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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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43rd Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2017

CE by Content: Ethics


 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
If You Are a BCBA, Are You/Can You Become a Dog Trainer? Some Ethics and Some Steps in That Direction
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom C
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terri M. Bright, Ph.D.
TERRI M. BRIGHT (MSPCA Angell)
Description: When you have studied behavior analysis, you find yourself being asked about the behavior of non-human species, usually dogs. Do you pause before stepping into the breach and making suggestions? Until you have the tools to implement the assessments and interventions you have used with humans, you will likely not be able to generalize your skills to another species. Safety is also a reason: 4 million people are bitten by dogs each year. To a trained professional, the precursors of aggression are like a blinking neon sign; to a novice, they are unnoticed. Whether in your neighborhood, your home, or your workplace, dogs pose a bite risk to humans. This workshop will first remind BCBAs and others what the ethics are of teaching outside of their scope of training and experience. It will also teach attendees to identify precursors of canid aggression as well as what to do when they see them. Finally, if you are interested in dog training, this workshop will demonstrate generalization of such skills as preference assessments and functional assessment/analysis of dog behavior, and give some simple tools for training dogs, as well as instructions on how to refer to the right dog trainer.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) via videos and textual prompts, identify the precursors of dog aggression and how to stay safe in the presence of an aggressive dog; (2) identify how your behavioral skills are skewed towards humans and how your dog-training skills may be skewed away from science; (3) identify when and if you should intervene with a dog's problem behavior; (4) identify an ethical dog trainer in their geographical area should they need a referral; (5) learn to perform preference assessments and use the Functional Assessment of Dog Behavior (FADB), an assessment created by the workshop presenter.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, surveys, choral responding, small group breakout, still photos of dogs, dog behavior videos and textual prompts. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and video demonstrations of dog behavior. Supplemental materials will be provided such as participants will be able to review all photos, videos and surveys after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This basic workshop is meant for those who find themselves in the company of dogs and who are tempted to train them. Though participant's individual dogs' behaviors are not the target of the workshop, enough information will be disseminated so that participants can, perhaps, begin their dog-training at home, using the tenets of ABA and within the scope of the BACB Task List; they will be able to recognize the limits of their behavioral skills across species. Those who come into contact with dogs in the community or workplace and who are fearful or uncertain will be better equipped to act appropriately, be it to gain safety or to find referrals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): dog behavior, functional assessment, training ethics
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Neurobehavioral Analysis of Epilepsy
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 7
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. In addition, persons with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be managed better, and important new life skills could be acquired, if their behavior analyst knew basic epileptology. This workshop will educate behavior analysts about epilepsy with a behavioral approach. The neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be briefly reviewed. The etiology, genetics and classification of various seizure disorders will be reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be related to analog human studies. Many clients are improperly medicated for pseudo-seizures. EEG (electroencephalography) is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy, and participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with this test, without sedation or anesthesia. Epileptic seizures dynamically modulate an organism's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates the frequency, intensity and duration of epileptic seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about these relationships. Dr. Neill's articles and publications can be viewed at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Neill/contributions and https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=7LVjQ7MAAAAJ&hl=en.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) Define an epileptic seizure; (2) Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures; (3) Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior; (4) Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions; (5) Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress; (6) Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures; (7) Prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia; (8) Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures; (9) Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy.
Activities: Lecture and video presentations will alternate with discussions of key topics and audience questions and experiences regarding epilepsy.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts, special education teachers, psychologists and therapists who write behavior plans for individuals with developmental disabilities
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, behavior disorders, epilepsy, seizures
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Leadership in Behavior Analysis: How to Use Behavioral Science to Lead Ethically in Our Field
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom F
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adam E. Ventura, M.S.
ADAM E. VENTURA (World Evolve, Inc.), ASHLEY TUDOR (BCBA)
Description: When considering leadership behavior in our field, several questions emerge, namely, What is leadership in behavior analysis? Why is it important, Who can lead others, and most importantly how do you shape the behavior of a behavior analysis leader? More specifically, how do you shape ethical leadership behavior? Identifying all of the elements that yield the ideal behavior analysis leadership mixture can be challenging. Leaders in our field are made up of a variety of different behavioral particles that if heated to the appropriate temperature can create a catalyst that brings out the best OR worst in their followers. But what is the appropriate formula for developing leaders and how can current leaders help energize their followers towards accomplishing the mission in an ethical manner? This workshop will provide answers to those questions and provide behavioral skills training on the intricacies of preparing to lead, leading others, and leading leaders in behavior analysis that will help grow your organization, achieve a high level of prominence within our field, and help to establish a long lasting (and positive) legacy for everyone at your organization.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and define the definition of leadership in behavior analysis; (2) identify and execute steps for preparing to lead in behavior analysis; (3) identify and execute steps for leading others in behavior analysis; (4) identify and execute steps for leading leaders in behavior analysis.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through the use of behavioral skills training and precision instruction utilizing a combination of the following activities: 1. Instructor presentation and group discussion 2. Individual and small group activities 3. Individual and small group competency building exercises 4. Individual and small group fluency building exercises
Audience: Workshop target audience is ABA Managers, ABA business owners, ABA Supervisors, ABA program directors, ABA clinical directors, and ABA administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Leadership, LIBA, OBM
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Solving Ethical Dilemmas in the Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Weihe Huang, Ph.D.
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum)
Description: This workshop is designed to increase participants' ability to ethically practice applied behavior analysis (ABA) by describing the characteristics of ethical dilemmas and discussing three tools that could be utilized to solve these dilemmas: core ethical principles in the ABA field, the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (the Code), and an ethical decision making model. When making ethical decisions, many behavior analysts tend to believe that these decisions are solely based on the analysis of objective data and relevant evidences. However, in reality the decision-making process is also influenced by behavior analysts' values, as well as societal values including those of services recipients. Behavior analysts often encounter ethical dilemmas when these values conflict. In the process of solving ethical dilemmas, the Code is helpful in many situations. In some cases, however, ethical dilemmas cannot be resolved by appealing to the existing guidelines or regulations. Part of this workshop is aimed at providing applied behavior analysts with ethical reasoning strategies in the event that the Code alone is insufficient. These strategies are based on the presenter's relevant experience of international as well as local practice and the available literature in the field of behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Name two historical cases that led the field of behavior analysis to its current understanding of professional ethics and describe two differences between behavior modification practiced in 1970s and behavior analysis ethically practiced today; (2) List and describe at least five core ethical principles in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis;(3) Identify and describe at least three of the most common ethical dilemmas faced by behavior analysts; (4) Demonstrate a working knowledge in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts by being able to identify appropriate guideline(s) that could address a particular ethical issue; (5) Identify, define, and explain problem-solving strategies in a variety of ethical situations; (6) perform the Six-Step Ethical Decision Making Model and generalize the learned skill to different scenarios by completing 100% of the required steps described in the ethical decision making model for at least two new ethical dilemmas.
Activities: Activities: Instructional strategies for this workshop include lecture and targeted reading. In addition, this workshop will use cases both provided by the presenter and generated by participants to illustrate the implementation of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and the steps in the Ethical Decision Making Model. Participants of this workshop will be encouraged to (1) identify their values and compare these values with primary ethical principles in the field of ABA; (2) recognize the characteristics of ethical dilemmas in the practice of ABA; and (3) apply the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and six steps specified in the Ethical Decision Making Model to cases that involve ethical dilemmas. The emphasis of the discussion will be on the application of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and the Ethical Decision Making Model to various clinical settings, including natural homes, residential facilities, day programs, and educational programs.
Audience: The workshop level is intermediate. The target audience of this workshop include BCBA-Ds, BCBAs, BCABAs, RBTs, and behavioral service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Molecular Functional Analysis: Ethical and Legal Challenges and Potential Solutions
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 6
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael Weinberg, Ph.D.
MICHAEL WEINBERG (Orlando Behavior Health Services, LLC; Amego, Inc; BEST Consulting Services), WILLIAM T. MARSH (Brevard Public Schools)
Description: In recent years the issue of conducting functional assessment vs. functional analysis has posed increasing ethical, legal and regulatory dilemmas for behavior analysts. Ethically, we are bound to conducting the most efficient, evidence-based assessment to find the function and other maintaining variables for problem behavior and devise a plan that is most likely to be effective based on the literature. However, there have been legal and ethical challenges to doing so in many states and jurisdictions and in various settings such as public schools, as well as via public funded services such as state departments of developmental disabilities. This presentation will review the main concerns regarding functional assessment and how these are presenting ethical and legal challenges to behavior analysts and some possible solutions to these dilemmas. The presenters will offer approaches to functional assessment and functional analysis including Molecular Functional Analysis which is based on use of trial-based systematic manipulations to reliably and validly identify function. These approaches can be readily implemented in applied settings and may serve as potential solutions to these challenges and permit for ethical, and evidence-based functional analysis methods in settings where these are not currently permitted or are considered an ethical/legal violation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify at least one main ethical concern being posed in various settings to the use of functional analysis ; (2) Identify two primary bases of legal challenges to functional analyses and explain the reasoning; (3) Describe alternative approaches to functional analysis that will permit for evidence-based methods, and may be acceptable ethically and legally in applied practice settings; (4) Identify how such an alternative will aid in maintaining BACB ethical standards.
Activities: Through the use of lecture and slide presentation, group discussion, practice vignettes, role play and guided practice exercises, and video clips, participant practice with assessment tools, participants will be actively engaged in learning processes throughout this workshop. Participants in this workshop will learn a new and unique method for functional assessment and functional analysis using our methods. Participants will be provided with supplemental materials including our assessment data collection tools and PowerPoint slides that present the methodology and logic.
Audience: Intermediate to Advanced audience. Participants should have training and experience with use of at least descriptive assessment methods and awareness of prevailing functional analysis methodology such as analog conditions (i.e. Iwata et. al., 1982/1994).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Applied Settings, Ethics, Functional Anaysis, Regulatory Aspects
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
A Practitioner's Guide to Clinical Decision Making
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall F
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Erica Jowett Hirst, Ph.D.
ERICA JOWETT HIRST (Southern Illinois University, Carbondale)
Description: This workshop will provide an opportunity for practitioners (or soon-to-be practitioners) to enhance their clinical skill set by working through a variety of activities targeting appropriate skill selection based on the characteristics of an individual client (rather than as a progression through a list of skills), data-based decision making (going beyond the basics, troubleshooting), programming for generalization, and solving common clinical challenges. The content of this workshop is based on the clinical experiences and education of the presenter and is used for training second-year Master's degree students in an ABAI-accredited behavior-analysis program. Overall, participants will have an increased ability to think critically about the decisions they make in the practice of behavior analysis, which should lead to better outcomes for the clients they serve.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) select appropriate skills to target given an individual's age and level of functioning; (2) make decisions based on a set of data (e.g., when to discontinue a skill, change a reinforcer, change a prompt level or type of prompt); (3) program for generalization based on the conditions under which the skill was taught; (4) respond to challenging clinical situations that are common to the practice of behavior analysis.
Activities: All workshop participants will be guided through a workbook that targets skills such as goal selection, data-based decision making, programming for generalization, and problem solving. The presenter will provide instructions for each activity, then participants will work through the activities in the workbook, first individually, then the instructor will lead participants through a group discussion, during which participants can share their answers and receive feedback for the decision they made.
Audience: The target audience is graduate students and new practitioners (less than 5 years experience).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): decision making, goal-setting, problem solving, programming generalization
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Marijuana, Client Abuse, and Coursework: Applying the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Janet L. Montgomery, M.S.
JANET L. MONTGOMERY (ABA Technologies, Inc.; Florida Institute of Techn), CHRISTI A. REED (ABA Technologies Inc.; Florida Institute of Techno), EMILY MEYER (ABA Technologies Inc.; Florida Institute of Technology)
Description: Behavior analysts face dilemmas every day without obvious professional or ethical solutions. Practitioners have a science to help change behavior, but this isn't enough. Surrounding ethical contingencies must be considered when selecting the best course of action. The BACB's Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts provides an excellent resource. The code should guide decisions so that the best interest and well-being of the client is always prioritized. Application of the compliance code is not always clear-cut or easy, however, the code elements provide a backdrop for ethical decision making. Practice using the code will assist the practitioner in exploring appropriate options. This workshop will highlight a variety of real-life examples with identification of applicable code elements and options for resolution. Scenarios will include the areas of child welfare, traumatic brain injury, autism spectrum disorder, applied behavior analysis clinics, controversial medical interventions, supervision, and academic settings. Participants will have the opportunity to interact, discuss and apply code elements to existing workshop scenarios in addition to reviewing audience generated ethical challenges.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify ethical violations in a given scenario; (2) identify the applicable code element(s) from the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts related to the scenario; (3) identify possible solutions or actions given an applied scenario; (4) discuss ethical dilemmas from personal clinical applications and related code elements.
Activities: The workshop includes lecture, discussion, small group breakout with opportunities for audience presentation.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for practicing BCaBAs and BCBAs at all levels interested in additional BACB Code Practice.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): BACB Code, Ethics, Scenarios
 
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Business of Applied Behavior Analysis: Setting Up, Growing, and Maintaining Applied Behavior Analysis Businesses
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom G
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Misty Jones, M.A.
PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York), ADRIENNE FITZER (The Applied Behavior Analysis Center, Inc. (ABAC)), MISTY JONES (Long Island ABA)
Description: Graduate training in Applied Behavior Analysis gives new professionals basic training in theory and skills focused mostly on working with individuals. Some people, however, desire or go on to set up their own business, an endeavor that requires new skills not taught at graduate school. The workshop will review some of the issues in setting up ABA businesses illustrated by two different companies. The first provides online continuing education and training and consultation services. The second provides ABA services mostly to children and adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Intellectual disabilities, their staff and families. The workshop will discuss the application of general ABA and organizational behavior management principles, such as data collection and analysis, modification of effort to increase recruitment to services in ABA businesses. The workshop will also identify common ethical challenges in the business of ABA and how to manage and resolve such challenges.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) list common challenges when first opening their own business, including business plans, hiring independent contractors and employees, health care law, insurance billing and state regulations; (2) describe the difference between being an independent contractor and a business owner; (3) identify key things a business owner needs to do at the inception of the business and the behavior that they must engage in to grow and maintain their new business; (4) identify common pitfalls and managing the risks; (5) describe how to diversify your business, expand your client base, develop your staff, reduce turnover; and (6) identify common ethical challenges in business and how to resolve them.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, and small group work on case studies.
Audience: The target audience includes graduate level trainees in ABA and new practitioners considering or involved in setting up ABA businesses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Incorporating Cultural Consideration Tactics into Applied Practice
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Noelle Neault, Ph.D.
NOELLE NEAULT (Simmons College)
Description: When providing clinical services, behavior analysts have an ethical obligation to address client-specific cultural factors that may impact treatment (BACB, 2014). Practitioner cultural awareness tactics include the detection of socially-mediated reinforcement or punishment contingencies (Hughes Fong, Catagnus, Brodhead, Quigley & Field, 2016). In order to increase training opportunities for practitioners, this workshop will present an overview of culturally sensitive considerations specific to behavior analytic service delivery. Content will include a review of proposed behavior analytic standards for cultural competence and recommendations for tactics to be incorporated into daily practice with clients (Hughes Fong & Tanaka, 2013). Additionally, case studies will be presented, followed by opportunities to practice selecting culturally sensitive tactics appropriate to the given case (Lynch & Hanson, 2011). Lastly, further recommended reading and resources will be shared.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define cultural awareness; (2) describe examples of cultural factors that may impact service delivery; (3) describe culturally-sensitive tactics that could be implemented as part of assessment and/or treatment acceptability; (4) make recommendations for how to address potential treatment barriers associated with cultural factors when presented with a behavioral service delivery scenario.
Activities: The structure of this workshop will be as follows: lecture, case method of instruction with small group breakoutsand discussion. Primary content will be taught via lecture and guided practice with respect to decision making.
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): cultural competence, service delivery
 
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Extending Behavior Analysis in Zoos and Aquariums
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Denver Zoo
Area: AAB/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lindsay Renee Mehrkam, Ph.D.
LINDSAY RENEE MEHRKAM (Monmouth University), NICOLE R. DOREY (University of Florida), Emily Insalaco (Denver Zoo)
Description: Note: This 6-hour workshop will take place entirely at the Denver Zoo. Today’s accredited zoos and aquariums are held to high standards of animal welfare. This involves assessment, implementation, and evaluation of current animal husbandry practices across a wide range of species - a task for which behavior analysis is well suited. This workshop will provide attendees with an overview of how behavior analytic methods are being extended in zoo settings to evaluate enrichment and training effectiveness. Participants will travel to world-renowned Denver Zoo and directly observe how behavioral principles are being used to guide animal care practices in zoos. Participants will learn how to successfully implement behavioral assessments using single-subject designs in a zoo setting. Participants will be guided through video demonstrations of preference assessments and positive reinforcement training with a variety of zoo species to observe the generalizability of these procedures. Attendees will also participate in discussions on future directions for behavior analysts in these nontraditional animal settings. The registration fee includes the cost of workshop materials as well as transportation to and from the Denver Zoo.* Attendees will meet at the headquarters hotel to take a shuttle to the zoo, and will return in time to attend afternoon workshops. Additional details will be communicated directly by the workshop presenters after registration has closed. *A portion of the proceeds will go to the Denver Zoological Society Enrichment Fund.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Operationally define environmental enrichment and identify ways in which enrichment strategies are evaluated and deemed effective; (2)Identify, review, and critique applications of operant conditioning in behavioral husbandry practices for variety of species; (3)Recognize and discuss variables to consider to ensure ethical and effective implementation and evaluation of behavioral assessments in zoos and aquariums using single-subject designs.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, direct observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies and procedures will be provided. Participants will be encouraged to participate in open discussions about content and future directions for practical application. Supplemental materials for reviewing training plans and ethograms will also be provided.
Audience: This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): animal training, enrichment, preference assessment, zoo
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Developing an Effective Skill-Based Treatment Following a Safe and Efficient Functional Analysis Model
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom A
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Child Study Center), MAHSHID GHAEMMAGHAMI (University of the Pacific)
Description: The functional analysis is a powerful methodological tool that can provide an effective and humane treatment for problem behavior (Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Despite its growing empirical support, a recent survey (Oliver, Pratt, & Normand, 2015) suggests that the majority of practicing behavior analysts are not conducting functional analyses to inform treatment considerations. Practitioners may be avoiding the functional analysis because of concerns that it places the patient or clinician in a dangerous environment and requires too much time or resources. We will be teaching the audience how to conduct a safe functional analysis that takes an average of 25 min and as little as 5 min based on our research (e.g., Jessel, Hanley, & Ghaemmaghami, 2016; Ghaemmaghami, Hanley, & Jessel, 2016) and collection of replications from clinical practice. We will then discuss how to use the results of the functional analysis to design effective, skill-based treatments that include the teaching of complex and developmentally appropriate functional communication skills, and skill-based delay tolerance procedures that increase other social behaviors such as compliance, task engagement, and social interaction, in order to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires needed to be successful in contextually complex environments with natural reinforcement contingencies.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) conduct a functional analysis of problem behavior in 25 minutes; (2) teach a child complex functional communication skills; (3) teach a child how to tolerate delays and denials to reinforcement; (4) program for generalization and maintenance of these skills.
Activities: The format combines lecture, small group activities, large group discussions, and video observations.
Audience: BCBA-Ds, BCBAs, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers who need to learn a fast and safe approach to assessing and treating problem behavior. This approach has been empirically validated for those with and without intellectual disabilities, with children as young as 1 and adults as old as 30, and can be conducted in multiple contexts such as classrooms, clinics, or homes.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): communication training, functional analysis, problem behavior, tolerance training
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Promoting Effective Behavioral Sexual Education and Instruction for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities and Autism Spectrum Disorder
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom H
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University), SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
Description: Sexuality is a topic that is difficult, or at least uncomfortable, for many professionals and parents to discuss, however it is a topic thatneeds to be addressed for the many individuals with developmental disabilities and ASD. Issues vary from individual to individual but may include social skills deficits impacting romantic relationships and interpersonal sexual relations, deficits in independence as related to personal hygiene, issues with masturbation, inappropriate sexual behaviors in public, sexual advances towards inappropriate people and issues with perspective taking to name a few. Applied behavior analytic treatments can be highly effective in promoting appropriate sexual behaviors and sexual expression in adolescents and adults. This workshop will focus on behaviorally-based strategies useful for individuals with developmental disabilities including individuals on all ends of the autism spectrum. This talk will begin with an overview of general issues regarding sexuality development as it relates to individuals with developmental disabilities. We will address the understanding of problem sexual behavior through functional assessment methods and discuss replacement treatment options based on function. We will discuss topics such as sexual development, sexuality knowledge, sexual behaviors both appropriate and inappropriate, issues regarding consent and common parent concerns. We will then move into more specific topics which could be included within a behaviorally-based sexual education curriculum designed for individuals with developmental disabilities and ASD. Treatment strategies discussed will include, but are not limited to, reinforcement-based procedures, video modeling, task analysis schedules, picture activity schedules, scripts and script fading, and social stories. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available. Although sexuality is an issue that often comes to the forefront in adolescence or early adulthood, information on sexuality is important for individuals of all ages. Topics related to ethical and legal decision making will also be discussed. Audience questions and discussion will be welcomed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) state at least 3 common issues experienced by people with developmental disabilities and ASD as they relate to appropriate and satisfying sexual development and expression; (2) develop several teaching programs for skill acquisition of at least 3 sexual behaviors using techniques and theories consistent with applied behavior analysis; (3) conduct a functional assessment of problem behavior as it relates to sexual expression and develop a behavior intervention plan based on the function; (4) identify issues associated with consent.
Activities: The workshop will consist of the following activities: Didactic instruction from the presenter; Group discussion; Presentation and review of teaching materials; Role play and practice of presented teaching procedures.
Audience: The current workshop content is geared towards the following audience: (1)Experienced behavior analysts who have a desire to learn how to apply behavioral principles and teaching methods to the subject of sexual behavior; (2)Educators and related service professionals who have a behavioral background and work with children with developmental issues that have needs in the area of sexuality; (3)Although not specifically geared towards parents and family members of individuals with needs, parents would be welcomed to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, health, sex education, sexual
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and the Practicing Behavior Analyst: Legal and Ethical Considerations
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom G
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This workshop will focus on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA, a US Law) and the issues that practicing behavior analyst should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments, writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term positive behavior supports as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations including FBAs. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the major components of the IDEIA; (2) Identify the areas of IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst; (3) Identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may serve under IDEIA; (4) Identify the legal requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation; (5) Identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA; (6) Identify when a BIP must be developed under the IDEIA; (7) Identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA; (8) Describe how the 2016 Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to SPED Law.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study, Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts; Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts; School Administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Education, Ethics, School Services, SPED Law
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Science at the Animal Shelter: Research Designs, Ethics, and Effective Collaborations With Animal Professionals
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom A
Area: AAB/CSS; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Erica N. Feuerbacher, Ph.D.
ALEXANDRA PROTOPOPOVA (Texas Tech University), ERICA N. FEUERBACHER (Carroll College), SHERRY WOODARD (Best Friends)
Description: Through the combined expertise of a nationally-renown animal shelter behavior director, applied animal behavior analysts, and university animal researchers, participants will learn how behavioral research is conducted at animal shelters. Topics of discussion will include (1) effective and humane research designs, (2) ethical considerations of working with shelter animals, and (3) establishing a working relationship with animal shelter professionals. The workshop will include presentations from various professionals, a brainstorming session in which participants will develop a plan of action for approaching an animal shelter and developing an effective and ethical research design. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, or theoretical concepts. Content is related to ethical, legal, statutory, or regulatory policies, guidelines, and standards.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) describe research methods that are appropriate for animal shelters; (2)list the potential ethical concerns with various research designs and provide solutions to these concerns; (3)describe the ethical concerns of conducting research with shelter animals from the animal, shelter volunteer, shelter staff, and community perspectives; (4)describe how to effectively communicate with other animal professionals; (5)develop a plan of action to conduct research at the participant's local animal shelter that includes initial contact, follow-up, and effective communication with all relevant member of the community.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be achieved through lecture, discussion, role-playing, and small-group activities.
Audience: Participants should be interested in learning how to effectively conduct research at animal shelters. Participants may be behavior analysts (no specific boar certification required), students in animal behavior, and animal professionals and enthusiasts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Animal Shelter, Collaborations, Ethics, Research Design
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analytic Training for Health, Life, Fitness, and Peak Personal Performances
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall C
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephen Ray Flora, Ph.D.
STEPHEN RAY FLORA (Youngstown State University)
Description: As obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other health problems are at epidemic proportions for many populations, including populations served by behavior analysts, it is vital that behavior analysts learn to apply behavior analysis to ameliorate these problems and to promote healthy lifestyles as effectively as possible. Medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of exercise, athletic participation, physical fitness are covered. The workshop will teach participants to use applied behavior analysis principles to objectively access, and optimally improve their own, or clients' physical fitness, health, and, if desired, athletic performances. Emphasis will be placed on behavior analytic gradual change techniques; optimal goal setting parameters; objective, data based analysis and decision making; and on how the use of behavioral analytic experimental designs, such as multiple baselines across situations and bounded changing criterion designs, may not just be used to measure change, but actually facilitate effective behavioral change. A focus will be on web based, fitness "personal quantification" tools (Strava, fitbit, etc) from a behavior analytic and ethical perspective. Although millions post personal fitness data, for ethical and legal purposes an explicit informed consent wavier of privacy should be obtained before any devices are used with clients. Even with consent ethical considerations are necessary.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State many of the behavioral, psychological, and medical benefits of physical fitness, athletic participation, and living a healthy lifestyle; (2) Perform functional assessment of current health and fitness related behaviors; (3) Perform task analyses of healthy eating behaviors; safe, effective exercise; and skilled athletic performances; (4) Identify personalized reinforcers, motivations, incentives, and values for healthy lifestyles, physical fitness and athleticism; (5) Understand the importance of, and how to effectively use, goal setting, task analysis, pinpointing; (6) Understand how to identify skill gaps,how to set realistically achievable goals,and how to effectively use publicly posted goals to achieve fitness and optimal athletic performance; (7)Use behavior analytic experimental designs to not only measure and access behavioral change but to facilitate health, fitness, and athletic behavioral changes; (8) Use the concepts of optimal physiological arousal, periodization, and super compensation in designing a personalized training program; (9) Analyze and use web-based, social media tools as health and fitness aids; (10) State ethical and legal dilemmas and dangers of using commercial internet based personal quantification; (11) Write an informed consent covering commercial personal quantification usage; (12) Use data collection, charting, and graphing to optimize fitness and improve eating related behaviors.
Activities: Participants will be guided though presented information with PowerPoint slides, worksheets and lecture handouts that will provide participants with the information necessary learn the medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of fitness and develop effective programs for improving health, physical fitness, diet behaviors, and healthy lifestyles; develop effective programs to optimize athletic performance; to use Behavior Analytic Experimental Designs to access and facilitate desired behavioral change: and state ethical and legal dilemmas and dangers of using commercial internet based personal quantification. Write an informed consent covering commercial personal quantification usage.
Audience: The target audience is board certified behavior analysts (BCBA), BCaBAs, psychologists, personal trainers, and others interested in learning to use behavior analytic procedures to promote healthy lifestyles, fitness, or to optimize elite performance. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, or health and fitness will also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: The Pulse of Behavior Analysis: Social Validity as a Process
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PCH; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kara Reagon, Ph.D.
KARA REAGON (Beacon Services of Connecticut), JUSTIN B. LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOSEPH H. CIHON (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College), JULIA FERGUSON (Autism Partnership)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to review the characteristics of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), define social validity, review the current peer reviewed research including social validity from the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, as well as other key publications related to the topic. Participants will develop an understanding of conceptual and procedural issues related to social validity, preference, treatment integrity, generalization and maintenance for applied research and clinical practice; as well as directions for future research. The workshop will include power point presentation and handouts. It will entail didactic instruction, role-plays, written activities, surveys, and task analyses. There are no foreseen risks associated with participating in this workshop. The content is based on previous methodological approaches to social validity, theoretical foundations of ABA (Baer, Wolf, & Risley, 1968, 1987) and social validity (Wolf, 1978), current research and clinical practice. There is no commercial support for the workshop or instructors. Furthermore, there are no relationships that could be reasonably construed as a conflict of interest.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) State the defining characteristics of Applied Behavior Analysis; (2) Define and assess social validity; (3)Define and measure treatment integrity; (4)Define, program for and assess generalization as it relates to social validity; (5)Define, promote and measure maintenance; (6)Give examples of how to assess preference of consumers and clients;(7)Use social validity task analyses with consumers and clients in the development of treatment programs for clients; (8) Participants will describe recent research-based examples of social validity.
Activities: power point presentation, lecture, handouts, didactic instruction, small group activities, role-plays, written activities, surveys, and task analyses.
Audience: Intermediate;new BCBAs, junior BCBAs (less than 5 years' experience) and young researchers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): generalization maintenance, preference, social validity, treatment integrity
 
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts: Bring Your Ethical Scenarios
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin, The Meadows Center), NANETTE L. PERRIN (LifeShare Management Group)
Description: Certified behavior analysts, applicants, and even approved course sequences are now required to abide by the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). As of January 2016, this approved document became enforceable by the BACB. The Code gives us valuable guidance as practitioners in the world of behavior analysis. This workshop will actively engage participants in discussions surrounding their own ethical dilemmas that occur in the home, clinics, and within schools and other organizations. Addressing the real world ethical dilemmas during implementation of behavior analysis can be a challenging endeavor especially for new professionals (Bailey & Burch, 2011). This workshop will discuss the 10 codes/guidelines that comprise the new Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). The instructors will quiz participants on their knowledge of each of the 10 guidelines, review each guideline, assist participants in identifying the appropriate ethical guideline related to their scenarios, and foster conversation around appropriate actions that could be taken. Bailey and Burch (2016) provide information in regards to these codes that will be shared with participants. A post quiz will also help review the workshop information.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State the 10 guidelines/codes of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014); (2) Accurately identify personal ethical dilemmas; (3) Accurately identify which guideline addresses the dilemmas; (4) Increase percentage of correct quiz questions related to ethics in behavior analysis.
Activities: Take pre/post quizzes regarding ethical behavior of behavior analysts Lecture on the 10 Guidelines/Codes in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) Lecture on Bailey and Burch (2011) viewpoints on ethical guidelines of behavior analysts Exercise to discuss participants' ethical examples Discussion on how to respond to ethical dilemmas that professionals in the field have encountered and shared with the group
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts-Doctorate, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Associate Behavior Analysts, and Registered Behavior Technicians, or those training to be any of these who are seeking additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals/families, supervisors/supervisees, and other service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethical practice, ethics, home/community
 
Workshop #W87
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Acting Out: Learning BACB Ethics and Problem-Solving Strategies Through Interactive Team-Based Learning
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
RICHARD WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University), JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
Description: This workshop is designed primarily for practitioners who have some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) and wish to improve their skills to (a) identify and analyze ethical challenges, (b) develop strategies to resolve ethical challenges, (c) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, and (d) obtain CEUs in the ethics domain as required for BACB recertification. Others, including licensed psychologists, who are interested in applying BACB ethical guidelines to real-world ethical challenges in practice and research are also encouraged to attend. Participants should be prepared to describe and discuss real world ethics cases in a manner that protects the identity of those individuals involved in the ethics cases.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and analyze ethical challenges; (2) identify and troubleshoot strategies to resolve ethical challenges; (3) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, (4) identify team based learning strategies that can be used to promote BACB ethics in work and educational settings.
Activities: This workshop will include very limited lecture content. Emphasis will be placed on small group activities and discussion, role plays, guided practice and fluency building exercises.
Audience: Intermediate level. This workshop assumes some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (PECC) for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
 
Workshop #W90
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Aggressive and Violent Behavior: Behavioral Conceptualization, Prevention, and Treatment
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall F
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Peter Sturmey, Ph.D.
PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: Behavior comes from three causes: Biological evolution, cultural evolution and evolution of the operant during the life span. Although Applied Behavior Analysis has long focused on functional analysis and treatment of aggression and violence, especially in people with little developmental disabilities, less attention has been paid to the broad context of the causes of aggression and violence . This workshop will provide a comprehensive review of aggression and violence and its implications for prevention and treatment at the level of individuals, couples and society.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the evidence for evolution of aggression and violence; (2) describedifferences between and within cultures in the degree of aggression and violence; (3) describe the development of aggression and violent behavior within individual humans; (4) describe the implications for prevention and treatment at the level of the individual, couple, and society.
Activities: The workshop will use lecture, video demonstrations, and a group exercise.
Audience: Intermediate including Masters and Doctoral level practitioners and teachers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Gender-Affirming Clinical Skills for Behavior Analysts: Looking Through the Lens of BACB Ethics
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall G
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Fawna Stockwell, Ph.D.
FAWNA STOCKWELL (Upswing Advocates; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago Campus), WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates)
Description: Transgender and gender nonconforming identities have gained increasing visibility within recent years, and gender plays a significant role in how social interactions are constructed for people of all gender identities. This workshop provides an overview of key concepts and social practices related to gender, as well as ways that the BACBs Professional and Ethical Compliance Code addresses gender. The instructors will facilitate a nonjudgmental space for participants to ask questions, explore new content, and brainstorm ways to build gender-affirming practices in their professional work. Participants will learn specific strategies of how Behavior Analysts can promote gender-affirming interactions with their clients, staff, and others. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and audience questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state which guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) are applicable to gender, (2) select key differences between gender identity, biological sex, gender roles, gender expression/presentation, and sexual orientation, (3) describe ways that the gender binary may restrict responding for all individuals, not only transgender people, and (4) state several concrete strategies to apply to the professional workplace that create a gender affirming environment for clients and staff.
Activities: Activities will include: Pre/post quizzes, lecture, small group discussion, FreeWrite exercises, worksheets, video examples, and online learning activities.
Audience: Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are interested in building their competence around the topic of gender. Teachers, therapists, and other helping professionals are also welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): diversity, ethics, gender, sexuality
 
Workshop #W96
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
How to Engage in Ethical Practice When One's Supervisor or Agency is Unethical
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 406/407
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ken Winn, M.S.
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence), KEN WINN (Firefly Autism)
Description: This workshop was created due to many prevalent, alarming, and real life student-generated scenarios provided to the author and instructor during a certification-board approved online course sequence in behavior analysis. The growth in online programs reflects an influx of non-behavior analysts to the field hired, in many cases, faster than certification (and training) programs can keep up. In the wake of fluctuating funding streams and new legislation, how can the community of behavior analysts plan to protect against ethical drift and prepare for new challenges? In order to explore this growing concern, we will explore several case studies from the past 5 years of practice in diverse settings in Colorado, a state relatively new to behavior analysis and to insurance-mandated behavior analysis. Case studies and sets of potential solutions will be presented from at least three distinct practice contexts: Instructing new behavior analysis students with varying previous experiences and advanced degrees; supervision in a hospital setting for psychologist-led teams new to behavior analysis; and community behavior analysis settings supporting learners with autism, developmental disabilities, or needs addressed by state-reimbursed early intervention programs. Some implications are discussed for each area of practice, ending with a call to action.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss rule-governed and contingency shaped examples of code application; (2) Identify features of behavioral environments fostering ethical behavior under optimal (best-case) conditions; (3) Identify discrepancies in resources between best-case and worst-case environments; (4) Tact ways to alter aspects of a behavioral environment contributing to working in long-term worst case scenarios; (5)Identify and generate examples of emergency situations given your client population and behavioral environment; (6) Generate potential solutions (identify connections between situational emergencies or barriers to ethical behavior, and changes in behavioral environments that reduce likelihood of similar future emergency situations); (7)Discuss how to apply ethical, code-complimentary behavior to situations that go beyond common ethics texts.
Activities: Objectives of the workshop will be met through a balance of lecture, small group breakouts, group discussion, and active student responding
Audience: This workshop is intended for new practitioners as well as behavior analysts with many years of experience. Ethical behavior in practice can be a "slippery slope" and practitioners from every level might find this beneficial
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Symposium #22
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Autism Explosion: Using Technology to Teach and Implement Applied Behavior Analysis and Best Practices to Multiple Team Members in Educational Settings
Saturday, May 27, 2017
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center 406/407
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Roz Prescott, M.A.
Chair: Laurie Sperry (Yale School of Medicine; Regis University)
Abstract: With increases in numbers of children identified with learning and behavioral challenges, schools and educational programs face more pressure to provide quality, positive and effective supports for students with special needs. According to the US Department of Education, in 2013 there were over 5.5 million students ages 6-21 in the United States served under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Part B, 21.3% were identified with autism, intellectual disability and/or emotional disturbance. The field of Applied Behavior Analysis continues to expand its reach in educational settings across the globe, but intervention can often be costly, time consuming, too far away and/or at levels outside of an educator or paraprofessionals level of expertise. This session will provide participants with an insight into three strategies for successfully implementing Applied Behavior Analytic practices into educational settings using technology that is accessible, cost effective, on-demand, and geared towards an educator's and/or paraprofessionals' skill level. Each of these methods will provide quantitative outcome data and qualitative narratives regarding their impact and success with clients across the United States and Internationally, and will address challenges of implementing Applied Behavior Analysis into rural and developing settings. Success stories achieved will be shared as well as challenges that continue to exist.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): professional development, schools, students, tehnology
 

Put Me in Coach: Using a Train the Trainer Model Approach to Promote Capacity Building and Effective Implementation of Best Practices in Educational Settings

MARIA WILCOX (Rethink)
Abstract:

The decision to implement new technology platforms in schools requires a financial investment, commitment to change, and time to learn and implement a new program. Stakeholders have priorities of student growth outcomes but also must be concerned with teacher engagement and fidelity of program use in which they have invested. Finding the time, financial and staff resources, and ongoing support continues to be a challenge in educational settings across the country and beyond. Research shows that using a train the trainer approach is an efficient and effective model in developing the professional repertoire of large groups of staff working in schools. The session will look at strategies to develop a train the trainer protocol, discuss the implementation process within school support frameworks, and address outcomes from current models used with a specific platform within the United States. The session will use both quantitative and qualitative data to share successes and continued needs in developing this training method to engage staff and increase the use of applied behavior analytic practices effectively and with success in school settings.

 
Using Technology to Enhance Clinical Supervision and Training in Educational Settings
JAMIE HUGHES-LIKA (ATAP)
Abstract: A growing body of published literature is forming a research basis to inform supervisors on how, when, and why to use technology-based supervision and training. In order to meet the ever-increasing need for clinical supervision in educational settings, supervisors are turning towards technology as a mechanism for supervision. The use of technology provides opportunities to implement evidence-based supervision, evaluate staff competencies, and provide feedback to shape effective interactions between supervisees and clients. A review of an empirically based approach to clinical supervision in educational settings will be presented. In addition, implications and suggestions for future research in this area will be discussed.
 
The Assistant Impact: Utilizing Technology and Applied Behavior Analysis Practices for Effective Development of Paraprofessionals Supporting Students with Autism in Educational Settings
ROZ PRESCOTT (Rethink)
Abstract: Paraprofessionals are pivotal to the success of special education students. There are more 1.2 million paraprofessionals engaged in the education of students (US Department of Labor, 2014). The vast majority of special education paraprofessionals, 97%, report providing 1:1 instruction to students with disabilities (Carter, O’Rourke, Sisco, & Pelsue, 2009). To deal with the shortage of special education teachers and number of students receiving special education services, paraprofessionals are often forced to serve in instructional roles for which they are not qualified (Ghere, 2003). Many paraprofessionals do not receive adequate training to meet the high demands of this profession (However, Ghere and York-Barr (2007). This presentation will provide participants a strategy for effective paraprofessional training using Applied Behavior Analysis, technology, and online learning. Learn how the large school districts in Florida and New York have used technology including video-based training and on-site coaching to increase the knowledge, skills, and behavior of paraprofessionals supporting children with autism and other disabilities. Quantitative outcome data and qualitative narratives regarding the impact and success of this model will be shared. This session will illustrate the importance of the paraprofessional role for student success, and an effective professional development model to enhance this important role.
 
 
Panel #25
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Science of Startups: Tips for Starting and Running an Ethical Business in ABA
Saturday, May 27, 2017
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2A
Area: PRA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adam E. Ventura, M.S.
Chair: Manuel Rodriguez (ABA Technologies, Inc.)
ADAM E. VENTURA (World Evolve, Inc.)
BRETT J. DINOVI (Brett DiNovi & Associates, LLC)
ANDREA MACKEN (Comprehensive Autism Services)
Abstract:

Starting a business in any field can be a scary proposition and often times evokes overwhelming questions like: Am I ready for this? Can I afford this? What if I fail? These questions can be amplified in emerging industries like Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) where the field itself is already on shaky and unstable ground. Moreover, starting a business in a booming field like ABA can be very tempting, especially since demand for services exceeds supply. It is easy to see why so many people want to start an ABA business. However, being prepared for successfully building an enduring and ethical enterprise is a critical set of skills for those brave ABA souls who endeavor to realize their most passionate ambitions. This panel will answer some of the most important questions about starting a business in ABA from ethics to finance to marketing and even OBM as it relates to starting and running a business in ABA.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA Practice, Ethical Practice, Startup Ethics
 
 
Symposium #50
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Practical and Ethical Issues in Current Functional Analysis Methodology: Potential Solutions
Saturday, May 27, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2C
Area: PRA/PCH
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
Chair: Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
Discussant: Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
Abstract:

Conclusions derived from current functional assessment practices heavily rely on indirect methods for gathering data (e.g. FAST, MAS). When a function is experimentally tested, current practices pose ethical, practical and theoretical concerns. Both approaches are problematic in that indirect data produces inaccurate and imprecise data, and experimental methods are typically not driven by a hypothesis, directly reinforce problematic behaviors, and do not involve simultaneous establishment of appropriate alternative behaviors. The first presentation will focus on a comparison between two indirect and one direct data collection method to generate hypothesis regarding function that is more accurate and efficient. The second will propose alternative experimental methods to test a subset of hypothesized functions and involve teaching alternative responses and do not reinforce problematic behaviors. The symposium will conclude with an argument to support (1) direct observation of consequences be used in place of indirect data to develop hypothesis and (2) use of use of alternative experimental methods such a free-operant and trial-based functional analysis procedures. The proposed methodology provides a more ethical, conceptually systematic, and practical assessment of function.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Direct Assessment, Ethics, Functional Assessment
 

Direct Observation of Consequences Toll for Raising Hypothesis About Function of Problematic Behaviors

(Applied Research)
PAULO GUILHARDI (Beacon ABA Services), Sue A. Rapoza-Houle Rapoza (Beacon ABA Services), Jennifer Smith (Beacon ABA Services), Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
Abstract:

Indirect data obtained through interviews such as the Functional Analysis Screening Tool (FAST) and Motivational Assessment Scale (MAS) are commonly used to develop hypothesis regarding function of problematic behavior despite the known inaccuracies produced by indirect data. While researchers use the FAST and MAS as a simple way to raise hypothesis, such use can be problematic if (1) the instrument fails to include the actual function as part of the hypothesis (miss) and (2) does not filter enough possibilities (false alarms). Those outcomes may mislead or waste assessors’ and clients’ time and efforts. The current research aimed to compare the FAST and MAS to a direct observation of consequences that follow problematic behaviors (Beacon Consequence Analysis Form - BCAF). Data from twelve children whose function of problematic behaviors were confirmed by a trial-based or free-operant functional analysis were used in this study. A comparison of the instruments hypothesis and confirmed function was conducted and rates of hits, correct rejection, misses, and false alarms calculated. The results supported the use of the BCAF which had the highest rates of hits (100%) and correct rejections (93.3%) and lowest rates of misses (0%) and false alarms (6.7%) to raise hypothesis regarding potential function.

 

Experimental Methods for Assessing Function Without Direct Reinforcement of Problematic Behaviors

(Applied Research)
JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services), Paulo Guilhardi (Beacon ABA Services), Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
Abstract:

Skinner defined functional analysis as the identification contingencies of reinforcement responsible for the acquisition of maintenance of responses. Iwata et al (1994) introduced a procedure that involved direct manipulations of the antecedent and consequences in order to experimentally determine the function of the problem behavior. While its approach was and has been now widely accepted some ethical, practical and theoretical concerns may be raised. For example, the appropriateness of its wide use may be questionable in some situations due to its directly reinforcing specific topographies of problematic behavior, and it assumes an invariable relationship between antecedent conditions and the consequences maintaining problematic behavior (e.g., problematic behaviors occurring under demand conditions are always reinforced by escape) which is not always the case. For example, a demand condition may function as a discriminative stimulus that attention (follow through with the demand) will be delivered. The present study attempts to identify a trial-based and free-operant alternative to conducting a functional analysis that involves teaching functional communication responses rather than reinforcing problematic behaviors. This method will be described and examples concerning functional analysis of multiple topographies such as prompt dependency, aggressions, and tantrums will be reviewed.

 
 
Panel #69
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Facilitated Communication, Behavior Analysis, Science, Rationality, and Ethics: An Oxford Style Mock Debate
Saturday, May 27, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: AUT/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Jason Travers, Ph.D.
Chair: Jason Travers (University of Kansas)
JASON TRAVERS (University of Kansas)
TRACIE L. LINDBLAD (Monarch House)
JAMES T. TODD (Eastern Michigan University)
Abstract: The academic debate about Facilitated Communication (FC), Rapid Prompting, and related pseudo-interventions for autism should have ended long ago. No science supports FC, and there is much good research to show the mechanisms by which the facilitator unconsciously authors the output attributed to the non-verbal subject. FC continues to be vigorously defended by academics and professionals whose credentials and training should immunize them against the promotion of demonstrated pseudoscience. Indeed, dozens of articles supportive FC have appeared in academic journals in recent years. All of this happens despite the best remediation efforts of scientists, practitioners, and others, including behavior analysts. One problem science-based academics and professionals face in dealing with FC is that its proponents often do not “play by the rules,” using a wide variety of logical fallacies and distracting rhetorical tactics to advance their views. Some of these practices were illustrated in a mock free-form debate over FC at ABAI in 2016, in which the designated FC proponent advanced his position primarily through the use of fallacies and personal attacks, occasionally sprinkled with facts. This proposed panel discussion will employ a more structured Oxford Style approach to illustrate how anti-scientific viewpoint is more likely to fail when the rules require the participants to adhere to facts and employ logical argument.
Instruction Level: Basic
 
 
Panel #79
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Preparing Students to Practice Ethical Applied Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 27, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ilene S. Schwartz, Ph.D.
Chair: Ilene S. Schwartz (University of Washington)
NANCY ROSENBERG (University of Washington)
KATHERINE BATEMAN (University of Washington)
KATHLEEN PETERSON (University of Washington)
Abstract:

Every student in a master's program in applied behavior analysis is required to take a course on ethics. Preparing these new practitioners is one of the most daunting aspects of a training program, yet there are few resources describing strategies to teach students to engage in ethical professional behavior. The purpose of this panel is to describe a process for talking about ethical issues that has been in use in a applied behavior analysis training program. The ethical decision making process will be described and different panelists will describe their experiences working with students as they implement the process.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
 
Panel #215
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
From Reinforcers to Religion: Navigating Ethical and Professional Issues in Multicultural Service Delivery
Sunday, May 28, 2017
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1E/F
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michele R. Traub, Ph.D.
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
KAR YAN CATHERINE TAM (Autism Partnership Hong Kong)
PAMELA OLSEN (The New England Center for Children - Abu Dhabi)
MARGARET BLOOM (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Abstract:

As the number of behavior analysts practicing internationally grows, there is an increasing need for our field to navigate complex social and cultural differences while remaining in line with our fundamental philosophies and our professional and ethical guidelines. Across the United States and the world, differences abound in the acceptability of certain behaviors, the treatment of individuals with disabilities, the use of reinforcement and punishment, and the role of religious, educational, and governmental institutions. The expansion of our field into new markets and areas of practice has outpaced our ethics and compliance code, and many practitioners need to balance social validity and cultural sensitivity with professional guidelines. This panel discussion will bring together practitioners from around the world to share experiences in delivering behavioral services in an increasingly multicultural society. Topics to be addressed include the use of punishment, prioritizing treatment goals, selecting reinforcers, navigating religious and cultural beliefs, and legal and ethical compliance issues.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): culture, ethics, international
 
 
Panel #241
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Ethicists Expound on Elaborate Ethical Events
Sunday, May 28, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: PRA/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jon S. Bailey, Ph.D.
Chair: Jon S. Bailey (Florida State University)
MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
THOMAS L. ZANE (University of Kansas)
JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
Abstract:

This panel is a continuation of previous presentations at ABAI on Behavior Analysts Behaving Badly. An ethicist is one who is sought after for ethical advice and counsel; For this panel we have brought together three such behavior analysis ethicists who are regularly consulted on a wide variety of complex cases concerning the practice of behavior analysis. Difficult cases covering: the use of evidence-based treatments, boundaries of competence, conflicts of interest, terminating behavioral services, conceptual consistency, gifting, supervisory competence and testimonials that have come through the ABAI Hotline as well as other sources will be discussed. To demonstrate the range of approaches used and opinions offered, recent cases will be tendered and each panelist will offer their guidance, we will then debate the merits of our various approaches. Toward the end of the session we will open the floor to questions from the audience and again each ethicist will respond so that the range of tactics and strategies will be apparent.

Instruction Level: Advanced
 
 
Symposium #280
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Emerging Practices in Assessment and Treatment of Disruptive Behavior: Novel Applications of Telehealth and Exploratory Data Analysis
Sunday, May 28, 2017
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1A/B
Area: DDA
CE Instructor: Joy Pollard, Ph.D.
Chair: Joy Pollard (Behavior Change Institute; Stanford University)
Discussant: Scott S. Hall (Stanford University)
Abstract:

Functional analysis (FA) is the gold standard for the assessment of severe disruptive behavior. Researchers in this field are actively working to refine the assessment and methods of interpretation of FAs in an effort to improve client outcomes. In this symposium, we will discuss methods that may be used to enhance clinical practices by way of improved efficiencies and access to care. The first paper will review the use of exploratory data analysis (EDA) to increase the time efficiency and objectivity of functional analysis (FA) interpretation. The second paper applies the EDA method to interpret FA data and subsequently coach parents via telehealth to implement a FCT protocol to reduce challenging behavior in children with Fragile X syndrome. The third paper utilizes an automated telehealth messaging system to obtain electronic data to assess generality of child outcomes outside of treatment sessions. Finally, we will conclude with an overview of ethical considerations and guidance on the development of the clinical and business infrastructure for telehealth service delivery.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional analysis, problem behavior, technology, telehealth
 

Enhancing the Efficiency and Objectivity of Functional Analysis Data Interpretation: A Step-by-Step Guide

(Theory)
SCOTT S. HALL (Stanford University), Joy Pollard (Behavior Change Institute; Stanford University), Katerina Monlux (Stanford University)
Abstract:

Functional analysis (FA) is a well-established assessment procedure designed to facilitate the selection of function-based treatments for problem behavior. Despite recent efforts to improve the objectivity of FA data interpretation, visual analysis of FA data requires applying a large set of complicated decision rules and subjective judgments that could result in interpretation errors and compromise subsequent treatment selection. In this article, we examined whether a common data analysis procedure employed in other areas of scientific inquiry - Exploratory Data Analysis (EDA) - could enhance the efficiency and objectivity of FA data interpretation. We first demonstrate how EDA plots can be generated from FA data using an example dataset. We then devise operational definitions to identify differentiated outcomes, the highest condition, and downward and upward trends, to facilitate the interpretation of the EDA plots. Finally, we generate EDA plots from the example FA datasets presented in Roane et al. (2013) and use the operational definitions we developed to interpret each FA. In each case, outcomes were consistent with those reported by Roane et al. Importantly, EDA plots significantly reduced the number of data points to be examined, allowing the FA data to be interpreted more efficiently and objectively. EDA techniques could therefore be employed as an adjunct or alternative to other visual analysis approaches designed to augment FA data interpretation. Continued refinement of the methods by which FA data are interpreted will likely result in improved treatment selection and greater acceptance of FA procedures by the wider scientific community in general.

 

Preliminary Findings of a Telehealth Model to Treat Problem Behaviors in Boys With Fragile X Syndrome

(Applied Research)
KATERINA MONLUX (Stanford University), Arlette Bujanda (Behavior Change Institute; Stanford University), Joy Pollard (Behavior Change Institute; Stanford University), Scott S. Hall (Stanford University)
Abstract:

Many individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a rare genetic disorder associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), commonly show severe problem behaviors such as self-injury and aggression that can be extremely distressing to families and can severely impact the child�s quality of life and educational placement. Although pharmacotherapies are commonly prescribed to treat problem behaviors in this population, evidence suggests that social-environmental factors play a significant role in the development and maintenance of these behaviors. We therefore evaluated whether targeted function-based behavioral treatments for problem behaviors in FXS, conducted via telehealth, could reduce problem behaviors in this disorder. Following in home assessments to identify the function of disruptive behaviors, caregivers received daily coaching via telemedicine to implement function-based treatments over a 12-week period. Preliminary findings suggest that telehealth behavioral treatment is an effective model for reducing problem behavior in children with FXS. This study will therefore help inform treatment decisions and aid clinicians in determining the appropriateness of pharmacotherapies in genetic conditions such as FXS.

 

Evaluating the Generality of Therapuetic Gains via Telehealth

(Applied Research)
NEALETTA HOUCHINS-JUAREZ (Vanderbilt University), Abigail Morgan (Vanderbilt University), Joseph Michael Lambert (Vanderbilt University), Mary Matthews (Vanderbilt University), Somer Wiggins (Vanderbilt University), Kayla Rechelle Randall (Vanderbilt University )
Abstract:

Generalization is essential to the social validity of effective intervention. However, it is difficult to evaluate the generality of therapeutic gains across all facets of a clients life because therapists are not available to collect data at these times. One solution is parent report; however, ensuring consistent and accurate data without presenting undue burden to family is challenging. In our study, we employed an automated texting system to send parents daily individualized-behavioral questions at prescribed times during all phases of intervention (i.e., assessment through discharge). Responding remained high throughout the investigation, suggesting texting may be a viable reporting option (although questions about reliability/accuracy remain). Importantly, obtained data indicate that problem behavior persisted outside of therapeutic sessions for the duration of the study; even after it had been eliminated during these sessions by parents who were trained to fidelity via behavior-skills training. These results suggest a greater focus on generalization is merited.

 

Ethical Considerations in the Development of a Telehealth Service Delivery Model: Recommendations for Clinicians and Behavior Analytic Organizations

(Service Delivery)
JOY POLLARD (Behavior Change Institute), Kathleen Karimi (Behavior Change Institute), Michelle Ficcaglia (Behavior Change Institute)
Abstract:

Telehealth service delivery models have become increasingly popular in the provision of behavior analytic services. Telehealth provides an opportunity to enhance care by providing clinicians and consumers with the ability to bridge issues related to geography by improving access to behavioral healthcare and reducing health disparities between urban and rural populations. As technology advances, this raises for consideration ethical challenges that may arise within this new model. Further, changes in the clinical and business infrastructure may be warranted to ensure safe, effective, and quality treatment for consumers. This paper explores ethical concerns when designing a telehealth service model within a behavior analytic organization. Recommendations related to the development of clinical and business infrastructure are provided to guide clinicians and organizations to promoting ethically sound services.

 
 
Panel #306
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Considerations in the Treatment of Severe Problem Behavior in the Home Setting
Sunday, May 28, 2017
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kim Phillips, M.A.
Chair: Alexandra K Petz (Autism Home Support Services)
LISA K. DWORKIN (Autism Home Support Services)
KIM PHILLIPS (Autism Home Support Services)
CHRISTIAN BENAVIDES (Beacon ABA Services)
Abstract: Serving individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in home settings is a growing sector in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). With this comes a number of ethical dilemmas related to safety, effectiveness, and environmental constraints. Given that individuals with ASD frequently demonstrate rates of challenging behaviors higher than those with intellectual disabilities but without autism (Brereton, Tonge, & Einfeld, 2006; Emerson & Hatton, 2007b)—this is an area that must be addressed by almost every in-home ABA practitioner and family of a child with ASD. When these behaviors become severe safety risks (due to age/size, learning history, etc.) these ethical dilemmas become more fraught as families’ abilities to safely manage behavior without support staff, availability of other placements, safety of ABA therapists, and efficacy of ABA programming all come into play. While schools and residential placements have resources to keep clients with severe behaviors and others safe, the home setting does not—frequently leading to reliance on crisis teams, hospitalization, and emergency placements. The panel discussion will focus on ethical considerations and decision making in addressing severe problem behavior in home settings with specific attention placed on case conceptualization, risk assessment, parent training, and crisis intervention.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Considerations, Problem Behavior
 
 
Symposium #321
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Evidence-Based Decision-Making: Considerations From Four Contexts
Sunday, May 28, 2017
5:00 PM–6:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2A
Area: PRA/EDC
CE Instructor: Susan Wilczynski, Ph.D.
Chair: Timothy A. Slocum (Utah State University)
Discussant: Ronnie Detrich (The Wing Institute)
Abstract:

Evidence-based practice can be characterized as a framework for decision- making. The presumption is if practitioners base their decisions on the integration of best available evidence, professional judgment, client values and context, then this framework can be a basis for all decisions practitioners must make in their professional practice. The four presentations in this session reflect how this framework can be applied across very different contexts.. The presentation by Susan Wilczynski discusses methods for training practicing applied behavior analysts to fully utilize the evidence-based practice decision-making model. The presentations by Larry Maheady and David Forbush consider challenges to training education professionals to adopt aspects of the evidence-based practice decision-making framework. Maheady will speak to issues in preparing pre-service teachers to adopt a data-based decision making process. Forbush will speak to issues in developing a statewide professional development program for educators. The presentation by Wayne Fuqua addresses issues of training applied behavior analysts to detect and troubleshoot treatment failures All presenters will highlight the relationship between the evidence-based practice decision-making framework and the Behavior Analysis Certification Board?s Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): decision-making, evidence-based
 

Training Behavior Analysts to Use the Evidence-Based Practice Decision-Making Model

(Service Delivery)
SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (Ball State University)
Abstract:

The evidence-based practice of ABA (EBP of ABA) decision-making model effectively integrates relevant sources of information that have historically been important to behavior analysis. For example, data on treatment effectiveness gleaned from the literature, our behavioral principles, and the clients history must be combined with issues of social validity and treatment feasibility to identify a treatment that is most likely to produce favorable client outcomes. This presentation addresses how the field of applied behavior analysis can bring the EBP of ABA to scale. To meet this goal, training must occur at several levels. For example, graduate training programs must offer training and continuing education units must be offered at conferences. But the greater emphasis in this presentation is on how to help practicing behavior analysts understand that the EBP of ABA decision-making framework provides a guide to practitioners in how to integrate our historic emphasis on variables such as treatment acceptability, treatment integrity, social validity, and client repertoire with data on client outcomes. A personalized system of instruction (PSI) will serve as an example of how to demonstrate how these variables can be integrated to select, retain, adapt, or reject treatments throughout the decision-making process.

 

Improving Evidence-Based Decision-Making Among Pre-Service General and Special Education Teachers

(Service Delivery)
LAWRENCE J. MAHEADY (SUNY Buffalo State)
Abstract:

This paper describes two inter-related efforts to improve evidence-based decision-making skills among novice general and special education teachers. The first approach utilized a two-course research design sequence to generate applied data sets from single case studies conducted by small groups of novice teachers. These data sets, in turn, are used blindly by other teams of novice teachers in a graduate assessment course to make ongoing data-based decisions. Novice teachers in the assessment course meet weekly to review individual data sets that are presented sequentially (i.e., one phase at a time A-B-A-B), and respond to series of decision-making questions. Assessment team members graph data sets for their target classes and two different individuals each week. They independently write responses to phase-specific, data-based questions, share them in weekly team meetings, and make recommendations for how to proceed instructionally (i.e., continue, adapt, or abandon interventions). Individual teams then present their respective evidence-based practices and data-based findings to the entire class. Organizational and pedagogical challenges to preparing novice educators to adopt aspects of an evidence-based practice decision-making framework are discussed.

 
Designing and Implementing an Evidence-Supported State-Wide Professional Development System for Educators
(Service Delivery)
DAVID FORBUSH (Utah State University)
Abstract: The Utah Professional Development Network (UPDN) is charged with enhancing social, emotional, and academic outcomes for students with disabilities in Utah. The UPDN strives to achieve these outcomes by enhancing educators’ knowledge, skills and dispositions through professional development (PD). The UPDN engages school and district level administrators intensively in systems change actions to support their personnel’s attainment of targeted knowledge, skills, and supporting dispositions aligning with gaps in student performance. These systems changes include adoption of evidence-based practices (EBP), transferring these practices from PD settings to school and classroom settings through collaboration, training and coaching, adapting non-core EBPs elements to increase adoption, function, sustainability, and scaling over time. The UPDN applies a 10 step PD planning process, and utilizes a five level PD evaluation process among other tools, in pursuit of targeted project outcomes. This presentation will focus on these tools/processes, and the decision making frameworks associated with select components.
 

Detecting and Troubleshooting Treatment "Failures": An Essential Component of Evidence-Based Practice

(Service Delivery)
RICHARD WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a multi-component process in which practitioners select, refine and deliver clinical services based on a) the best available scientific evidence, b) unique client and contextual features, c) training and competence of the practitioner, d) ongoing clinical progress monitoring and decision making and e) early detection and trouble shooting of treatment failures." Developed initially in medicine, EBP has been extended to the delivery of applied behavior analysis (ABA) services and is considered an essential feature of ethical and high quality ABA service delivery. This presentation will offer practical advice for ABA practitioners who wish to incorporate EBP strategies into their clinical services and thus improve the quality and accountability of ABA and clinical behavior analysis service delivery. Objectives (at least 3): Attendees will 1) identify the essential features of evidence based practice in ABA 2) select and use behavioral data and visual displays to monitor clinical progress 3) describe strategies to detect and trouble shoot treatment failures

 
 
Symposium #326
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
An Evaluation of Methods Improving the Safety and Efficiency of the Functional Analysis and Treatment Process
Sunday, May 28, 2017
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1C/D
Area: DDA/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
Chair: Joshua Jessel (Child Study Center)
Abstract:

The functional analysis and treatment of problem behavior involves the identification of the reinforcers maintaining problem behavior, and the development of a function-based treatment whereby those same reinforcers are presented contingent on appropriate behavior. When working with children who exhibit severe problem behavior, the safety of those involved (patient and therapist) is of the utmost concern. Often times, modifications to assessment and treatment procedures can be made to ensure (a) the functional analysis, a context intended to evoke problem behavior, is as brief as possible and (b) those components which could potentially worsen problem behavior are eliminated. The first study evaluates the efficacy of a 5-min functional analysis as a tool to inform the development of a treatment intended to reduce the evocation of problem behavior. The following two studies in this symposium evaluate the manipulation of reinforcer dimensions in treatments where extinction cannot be implemented due to the severity of problem behavior. The results of these studies support the use of multiple modifications that could improve the safety for all those involved with the functional analysis and treatment process.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): differential reinforcement, efficiency, functional analysis, safety
 

An Evaluation of the Single-Test Interview-Informed Synthesized Contingency Analysis

RACHEL METRAS (University of North Texas), Joshua Jessel (Child Study Center), Gregory P. Hanley (Western New England University), Mahshid Ghaemmaghami (University of the Pacific), Melinda Robison (Child Study Center)
Abstract:

Functional analysis can often be a lengthy process requiring time and resources not readily available to practitioners working with children who exhibit severe problem behavior. The interview-informed synthesized contingency analysis (IISCA) was recently developed as an alternative functional analysis format that improved analytic efficiency by requiring only 25 min to conduct (Jessel, Hanley, & Ghaemmaghami, 2016). Furthermore, in a reanalysis of 10 analyses, Jessel et al. (2016) found that a within-session analysis could reduce the process to as little as a single 5-min session. We extended this previous research by conducting what was termed the single-test IISCA with two boys who exhibited severe problem behavior. A function-based treatment package, including reinforcement thinning, informed by the results of the single-test IISCA nearly eliminated problem behavior for both participants. We suggest that the single-test IISCA could be a viable alternative to other functional analysis formats when time is limited.

 

Manipulating Dimensions of Reinforcement to Reduce Rates of Problem Behavior in the Absence of Escape Extinction

Sandra Beatriz Castellon (Florida Institute of Technology), ALISON M. BETZ (Coastal Behavior Analysis), Krystal Aguirre (Florida Institute of Technology), Madeleine Diane Keevy (Florida Institute of Technology; The Scott Center for Autism), Ansley Catherine Hodges (Nemours Children's Hospital)
Abstract:

Although escape extinction is often included as a treatment component for children with problem behavior, it may not always be feasible to implement in many cases. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which manipulating dimensions of the reinforcement for the alternative response (i.e., compliance) influenced rates of problem behavior in the absence of escape extinction. Specifically, we compared the effects of manipulating the quality and magnitude of reinforcement for the alternative response. Additionally, we evaluated the most effective treatment under leaner schedules of reinforcement to further evaluate treatment efficacy. Results from the study suggested that manipulating the quality of reinforcement produced more robust results during treatment comparison for escape-maintained problem behavior. Further, as the schedule of reinforcement for alternative responding was thinned, lower levels of problem behavior were maintained at increasingly lean schedules when alternative responses resulted in the delivery of a high-quality reinforcer.

 

Investigation of Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior Without Extinction for Escape-Maintained Problem Behavior

ADAM M. BRIGGS (University of Nebraska Medical Center, Munroe-Meyer Institute), Claudia L. Dozier (The University of Kansas), Amber Lessor (University of Kansas), Bertilde U Kamana (University of Kansas), Rachel Jess (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

Previous research indicates that manipulating dimensions of reinforcement during differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) for situations in which extinction (EXT) cannot be implemented is a potential approach for treating problem behavior. Therefore, we replicated and extended previous research by evaluating the effects of DRA without EXT for escape-maintained problem behavior by determining (a) the conditions under which DRA without EXT was effective for decreasing and maintaining low levels of problem behavior and (b) whether intervention effects would maintain while the token exchange schedule for the alternative response (i.e., compliance) was thinned. Results showed that effective treatments were developed in the absence of EXT by manipulating the magnitude and quality of reinforcement for compliance for all four participants and maintained when reinforcement schedules were thinned for three of the four participants. Implications and future directions related to manipulating dimensions of reinforcement for alternative responding without EXT for problem behavior maintained by social-negative reinforcement and schedule thinning are discussed.

 
 
Symposium #376
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysis: Present Status of the Field in Latin America and Where We are Going
Monday, May 29, 2017
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1C/D
Area: DDA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mapy Chavez Cueto, Ph.D.
Chair: Mapy Chavez Cueto (Alcanzando)
Abstract:

Professionals working on the Behavior Analysis field in Latin America come together to share their experience and objetives for the future.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, latin america, spanish, staff training
 

Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism in Latin America

ANTUANETE CHAVEZ (Alcanzando, Inc.), Sandra Granados (Alcanzando, Inc.), Lorena Vera (Alcanzando, Inc.), Patricia Rojas (Alcanzando, Inc.), Mapy Chavez Cueto (Alcanzando, Inc.)
Abstract:

Alcanzando is a not for profit organization that provides educational services based on the principles of applied behavior analysis to children with autism around the Spanish speaking world. This presentation is meant to share the data from their services over the last 8 years, to discuss ethical and cultural issues that had been encountered, as well as the solutions that have been and continue to be implemented. Data regarding acquisition of skills by students as well as staff will be shared.

 

Using Behavior Analysis to Prepare Children With Disabilities in Cusco, Peru for a Successful Future

Celeste Marion (Executive Director of Manos Unidas Peru), BELEN RODRIGUEZ (Alcanzando), Mapy Chavez Cueto (Alcanzando)
Abstract:

Manos Unidas Peru is a registered Peruvian non-profit organization founded in 2008 as the first and only private/non-for-profit school for special education in Cusco, Peru. Today Manos Unidas Peru consists of three programs: ?Camino Nuevo? el Centro de Educacion Basica Especial Particular (est. 2009), The Inclusion Project for children in traditional classrooms (est. 2011), ?Phawarispa? vocational training program (est. 2014). This presentation is meant to share data regarding the obstacles encountered as well as roads to success built in these 8 years. Pre and post data of our students will be shared.

 

Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism: Our Experience in Ecuador

MARIA CHANG (Centro Enigma), Mapy Chavez Cueto (Alcanzando), Antuanete Chavez (Alcanzando)
Abstract:

Centro Enigma is the first educational center founded in Ecuador to provide behavior analytic services to children in the Autism Spectrum. This presentation will discuss the Ethical and Cultural considerations as well as barriers we have encountered when providing services en Ecuador. Data from the programs for our students as well as staff will be shared.

 
 
Panel #383
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Responsibilities of a Board Certified Behavior Analyst: Maintaining Professional Identity as an Interdisciplinary Team Member
Monday, May 29, 2017
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2C
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica Franco, Ph.D.
Chair: Lupe Castaneda (Behavior Pathways, LLC)
JESSICA FRANCO (University of Texas at Austin)
BERENICE DE LA CRUZ (Autism Community Network)
MEGAN G. KUNZE (University of Oregon)
Abstract: Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has long held a prominent role in evidence based practices for children with autism. Continued growth in numbers of professionals adapting and learning ABA practices, calls Board Certified Behavior Analysts to be ethically responsible for the fidelity of the analysis and science behind behavioral interventions. Ignoring this responsibility puts our field at further risk of scrutiny, misinterpretation and folklore. According to the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts by the BACB (2014), “Behavior analysts have an obligation to the science of behavior and the profession of behavior analysis”. The panel will discuss: a) the ethical requirements posed to all certificates under this code of ethics, b) their unique experiences and ethical roles with interdisciplinary teaming in assessment, intervention services, university faculty, and supervision, and c) how the growing demand for certified practitioners may impact the future of ABA practices, other disciplines and our ethical responsibilities to our clients.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, collaboration, ethics, interdisciplinary
 
 
Panel #406
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Telehealth: A Viable Option for Ethical and Effective ABA Services
Monday, May 29, 2017
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2A
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Janet Vasquez, M.S.
Chair: Janet Vasquez (World Evolve Therapy)
KIMBERLY D WOOLERY (World Evolve Therapy)
LAURIE TARTER (Sunny Days, Inc.)
KARELIX ALICEA (Lotus Behavioral Interventions)
Abstract: The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has increased markedly in recent decades, which has resulted in a high demand for providers of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) therapy in the United States and internationally. In order to meet these increasing demands, ABA providers have found the Telehealth Service Delivery Model, which has received a growing interest over the past few years, as a viable option for ethical and effective ABA services. Telehealth services differ significantly from on-site services, as it requires clinicians to make special considerations when providing services remotely. This panel will discuss several critical areas related to the telehealth model, which include, but are not limited to, setting up a Telehealth program, using HIPAA-compliant technology, conducting effective assessments, providing ongoing remote supervision and parent training, as well as documentation and reporting. Each of the panel members will contribute their own unique experiences as they pertain to each of these key areas.
Instruction Level: Basic
 
 
Invited Tutorial #407
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Applied Ethics for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Monday, May 29, 2017
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 4
Area: PRA/AUT
BACB/QABA CE Offered. CE Instructor: Steven Woolf, Ph.D.
Chair: John M. Guercio (Benchmark Human Services)
STEVEN WOOLF (Beacon ABA Services)
Dr. Woolf has been a BCBA-D for over 17 years and is the Senior Vice President of Beacon ABA Services, which is the largest home based EIBI service provider in the Northeast. He regularly communicates with state officials at Department of Public Health, Department of Developmental Services, special education directors, and state legislators on the funding and quality of ABA services. Dr. Woolf has authored publications and regularly presents ABA research at state and national conferences. He has extensive experience providing treatment to children and adults with disabilities. He is the former past president, one of the founders of MassABA, executive member on CTABA, executive member of MassABA, and chairperson of the ABAI Chapter leadership committee. Dr. Woolf's specialty areas include managing large scale home-based service delivery system and licensure of behavior analysts. He has served on state committees to define behavior analyst licensure standards and regulations. Dr. Woolf also has significant experience working with numerous health insurance providers relative to funding ABA treatment and presents regularly on the new AMA CPT codes.
Abstract:

This presentation addresses some of the most common ethical issues behavioral practitioners encounter when providing home-based and school services. As the numbers of BCBAs have grown over the last few years and ABA services funding increased, behavior analysts are increasingly exposed to ethical dilemmas that may jeopardize their certification or license. The presenter shall complete a data based overview of some of the most common ethical complaints encountered by related human service professionals enforced by state regulatory boards. The presentation also highlights survey data based on ethical challenges experienced by practicing behavior analyst. The presenter will also provide analysis of state behavior analyst licensing regulations cross referenced to the BACB compliance code. Finally, the presenter shall provide strategies for dealing and responding to ethical issues commonly encounter by practicing behavioral professionals. This workshop addresses a variety of ethical and best practice issues: in-field supervision of paraprofessional staff, appropriate discharge/termination of cases, fraudulent billing, school consultation, documentation of services, informed consent, misrepresentation, punishment as intervention, and maintaining of clinical records.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Licensed BCBAs, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list the three most common ethical dilemmas encountered by practicing behavior analysts; (2) identify three sections of the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code most applicable to providing home- and school-based ABA-based treatment; (3) list three antecedent control strategies to avoid controversial ethical situations when delivering services in schools and homes.
 
 
Symposium #419
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethics and the Treatment of Problematic Sexual Behavior in Residential Settings
Monday, May 29, 2017
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1C/D
Area: DDA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kimberly E. Church, Psy.D.
Chair: Kimberly E. Church (Human Development Center)
Abstract:

While sexual behavior is not inherently problematic, contextually inappropriate sexual behavior can be harmful to both clients and communities. The purpose of this symposium is to present perspectives of those who have worked in the areas harmful or problematic sexual behavior, and to examine data-based decision making and ethical considerations for the clients and communities they serve.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): data-based, problematic sexual, sexually harmful
 

Ethics of Restricting Age-Appropriate Activities to Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities With Harmful Sexual Behavior

DUNCAN PRITCHARD (Aran Hall School), Veda Richards (The Senad Group), Heather Penney (Aran Hall School), F. Charles Mace (Aran Hall School)
Abstract:

A multi-component behavioral intervention (MCBI) was associated with a reduction in severe problem behavior, including harmful sexual behavior in some young people attending a residential program in a rural area of the UK. Those young people who adhered to the program earned access to the internet and social media and also participated in staff supported community-based activities such as attending college and work experience. These young people were also allowed to travel further from the school to go to, for example, the cinema, sports events, and restaurants. Those young people who did not adhere to the program by not demonstrating consistent levels of safe and appropriate were denied access to some of these activities. The ethical considerations of denying young people access to age-appropriate activities will be discussed.

 
Overview of a Sexual Behavior Treatment Package Combining Rule Governed and Contingency Shaped Behavioral Interventions
STEPHANI FAUERBACH (Human Development Center), Kimberly E. Church (Human Development Center), Ashley Tomaka (Human Development Center)
Abstract: Due to ethical and safety considerations in treating problematic sexual behavior, it is often necessary to truncate baselines and accelerate the assessment process to initiate treatment designed to prevent further occurrences of harmful behavior. Antecedent manipulations, including verbal descriptions of behavioral contingencies, combined with shaping may provide an effective way to prevent or reduce the occurrence of problematic sexual behavior and promote pro-social behaviors. An overview and longitudinal clinical data for a residential treatment package for adult males diagnosed with intellectual disabilities, co-occurring mental health disorders and a history of problematic sexual behavior will be presented. Training includes programs on societal rules for appropriate sexual behavior, along with the consequences of appropriate or inappropriate behavioral responses. Clinical case examples illustrating a long-term data driven treatment process incorporating the use of rule and consequence anticipation as an adjunct to treatment will be provided, along with suggestions for applied research.
 
Real World Examples of Ethical Code Applications for Behavior Analytic Treatment of Sexual Offending Behavior
ASHLEY TOMAKA (Human Development Center), Kimberly E. Church (Human Development Center), Stephani Fauerbach (Human Development Center)
Abstract: Ethical considerations are an integral part of service delivery in behavior analysis, especially when the focus of treatment is problematic sexual behavior. In this presentation, case examples requiring ethically sound data-based decisions will be presented and discussed while highlighting relevant elements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s (BACB’s) Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (the “Code”). Common ethical dilemmas arising in service provision include balancing individual rights and community safety, designing effective treatment targeting covert or low frequency behavior, and assessing treatment effectiveness and planning for appropriate treatment fadeout. Clinical data will be presented to illustrate real world examples of how these challenges may be addressed safely and effectively. Clinical findings support an individualized data-based approach based on ongoing assessment through probes and in situ monitoring.
 
 
Symposium #495
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Considerations for Collaborative Service Delivery
Monday, May 29, 2017
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1C/D
Area: DDA/CSS
CE Instructor: Laura Bassette, Ph.D.
Chair: Laura Bassette (Ball State University)
Abstract:

Providing effective ethical treatment to clients with autism and/or other developmental disabilities across the lifespan requires collaborative interdisciplinary teamwork between parents, teachers, behavior analysts, and other service providers. Specifically, practitioners who work in diverse settings may need to understand different organizational cultures, relevant laws, applicable policies, perspectives, and procedures from others who do not come from a behavior analytical framework. Behavior analysts who are knowledgeable of how various environmental stimuli contribute or negate to collaborative efforts are in a unique position to contribute to the success of the collaborative effort. This symposium will provide an overview of the various entities that can potentially impact cooperation amongst teams across various settings (e.g., school based special education settings, home-based applied behavior analysis settings, residential adult service settings) and how these influence interdisciplinary team members perspectives. The application of the ethical code and generalization of ethical behavior and skills will be discussed in relation to relevant ethical scenarios.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): collaboration, ethics, interdisciplinary teams, service provision
 
Ethical Collaboration in Behavior Analysis
(Service Delivery)
LAURA BASSETTE (Ball State University)
Abstract: Effective collaboration requires behavior analysts acquire, maintain, and generalize a complex repertoire of social, communicative, and professional behavior. Furthermore, the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts mandates that behavior analysts engage in appropriate collaborative activities to advocate for the needs of their clients and provide effective treatment. It is imperative for behavior analysts to acknowledge how their behavior: influences the collaborative effort, impacts team members’ perceptions of behavior analysis, and address the overall ethical implications of these for clients. While behavior analysts are required to collaborate with others, these skills are not typically the focus of master’s level applied behavior analysis higher education programs and behavior analysts previously reported that issues with collaboration are a result of other team members’ lack of effort. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss relevant strategies behavior analysts can use to elicit ethical collaborative behavior among team members through capitalizing on known behavior analytical principles. Specific antecedent and consequence based strategies (e.g., assigning team members to specific roles during team meeting, strategies to effectively pair yourself as reinforcing with interdisciplinary team members) and managing differing expectations among stakeholders & team members will be discussed.
 

Promoting Positive Collaboration Between Parents of Children With Autism and Educators Using Behavior Analysis

(Service Delivery)
JESSICA BOSTIC (Ball State University), Laura Bassette (Ball State University)
Abstract:

Positive collaboration among educators and parents is a vital component when developing a successful Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for students receiving special education services. Parents of students diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) report overall negative perceptions of educators in terms of adequate preparation and knowledge of their childs unique disability. The breakdown in this partnership can be attributed to a lack of communication initiation from teachers, insufficient teacher knowledge, and differences in attitudes and opinions regarding the needs of the individual child/student. With the rapid increase in the prevalence of ASD in todays classrooms, it is highly probable that both general and special education teachers will encounter multiple students with ASD each year; however, most teachers receive minimal preparation in evidence-based practices for students with ASD. This presentation will provide recommendations for how the partnership between teachers and parents of students with ASD can be mended through high-quality training opportunities under the principles and guidelines of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA).

 
Common Challenges to Providing Ethically Appropriate Evidence-Based Practice in ICF/ID and Waiver Funded Settings
(Service Delivery)
FRITZ KRUGGEL (Supportive Community Innovations)
Abstract: The majority of individuals with developmental disabilities and/or autism who receive applied behavior analytic therapy and/or supports will also receive some amount of Long Term Care (LTC) services over the course of their lifespan. LTC for adults with disabilities typically includes a wide range of services such as: case management, residential, behavioral, and vocational rehabilitation. Currently over 8 million individuals receive publicly funded, Long Term Care disability services nationwide, at a cost of over $147 billion dollars annually. These facts alone reveal with tangible relevance the importance of efficacious collaboration with others responsible for providing care to individuals receiving LTC services, and thus the need to address how our ethics are informed and animated when working in these settings. Behavior Analysts working in ABA therapy, school, and Home and Community Based settings need to understand the variables present in Long Term Care environments and how they impact collaborative efforts in the field. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of the factors that impact LTC services and how this relates to behavior analytical services.
 
 
Panel #499
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Risky Business Revisited: Ethics, Interventions, and Consultation in the Area of Sexuality
Monday, May 29, 2017
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
Chair: Worner Leland (Upswing Advocates)
SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University)
KIMBERLY E. CHURCH (Human Development Center)
Abstract:

The field of behavior analysis acknowledges our responsibility to ethically provide services that support the autonomy of and maximize reinforcement for our clients, while also maximizing benefit to the community at large. Perhaps in no arena is this responsibility more pertinent than in that of sexual behavior. Cognizance around ethical issues as well as potential legal implications is of highest importance, especially in situations in which our clients have developmental disabilities. This panel will serve as a sounding board for common issues faced in the field as behavior analysts who address potential behavior change surrounding sexual behavior. Panelists will provide anecdotal information to inform best practices, surrounding the ethics of consultation and intervention, and the ethical considerations of each. Past Risky Business panels will serve as a brief touchpoint for this panel, as our panelists continue to bring us new and relevant information in the realm of sexual behavior.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): developmental disabilities, ethics, sexual behavior
 

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