calculating treatment integrity data. For example, experimenters may collect data on the trainees implementation of each step of intervention and calculate treatment integrity by dividing the number of correctly implemented treatment steps by a total number of steps per session. The present study describes variations in treatment integrity calculations and the implications of using each method of calculation. We will review trends in treatment integrity calculations used in staff/caregiver training studies and compare those methods to studies in which treatment integrity errors are evaluated. Raw data from staff/caregiver training studies published in the past seven years will be obtained and re-calculated using different criteria, and aggregated outcomes of these re-calculations will be presented and discussed. Clinical implications of the recalculations, suggestions for integrity calculations, and future research will be discussed.

 

Efficacy of Differential Reinforcement of Other Behavior Implemented With Reduced Treatment Integrity

(Applied Research)
GABRIELLE MESCHES (West Virginia University), Claire C. St. Peter (West Virginia University), Apral Foreman (West Virginia University), Lucie Romano (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

Treatment integrity refers to the degree to which a treatment is implemented as it was designed. Treatment integrity failures are known negatively affect differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) and response cost, but little is known about effects of integrity failures on differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO). We assessed the efficacy of a DRO procedure when implemented perfectly and when implemented with varying degrees of treatment integrity failures using a human-operant preparation with students from a university (Experiment 1) and with a child who engaged in socially significant challenging behavior (Experiment 2). The DRO was effective at all levels for 3 human operant participants, but lost efficacy when implemented with 60% or lower treatment integrity for the remaining 3 participants. We also obtained a loss of treatment effects at around 60% integrity with the clinical replication. These data suggest that DRO interventions may be effective with some level of failure in treatment integrity, but there may be a critical integrity level around 60% at which the intervention breaks down.

 
Effects of Treatment Integrity Errors on Responding: A Fifteen Year Review
(Applied Research)
DENYS BRAND (The University of Kansas), Florence D. DiGennaro Reed (University of Kansas), Amy J. Henley (The University of Kansas), Elizabeth Gray (University of Kansas), Brittany Crabbs (University of Kansas)
Abstract: Treatment integrity measures the extent to which direct care staff implement procedures consistent with the prescribed protocols. Errors made by direct care staff when implementing teaching or treatment procedures may impede progress or harm consumers. In recent years, treatment integrity research has begun to assess how specific types of treatment integrity errors affect consumer behavior. Studies of this type involve manipulating systematically the degree to which treatment integrity errors are administered and measuring their effect on consumer behavior. The current review evaluated articles published across seven behavior analytic journals between 2001 and 2015. The main objectives of this review was to identify 1) the number of studies in which levels of treatment integrity were manipulated systematically, 2) the types of errors investigated, 3) which parts of the intervention procedure were manipulated, and 4) the degree to which these errors affected participant behavior. Fourteen studies from nine articles met inclusionary criteria. Results showed that a majority of studies involved children with disabilities, took place in a school setting, and manipulated errors during the consequence component of treatment.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #245
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision

Teaching Principles of Behavior Analysis: An Evolving Model for Developing and Testing Knowledge and Skills

Sunday, May 28, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 4
Area: TBA
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Amoy Kito Hugh-Pennie, Ph.D.
Chair: Amoy Kito Hugh-Pennie (The Harbour School-Hong Kong)
SANDRA SUNDEL (Sun Health Career Solutions, Inc.), MARTIN SUNDEL (Sun Family Care)
Sandra S. Sundel is the president and CEO of Sun Family Care. She was formerly on the social work faculty at Florida Atlantic University. She was executive director of family service agencies in Florida and Texas, and also served as executive director of group homes for adults with developmental disabilities in Texas. She holds an MSSW from the University of Louisville and a Ph.D. in clinical social work from the University of Texas at Arlington. She has taught courses in social work practice, behavior therapy, interpersonal communication, and group work, and has con­ducted numerous workshops and seminars. She has consulted with corporations, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations on organizational behavior management and interpersonal communication in the workplace. As mental health consultants to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Cyprus, Sandra and Martin designed and implemented a psychosocial rehabilitation project to foster collaborative relationships between Greek and Turkish Cypriots.
Martin Sundel is the director of Clinical Services for Sun Family Care, a company that provides care management and counseling to older adults. He was the Dulak Professor of Social Work at the University of Texas at Arlington and also served on the faculties of the University of Michigan, the University of Louisville, and Florida International University. He holds a Ph.D. in social work and psychology from the University of Michigan and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Laboratory of Community Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School. He is a Charter Clinical Fellow of the Behavior Therapy and Research Society and has been recognized as a pioneer in introducing behavior therapy in Latin America. He has published extensively on the application of behavioral science knowledge to the helping professions. An avid table tennis player, he has won three national championships and silver and bronze medals in international tournaments.
Abstract:

We describe a model used to teach the principles of behavior analysis and their application in the human services to students and practitioners over the past five decades. Materials for the book were developed in the late 1960’s at the University of Michigan School of Social Work, where the first presenter began his teaching career in 1968. The second presenter supervised the administration and testing of the materials. The course content and testing materials were continuously revised and updated over the following years by both presenters, based on data related to student mastery of the content. The teaching model was influenced by the prominent educational technology at the time, including: (1) the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching at the University of Michigan; (2) the programmed instructional format of Skinner and Holland, and that of Geis, Stebbins, and Lundin; (3) Fred Keller’s Personal System of Instruction (PSI); and (4) Robert Mager’s influential publication on preparing instructional objectives. The first presenter will describe the methodology used to develop the materials and how they provided the basis for a textbook that has been revised over six editions. The second presenter will describe how the materials and resulting textbook were used in undergraduate, graduate and professional courses and seminars. Together, the two presenters will provide examples of their experiences using the textbook to teach behavior analysis. They will present the rationale for the organization and structure of the text and course, along with reasons for including and excluding specific content. The two presenters identify historical, methodological, and conceptual issues that formed the underpinnings of their unique approach to teaching behavior analysis, as well as how the model has evolved. The two presenters, one from a primarily academic perspective and the other from a primarily applied perspective, provide complementary viewpoints on this topic.

Target Audience:

Individuals teaching behavior analysis or those training students and practitioners in behavior analysis.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe a model used to teach the principles of behavior analysis and their application in the human services to students and practitioners; (2) describe the methodology used in developing the training materials; (3) identify historical, methodological, and conceptual issues that formed the underpinnings of this approach to teaching behavior analysis, as well as how the model has evolved.
 
 
Panel #295
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: A Strategic Approach to Supervision
Sunday, May 28, 2017
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2A
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sarah Winningham, M.A.
Chair: Karen Chung (Special Learning, Inc. )
SARAH WINNINGHAM (Special Learning, Inc.)
MAYRA CAMACHO (Special Learning, Inc)
CHRYSTAL AYALA (Special Learning, Inc)
Abstract:

Supervision has become an increasingly greater challenge in the field of ABA as the rate of practitioners increases. Appropriate supervision for practitioners is the foundation for building the next generation of behavior analysts. The panel will discuss issues and scenarios that have arisen for BCBAs in the process of providing supervision, and offer solutions to help BCBAs overcome these challenges. Panelists will also address the ethical guidelines for providing supervision, which are presented in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts, discussing violations to that code. The BCBA community has voiced an increasingly urgent need for a structured guide to successfully and strategically implement a supervision program. To meet this need, Special Learning, with guidance from Dr. Jon Bailey, has developed a curriculum to guide BCBAs through the process of providing effective supervision. This presentation will provide a detailed explanation of steps that should be followed to provide appropriate supervision, starting with the initial meeting and continuing until supervision is complete. Part of this unique approach to supervision is a flowchart created by Dr. Jon Bailey, which provides step-by-step guidance for teaching supervisees. Panelists will answer questions from the audience, providing guidance for behavior analysts.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BCaBA Supervision, Candidate Supervision, RBT Supervision, Supervision
 
 
Symposium #304
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Using Telemedicine to Supervise Functional Analysis and Discrete Trial Performance
Sunday, May 28, 2017
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 3B
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sharlet D. Rafacz, Ph.D.
Chair: Sharlet D. Rafacz (California State University, Fresno)
Discussant: Kelly M. Schieltz (The University of Missouri)
Abstract: Current technology allows the field of behavior analysis to expand its reach. In particular, thanks to telemedicine, training and service delivery are now possible despite large geographical distances. Utilizing these technologies will allow instructors, supervisors, and clinicians to provide or oversee services in a more efficient and cost-effective manner. Prior to making the transition, however, it’s necessary to confirm that training, supervision and service delivery are equally effective when delivered via telemedicine. As such, this symposium will address two key areas of training and supervision, specifically conducting functional analysis and discrete trial training. The first study in this symposium evaluates a procedure for offering master’s students faculty-supervised experience in designing, implementing, and evaluating data collected in a telemedicine approach to functional analysis. The second study will compare the relative effectiveness of in-person and telemedicine feedback, specifically videoconference and bug-in-ear, on discrete trial performance. The benefits and limitations to utilizing telemedicine for training and supervision will then be discussed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional analysis, online education, supervision, telemedicine
 
Functional Analysis Training for the Online Master’s Student: A Telemedicine Approach
THOMAS G. SZABO (Florida Institute of Technology), Ellie Chambers (Florida Institute of Technology), Kelly Deacon (ABC Group), Hannah Laviana (Florida Institute of Technology), Rebecca Oshiro (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Functional analysis (FA) methodology is the gold standard for evaluating contingency relations between stimulus events and unwanted behavior. Bricks-and-mortar university training programs often have mechanisms in place for providing hands-on FA training to students of behavior analysis. In the past decade, online alternatives to bricks-and-mortar programs have emerged; yet many of these programs have not developed comparable mechanisms for providing FA instruction and guided practice. One barrier is that supervisors in applied settings may not have had sufficient FA training themselves and are thus rightly reluctant to subject clients to procedures for which they lack the necessary competence to guide their students. We evaluated a procedure for offering students faculty-supervised experience in designing, implementing, and evaluating data collected in a telemedicine approach to functional analysis. Results showed strong procedural adherence and inter-rater reliability in two FA procedures conducted from start to finish by students in a master’s degree program in professional behavior analysis. Implications for online graduate training program development are discussed.
 

A Comparison Between In-Person, Videoconference, and Bug-in-Ear Feedback on Treatment Integrity With Early Intervention Employees

CRYSTAL LOZA (California State University, Fresno), Sharlet D. Rafacz (California State University, Fresno)
Abstract:

The prevalence of autism has increased substantially over the past decade (Centers for Disease Control, 2015), bringing early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) services into greater demand for families living in both urban and rural areas (Jang et al., 2012; Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2015). Currently there are not enough behavior analysts to oversee these interventions and as a result many behavior analysts must travel long distances to see clients. By providing employee feedback through telemedicine approaches such as bug-in-ear (BIE) and videoconference technology, behavior analysts can assist clients by remotely monitoring interventions delivered by behavior technicians. Doing so can save time and that time can be used to assist more clients. In this study, we evaluated the relative effectiveness of BIE, videoconference, and in-person feedback on increasing treatment integrity with behavior technicians working for an EIBI company. The potential secondary effects (i.e., distractibility) of the stimuli present across each delivery method were also examined. The experiment utilized a multi-element research design with an initial baseline and a brief follow-up of the three feedback delivery methods. Relative effectiveness, secondary effects, social validity and cost-benefit of each feedback method will be discussed.

 
 
Symposium #307
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Trauma Informed Care: Through the Lens of Applied Behavior Analysis
Sunday, May 28, 2017
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 4
Area: CBM/DDA
CE Instructor: David Donnelly, Ph.D.
Chair: David Donnelly (University of Rochester)
Abstract: Within the medical and psycho-social therapeutic communities, there has been a growing awareness that exposure to traumatic events can have a significant impact on the person so exposed. As a result, there has been a growing literature calling for and describing approaches labeled as Trauma Informed Care (TIC). Considerable journal space and federal funds have been dedicated to TIC, and reports of effective treatment have multiplied as well. As with many new ways of conceptualizing and treating problems, there has been much excitement regarding this as a way of improving therapist sensitivity and therapeutic outcomes. The rapid expansion and variety of methods claiming to be TIC has resulted in a field that lacks cohesion, as well calling into question validity of the claims made. The purpose of this symposium will be to discuss the concept of trauma from a behavior analytic perspective, to explore the existing TIC literature through the lens of applied behavior analysis (ABA), and to highlight where a behavioral approach can be used to better define, understand, and effectively treat individuals who have experienced trauma. It will be suggested that TIC would benefit substantially from ABA conceptualization, methods, and outcome measures.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Trauma-Informed Care: Operationally Defining Trauma
(Theory)
KEITH FREDERICK GORDON (University of Rochester / Hillside Family of Agencies), David Donnelly (University of Rochester)
Abstract: The term “trauma” has become ubiquitous (both amongst mental health service providers as well as the general public) when describing adverse past events and their effect on the behavior of individuals. Correspondingly, service providers across multiple disciplines have been tasked with providing “Trauma-Informed Care” to consumers. While operational definitions of trauma have been generally lacking, it has been described as asking “what happened to you?” instead of “what’s wrong with you?” With its emphasis on ontogeny and the lawful, deterministic nature of behavior, Applied Behavior Analysis is fundamentally oriented towards providing service consistent with this ideal. By defining trauma and its behavioral effects in precise scientific terms, ABA researchers can open a path towards invaluable contributions to the existing body of research. It is also imperative that ABA practitioners bring this precision to interdisciplinary treatment teams serving trauma affected individuals. Dialectical Behavior Therapy’s teaching and differential reinforcement of incompatible and alternative behaviors (“Distress Tolerance Skills”) is one example of a well-established treatment in use by other disciplines where collaboration from a behavior analyst is clearly therapeutically indicated.
 
Evidence Based Treatment of Trauma-Informed Care: A Review of the Literature
(Theory)
KELLY POSTLE (University of Rochester; Stepping Stones Learning Center; NYSABA;), David Donnelly (University of Rochester)
Abstract: Patients with a history of single or multiple traumatic life events who utilize health care or social services may become re-traumatized or experience distress during these interactions. Direct service professionals can eliminate or reduce these episodes through trauma informed care (TIC) that is person-centered and unique to specific person’s needs. Despite the growing professional awareness and need to incorporate TIC into practice, few research studies have examined successful care implementation or outcomes within these vulnerable populations using a behavioral approach in conjunction with patient reported outcomes. The literature focusing on providing TIC across practice settings over the past three years was reviewed, focusing on objective measures of behavior change for the person that had experienced trauma. Results suggest that most of the current literature does not provide sufficient information to be considered evidence-based. Recommendations regarding possible contributions from Applied Behavior Analysis will be included.
 
Trauma-Informed Care: Trauma as Establishing Operation?
(Theory)
MEGHAN L. MCGEE (University of Rochester Warner School of Education), David Donnelly (University of Rochester)
Abstract: The co-occurrence of a mental health illness in individuals with an intellectual disability is approximately 3 to 5 times greater than those without a disability. Research studies and other prevalence data indicate findings of a significant range, 20% to 71% respectively. Further, individuals with a developmental disability demonstrate a higher rate of problem behavior than those without a disability or mental health need. Baker & Blumberg (2006) positioned “an underlying psychiatric disorder can be seen as an establishing operation” when engaging in a functional behavior assessment: the process to investigate the environmental influences and reinforcement on problem behavior. The establishing operation informs the likelihood of target problem behavior by altering the reinforcing (and punishing) value of the consequences immediately following the behavior. The purposes of this paper will be to investigate a similar position with a specific establishing operation, trauma. A preliminary review of the behavioral literature has yielded no empirically valid studies investigating trauma as an establishing operation independent of developmental disability or in its co-occurrence.
 
 
Panel #330
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Tools to Enhance Performance in Human Service Settings
Sunday, May 28, 2017
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D-G
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Coby J. Lund, Ph.D.
Chair: Coby J. Lund (DataFinch Technologies)
LINDA A. LEBLANC (LeBlanc Behavioral Consulting LLC)
JANET BARNETTE LUND (DataFinch; Integrated Behavioral Solutions)
DAVID A. WILDER (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: The panelists will discuss the importance of OBM in human service settings with an emphasis on the impact of effective or ineffective performance on quality of care and employee satisfaction. Several tools exist that can support effective performance. Each panelist will describe a tool that is designed to enhance some aspect of performance in human service settings. Electronic data collection can be a tool to standardize efficient data collection and analysis while saving man hours. Performance analysis tools can be used in human service settings to identify core determinants of individual underperformance (e.g., training needs, lack of discriminative stimuli in the environment) at both the specific task level (PDC-HS) and overall caseload management level (CMSS). The panel will also discuss additional tools that are needed and the optimal design features of those tools to keep them conceptually systematic and effective in support of human services.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): data collection, electronic data, performance management, treatment integrity
 
 
Panel #333
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Are you Training a Future Behavior Analyst or Interventionist? Effectively Supervising Behavior Analysts in Training
Sunday, May 28, 2017
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2B
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, Ph.D.
Chair: Nga Luong-Richards (Florida Institute of Technology)
MEGAN MILLER (FSU CARD; Navigation Behavioral Consulting)
MATTHEW CICORIA (Behavioral Observations Podcast)
MARY SAWYER (Aubrey Daniels Institute)
Abstract:

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board provides guidelines to Board Certified Behavior Analysts for provision of effective supervision. However, discussions on social media forums such as Facebook raise concerns about the quality of supervision received by students in the field of Behavior Analysis. This panel focuses on discussing key components in providing effective supervision, teaching supervisees to engage in problem solving using the evidence based practice framework, and how to promote behavior analytic skills over solely implementing interventions. Panelists will provide insight and recommendations based on their experiences training supervisees in the home and school environment.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): evidence based, problem solving, Supervision
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #378
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision

The National Implementation and Evaluation of Parent Training in Norway

Monday, May 29, 2017
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 4
Area: DEV
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Sigmund Eldevik, Ph.D.
Chair: Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
TERJE OGDEN (Norwegian Center for Child Behavioral Development)
Terje Ogden, Ph.D., is research director at the Norwegian Center for Child Behavioral Development in Oslo, a position he has held since 2003. He is also a professor at the Institute of Psychology, University of Oslo. He is the author of more than one hundred scientific publications, and has written several books and book chapters on the development of child conduct problems, and on the effectiveness and implementation of preventive and therapeutic interventions. He is trained as an educational psychologist and has a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Bergen on the topic of family-based treatment of serious behavior problems in children and youth. Most of his research centers on the development, evaluation and large scale implementation of interventions targeting children with antisocial and co-occurring problems. The evidence-based interventions aim to strengthen child and family relations, improve parenting skills in order to reduce family conflicts and coercion, promote inclusion and prevent placement out of home. Ogden has also contributed to the efforts of adapting programs to the needs of various groups of children and their families. Ogden is also the project leader of a longitudinal prospective study of the normative behavioral and social development of 1200 Norwegian children from 6 months to school age.
Abstract:

A Norwegian national implementation strategy aimed to test and conduct a large-scale implementation of The Oregon model of Parent Management Training (PMTO) based on Gerald Patterson's Social Interaction and Learning theory. The program targets children with antisocial behavior and co-occurring problems and their families. A randomized trial demonstrated the effectiveness of the program, and identified central moderators, mediators and predictors. Fidelity to the PMTO model was found to predict child behavioral outcomes better than parent-reported treatment alliance. Several parents seemed to manage with shorter interventions, and the "Early Interventions for Children at Risk" program was designed for implementation in the municipalities. In line with findings from a study of the normative development of aggression, this adapted program targets children from the age of 3 years on. In sum, findings confirmed that PMTO principles and components could be successfully transported from US to real-world settings in Norway with sustained positive outcomes and maintenance of competent adherence. PMTO has been tested with positive outcomes in both individual and group trainings and in high and low dosages of treatment. The Norwegian project may serve as an inspiration for the testing and scaling up of evidence-based parenting programs in other countries, particularly in Europe.

Target Audience:

Professionals interested in the effectiveness, implementation, and scaling up of parenting interventions for families with children with antisocial behaviour and co-occurring problem.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the principles and components of a parenting intervention targeting antisocial behavior in children and the process of crossing national and language borders; (2) discuss how these interventions may be implemented and adapted through children's services in order to accommodate the needs of children and families with different characteristics and needs; (3) describe the process of scaling up program delivery with sustainability through continuous training of practitioners and quality assurance to maintain program fidelity.
 
 
Symposium #412
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Examining Cross Cultural Supervision
Monday, May 29, 2017
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2C
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Hughes Fong, M.A.
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Saint Joseph's University)
Abstract: This symposium will examine the ethics, challenges and strengths of cross cultural supervision. Whether our supervisees are those seeking board certification other employees, parents or other professionals, different languages, customs, and values may impact the supervision experience. It is important to supervisor and supervisees to explore the potential impact of these factors, as well as address how to uphold a clinically sound and ethical supervision experience. This symposium will discuss the relevant ethical codes, applied behavior analysis practices and experiences related to cross cultural supervision. This symposium discussion will include the experiences of individuals providing supervision to, or from, those in Jamaica, Korea, Japan, and Mexico.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, multicultural, social validity, supervision
 

Tearing Down the Wall of Language Barriers: Addressing the Ethics of Providing Services to Families With a Different Native Language

KRISTA BROOKER (Mariposa Autism Service Center - AIT)
Abstract:

As behavior analysts it is our duty to provide quality care while following our ethical code, but there may be times where the environment makes this a difficult challenge. Our ethics state we must use language understandable by the recipients of our craft, however working in a border town often means providing services to families where English is a second language if even spoken at all. To overcome this challenge, we have implemented strategic staffing by having at least one team member who works with the family that can also speak the native language of the family, in addition to a lot of patience from all parties involved. The results fostered trust in our services and increased family participation in our programs. These results are likely able to be generalized, however providing services to a family that does not speak your same language should only be practiced when there is no better option.

 

Verbal Behavior and Supervision:Is the Message Lost?

SOOK KIM (Multicultural Alliance of Behavior Analysts)
Abstract:

Different cultural groups tend to have different ways of interpreting the world and the events that happen within it (Hill, Carjuzaa, Aramburo, & Baca, 1993; McIntyre & Silva, 1992). Verbal behavior is described as being being behavior which is reinforced through the mediation of the other people (Skinner, 1957). But what happens when the speaker and listener speak different languages, or have different cultural beliefs? What happens if the listener is unable to appropriate discriminate the speakers verbal stimuli in a way in which the speaker understands? Can the supervisor still reinforce the verbal behavior of the supervisee?As a Korean BCBA working primarily with Korean American families, I have experienced receiving supervision from a supervisor from an outside culture. Similarly, I have also provided supervision to supervisees who are from a different culture. From my experience, the literal language barrier is just one of the many considerations that must be given when attempted to bridge cultures and ensure a successful supervision experience.

 
Supervisors as Game Changers: Narrative as Behaviors
SAKURAKO SHERRY TANAKA (Mutlicultural Alliance of Behavior Analysts)
Abstract: In her article “The Inclusion of Cultures and Cultures of Inclusion,” Charlotte Mandell writes that competing contingencies interact, modified by the larger social context, thus the behavior of individuals’ changes, and new contingencies are created. “Thus, continuous reflection on the multiple and potentially conflicting contingencies acting on the behavior of our clients, students, colleagues and neighbors may enhance our effectiveness at work and also facilitate civil and productive interactions throughout our lives” (2007). As a Japanese linguist/anthropologist-turned behavior analyst, one would like to examine what it may take to communicate functionally – not merely words – across the culturally diverse contexts; to co-create narratives through supervision experience. Do you really know if you reinforced or punished the supervisee’s response with your “feedback?” What other considerations, rules, and learning tasks may lie beyond knowing the Science and Ethics developed in the Western World? Where do we come from, and where do we aim to go, shape who we are now: history is within our hands if we can co-create narratives that can lead us beyond divisions that have set the world apart over the centuries.
 
 
Panel #446
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Analyzing and Improving Complex Employee Behaviors in Human Service Organizations
Monday, May 29, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1-3
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nicole Gravina, Ph.D.
Chair: Heather M. McGee (Western Michigan University)
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc and TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
HEATHER M. MCGEE (Western Michigan University)
NICOLE GRAVINA (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Employees in human service organizations engage in complex behaviors like problem solving, decision making, and leadership skills, on a regular basis (e.g., dealing with difficult employees, managing time and work tasks, and choosing appropriate measurement systems). Despite increased requirements for supervision for BCaBAs and RBTs, the effects are only as good as the supervisors and the systems in which they work. It is the responsibility of supervisors to train, monitor, and manage those behaviors. Although complex behaviors are common and important in human service organizations, they have received little attention in the applied behavior analytic literature. In this panel, strategies for defining, assessing, and intervening on complex employee behaviors in human service organizations will be discussed. Specific examples from research and practice will be provided to illustrate these strategies and systems and processing for supporting them will be discussed. Practical applications and areas for further development and research will also be highlighted.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Complex behavior, Human services, Staff performance
 
 
Panel #451
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Supervision and Training of BCBA Candidates in Home and Community Field Study Settings
Monday, May 29, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center 304
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Linda S. Heitzman-Powell, Ph.D.
Chair: Linda S. Heitzman-Powell (The University of Kansas Medical Center)
JANA M. SARNO (Autism Home Support Services)
KATRINA OSTMEYER (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.)
SUMMER LEFEBVRE (University of Alaska, Anchorage Center for Child Health and Development)
Abstract:

Effective supervision practices have been a concern for the behavior analytic community leading to new, more rigorous guidance regarding supervision regulations outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB: BACB newsletter, Sept. 2011, p.1). Despite this discussion, there is limited research or guidance on best practice in supervision of behavior analysts. Lack of research and appropriate technologies for consistent, high quality supervision is a potential liability for the field as a whole since having advanced training asclinical personnel is no guarantee one is able to effectively transfer both knowledge and skill to those they are supervising (Martin & Cannon, 2010). This issue can be compounded in rural areas where individuals may engage in one of the many distance-based education programs in fulfillment of the educational requirements of certification, but lack high-quality training and supervision opportunities. This panel will explore the unique challenges of providing an evidence-based training experience from a distance, lessons learned, and future directions for the field from the viewpoints of the researcher, supervisor, and supervisee. An emphasis will be placed on the use of a structured supervision curriculum and measurement procedures.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Distance-based, supervision
 
 
Symposium #472
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Towards Higher Standards for the Practice of Behavior Analysis
Monday, May 29, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1A/B
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Lynn Hammond, Ph.D.
Chair: Jennifer Lynn Hammond (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis (CABA))
Discussant: Michele D. Wallace (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

The current symposium centers around topics related to the necessary skills required to provide effective behavior analytic services, and the extent to which our field is potentially equipped to this end. Special attention will be paid to practitioners who support individuals who exhibit severely challenging behaviors in the home and community settings, however, each presentation includes implications for practitioners across a range of settings and populations. The first is a discussion paper on the recent increase in publications regarding the current standards for graduate training and the supervision of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), as well as the potential divide between science and practice within the field of behavior analysis. The second paper focuses on the outcomes of a survey designed to extend previous research on the various types of staff and supervisory training, as well as performance management procedures offered to BACB certificants actively working in the applied setting.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
 

The Potential Impact ofa Divide Between Science and Practice in the Field of Behavior Analysis

BENJAMIN THOMAS HEIMANN (CABA), Rachel Taylor (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis)
Abstract:

There has been a recent increase in publications related to increasing the standards for 1) graduate training programs in ABA (e.g., Dixon, Reed, Smith, & LaMarca, 2015) and 2) supervision of individuals pursuing BCBA certification (e.g., Turner, Fischer, & Luiselli, 2016). Carr (2016) suggested a potential deficit of over 55,000 BCBAs to meet the growing need for behavior analytic services, making these discussions related to the quality of graduate training and BCBA trainee supervision extremely important. However, there has been relatively less attention paid to issues associated with ensuring on-going training for individuals who have already completed graduate school and have obtained their BCBA. By definition, as the demand for behavior analytic services increases, it may be reasonable to expect increased expertise in the practitioner skill set maintained by BCBAs. The purpose of the current paper is two-fold: 1) to review the recent publications on issues related to training behavior analysts, and to extend this discussion to the on-going supervision of BCBAs, and 2) to provide suggestions for supporting the on-going development of BCBAs who are faced with increasingly complex clinical issues. These topics will be addressed with respect to recent publications regarding the potential divide between science and practice within the field of behavior analysis (e.g., Critchfield, 2015b).

 

Quality Control: An Assessment of the Current Status of Supervision for Behavior Analysts

RICHARD COLOMBO (Center for ABA), Rachel Taylor (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis), Jennifer Lynn Hammond (Center for Applied Behavior Analysis (CABA))
Abstract:

The purpose of the current investigation was to extend previous research on the various types of staff and supervisory training and performance management procedures offered to BACB certificants. Reed and Henley (2015) surveyed 382 individuals to this end, and their results suggest several areas that require increased attention; in particular, half of the respondents indicated that they did not receive initial pre-service training and nearly one third of respondents indicated that they do not receive on-going training in their work setting. The outcomes of Reed and Henley's investigation provide several valuable avenues for future research and practice. It is important to note, however, that only 18.9% of respondents reported that they work in the home setting (the remainder worked in center/school-based programs). Community-based practitioners are operating under far different contingencies than those who work in a group setting, which directly impacts issues related to staff training and performance management. Moreover, the topography and severity of challenging behaviors may differ across the home and school settings for a given individual. As such, the purpose of the current investigation was to extend Reed and Henley to include 1) more BCBA respondents who practice in the home setting and 2) more data on the frequency and nature of training and supervision received and provided by the respondents (with particular attention to severely challenging behaviors). Potential benefits associated with establishing a more robust definition of on-going training and performance management will be discussed. Implications for the concept of "Continuing Education" also will be presented.

 
 
Symposium #479
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Social and Nonsocial Stimuli as Reinforcers for the Behavior of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Typically Developing Children
Monday, May 29, 2017
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4A/B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Svein Eikeseth, Ph.D.
Chair: Kristine Safaryan (California State University Los Angeles)
Discussant: Kristine Safaryan (California State University Los Angeles)
Abstract:

This symposium presents four studies examining effects of various types of social and nonsocial reinforcers for the behavior of children with autism spectrum disorders and typically developing children. Effects of three types of social reinforcers (i.e., enthusiastic praise, neutral praise, and smiling faces) and one type of nonsocial reinforcer (i.e., geometric forms) were assessed. Results shows that for the children with autism, exited praise was more reinforcing as compared to praise given in a neutral tone of voice. In contrast, the two types of praise was equally effective for typically developing children. When given a choice between a smiling face and a geometric form, children with autism preferred the geometric reinforcer to a lager extent than was the case for the typically developing children.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Nonsocial Reinforcers, Praise, reinforcement quality, social reinforcers
 
Effects of Quality of Praise on Discrimination Acquisition
JENNIFER REBECCA WEYMAN (University of South Florida), Jolene R. Sy (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Abstract: Previous research has shown that praise is an effective reinforcer; however, few studies have evaluated how qualitative differences in praise affect responding. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of neutral-quality praise, high-quality praise, and no praise on the rate of discrimination acquisition and maintenance of discriminations at a 6-week follow-up with children diagnosed with autism and intellectual disabilities during discrete-trial training. In addition, preference for neutral-quality praise, high-quality praise, and no praise was evaluated. Slightly faster acquisition was observed during the high-quality praise condition relative to the neutral-praise and no praise conditions for all three participants and independent discriminations maintained at a 6-week follow-up for two of two participants during all three conditions. In addition, one of three participants preferred high-quality praise. These results suggest that there is a slight advantage to using high-quality praise relative to neutral-quality praise and no praise during discrete-trial training.
 

A Comparison of Enthusiastic and Neutral Praise in Skill Acquisition in Children With Developmental Disabilities

MEGAN HINDS (Lovaas Institute for Early Intervention), Michele D. Wallace (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

In an expansion of Polick, Carr and Hanney (2012), the purpose of this study is to determine the effects of enthusiastic and neutral praise in skill acquisition by four children with developmental disabilities in this alternating treatment design with a concurrent multiple baseline. One skill with six objectives, three for each phase of treatment, was targeted for each participant. Skill acquisition was measured as a percentage of opportunity as well as sessions to mastery to determine which method resulted in faster skill acquisition. During one phase, enthusiastic social praise was delivered contingent on a correct response while neutral praise was delivered during the second phase. Enthusiastic praise was defined as varied pitch and intonation, volume or tempo as well as an animated tone of voice. Neutral Praise was defined as even and consistent pitch and tone. The same ten approved phrases were used as in both phases of treatment. No sensory input or gestures were provided during either phase of treatment. For all four participants, skill acquisition was faster when enthusiastic social praise was delivered by an average of 1.43 sessions. Anecdotal reports indicate that noncompliance was higher in participants during the neutral praise phase and Clients failed to meet mastery in more neutral praise targets. Limitations and recommendations for future research are discussed.

 

Praise Delivered in Excited Tone or Neutral Tone Affect the Behavior of Children With Autism Differently From That of Typically Developing Children

SVEIN EIKESETH (Oslo and Akershus University College), Catherine M. Gale (UK Behaviour Analysis and Research Group CIC), Miriam Worku (UK Young Autism Project), Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
Abstract:

According to treatment manuals, praise when used as a putative reinforcer should be given in an excited voice. However, no published study have directly evaluated whether excited praise is more effective than praise delivered in a neutral tone. To examine this questions experimentally, an application for a tablet to assess responding to social praise delivered in excited tone and neutral tone was developed. Two squares, one red and one yellow were presented simultaneously on the tablet screen. Whenever one of the stimulus was touched, it played an audio clip of social praise either delivered in excited tone or neutral tone. Participants were 10 children with ASD and 9 typically developing children. Dependent variable was number of touches on each type of stimuli within and across participants. Results showed that for children with ASD, praise delivered in excited tone was more reinforcing compare to praise delivered in neutral tone. For typically developing children, in contrast, both conditions were equally effective in controlling responding, and hence, equally effective as reinforcers.

 

Assessing Reinforcement Magnitude of Social and Nonsocial Stimuli in Children With Autism and Typically Developing Children Using a Progressive Ratio Reinforcement Schedule

SVEIN EIKESETH (Oslo and Akershus University College), Catherine M. Gale (UK Behaviour Analysis and Research Group CIC)
Abstract:

This study assessed reinforcement magnitude of social and nonsocial stimuli in children with autism and typically developing children using a progressive ratio reinforcement schedule. An application for a tablet was developed to assess responding to social images and nonsocial images. A pixelated stimulus was presented on the tablet screen, and whenever it was touched, it played a video clip for two seconds. The video clip was either a social image (a face) or a nonsocial image (a geometric pattern). Participants were 10 children with autism and 10 typically developing children. Dependent variable was the reinforcement schedule reached before responding extinguished (i.e., break point), and rate of responding across sessions. Results showed that for nonsocial stimuli, the break point and the rate of responding was higher for the children with autism as compared to the typically developing children. For the social stimuli the break point and the response rate was for similar for the children autism compared to the typically developing children. Results suggest that nonsocial stimuli is a more potent reinforcer for the behavior of children with autism as compared to typically developing children. Potent nonsocial reinforcers may select stereotyped and repetitive behavior and defici verbal and social skills.

 

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