Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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43rd Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2017

CE by Type: QABA


 

Workshop #W3
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Application of the Play and Language (PAL) Program for Early Autism Intervention
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Evelyn Amanda Boutot, Ph.D.
EVELYN AMANDA BOUTOT (Texas State University), SAMUEL DIGANGI (Arizona State University)
Description: This hands-on workshop will teach participants how to use a new early intervention assessment and curriculum, the PAL, to develop instructional programs for young children with or at risk for autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities. Based on 2 years of pilot use and 2 years of broader practice, the PAL is designed for infants and toddlers ages 0-5 years of age and covers five domains: Imitation and play skills, joint attention and social interaction, visual discrimination, receptive language, expressive language. The authors/presenters will provide participants with a basic overview of the PAL development (over a 10 year period, including pilot testing and content analysis by subject matter experts), demonstrate and provide opportunities to practice scoring the assessment for initial program development and on-going progress monitoring, and will demonstrate and provide practice on developing an intervention program based on assessment results. Presenters will also describe how the PAL should be part of a comprehensive assessment protocol, including other assessments such as the VB-Mapp as a companion assessment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) List and describe the 5 domains areas covered by the PAL; (2) Describe at least 2 uses of the PAL and for whom it is suited; (3) Score the PAL across multiple domains for both initial program planning and on-going progress monitoring; (4) Describe how the PAL can be used to develop and monitor intervention programs; (5) Discuss the usefulness of the PAL as part of a comprehensive assessment protocol.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, discussion, guided practice, small group breakout, and video observation.
Audience: BCaBAs and BCBAs/BCBA-Ds working with infants, toddlers and/or preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disability or delay. Target audience are those whose responsibility it is to assess for initial program development and/or on-going progress monitoring.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): assessment, infants, play, program development
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Behavioral Relaxation: Training and Scale
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall C
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Victoria Stout Kubal, M.S.
VICTORIA STOUT KUBAL (California Consulting and Research Institute)
Description: Relaxation techniques are an integral part of the successful treatment of those exhibiting anxiety-related, pain-related, and/or anger-related behaviors. The sooner a client learns relaxation and other types of self-control techniques, the safer his/her internal and external environments may become. In addition, due to limitations in funding, providers must often demonstrate that extensive treatment progress has been made within a relatively short period of time. Poppen's (1998) Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) is an assessment tool for measuring the progress of an individual demonstrating the 10 overt relaxed behaviors taught to criterion with Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT). BRT can be an effective part of treatment for individuals with emotional/mental disorders, hyperactivity, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, physical limitations, and/or restricted cognitive/intellectual capabilities. This workshop will provide an opportunity to experience Poppen's (1998) Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT) by means of labeling, modeling, imitation, practice, and corrective feedback. Once workshop participants are proficient in demonstrating URT and can verbally describe these 10 relaxed behaviors and corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors, they will be taught how to assess URT using the BRS.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Position his/her own body in alignment with the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT); (2) Write a description of each of the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from URT in his/her own words and provide corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors; (3) Give another individual appropriate feedback so that the other individual can correct himself/herself according to the 10 URT postures; (4) Observe, record, and assess another individual's performance of the 10 relaxed behaviors from URT by accurately using the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS).
Activities: Verbal Behavior: Listen to a presentation regarding the physiological effects of relaxation, the history of using relaxation training to treat psychological and physical disorders, and Poppen's (1998) development of Behavioral Relaxation Training and the Behavioral Relaxation Scale. Labeling and Modeling: View a live demonstration of the 10 postures included in Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT). Each relaxed posture will be labeled, described topographically, and demonstrated physically. Modeling and Imitation: Learn how to breathe diaphragmatically, then imitate the other 9 relaxed behaviors of URT while viewing an instructor as model. After each participant has proficiently demonstrated each posture separately, he/she will practice relaxing all 10 areas at the same time. Feedback: Practice silently while the instructors are giving each participant individual corrective feedback. Later, workshop participants will form pairs and alternate practicing URT and giving each other corrective feedback. Criterion Tests: Take URT Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion test. Take BRS Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion test. Assessment: Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) scoring methodology will be explained and demonstrated. All observers, including the instructor, will simultaneously score the BRS for the model.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is comprised of practitioners who are certified by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board at the Doctoral (BCBA-D), Master's (BCBA), or Bachelor's (BCaBA) degree levels and who work with the following populations: clients with anxiety disorders, pain-related difficulties, or anger management problems; individuals who suffered a traumatic brain injury; individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, or other developmental disabilities; persons exhibiting hyperactive or repetitive behaviors; clients exhibiting schizophrenic behaviors; and persons who experience an extreme amount of stress. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, clinical behavior analysis, family and child therapy, and/or health and fitness training will also benefit from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Mindfulness, Relaxation, Self-Control, Stress Management
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Learn to Play and Play to Learn: Integrating Verbal and Social Skills Instruction Into Common Play Activities
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 4
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeffrey Skowron, Ph.D.
JEFFREY SKOWRON (Beacon ABA Services), SUZANNE SANDA (Beacon ABA Services/Beacon Assessment Center), BROOKE HYLAND LITTLETON (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: In this interactive workshop, we will identify and practice methods for teaching verbal behavior and adaptive social skills in the context of common games and play activities of toddlers and pre-school aged children. The presenters will provided an overview of the different developmental stages of play, as well as a review of empirically supported strategies for teaching play skills. We will then review the verbal operants, as well as age- and developmentally-appropriate social skill behaviors. With this foundation, the presenters will guide participants in identifying and modeling strategies for using common games, toys, and play materials to teach young children developmentally appropriate skill sequences. Special emphasis will be given to mand training and instruction in basic attentional and social skills (e.g., listening; joining in; sharing). Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions and receive feedback about ways of integrating this material into their current clinical work.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and provide examples of different developmental stages of play; (2) identify appropriate social skills to target with instruction for young children; (3) identify the different verbal operants and provide examples of common topographies in young children; (4) develop and model strategies for teaching social skills to young children in the context of typical play routines; (5) identify and model strategies for teaching verbal behavior to young children in the context of typical play routines; (6) discuss strategies for applying skills and strategies from this workshop into their current clinical activities.
Activities: This workshop will includesmall- and whole-group activities, augmented with lecture and video models of concepts and techniques. Participants will have the opportunity to model skills in small groups using actual play materials. The workshop is Intermediate level, designed for early career or other BCBAs looking to expand their repertoire of skills related to teaching early skills to young children. Though the presenters work primarily with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, the content is applicable to any child in need of instruction in verbal or social skills.
Audience: intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Play skills, Social skills
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Solving Ethical Dilemmas in the Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Weihe Huang, Ph.D.
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum)
Description: This workshop is designed to increase participants' ability to ethically practice applied behavior analysis (ABA) by describing the characteristics of ethical dilemmas and discussing three tools that could be utilized to solve these dilemmas: core ethical principles in the ABA field, the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (the Code), and an ethical decision making model. When making ethical decisions, many behavior analysts tend to believe that these decisions are solely based on the analysis of objective data and relevant evidences. However, in reality the decision-making process is also influenced by behavior analysts' values, as well as societal values including those of services recipients. Behavior analysts often encounter ethical dilemmas when these values conflict. In the process of solving ethical dilemmas, the Code is helpful in many situations. In some cases, however, ethical dilemmas cannot be resolved by appealing to the existing guidelines or regulations. Part of this workshop is aimed at providing applied behavior analysts with ethical reasoning strategies in the event that the Code alone is insufficient. These strategies are based on the presenter's relevant experience of international as well as local practice and the available literature in the field of behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Name two historical cases that led the field of behavior analysis to its current understanding of professional ethics and describe two differences between behavior modification practiced in 1970s and behavior analysis ethically practiced today; (2) List and describe at least five core ethical principles in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis;(3) Identify and describe at least three of the most common ethical dilemmas faced by behavior analysts; (4) Demonstrate a working knowledge in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts by being able to identify appropriate guideline(s) that could address a particular ethical issue; (5) Identify, define, and explain problem-solving strategies in a variety of ethical situations; (6) perform the Six-Step Ethical Decision Making Model and generalize the learned skill to different scenarios by completing 100% of the required steps described in the ethical decision making model for at least two new ethical dilemmas.
Activities: Activities: Instructional strategies for this workshop include lecture and targeted reading. In addition, this workshop will use cases both provided by the presenter and generated by participants to illustrate the implementation of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and the steps in the Ethical Decision Making Model. Participants of this workshop will be encouraged to (1) identify their values and compare these values with primary ethical principles in the field of ABA; (2) recognize the characteristics of ethical dilemmas in the practice of ABA; and (3) apply the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and six steps specified in the Ethical Decision Making Model to cases that involve ethical dilemmas. The emphasis of the discussion will be on the application of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and the Ethical Decision Making Model to various clinical settings, including natural homes, residential facilities, day programs, and educational programs.
Audience: The workshop level is intermediate. The target audience of this workshop include BCBA-Ds, BCBAs, BCABAs, RBTs, and behavioral service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
A Practitioner's Guide to Building a Customized Electronic Data Collection System Using Microsoft Excel
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cody Morris, M.A.
CODY MORRIS (Western Michigan University ), NEIL DEOCHAND (Western Michigan University), NATHAN VANDERWEELE (Western Michigan University)
Description: Electronic data collection is increasing in popularity within the practice of applied behavior analysis. With the growing use of paperless data collection systems, the skills to create or customize electronic data collection systems may be very beneficial to practitioners. This workshop will teach a simple skill set that will allow any practitioner to turn a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet into a functioning and mobile electronic data collection system. Components of this training will include how to (a) create a basic electronic data collection table with dropdown menus and autofill features, (b) create a timestamp for all data entered, and (c) create automatically graphing displays of data. In addition, security and compliance to regulations will be discussed. While participants do not need familiarity with Microsoft Excel to benefit from this workshop, a basic understanding of behavior analytic data collection procedures would be helpful. While it isn't required, participants should bring a computer (any operating system) with the Microsoft Excel program to participate in the guided practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) use Microsoft Excel and other free technology to create and modify electronic data collection systems; (2) collect and analyze data on the timeliness of data collection; (3)create graphs that automatically update to allow for instantaneous data analysis.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of presentation/modeling of the skill and guided practice.
Audience: Any practitioner with a basic understanding of behavior analytic data collection procedures. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel is not required.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Data Collection, Technology
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
A Progressive Approach to Discrete Trial Teaching: Some Current Guidelines
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 2
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joseph H. Cihon, M.S.
JUSTIN B. LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOSEPH H. CIHON (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College), RONALD LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOHN JAMES MCEACHIN (Autism Partnership Foundation), MITCHELL T. TAUBMAN (Autism Partnership Foundation), JULIA FERGUSON (Autism Partnership Foundation)
Description: Discrete trial teaching (DTT) is one of the cornerstones of applied behavior analysis (ABA) based interventions. Conventionally, DTT is commonly implemented within a prescribed, fixed manner in which the therapist is governed by a strict set of rules. In contrast to conventional DTT, a progressive approach to DTT allows the therapist to remain flexible, making in-the-moment analyses and changes based on several variables (e.g., individual responding, current and previous history). The instructors will 1) describe some guidelines to a progressive approach to DTT, 2) provide research, clinical data, and video examples of a progressive approach to DTT, and 3) provide opportunities for the participants to practice components of a progressive implementation of DTT.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify 8 guidelines to a progressive approach to DTT; (2) identify the disadvantages associated with a not adopting a progressive approach to DTT; and (3) identify considerations while training staff in a progressive approach to DTT.
Activities: Instructional strategies include a balance of: lecture, video observation, discussion, and guided practice.
Audience: Behavior analysts who have previous experience working with individuals diagnosed with autism or developmental disabilities and who have and have not implemented DTT.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, DTT, progressive ABA
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
CANCELED: Marijuana, Client Abuse, and Coursework: Applying the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Janet L. Montgomery, M.S.
JANET L. MONTGOMERY (ABA Technologies, Inc.; Florida Institute of Techn), CHRISTI A. REED (ABA Technologies Inc.; Florida Institute of Techno), EMILY MEYER (ABA Technologies Inc.; Florida Institute of Technology)
Description: Behavior analysts face dilemmas every day without obvious professional or ethical solutions. Practitioners have a science to help change behavior, but this isn't enough. Surrounding ethical contingencies must be considered when selecting the best course of action. The BACB's Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts provides an excellent resource. The code should guide decisions so that the best interest and well-being of the client is always prioritized. Application of the compliance code is not always clear-cut or easy, however, the code elements provide a backdrop for ethical decision making. Practice using the code will assist the practitioner in exploring appropriate options. This workshop will highlight a variety of real-life examples with identification of applicable code elements and options for resolution. Scenarios will include the areas of child welfare, traumatic brain injury, autism spectrum disorder, applied behavior analysis clinics, controversial medical interventions, supervision, and academic settings. Participants will have the opportunity to interact, discuss and apply code elements to existing workshop scenarios in addition to reviewing audience generated ethical challenges.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify ethical violations in a given scenario; (2) identify the applicable code element(s) from the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts related to the scenario; (3) identify possible solutions or actions given an applied scenario; (4) discuss ethical dilemmas from personal clinical applications and related code elements.
Activities: The workshop includes lecture, discussion, small group breakout with opportunities for audience presentation.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for practicing BCaBAs and BCBAs at all levels interested in additional BACB Code Practice.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): BACB Code, Ethics, Scenarios
 
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Inner Behavior: Changing Thoughts, Feelings, and Urges
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Abigail B. Calkin, Ph.D.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center)
Description: Based on Skinner's writings and Lindsley's seminal work and research in identifying, counting, and analyzing inner behavior, this workshop looks at thoughts, feelings, and urges as behaviors that a person can observe, count, and change. It takes the participants on a journey to some of their own inner behaviors. It includes some charts of people who have counted inner behaviors in the past 50 years. The workshop reviews how to use the Standard Celeration Chart to record the frequencies and changes of any inner behavior.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State the research background and their familiarity with research on observing and changing inner behavior; (2) Define thoughts, feelings, and urges and name specific examples of each; (3) Practice writing positive thoughts, feelings, and/or urges at 30-35 per minute or saying them at 50-75 per minute; (4) Count and record some specific inner behaviors for the duration of the workshop; (5) Develop a plan to change inner behaviors of self or clients.
Activities: The primary focus is to identify, list, count, record, and change inner behavior and to practice these skills. There is some information on the literature and successes of this technique. Participants can leave with a written plan for at least one client. The format is slide presentations with comments, and large and small group discussion.
Audience: Psychologists, clinical behavior analysts, parents and teachers of regular or special education children, including those with behavior disorders.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): celeration chart, inner behavior, PTSD
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
CANCELED: Verbal Behavior and Using VB Programming and Competency Checklists in Developing Communication Skills With Adults
Thursday, May 25, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: VRB/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Vivian A. Attanasio, M.S.
AMANDA DUVA (Services for the Underserved), VIVIAN A. ATTANASIO (Services for the Underserved), AMY RACHEL BUKSZPAN (Services for the Underserved)
Description: Skinner's 1957 analysis of verbal behavior suggests that language is behavior and functional language, or lack thereof, is directly related to problem behaviors. Though there is a robust pool of research and review of teaching practices with children, evidence-based programming are lacking in the use of typical VB techniques in working with adults with developmental disabilities. Working with an older population who retain a long history of previously learned and reinforced behaviors, and who now engage in multifaceted relationships calls for not only the use of basic teaching techniques, but also demands for more complex programming to address abstract and advanced needs. The workshop will apply the theory to practice by reviewing several cases of varying-level learners, discussing the obstacles faced for each of these individuals, and how the team was able to utilize the principles of ABA and VB to guide the teaching of communication skills. The group will then practice these methodologies together using the Behavioral Skills Training Model.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (a) Describe the Verbal Operants as they relate to functions of behavior; (b) Conduct a manding session with an individual with basic pre-requisites; and (c) Describe and complete a competency checklist on mand training; (d) Identify methodologies utilized in developing communication programs for adults.
Activities: This workshop will include a lecture, data review of several case studies, and introduction of tools used by the authors for training purposes. Small group breakout periods and immediate feedback will occur to facilitate acquisition of identified skills.
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, RBTs and clinicians working with children and adults who demonstrate communication deficits.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): competency checklist, developmental disabilities, manding, verbal behavior
 
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Extending Behavior Analysis in Zoos and Aquariums
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Denver Zoo
Area: AAB/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lindsay Renee Mehrkam, Ph.D.
LINDSAY RENEE MEHRKAM (Monmouth University), NICOLE R. DOREY (University of Florida), Emily Insalaco (Denver Zoo)
Description: Note: This 6-hour workshop will take place entirely at the Denver Zoo. Today’s accredited zoos and aquariums are held to high standards of animal welfare. This involves assessment, implementation, and evaluation of current animal husbandry practices across a wide range of species - a task for which behavior analysis is well suited. This workshop will provide attendees with an overview of how behavior analytic methods are being extended in zoo settings to evaluate enrichment and training effectiveness. Participants will travel to world-renowned Denver Zoo and directly observe how behavioral principles are being used to guide animal care practices in zoos. Participants will learn how to successfully implement behavioral assessments using single-subject designs in a zoo setting. Participants will be guided through video demonstrations of preference assessments and positive reinforcement training with a variety of zoo species to observe the generalizability of these procedures. Attendees will also participate in discussions on future directions for behavior analysts in these nontraditional animal settings. The registration fee includes the cost of workshop materials as well as transportation to and from the Denver Zoo.* Attendees will meet at the headquarters hotel to take a shuttle to the zoo, and will return in time to attend afternoon workshops. Additional details will be communicated directly by the workshop presenters after registration has closed. *A portion of the proceeds will go to the Denver Zoological Society Enrichment Fund.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Operationally define environmental enrichment and identify ways in which enrichment strategies are evaluated and deemed effective; (2)Identify, review, and critique applications of operant conditioning in behavioral husbandry practices for variety of species; (3)Recognize and discuss variables to consider to ensure ethical and effective implementation and evaluation of behavioral assessments in zoos and aquariums using single-subject designs.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, direct observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies and procedures will be provided. Participants will be encouraged to participate in open discussions about content and future directions for practical application. Supplemental materials for reviewing training plans and ethograms will also be provided.
Audience: This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of behavior analytic principles in zoos and aquariums. Participants will learn how zoos develop and review training and enrichment programs using single-subject design methodology and individual-level analysis to facilitate husbandry goals for a variety of species. Participants will also learn how to successfully implement assessment and evaluation tools for husbandry strategies in zoological settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): animal training, enrichment, preference assessment, zoo
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Running Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom F
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ashley Rodman, M.S.
ASHLEY RODMAN (Advances Learning Center), MEGHAN GLADU (Advances Learning Center), FRANCES NIEVES SERRET (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: grouping students in effective clusters, using group contingencies, taking data on multiple students at once, and individualizing prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running effective activities that provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social stimuli. This workshop will teach specific learning activities that target skills in the domains of body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking. It will also provide training on how, when, and why to use group contingencies and give strategies for individualizing social instruction in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Use a variety of activities designed to provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social cues; (2) Facilitate activities that teach body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking; (3) Group students into effective learning clusters; (4) Use several different group contingencies and identify the reasons behind using each type of contingency; (5) Collect data on multiple students; (6) Individualize prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students; (7) Take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups to complete guided notes and case studies and participate in video-modeled activities and role-plays.
Audience: The intended audience includes Board Certified Behavior Analysts who train staff to run social skills groups; teachers, SLP's, behavioral instructors, or therapists who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; and anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Supervision
BACB-Compliant Multi-Media Supervisor Training
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Granite B
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (TheBehaviorAnalyst.com; Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc )
Description: Hundreds of BCBAs have participated in this mixed-media, BACB-Compliant Supervision Training workshop since 2013! This workshop prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors, including new BCaBA supervision responsibilities. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional 2 1/2 hours online through www.TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost 9 hours of content while using only 6 hours of conference time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and interesting video situations, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Multiple populations and environments are represented, including child welfare, education and in-home. Additionally, participant-trios will participate in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, an additional 3 CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. Note: This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB. The additional online CE credits are not sponsored by ABAI.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the purpose of supervision; (2) demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback; (3) describe their obligations regarding behavioral skills training; (4) discuss methods to evaluate the effects of supervision.
Activities: Participants will engage in: Didactic lecture, critiques of video supervision scenarios, and guided and directed discussions of professional and ethical responsibilities. Additionally, all participants will be divided into triads for multiple role play scenarios, taking turns as supervisor, supervisee and observer with each new scenario.
Audience: This workshop is for BCBAs who will be supervising pre-certification interns, BCaBAs, and Registered Behavior Technicians, as well as BCaBAs who will be supervising RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Multi-Media, Supervisor, Supervisor Training
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Supervision
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Behavior Analysts: Behavioral Flexibility Training Within Your Scope of Practice
Friday, May 26, 2017
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom E
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
THOMAS G. SZABO (Florida Institute of Technology), JONATHAN J. TARBOX (FirstSteps for Kids; University of Southern California ), EMILY KENNISON SANDOZ (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
Description: Have you ever wondered how applied behavior analysts might respond to an individual's private events while staying within our scope of practice and maintaining the highest levels of scientific rigor? How to go about saving the world with behavior analysis? For example, how do you help a parent mediate ABA services when she feels ashamed and has difficulty focusing? Help client deal with bigoted behavior, traumatic events, sexual violence, or bullying? Do you have the professional skills to handle such conversations with compassion and caringly bring your client's focus under the control of relevant contingencies of reinforcement? Applied behavior analysts have developed potent, evidence-based technologies for igniting socially significant behavioral change in a variety of settings. This workshop brings to behavior analysts new tools with which to establish the need for, occasion, and reinforce responding that is sensitive to changes in the prevailing contingencies of reinforcement. We will examine the practical tools and basic science undergirding acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and how you might be able to make use of ACT strategies in your practice, while staying close to the BACB Task List 4th edition and our scope of practice as outlined by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Examine data from investigations on treating child and adult behavioral rigidity; (2) Engage in (or observe) experiential exercises designed to promote flexibility; (3) Discuss these exercises within the context of basic behavior analytic principles.
Activities: Activities will include - Lecture on basic research that led to this practice, including stimulus equivalence, relational framing, rule insensitivity, and delay discounting - Practical small- and large- group training on how to develop your own ACT procedures to help people spend less time struggling with private events and more time engaging in behavior that accomplishes - Group discussion pertaining to the focuses of ACT that are appropriate for behavior analysts versus those that are better left to those in psychotherapy and counseling fields Note: this workshop is not about treating psychological disorders. It is about helping behavior analysts address a fuller range of human behavior and, in doing so, help clients, clients' parents, and behavior analysts themselves, to be more effective in achieving their daily goals.
Audience: This workshop does not require previous training in basic principles of learning or ACT. It is geared to be an introductory level workshop that anyone can attend. However, there is a significant amount of new material here that will be of value to those that are well trained in conceptual, experimental, applied research, and practice domains of the science. Therefore, we strongly encourage intermediate and advanced learners to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Behavioral flexibility, Delay Discounting, Relational Framing, Stimulus Equivalence
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
CANCELED: An Interactive Visual Schedule: Establishing Social Initiation and Flexible Play
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paulo Guilhardi, Ph.D.
ASHLEY DOUGLAS (Beacon ABA Services Inc.), JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services Inc.), PAULO GUILHARDI (Beacon ABA Services Inc.)
Description: Deficits in social initiation and appropriate play are defining characteristics of an Autism Spectrum Disorder diagnosis. Traditional play schedules have focused on increasing appropriate play by linking task completion activities together using visual supports. These play activity schedules, while effective at promoting appropriate play, do not teach the child to request others to play with him or involve the child in the social routines happening in his environment. The current workshop will focus on a new approach to the traditional visual play schedule that requires the child to: request a partner to play with him, engage in a variety of play activities both independent and social in nature, and demonstrate flexibility in his ability to follow the schedule given a variety of activities based on those that are available in his current environment and listed in varied orders. This protocol is taught using a combination of video modeling and graduated guidance.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the deficits in children with ASD to rationalize a need for teaching visually; (2) customize an interactive visual schedule program for their client's level and needs; (3) implement the steps of the interactive visual schedule protocol using faded video modeling and graduated guidance; (4) identify the steps of the protocol as they are being performed and collect accurate data on client performance.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, small group instruction, guided practice, and video observation.
Audience: Certified behavior analysts, graduate students, ABA practitioners
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): flexible routines, social initiations, video modeling, visual schedule
 
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
My BCBA is Amazing!
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom C
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Colleen DeMello, M.A.
COLLEEN DEMELLO (Applied Behavioral Strategies), LAURA BUNDA (Applied Behavioral Strategies)
Description: Behavior analysts are faced with many environmental variables that either directly or indirectly influence efficacy of treatment when working with families in a home setting. Awareness of these variables is essential in developing solid working relationships with families and developing strategies that will produce maximum results.This workshop is designed to teach Behavior Analysts how to take a functional approach to working with parents in the home and demonstrate the ability to train parents how to become an effective agent of change with their children.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify variables that influence successful in-home ABA intervention; (2) Explain customer service as it relates to ABA; (3) Demonstrate how to effectively set expectations with parents/caregivers; (4) Develop goals and objectives that meet family's and child's needs; (5) Demonstrate how to effectively train parents to be an agent of change.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case studies, Question & Answer, Small Group Breakout
Audience: BCaBAs, BCBAs, Supervisors of BCBAs, Teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Solving the Receptive Language Puzzle: Pushing the Boundaries of Research and Practice
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom F
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Vincent LaMarca, M.A.
VINCENT LAMARCA (Little Star Center)
Description: Initial difficulty with receptive language is common for some children with autism (Carp 2012). A number of strategies have been tested over the years (Chestnut, 2003; Pelios,2004) and general guidelines for teaching receptive language have been published (Grow, 2013). But what to do when all else fails? This workshop will review 22 current treatment procedures that have been effective for some children with autism. Treatment procedures were identified through a literature review of receptive language research as well as case study examples. Research data, clinical data, and video examples of how to implement different strategies will be presented. The workshop will also identify other potential formats and additional steps that may help some children who would not otherwise gain receptive language skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify 22 different teaching procedures that can be used with receptive language; (2) categorize different teaching procedures in a manner that allows for systematic review of which procedure to implement; (3) identify different client profiles that may make one strategy more effective than another; (4) create modifications to different strategies that remain grounded in research.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, active student responding, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts who have previous experience working with individuals diagnosed with autism or developmental disability and who have implemented behaviorally based procedures to teach receptive language, 2016 FABA conference attendees who wanted more than my 1-hour presentation could offer, and curious individuals who typically hold strong views they like to post on social media.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): listener responding, receptive labeling, receptive language
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Teaching the Essential Eight Skills: Preparing Children With Developmental Disabilities, Including Autism, for the Rest of Their Lives
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy and Associates), TROY FRY (Patrick McGreevy and Associates)
Description: Many Practitioners working with children with developmental disabilities, including autism, have become Board Certified Behavior Analysts within the past 4-5 years. Often, their instruction was based on The BACB Fourth Edition Task List, which includes no items that would help them decide what skills to target and teach. This workshop will familiarize participants with the difference between developmental skills and functional skills, and will teach them to target and teach the Essential Eight Skills from Essential for Living.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe and differentiate examples of developmental and functional skills; (2) name and describe the Essential Eight Skills; (3) demonstrate how to teach each of the Essential Eight Skills.
Activities: This workshop will include lecture, discussion, and guided practice on how to teach the Essential Eight Skills.
Audience: This basic-level workshop is designed for practicing behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, developmental disabilities, functional skills, life skills
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts: Bring Your Ethical Scenarios
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin, The Meadows Center), NANETTE L. PERRIN (LifeShare Management Group)
Description: Certified behavior analysts, applicants, and even approved course sequences are now required to abide by the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). As of January 2016, this approved document became enforceable by the BACB. The Code gives us valuable guidance as practitioners in the world of behavior analysis. This workshop will actively engage participants in discussions surrounding their own ethical dilemmas that occur in the home, clinics, and within schools and other organizations. Addressing the real world ethical dilemmas during implementation of behavior analysis can be a challenging endeavor especially for new professionals (Bailey & Burch, 2011). This workshop will discuss the 10 codes/guidelines that comprise the new Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). The instructors will quiz participants on their knowledge of each of the 10 guidelines, review each guideline, assist participants in identifying the appropriate ethical guideline related to their scenarios, and foster conversation around appropriate actions that could be taken. Bailey and Burch (2016) provide information in regards to these codes that will be shared with participants. A post quiz will also help review the workshop information.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) State the 10 guidelines/codes of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014); (2) Accurately identify personal ethical dilemmas; (3) Accurately identify which guideline addresses the dilemmas; (4) Increase percentage of correct quiz questions related to ethics in behavior analysis.
Activities: Take pre/post quizzes regarding ethical behavior of behavior analysts Lecture on the 10 Guidelines/Codes in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) Lecture on Bailey and Burch (2011) viewpoints on ethical guidelines of behavior analysts Exercise to discuss participants' ethical examples Discussion on how to respond to ethical dilemmas that professionals in the field have encountered and shared with the group
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts-Doctorate, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Associate Behavior Analysts, and Registered Behavior Technicians, or those training to be any of these who are seeking additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals/families, supervisors/supervisees, and other service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethical practice, ethics, home/community
 
Workshop #W83
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Save Time in Microsoft Excel Automating Phase Change Lines and Labels, Selecting Date Ranges, and Creating Templates
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall E
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Neil Deochand, M.S.
NEIL DEOCHAND (Western Michigan University), CODY MORRIS (Western Michigan University )
Description: Excel is a widely used versatile tool, but it is not always user-friendly when meeting the unique needs of the behavioral practitioner. The drawing in of phase lines and repetitive typing of phase labels constitutes a laborious and repetitive task for behavior analysts. Few solutions have been offered to automating the phase labels, the descriptive text that accompanies a phase change line, despite their pervasive use in behavior analytic graphical displays. The purpose of this workshop is to offer an updated way (and free templates) to add phase change lines with their respective labels so they are updated in all graphs from a single cell in a worksheet, and teach attendees how to adjust their date ranges with minimal effort.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) design and create clear graphical displays in Microsoft Excel; (2) use embedded elements for phase labels and phase change lines that stay fixed to the graph; (3) automatically update date ranges for all graphs; (4) create templates to save time.
Activities: Instructional activities: Video observation, small group breakout, supplemental materials in the form of templates will be provided Workshop objectives: Minimize drawing in elements to graphs which do not stay fixed to the graph when moved or updated. Reduce time taken to create a graphs using templates. Increase fluency graphing in Microsoft Excel.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs), Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBAs), those seeking behavioral certification, psychologists, and any health care providers who track behavioral data. This workshop is for those who have some basic knowledge regarding the use of Excel for creating graphical displays.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Excel®, graphing, phase change, single-subject design
 
Workshop #W84
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Software Tools for Direct Observation: Hands-On Learning of ObserverWare for Services Providers and Researchers
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Sharpe, Jr., Ed.D.
THOMAS L. SHARPE, JR. (Educational Consulting, Inc.; ABA Therapy Solutions, LLC), JOHN KOPERWAS (Educational Consulting, Inc.)
Description: This workshop will provide hands on application of a user friendly software package designed to collect and analyze discrete and time-based behavioral data for evaluation and feedback applications in direct observation client settings. Workshop information is useful to direct services providers, graduate students, behavioral psychologists, CBA professionals, and researchers -- all interested in analyzing complex configurations of behaviors emitted at high rates, oftentimes overlap in time, and which are context dependent. Discussion includes (a) recommended procedures when collecting time-based data in the live setting and from videotape records, and (b) computer generated behavior descriptions, graphic displays, statistical analyses and reliability comparisons of data files when engaged in data analysis, data based feedback, and assessment of data integrity. Participants will be provided with all workshop presentation materials and a complimentary downloadable copy of the complete software package along with a .pdf file summary copy of a compatible research methods text published by Sage Publications. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in study and application of findings, procedures, practices, and theoretical concepts. Workshop participants will need to bring an IBM compatible laptop and/or an iPad to facilitate hands-on workshop interactions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) construct and apply systemic observation systems;(2) generate a time-based behavioral record using an inclusive overlapping category system; (3)construct graphic representations; (4)perform traditional and sequential analyses using multiple measurement methodologies; (5)edit graphic data representations and apply relevant visual and statistical analyses; (6) conduct reliability and treatment fidelity analyses; (7) apply a variety of data record, edit, and merge functions when operating with complex multiple event category systems; (8) discuss the principles and practice of discrete and sequential behavior analysis methods; (9) apply a range of computer-based data collection, data analysis, data based feedback, and reliability procedures to their particular behavior analysis interests; (10) understand and apply a range of computer-based descriptive and statistical data analysis techniques in relation to discrete and sequential data sets; (11) construct a variety of behavior graphs and apply appropriate analysis and client feedback techniques to the graph types covered, and in relation to direct wervices and applied research application examples.
Activities: Activities include: (1) review of traditional behavior analysis recording methods; (2) introduction to, and hands on application of, a computer-based package designed to enhance behavior analyses of complex interactive settings; (3) detailed hands-on demonstration of data collection features, discrete and sequential analysis capabilities, within and across data-file graphic representations, and a variety of reliability, treatment fidelity, and data manipulation and editing functions; all designed to facilitate applied activities in behavior planning, assessment, treatment, feedback, and ongoing observation of a variety of settings and environments. The format combines lecture, small group and individualized activities, guided practice, and competency facilitating exercises.
Audience: Direct services providers, graduate students, behavior analysts, CBA and related therapists working in a variety of applied and experimental settings who are interested in the interactive nature of behavior in situations where study of multiple behaviors and events, multiple participants, and changing setting variables are present. Those working in educational and social science settings and who are challenged with how to describe and analyze highly interactive behavioral transactions should find the workshop experience and complimentary software particularly appealing to a wide range of research and assessment applications.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Gender-Affirming Clinical Skills for Behavior Analysts: Looking Through the Lens of BACB Ethics
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall G
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Fawna Stockwell, Ph.D.
FAWNA STOCKWELL (Upswing Advocates; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Chicago Campus), WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates)
Description: Transgender and gender nonconforming identities have gained increasing visibility within recent years, and gender plays a significant role in how social interactions are constructed for people of all gender identities. This workshop provides an overview of key concepts and social practices related to gender, as well as ways that the BACBs Professional and Ethical Compliance Code addresses gender. The instructors will facilitate a nonjudgmental space for participants to ask questions, explore new content, and brainstorm ways to build gender-affirming practices in their professional work. Participants will learn specific strategies of how Behavior Analysts can promote gender-affirming interactions with their clients, staff, and others. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and audience questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state which guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) are applicable to gender, (2) select key differences between gender identity, biological sex, gender roles, gender expression/presentation, and sexual orientation, (3) describe ways that the gender binary may restrict responding for all individuals, not only transgender people, and (4) state several concrete strategies to apply to the professional workplace that create a gender affirming environment for clients and staff.
Activities: Activities will include: Pre/post quizzes, lecture, small group discussion, FreeWrite exercises, worksheets, video examples, and online learning activities.
Audience: Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are interested in building their competence around the topic of gender. Teachers, therapists, and other helping professionals are also welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): diversity, ethics, gender, sexuality
 
Workshop #W96
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
How to Engage in Ethical Practice When One's Supervisor or Agency is Unethical
Friday, May 26, 2017
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 406/407
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ken Winn, M.S.
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence), KEN WINN (Firefly Autism)
Description: This workshop was created due to many prevalent, alarming, and real life student-generated scenarios provided to the author and instructor during a certification-board approved online course sequence in behavior analysis. The growth in online programs reflects an influx of non-behavior analysts to the field hired, in many cases, faster than certification (and training) programs can keep up. In the wake of fluctuating funding streams and new legislation, how can the community of behavior analysts plan to protect against ethical drift and prepare for new challenges? In order to explore this growing concern, we will explore several case studies from the past 5 years of practice in diverse settings in Colorado, a state relatively new to behavior analysis and to insurance-mandated behavior analysis. Case studies and sets of potential solutions will be presented from at least three distinct practice contexts: Instructing new behavior analysis students with varying previous experiences and advanced degrees; supervision in a hospital setting for psychologist-led teams new to behavior analysis; and community behavior analysis settings supporting learners with autism, developmental disabilities, or needs addressed by state-reimbursed early intervention programs. Some implications are discussed for each area of practice, ending with a call to action.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss rule-governed and contingency shaped examples of code application; (2) Identify features of behavioral environments fostering ethical behavior under optimal (best-case) conditions; (3) Identify discrepancies in resources between best-case and worst-case environments; (4) Tact ways to alter aspects of a behavioral environment contributing to working in long-term worst case scenarios; (5)Identify and generate examples of emergency situations given your client population and behavioral environment; (6) Generate potential solutions (identify connections between situational emergencies or barriers to ethical behavior, and changes in behavioral environments that reduce likelihood of similar future emergency situations); (7)Discuss how to apply ethical, code-complimentary behavior to situations that go beyond common ethics texts.
Activities: Objectives of the workshop will be met through a balance of lecture, small group breakouts, group discussion, and active student responding
Audience: This workshop is intended for new practitioners as well as behavior analysts with many years of experience. Ethical behavior in practice can be a "slippery slope" and practitioners from every level might find this beneficial
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Special Event #14
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Opening Event and Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis Awards
Saturday, May 27, 2017
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom (Plenary)
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Martha H�bner, Ph.D.
Chair: Martha Hübner (University of São Paulo)
 

SABA Award for Distinguished Service to Behavior Analysis: An Operational Analysis of the Psychological Term “Service”

CAROL PILGRIM (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Dr. Carol Pilgrim is professor of psychology and associate dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of North Carolina Wilmington. Dr. Pilgrim has contributed substantially to behavior analysis through her leadership, teaching, and research. She has served as president of its major organizations, including ABAI (as well as its Southeastern ABA chapter), the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, and Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of the American Psychological Association. She also served as secretary of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and as a board member of that organization for 8 years. She has advanced the dissemination of behavior analysis and the vitality of its journals in her roles as chair of the Publication Board of ABAI, editor of The Behavior Analyst, co-editor of the Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior Bulletin, and associate editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. She has served on the board of directors of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and other organizations, and chaired numerous committees. Dr. Pilgrim is known, in addition, as a stellar teacher and mentor. She has been recognized with numerous awards, including the North Carolina Board of Governors Award for Excellence in Teaching and the ABAI Student Committee Outstanding Mentor of the Year Award. Dr. Pilgrim's research expertise and contributions traverse both basic experimental and applied behavior analysis. Her health related research has brought behavior analysis to the attention of scientists and practitioners in cancer prevention, and she is noted for her innovative work on the development and modification of relational stimulus control in children and adults.
Abstract:

Skinner’s 1945 treatise, “An Operational Analysis of Psychological Terms,” established a defining and fundamental characteristic of radical behaviorism by emphasizing the necessity of understanding scientific verbal behavior in terms of the same principles applied to the understanding of any behavior – that is, in terms of its antecedents and consequences. Further, his call for a functional analysis of any psychological concept was predicated on the position that only such an analysis would lead to more effective action with respect to the subject matter at issue. To the extent that “service” contributes to the survival of our discipline and world view, it follows that an examination of the conditions under which we speak of “service” may prove useful in our efforts to target and increase such activities. Thus, this talk will review some of the varied forms of professional activity that occasion service descriptions, with an eye toward creating and identifying opportunities, facilitating the professional actions needed, and consequating service efforts effectively.

 

SABA Award for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis: The New England Center for Children: Twenty Years of International Service Delivery

VINCENT STRULLY (New England Center for Children)
Abstract:

Vincent Strully, Jr., CEO and Founder of The New England Center for Children (NECC®), is proud to accept the 2017 SABA Award for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis on behalf of NECC. Despite the growing acceptance and demand for behavior analytic services, there are considerable challenges to developing sustainable models of service delivery internationally, including language barriers, differences in cultural practices, and funding considerations. Over the past 40 years, we have identified several components that are essential for the development of sustainable models of service delivery worldwide. Government funding and support are critical for success, as are training programs that provide local staff access to graduate-level instruction in behavior analysis. Also, NECC’s development of the Autism Curriculum Encyclopedia (ACE®), an application providing an interactive interface containing assessment tools, lesson plans, teaching materials, and student performance reports for over 1,900 skills, has provided an effective and efficient curriculum necessary for delivering sustainable services.

 

SABA Award for Scientific Translation of Behavior Analysis: The Future of Behavior Analysis

ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
Anthony Biglan, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute. He is the author of The Nurture Effect: How the Science of Human Behavior Can Improve our Lives and Our World. Dr. Biglan has been conducting research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 30 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use both through school-based programs and community-wide interventions. And, he has evaluated interventions to prevent high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure. In recent years, his work has shifted to more comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent the entire range of child and adolescent problems. He and colleagues at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences published a book summarizing the epidemiology, cost, etiology, prevention, and treatment of youth with multiple problems (Biglan et al., 2004). He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which released its report in 2009 documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions that can prevent multiple problems. As a member of Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission, he is helping to develop a strategic plan for implementing comprehensive evidence-based interventions throughout Oregon. Information about Dr. Biglan’s publications can be found at http://www.ori.org/scientists/anthony_biglan.
Abstract:

Behavior analysis has been foundational for a broad range of treatment and prevention interventions. However, there are reasons to believe that behavior analysts are not contributing to the improvement of societal wellbeing to the extent that B. F. Skinner envisioned in his seminal writings. In the past 2 years, I have spoken with hundreds of behavior analysts, many of whom expressed this kind of concern. I will summarize these concerns and suggest principles that might help behavior analysis as a field fulfill its promise to bring about unprecedented advances in human wellbeing. Specifically, I will suggest changing the criteria regarding what a behavior analysts should know from one that restricts our focus to practices and methods that are explicitly labeled as “behavior analytic” to one that encourages behavior analysts to embrace any empirical evidence or methods that contribute to human wellbeing, initiating much more empirical research on strategies for influencing climate change, and forging alliances with other areas of behavioral science.

 

SABA Award for Enduring Programmatic Contributions in Behavior Analysis: The Psychology Department at the University of North Carolina Wilmington: A Port for Behavior Analysis for Four Decades

JULIAN KEITH (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Abstract:

Behavior Analysis has been a significant focus of the Psychology Department at the University of North Carolina Wilmington since 1976. The department’s contributions to the field can be measured in research, teaching, and service. The faculty have published hundreds of peer-reviewed journal articles, books and book chapters spanning the experimental analysis of behavior, applied behavior analysis, and translational research. Faculty and students closely collaborate on research, including: basic learning principles, choice, teaching, behavioral pharmacology, behavioral economics, stimulus control, memory span, contingency management, functional analysis, preference assessment, health behavior, animal behavior, and pediatric feeding. In addition to training countless undergraduate students in behavior analysis, the program has graduated 96 master’s students who have completed a thesis with a behavior analytic focus, and will begin training Ph.D. students in behavior analysis in 2017. Faculty have served in leadership roles within ABAI and Div. 25 of APA, and various other national, state and regional organizations. They have served as editors or editorial board members for key journals such as The Behavior Analyst, JEAB and JABA. The presentation will include a brief history of the department’s contributions, as well as a description of its vision for the training of behavior analysts.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss variables related to starting and sustaining international ABA services; (2) describe the essential components for the development of sustainable service delivery.
 
 
 
Symposium #17
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Treatment of Food Selectivity Among Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Saturday, May 27, 2017
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 3B
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Abby Hodges, M.Ed.
Chair: Madison Cloud (Vanderbilt University; Baylor University)
Discussant: John Borgen (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract:

Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are at a greater risk for feeding problems relative to their typically developing peers. A substantial percentage (46-89%) of children with ASD display feeding problems, including food selectivity, food refusal, and other mealtime behavior problems such as elopement from the table or crying. Parents of children with autism report that they struggle to manage their childrens feeding problems and worry about the potential negative effects on health and development. Researchers have identified a need for additional replications of promising focused behavioral interventions with positive effects on feeding and mealtime challenging behavior in children with autism and food selectivity. The current studies assess the generality of such feeding interventions (i.e., differential reinforcement, shaping, and a high-probability instructional sequence), by evaluating the effects of these treatments in children with ASD who display food selectivity. Whereas the use of shaping and differential reinforcement resulted in a decrease in food selectivity, the use of the high probability instructional sequence did not show the same effects. All participants were provided with individualized treatment evaluations until they demonstrated improvements in feeding.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, food selectivity
 
Using Shaping to Increase Foods Consumed by Children with Autism
ABBY HODGES (Baylor University), Tonya Nichole Davis (Baylor University), Madison Cloud (Vanderbilt University, Baylor University), Laura Phipps (Baylor University), Regan Weston (Baylor University)
Abstract: Food refusal is a common problem among children with developmental disabilities and may be exhibited in a variety of ways. For example, a child may engage in behaviors such as head turning, batting at the spoon, crying, or tantruming to avoid eating. Generally, these behaviors can be described as noncompliance with instructions to eat. Although existing research indicates the effectiveness of behavioral interventions to treat food refusal, much of this research targets increased food volume and relatively little research targets increased food variability. The current study used differential reinforcement and shaping to increase the variety of foods accepted by two children with autism who demonstrated significant feeding inflexibility. Participants were introduced to four new food items via a hierarchical exposure, which involved systematically increasing the desired response with the food item. Level of food consumption was evaluated using a combined multiple baseline plus changing criterion design. Following intervention, all participants accepted all foods targeted, expanding upon the number of foods consumed.
 

Failure to Replicate Feeding Improvements With the High-Probability Instructional Sequence in Children With Autism

BRYANT C. SILBAUGH (The University of Texas at Austin, Special Education Department), Terry S. Falcomata (The University of Texas at Austin), Samantha Brooke Swinnea (University of Texas at Austin)
Abstract:

Researchers have identified a need for additional replications of promising focused behavioral interventions with positive effects on feeding and mealtime challenging behavior in children with autism and food selectivity (FS). Therefore, the current study assessed the generality of one such promising intervention, the high-probability instructional sequence (HPS), by attempting a replication in children with autism and FS. High inter-observer agreement and treatment fidelity justify strong confidence in the results. We failed to replicate previously reported effects of the HPS on low-probability feeding responses for three consecutive children enrolled in the study. Subsequently, all three children were provided with individualized treatment evaluations until they demonstrated improvements in feeding and mealtime challenging behavior. Pending further research, the current results suggest practitioners should consider ruling out more empirically supported focused behavioral interventions such as escape extinction and differential reinforcement by relying on treatment individualization through rigorous progress monitoring, before applying the HPS to treat FS in children with autism. Implications of the current study for future research and practice are discussed in the context of publishing failures to replicate in applied behavior analysis and other disciplines.

 
 
Symposium #29
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Enhancing the Efficiency of Instructional Procedures for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Saturday, May 27, 2017
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4C/D
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Regina A. Carroll, Ph.D.
Chair: Regina A. Carroll (West Virginia University)
Discussant: Bridget A. Taylor (Alpine Learning Group)
Abstract:

Practitioners and researchers have effectively used a range of instructional techniques from applied behavior analysis to teach critical social, language, and academic skills to children with autism spectrum disorders. The collection of studies in this symposium will explore how different variations in instructional procedures can influence the acquisition and generalization of skills for children with autism. First, Sophie Knutson will present a study comparing varying task interspersal ratios on the efficacy and efficiency of discrete-trial teaching. Second, Natalie Jones will present a study comparing the effectiveness and efficiency of teaching procedures with secondary targets embedded into a demand and play context. Third, Shaji Haq will present a study assessing the acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of skills taught using prompting and reinforcement or instructive feedback procedures. Fourth, Bethany Hansen will present a study evaluating the effects of single-exemplar and multiple-exemplar training on the acquisition and generalization of third person pronouns. Finally, Bridget Taylor will discuss interesting components of each study, and describe future areas of research on skill acquisition.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Instructive Feedback, Multiple Exemplars, Skill Acquisition, Task Interspersal
 
Comparing the Efficacy and Efficiency of Varying Task Interspersal Ratios
SOPHIE KNUTSON (University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee), Tiffany Kodak (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Dayna Costello (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee), Gabriella Van Den Elzen (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee), Terra Cliett (University of North Texas), Ella M Gorgan (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee), Mary Halbur (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee), Samantha Klasek (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee)
Abstract: Task interspersal is a procedural variation of discrete-trial teaching that has been implemented to facilitate the acquisition of novel skills, and may reduce problem behavior during instructional time. The literature shows equivocal results regarding the efficiency of task interspersal, but there is limited literature indicating the effects on level of problem behavior. The current study extends the literature on task interspersal by comparing the efficacy and efficiency of varying task interspersal ratios implemented in early intervention practices with children with autism spectrum disorder and related disorders on acquisition and levels of problem behavior. The four ratios of mastered to acquisition stimuli included: 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, and 0:1. An adapted alternating treatments design was implemented to compare the number of stimuli mastered and the level of problem behavior across conditions. All ratios were effective in facilitating the acquisition of stimuli, but the 0:1 condition was the most efficient intervention procedure. Results were inconsistent on the efficacy of the procedures regarding levels of problem behavior.
 

Embedding Secondary Targets Into Demand and Play Contexts When Teaching Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

NATALIE RUTH JONES (West Virginia University), Regina A. Carroll (West Virginia University), Jessica Cheatham (West Virginia University), Hanah Conlan (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

Instructive feedback has been shown to vastly improve the efficiency of structured teaching procedures. Instructive feedback involves presenting secondary targets (i.e., extra non-target skills) in an instructional trial. Learners are not required to respond to these additional skills; however, previous studies show that learners may acquire secondary targets in the absence of direct teaching. In the current study we evaluated the conditions under which three children with autism acquired secondary targets in the absence of direct teaching. We used an adapted-alternating-treatments design to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of four teaching procedures with and without secondary targets embedded into demand and play contexts. The results showed that two participants acquired secondary targets presented across all conditions; however, learning was more efficient when secondary targets were presented within a demand context. Findings from this study suggest that instructive feedback may increase the number of skills that children with autism can learn without increasing instructional time, and that the demand context may mediate some of these effects.

 

Examination of Acquisition, Generalization, and Maintenance of Skills Using Instructive Feedback for Children With Autism

SHAJI HAQ (Trumpet Behavioral Health), Tiffany Kodak (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Rachel Yosick (Marcus Autism Center), Brittany Lee Bartlett (Marcus Autism Center), Taylor Thompson (Marcus Autism Center), Patricia Zemantic (University of Oregon), M. Alice Shillingsburg (Marcus Autism Center, Emory University School of Medicine)
Abstract:

Although instructive feedback is an effective and efficient approach for skill acquisition, there is limited research on generalization and maintenance of skills that are trained using this procedure (Nottingham, Vladescu, & Kodak, 2015). In this study, we taught intraverbal fill-ins using prompting and reinforcement (i.e., primary targets) or instructive feedback (i.e., secondary targets), and we assessed generalization of skills to novel therapists or to corresponding wh- questions. In addition, we assessed maintenance of a) primary targets, b) secondary targets, and c) generalization targets during two and four-week probes. Results indicated that all three participants acquired, generalized, and maintained skills in all conditions. Implications for research and clinical practice will be discussed.

 

Training Sufficient Exemplars When Teaching Expressive Labeling of Third Person Pronouns to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

BETHANY HANSEN (Marcus Autism Center), Jamie Lee Cohen (Marcus Autism Center), Cassondra M Gayman (Marcus Autism Center), Whitney Trapp (Marcus Autism Center), M. Alice Shillingsburg (Marcus Autism Center, Emory University School of Medicine)
Abstract:

Studies have found pronoun difficulties as a noted deficit for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (Wilkinson, 1998). Stokes and Baer (1977) discuss the importance of programming sufficient exemplars to promote generalization when teaching a potentially generalizable skill, such as pronoun use. The purpose of this study is to assess the need for multiple exemplar training in facilitating generalization of correct pronoun use. A multiple baseline design across participants was used to evaluate the effects of single exemplar training on the acquisition of third person pronouns, followed by multiple exemplar training if generalization did not occur. Baseline data were collected for three sets, each consisting of nine targets that included three third person pronouns (i.e., he, she, and they) engaging in three different verbs (e.g., sleeping). Three targets in set one were initially targeted for intervention (e.g., each pronoun engaging in a different verb). Probes were conducted once mastery criteria were met. Untrained targets within and/or across sets were trained until generalization was observed. Results showed that one participant demonstrated generalization within and across sets following single exemplar training of one set, one participant demonstrated generalization within and across sets following multiple exemplar training of one set, and one participant demonstrated generalization following multiple exemplar training of multiple sets. These findings support the need for assessing the number of exemplars that require training to promote untrained, novel responses for learners with Autism Spectrum Disorders.

 
 
Symposium #42
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Reducing Problem Behavior With Functional Communication Training: Two Case Studies
Saturday, May 27, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 3B
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Sigmund Eldevik, Ph.D.
Chair: Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
Discussant: Tara A. Fahmie (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract:

The two studies used functional communication training on separate individuals with autism spectrum disorder. One of the studies described a synthesized analysis and treatment, where the analysis was based on an open-ended interview and the treatment was functional communication- and delay-tolerance training, on a child with severe problem behavior (Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, & Hanratty, 2014). The second study described a traditional functional analysis(Iwata, Dorsey, Slifer, Bauman, & Richman, 1994) including a precursor analysis as basis for FCT, on an adult with severe problem behavior . The first study was conducted in an early intensive behavior intervention program EIBI in the USA, and the second study was conducted in a residential facility for adults in Norway. Both studies resulted in a considerable reduction in problem behaviors and an increase in appropriate requests. The findings suggest that functional communication training can be used over age range and settings, and lead to meaningful improvements in problem behavior.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Communication Training, Differential reinforcement, Functional analysis
 
Improvements in Problem Behavior with Synthesized Analysis and Treatment: A Systematic Replication in an EIBI Home Program
REBEKKA STRAND (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sc), Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
Abstract: A recent study described a synthesized treatment where a functional analysis was based on an open-ended interview and combined with functional communication and delay-tolerance training (Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, & Hanratty, 2014). The treatment resulted in a reduction in problem behaviors and an increase in appropriate requests. Most of the analysis and intervention were done in a clinic setting and required weekly visits by the family. The present study is a systematic replication, where we conducted the same synthesized treatments, with a young child with Autism Spectrum Disorder ASD enrolled in a home based Early Intensive Behavior Intervention program EIBI. Outcomes were similar with a marked reduction in problem behaviors and an increase in appropriate requests. These findings suggest that it is possible to conduct this intervention in a home setting, with weekly consultations with parents. Our study show the utility of the synthesized treatment in an EIBI program in a home setting and how this can contribute to client time and costs.
 
Reduction in Restraints Following a Functional Analysis of Severe Problem Behavior and Communication Training
PETUR | I PETURSSON (Agency for Social and Welfare Services, Support Se), Sigmund Eldevik (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
Abstract: We combined functional analysis of problem behavior and precursors and subsequent communication training in an attempt to reduce the time in restraint of an adult male with severe and persistent problem behavior. The highest frequencies of problem behavior were seen in the demand conditions, but the frequencies of precursors were less differentiated across conditions. We applied functional communication training to establish an alternative response to escape demands. This resulted in a reduction in problem behavior, and some reduction in precursors. Restraint reduction followed because of the reduction in problem behavior. Treatment gains, also in terms of restraint reduction were maintained in the client’s natural environment over one year from the initial treatment. Functional analysis and functional communication training are discussed as an option for reducing the use of restraint for adults with severe and persistent problem behaviors.
 
 
Symposium #44
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Advancements in Teaching Play Skills to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Saturday, May 27, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4E/F
Area: AUT/EDC
CE Instructor: John D. Molteni, Ph.D.
Chair: John D. Molteni (University of Saint Joseph)
Discussant: William H. Ahearn (New England Center for Children)
Abstract:

The development of play skills in children with Autism Spectrum Disorder is an ever present need in educational and treatment programs. In the first paper, the authors will present the use of matrix training to teach play skills to three preschool student with Autism Spectrum Disorder using same-age peer trainers. The results will be discussed in terms using matrix training as a generative instructional method for play and the potential benefit for using peers as trainers. The authors of the second paper evaluated a multi-component treatment package including blocking stereotypy, differential reinforcement, and backward chaining, to increase functional leisure engagement (FLE) in three school-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. These results will be discussed in terms of their effect on increased FLE as well as decreases in stereotypy. Both procedures will be discussed in terms of their generalization to novel peers and toys respectively and the potential benefit as interventions to be utilized within school settings.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional play, leisure skills, matrix training, play skills
 

Increasing Sociodramatic Play Skills in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder via Peer-Mediated Matrix Training

(Service Delivery)
ELIZABETH HATZENBUHLER (University of Saint Joseph), John D. Molteni (University of Saint Joseph), Judah B. Axe (Simmons College)
Abstract:

Matrix training is a generative instructional approach where stimulus pairings are taught with the goal of emergent responses occurring without direct instruction. The matrix in this study was comprised of four character-action pairs aligned on a vertical and horizontal axis respectively. The researcher trained peers without identified disabilities to provide instructions and feedback to three children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) for four character-action pairings. For all participants, untrained responses for the remaining character-action pairings emerged in 73% to 100% of opportunities. In addition, responses for all participants generalized to novel peers. For two of the three participants, responses also generalized to independent play. Results of this study suggest that matrix training mediated by a peer can be an effective and efficient method for teaching sociodramatic play skills.

 

Increasing Functional Leisure Engagement for Children With Autism Using Backward Chaining

(Service Delivery)
Chelsea Kremer (Marcus Autism Center), CLAIRE LEA (Marcus Autism Center), Robin K. Landa (Western New England University), Sarah Frampton (Marcus Autism Center), M. Alice Shillingsburg (Marcus Autism Center, Emory University School of Medicine)
Abstract:

Research with individuals with disabilities has demonstrated the utility of intervention approaches to address toy play, also referred to as functional leisure engagement (FLE). Examples include prompting FLE, blocking stereotypy, and differentially reinforcing appropriate FLE with social or automatic (i.e., access to stereotypy) reinforcers. Backward chaining has yet to be evaluated, but may be useful for establishing more complex FLE. The current study employed a treatment package consisting of these components with three school-aged children with autism in a therapeutic classroom. Effects were evaluated during pretest and posttest sessions, which consisted of free access to toys in a novel setting. The percentage of session with FLE and stereotypy (two participants only) was evaluated using a multiple probe design across participants. Results showed all participants demonstrated an increase in FLE and two participants showed decreased stereotypy. Feasibility for classroom implementation is discussed.

 
 
Symposium #68
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Examining Response Interruption and Redirection Methods
Saturday, May 27, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4E/F
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kimberly Gauthier, M.S.
Chair: Haley Steinhauser (New England Center for Children; Western New Engla)
Abstract:

Previous research demonstrates that response blocking and response interruption are effective treatments for behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement, such as stereotypy. These three studies further evaluated variations of the response interruption and redirection (RIRD) procedure described by Ahearn, Clark, MacDonald, and Chung (2007). Gauthier and Ahearn assessed different levels of procedural integrity of the RIRD procedure in the treatment of vocal stereotypy. RIRD with diminished integrity suppressed stereotypy for some participants, but generally, full integrity resulted in more immediate suppression. Shawler, Dianda, and Miguel replicated and extended Love, Miguel, Fernand, and LaBrie (2012) in a comparison of RIRD and response competition in the treatment of vocal stereotypy. Significant stereotypy suppression was observed with one of the two participants in the response competition condition, but RIRD resulted in greater suppression for both participants. Steinhauser and Ahearn further evaluated the RIRD procedure in a systematic replication of Ahrens, Lerman, Kodak, Worsdell, and Keegan (2011) by comparing motor RIRD and vocal RIRD without prompting in the treatment of stereotypy. Both RIRD procedures reduced stereotypy with all participants, but the most effective procedure was idiosyncratic across participants.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): automatic reinforcement, response interruption, stereotypy
 
An Evaluation of Varying Integrity of Implementation of Response Interruption and Redirection on Vocal Stereotypy
KIMBERLY GAUTHIER (New England Center for Children; Western New Engla), William H. Ahearn (New England Center for Children; Western New Engla)
Abstract: Response interruption and redirection (RIRD) is common treatment for automatically maintained behavior such as stereotypy (Ahearn et al., 2007). RIRD is a variation of response blocking, shown to decrease automatically maintained behavior even at diminished integrity (Lerman & Iwata, 1996; Smith et al., 1999). The purpose of the current study was to assess RIRD at two levels of procedural integrity to evaluate whether the less intrusive procedure is effective in suppressing vocal stereotypy. An ABAB variant design, in which the B component was an alternating treatment comparison of two different levels of procedural integrity, was used. Treatment sessions alternated between implementing RIRD with 100% integrity by interrupting and redirecting all instances of vocal stereotypy and 33% integrity by interrupting and redirecting one out of every three instances. Results varied across participants. Generally, full integrity had a more immediate suppressive effect compared to diminished integrity. Results indicate that for some individuals, a less intrusive form of RIRD can be equally as effective in suppressing stereotypy.
 

Response Competition and Response Interruption and Redirectionas Treatment for Vocal Stereotypy

Lesley A. Shawler (Endicott College), MARIA CARAM (Easter Seals, Oklahoma), Caio F. Miguel (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract:

Stereotypy is defined as any repetitive vocal or motor behavior that does not have an apparent function. Two recent methods for treating stereotypy include response competition and response interruption and redirection (RIRD). The purpose of the current study was to replicate and extend results of Love, Miguel, Fernand, and LaBrie (2012) by directly comparing the reductive effects of RIRD and response competition separately on vocal stereotypic behaviors using a multielement with reversal design. Reductive effects between auditory and nonauditory toys within the response competition condition were also compared. Participants were one male and one female child diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Results for both participants indicate a greater suppression of vocal stereotypy during RIRD. However, for participant two, there were also significant reductions in vocal stereotypy when she engaged with competing items that provided auditory stimulation. Finally, for both participants, there were some increases in appropriate vocalizations during treatment conditions. These findings support the results of previous literature on RIRD and matched stimulation as an effective method to reduce vocal stereotypy.

 
An Evaluation of Procedural Components of Response Interruption and Redirection
HALEY STEINHAUSER (New England Center for Children; Western New England University), William H. Ahearn (New England Center for Children)
Abstract: Previous research demonstrates that response interruption and redirection (RIRD) can decrease stereotypy for individuals with autism (Ahearn, Clark, MacDonald, & Chung, 2007; Ahrens, Lerman, Kodak, & Keegan, 2011; Martinez & Betz, 2013). Ahrens et al. (2011) compared the effects of motor RIRD to vocal RIRD on both motor and vocal stereotypy using a prompting hierarchy. The purpose of the current study was to systematically replicate Ahrens et al. by comparing the efficacy of motor and vocal RIRD without prompting compliance with issued demands in the treatment of stereotypy. The participants included four males, between the ages of 15 and 21. The RIRD procedures were presented using an ABAB design with an alternating treatments analysis during the B condition. During both RIRD procedures, the therapist neutrally presented the corresponding RIRD demands upon the occurrence of stereotypy and presented demands until the participant complied with three consecutive responses in the absence of stereotypy. The results of the current study suggest that both motor and vocal RIRD, without prompting, can decrease stereotypy engagement with the most efficacious procedure being idiosyncratic across participants. Interobserver agreement was collected for a minimum of 30% of sessions with a range of 86% to 100%.
 
 
Panel #72
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
The Elements of Effective Instruction
Saturday, May 27, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ronald C. Martella, Ph.D.
Chair: Ronald C. Martella (University of Oklahoma)
NANCY MARCHAND-MARTELLA (University of Oklahoma)
RONALD C. MARTELLA (University of Oklahoma)
AMEDEE MARTELLA (Carnegie Mellon University)
Abstract:

This presentation will highlight the four big ideas of effective instruction. These big ideas include (a) setting expectations, (b) increasing student engagement, (c) providing praise, and (d) correcting errors. Research supporting these four elements will be shared. Illustrative videos and participant practice using research validated programs will be included in the presentation. Expectations involve a focus on establishing expectation routines and teaching them explicitly. Increasing student engagement will focus on choral responding, use of white boards, and other response card requirements. Providing praise will emphasize the use of general and special praise statements. Finally, correcting errors will involve modeling and firming practices to ensure future success. Problem solving scenarios will also be shared.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
 
Symposium #80
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Behavior Analytic Emotion Instruction for Children With Autism
Saturday, May 27, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center 304
Area: TBA/DEV; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jeremy H. Greenberg, Ph.D.
Chair: Jeremy H. Greenberg (The Children's Institute of Hong Kong)
Abstract:

The focus of this symposium is on behavior analytic emotion-related instruction for children with autism spectrum disorders. The first study used a stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure to teach preference for books for children. Results indicated that children spent more time on looking at books and their stereotyped behaviors decreased after the intervention was completed. The second study used multiple exemplar instruction to teach a student with autism to tact others' emotions and environmental contexts associated with emotions. Results indicated that the student's emotion recognition skills improved as a function of multiple exemplar instruction. The third study employed a behavior analytic emotion intervention program to improve emotional and behavioral competence for children with autism. This study utilized a group design with pre and post tests. The emotion program was delivered in a group format with two to three children in each group. Statistical analyses comparing scores on pre and post tests indicated that children's behavioral and emotional competence improved after the intervention.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, behaivoral instruction, emotion skills
 

Using Stimulus-Stimulus Pairing to Teach Children's Preference for Books

Hyunok Kim (Nexon Prumae Children's Rehabilitation Hospital), Kyungmi Oh (Nexon Prumae Children's Rehabilitation Hospital), Hyejeong Jang (Nexon Prumae Children's Rehabilitation Hospital), Jihye Ha (Nexon Prumae Children's Rehabilitation Hospital), Hye-Suk Lee Park (KAVBA ABA Research Center), GABRIELLE T. LEE (Michigan State University)
Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to test the effects of a stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure on children's preference for books and their stereotyped behaviors. Two 3-year-old boys and one 4-year-old girl with autism participated in this study. A multiple baseline across participants design was used. The stimulus-stimulus pairing procedure consisted of delivering each child's preferred items or edibles while they were looking at books. Results indicated that all children spent more time on looking at books and their stereotyped behaviors also decreased during free play time after the intervention was completed.

 

Teaching a Middle School Student With Autism to Tact Emotions and Causes of Emotions

HUA FENG (National ChangHua University of Education), po-lung Cheng (National Changhua University of Education), Wenchu Sun (Behavior Therapy and Consultation Research Center)
Abstract:

One of the major deficits for people with autism is to understand other peoples emotions. Tact emotion training is important for their emotional regulation and social interaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a multiple examples strategies and verbal prompt procedure can increase the percentage of correct responses of : (1) tact facial expressions (happy, sad, sacred and angry), (2) tact others emotions and (3) tact the cause of emotions in context, for a student with autism. A middle school student with autism participated in this study. A multiple probe across behaviors design was used. Results indicated that the student acquired the skills of tacting emotions and the environmental contexts associated with the emotions.

 

Effects of an Emotion Intervention on Behavioral and Emotional Competence for Children With Autism

GABRIELLE T. LEE (Michigan State University), Sheng Xu (ChongQing Normal University), ShaoJu Jin (ChongQing Normal University), Dan Li (ChongQing Normal University), Shuangshuang Zhu (ChongQing Normal University)
Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a behavior-analytic emotion intervention on childrens behavioral and emotion competence. Eight children (seven boys and one girl, age 7-8) diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder participated in this study. The study used a group design with pre and post tests to measure the intervention effects. The emotion intervention was delivered in a group format with two or three children in one group for the first 12 sessions and two individuals sessions. The content included a) emotion recognition, b) identifying antecedent and context of emotion, c) expressing ones own emotions with contextual information, d) seeking help, e) emotion management techniques (i.e., relaxation, distraction), and f) self-delivery of reinforcement for emotion management. Results indicated that the emotion intervention increased childrens behavioral and emotional competence.

 
 
Special Event #122
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Presidential Scholar's Address: Psychological Research to Guide Technology Design That Supports Successful Aging
Saturday, May 27, 2017
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom (Plenary)
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: M. Jackson Marr, Ph.D.
Chair: M. Jackson Marr (Georgia Tech)
 
WENDY ROGERS (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)
Dr. Rogers is the Khan Professor of Applied Health Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She received her B.A. from the University of Massachusetts - Dartmouth, and her M.S. and Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology. She is a Certified Human Factors Professional (BCPE Certificate #1539). Dr. Rogers is the Director of the Human Factors and Aging Laboratory and her research includes design for aging, technology acceptance, human-automation interaction, aging-in-place, human-robot interaction, cognitive aging, and skill acquisition and training. Dr. Rogers is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the Gerontological Society of America, and the American Psychological Association. She is past Editor of the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied and currently serves as the Chief Editorial Advisor for APA.
Abstract:

The Human Factors and Aging Laboratory (www.hfaging.org) is specifically oriented toward psychological science that supports successful aging. Our research does not emphasize loss of function associated with aging; rather, we wish to understand how to enable older adults to retain and enhance their ability to function in later life. Our research efforts are conducted within the framework of human factors psychology and we strive to apply that scientific knowledge to better design products, environments, and training. There is much potential for technology to enable older adults to age successfully. In this presentation I will provide an overview of the needs, capabilities, preferences, and limitations of older adults as well as the role of human factors research for technology design. I will then discuss our research on the design of technologies with examples ranging from mobile apps to personal robots. Central to my presentation will be a focus on research questions, methods, and areas of application.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Explain the field of human factors and ergonomics as it relates to applied behavior analysis; (2) Identify unique needs, capabilities, limitations, and preferences of older adults; (3) Describe the potential of emerging technologies and how they might be applied to assist people aging with and without disability.
 
 
 
Symposium #159
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Advances in the Assessment and Treatment of Problem Behavior Maintained by Automatic Reinforcement
Sunday, May 28, 2017
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4C/D
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Marc J. Lanovaz, Ph.D.
Chair: Marc J. Lanovaz (Université de Montréal)
Abstract:

Most children with autism spectrum disorders engage in problem behaviors (e.g., stereotypy) that are maintained by automatic (nonsocial) reinforcement. Given that researchers and practitioners typically have no control over the consequences maintaining these behaviors, assessment and treatment are often a challenge in applied settings. To address this issue, the symposium aims to present recent advances in both the assessment and treatment of problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement in children with autism spectrum disorders. The first presentation will discuss the use of a modified trial-based functional analysis to identify the function of automatically-reinforced behavior following ambiguous results. The second presentation will examine the effects of using a technology-based intervention on engagement in stereotypy and other challenging behavior in a girl with autism. Finally, the third presentation will present the results of a study on validating the algorithms of an app designed to support parents in the reduction of stereotypy in children with autism spectrum disorders. Altogether, the presentations will provide an overview of recent research on the assessment and treatment of automatically-reinforced behavior in this population.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Automatic Reinforcement, Functional Analysis, Stereotypy, Technology
 
Advances in Trial-Based Functional Analysis of Automatically Maintained Challenging Behavior
MANDY J. RISPOLI (Purdue University), Katie Wolfe (University of South Carolina), Matthew T. Brodhead (Michigan State University), Emily Gregori (Purdue University)
Abstract: Trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) allows for the experimental assessment of variables which may influence challenging behavior within ongoing activities and routines in the learner’s natural environment. The purpose of this study was to extend the work on TBFA to assess vocal scripting behaviors in three boys with autism spectrum disorder. Following initial ambiguous TBFA results, the TBFA procedures were modified to capture relevant motivating operations. These modified TBFAs led to the identification of an automatic function for all three participants’ vocal scripting. The validity of the TBFA results was examined for each participant using an ABAB design in which A was baseline and B was noncontingent attention. Under the noncontingent attention conditions, vocal scripting dropped to near zero levels. These results speak to the utility of modifying the TBFA to identify the function and relevant abolishing operations for stereotyped behavior. Implications for future research and practice will be discussed.
 

Effects of Visual Activity Schedules With Embedded Video Modeling on the Academic Skills and Challenging Behaviors of a Child With Autism

KATHERINE LEDBETTER-CHO (Texas State University), Russell Lang (Texas State University-San Marcos), Melissa Moore (Texas State University), Katy Davenport (Texas State University-San Marcos), Allyson Lee (Texas State University), Caitlin Murphy (Texas State University), Laci Watkins (The University of Texas at Austin), Mark O'Reilly (The University of Texas at Austin)
Abstract:

The use of portable electronic devices to learn novel skills offers a number of benefits to individuals with autism including social acceptability and increased independence. A multiple baseline across behaviors design was used to evaluate the effects of iPod-based visual activity schedules with embedded video models on the academic skill acquisition of a young girl with autism. The participant engaged in stereotypy, which was reported to increase in the presence of the iPad, and other challenging behaviors during work. Results indicated that the intervention was effective at improving the participants performance of each academic task. Following the removal of intervention, the participant accurately performed two of the three skills without additional teaching procedures. Stereotypy remained stable and the participants engagement in challenging behavior decreased as she demonstrated acquisition of each academic task. Stimulus generalization across academic targets was demonstrated and skill acquisition was maintained during three-week follow-up probes. Implications for practitioners and directions for future research are discussed.

 
Using Mobile Technology to Reduce Stereotypy: Validation Study of the Decision-Making Algorithms
ISABELLE PRÉFONTAINE (Université de Montréal), Marc J. Lanovaz (Université de Montréal), Emeline McDuff (Université de Montréal), Catherine McHugh (Monarch House), Jennifer Lynn Cook (Monarch House)
Abstract: Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) often engage in stereotypy, which may interfere with ongoing activities and social interactions. Parents do not always have access to the resources necessary to implement behavioral interventions that will effectively reduce engagement in stereotypy. To address this issue, we developed an iOS app, the iSTIM, designed to support parents in reducing stereotypy in their child with ASD. The purpose of this study was to test the effects of the iSTIM on the behavior of children with ASD. To this end, university students implemented the procedures recommended by the iSTIM (i.e., noncontingent access or differential reinforcement) and examined their effects on the stereotypy and appropriate behavior of 11 children with ASD between the ages of 3 and 8 using an alternating treatment design. Using the iSTIM reduced engagement in stereotypy while increasing appropriate engagement in 8 participants. Our results indicate that the iSTIM may decrease engagement in stereotypy, but that some of the decision-making algorithms may benefit from modifications before beginning testing with parents. We may need to modify the implementation of the latter to improve its efficiency. The next steps are to update the app and test it using parents as behavior change agents.
 
 
Symposium #188
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Facilitating Communication in Individuals With Language Deficits Using Cross-Modal and Verbal Relational Training
Sunday, May 28, 2017
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Karl Gunnarsson, M.S.
Chair: Alysse A Cepeda (Southern Illinois University)
Abstract:

Communicative delays are a challenge commonly experienced by individuals with disabilities that have deficits within their verbal repertoires. The increasing prevalence of individuals with disabilities has led to an increasing relevance for empirically based treatments designed to address deficient verbal repertories. Facilitating the development of complex verbal operants and the emergence of derived stimulus relations is a crucial consideration for this population that can produce significant gains toward a robust and sophisticated verbal repertoire. The present set of studies will discuss the application of procedures taken from the Promoting the Emergence of Advanced Knowledge (PEAK) curriculum to teach complex verbal operants to individuals with autism and traumatic brain injuries, two populations that frequently have delayed verbal repertories. The presenters will outline sets of procedures to teach abstraction of stimulus properties across sensory modalities using the Picture Exchange Communication System, as well as methods to promote the emergence of metonymical tacts of gustatory stimuli using stimulus equivalence in individuals with autism. In addition, the application of a set of procedures to teach complex verbal operants to individuals with traumatic brain injuries will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Cross-modal, PEAK, PECS, TBI
 

Abstraction of Tactile Properties by Individuals With Autism Using the Picture Exchange Communication System

CALEB STANLEY (Southern Illinois University), Jordan Belisle (Southern Illinois University), Amani Alholail (Southern Illinois University), Megan Galliford (Southern Illinois University), Mark R. Dixon (Southern Illinois University)
Abstract:

Gustatory, olfactory, and tactile properties are features of stimuli that are encountered on a daily basis. Much of the literature focuses on the development of responding to auditory and visual properties of stimuli, however, there is limited literature available on the development of responding to other sense modalities, such as taste, smell and touch. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a set of procedures described in the PEAK-Generalization curriculum for bringing tact extensions of abstracted tactile properties under stimulus control. A multiple baseline design across skills was implemented with two participants with disabilities, in which correctly tacting tactile properties of Wet/Dry and Hard/Soft stimuli was reinforced. Baseline accuracy for correct responses was below 50%, and all participants demonstrated mastery following training (5 consecutive trial blocks at 100%). Generalization probes of novel stimuli were conducted throughout the study, and both participants demonstrated generalization of stimulus control to novel stimuli with the same tactile properties. Mastery of trained and tested skills were maintained following a 2-week period. The results have implications for procedures that promote the abstraction of stimulus properties other than that of visual and auditory.

 

"Someone Call the Fire Department!": Evaluating the Establishment of Gustatory Equivalence Relations and Metonymical Tact Extensions in Children With Emotional Behavior Disorders

EMILY DZUGAN (Saint Louis University), Lindsey Freivogel (Saint Louis University), Alyssa N. Wilson (Saint Louis University), Tyler S Glassford (Saint Louis University), Sadie L. Lovett (Central Washington University)
Abstract:

Minimal research to date has explored the clinical utility of incorporating metonymical tact extentions into equivalence relations. The purpose of the current study was to extend previous research using the Promoting Emergence of Advanced Knowledge Relational Training System Equivalence Module (PEAK-E) to determine if stimulus equivalence with gustatory stimuli and metonymical tact extensions would emerge for three participants diagnosed with Emotional Behavior Disorder (EBD). A nonconcurrent multiple probe embedded within a multiple baseline across participant design was used. Participants were trained three, six-member stimulus classes (i.e., A-B, A-C, A-D, E-D, F-D) that included gustatory stimuli (A), images (B), spoken words (C), written words (D), metonymical tacts (E), and Greek letters (F) across flavor categories (sweet, sour, and spicy). Participant response selection and intraverbal vocal responses were collected across training and testing trials respectively. Two participants were tested on selection-based and intraverbal responses of novel metonymical tacts following training. During baseline probes, the mean percent of correct responding was 75%.Following training, all participants responded correctly on 90% of trials, and demonstrated acquisition of 25 untrained relations. Participants who completed testing for novel metonymical tacts did not demonstrate generalization of the tact extensions or an emergence of correct intraverbal responses.

 
Investigating the Utility of PEAK Relational Training System for Brain Injured Individuals
KARL GUNNARSSON (Southern Illinois University; Neurorestorative), Kristen Whiteford (Southern Illinois University), Ayla Schmick (Southern Illinois University), Kendra Hall (Southern Illinois University), Meghan Doherty (Southern Illinois University), Mark R. Dixon (Southern Illinois University)
Abstract: In the past few years there has been an increase in research studies on deficits in derived relational responding experienced by autistic individuals. The current experiments evaluated the feasibility of the PEAK to teach and establish complex verbal operants to individuals diagnosed with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Two experiments were conducted. In experiment 1 relationship between scores from the PEAK assessment, Ross Information Processing Assessment (RIPA-2), Glasgow Coma Scale scores, and pre-morbid education levels, and location of brain injury was analyzed. In experiment 2, a multiple baseline across three tasks within three participants was used to teach complex verbal operants. Results from experiment 1 identified significant relationships between PEAK and RIPA-2 scores and PEAK and number of years since injury. Results from experiment 2 demonstrated that complex verbal operants could be trained after a brain injury. Implications of these two experiments are that the PEAK relational training system shows preliminary feasibility with the TBI population. Limitations of the PEAK relational training system will be discussed as well as the utility of this system for rehabilitative purposes for the TBI population.
 
 
Symposium #204
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Instructional Strategies That Promote Independent Responding and Reduce Dependence on Prompts
Sunday, May 28, 2017
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4E/F
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Tiffany Kodak, Ph.D.
Chair: Tiffany Kodak (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee)
Abstract:

Skill acquisition programs frequently include prompts to occasion behavior. Responses under the control of a prompt are then transferred to the discriminative stimulus or establishing operation that evoke behavior in the natural environment. Despite substantial evidence regarding the efficacy of transfer of stimulus control procedures, some individuals may not consistently engage in independent responding in appropriate settings. The current symposium presents a collection of studies that evaluated strategies to promote independent responding and reduce or prevent dependence on prompts. The first study compared the efficacy and efficiency of three interventions to treat prompt dependence for children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental disabilities. The second study provided tactile prompts to reduce rapid eating in a child with autism and compared two prompt fading strategies. The third study investigated the effects of fading procedures to teach independent and varied play skills to young children with autism during free play on the playground. All three studies will provide a discussion of how best to promote independent responding and fade prompts from instruction.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Independent responding, Prompt dependence
 

Assessing Treatment Options for Pre-Existing Prompt Dependence

ELLA M GORGAN (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Tiffany Kodak (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Brittany Benitez (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Gabriella Rachal Van Den Elzen (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Dayna Costello (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee), Miranda May Olsen (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee)
Abstract:

Prior research has focused on identifying effective strategies to prevent prompt dependence from occurring during the training of novel skills, although it is unclear whether interventions are also effective for reducing pre-existing prompt dependence. The current literature has also indicated that the relative efficacy and efficiency of different interventions may be idiosyncratic across learners, suggesting the potential benefit of an individualized assessment. The purpose of the current study was to extend the literature on prompt dependence and assessment-based instruction by conducting an assessment to compare interventions for skills for which four participants with developmental disabilities consistently engaged in correct responses following prompts but did not perform independently. An alternating treatment design was used to compare the effects of differential reinforcement, prompt fading, and an extended response interval on independent correct responses. Thus far, the results indicate that fading the vocal prompt may increase independent correct responding, but differential reinforcement was the most efficacious and efficient intervention strategy. The results also support the extension of assessment-based instruction to identify interventions for prompt dependence.

 

Evaluation of Stimulus Intensity Fading on Reduction of Rapid Eating in a Child With Autism

AMBER VALENTINO (Trumpet Behavioral Health - Monterey Bay), Linda A. LeBlanc (Trumpet Behavioral Health), Paige Raetz (Trumpet Behavioral Health)
Abstract:

This study assessed the effects of a vibrating pager (i.e., tactile prompt) on reduction of rapid eating in an adolescent male with autism. We replicated the procedures used by Anglesea et al. (2008) to slow the pace of food consumption with two extensions. The first extension was to examine whether the pager prompt could be successfully faded by altering the intensity of the vibration. The second extension was to compare the effects of fading by stimulus intensity vs. fading by stimulus frequency. An ABABCBCB reversal design was used to evaluate the effects of the tactile prompt on reduction of pace of eating (ABAB) and to compare the effects of fading the tactile prompt by intensity vs. by frequency (CBCB). Results showed that the pager was successful in decreasing the pace of eating to an appropriate level and the tactile prompt was successfully faded. Fading by frequency was ineffective in maintaining an appropriate pace of eating while intensity fading was successful. The intensity fading involved switching the pager from a high intensity, to a low intensity and to low intensity that was muffled.

 

An Evaluation of the Effects of Fading Procedures on Children Using Activity Schedulesto PlayonthePlayground Appropriately

KYLEE LEWIS (Utah State University), Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University)
Abstract:

Children with autism often have difficulty playing appropriately and independently. Activity schedules have been shown to be effective at teaching children with autism to play. Some individuals with autism engage in repetitive behaviors, especially on the playground. A previous study showed that activity schedules were effective at reducing repetitive or patterned behavior on the playground by teaching three students with autism to play appropriately and independently. This study investigated the effects of fading procedures on teaching independent and varied play skills to young children with autism during free play on the playground. All three participants engaged in more playground activities when they were taught to use the activity schedule binders. Two of the three participants were able to fade to more portable forms of activity schedules, and go through the entire fading sequence. One of the participants was only able to fade to smaller size pictures in the activity schedule binder.

 
 
Panel #215
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
From Reinforcers to Religion: Navigating Ethical and Professional Issues in Multicultural Service Delivery
Sunday, May 28, 2017
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1E/F
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michele R. Traub, Ph.D.
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
KAR YAN CATHERINE TAM (Autism Partnership Hong Kong)
PAMELA OLSEN (The New England Center for Children - Abu Dhabi)
MARGARET BLOOM (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Abstract:

As the number of behavior analysts practicing internationally grows, there is an increasing need for our field to navigate complex social and cultural differences while remaining in line with our fundamental philosophies and our professional and ethical guidelines. Across the United States and the world, differences abound in the acceptability of certain behaviors, the treatment of individuals with disabilities, the use of reinforcement and punishment, and the role of religious, educational, and governmental institutions. The expansion of our field into new markets and areas of practice has outpaced our ethics and compliance code, and many practitioners need to balance social validity and cultural sensitivity with professional guidelines. This panel discussion will bring together practitioners from around the world to share experiences in delivering behavioral services in an increasingly multicultural society. Topics to be addressed include the use of punishment, prioritizing treatment goals, selecting reinforcers, navigating religious and cultural beliefs, and legal and ethical compliance issues.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): culture, ethics, international
 
 
Symposium #221
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Evaluating the Efficacy and Effectiveness of Treatments for Severe Problem Behavior
Sunday, May 28, 2017
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2B
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Mahshid Ghaemmaghami, Ph.D.
Chair: Jacqueline N. Potter (Cohasset Public School District)
Discussant: Louis P. Hagopian (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract:

The present symposium explores new areas of treatment and provides a review of the efficacy and effectiveness of established treatments for severe problem behavior. In Study 1, the boss-hat protocol was implemented and destructive behavior was observed to decrease by an average of 96% across cases. Results of this study emphasize the importance of function-based treatment even when the function may momentarily fluctuate. Study 2 provides an updated review of behavioral treatments for self-injurious behavior and examined current treatment trends. Study 3 focused on the effectiveness of functional communication training (FCT) with contingency-based reinforcement thinning with 25 outpatient clinical cases in which the IISCA was applied during the assessment period. Results showed at least a 90% reduction in problem behavior across cases. Study 4 focused on the efficacy and effectiveness of FCT in published research to date as well as whether or not FCT has been established as an evidenced-based practice in the general field of psychology.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): FCT, IISCA, Multiple Schedule, Self-Injury
 

The Boss Hat: Treating Destructive Behavior Reinforced by Increased Caregiver Compliance With the Child's Mands

TODD M. OWEN (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Wayne W. Fisher (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Henry S. Roane (SUNY Upstate Medical University), Jessica Akers (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), William Sullivan (SUNY Upstate Medical University)
Abstract:

Standard functional analyses (FA) sometimes do not identify momentary fluctuations in the function of destructive behavior (Bowman et al., 1997). In such cases, individuals may mand for the reinforcer that is currently most preferred, and destructive behavior may be evoked if this mand is not reinforced. In the current study, following inconclusive standard FAs, we conducted a mand analysis with a test condition in which mands produced reinforcement only following destructive behavior and a control condition in which mands produced reinforcement throughout. We then evaluated a function-based treatment colloquially referred to as the boss-hat protocol in which we provided differential or time-based reinforcement of mands in accordance with multiple or chained schedules that included reinforcement-schedule thinning to practical levels. By treatments end, destructive behavior decreased by an average of 96% from baseline rates across all cases. We discuss these results relative to the importance of matching treatments for destructive behavior to operant functions even when those functions fluctuate from one moment to the next.

 

Self-Injurious Behavior:A Review of the Literature,2001-2016

LESLEY A. SHAWLER (Endicott College), Samantha Russo (Eden Autism, Endicott College), SungWoo Kahng (University of Missouri; Endicott College), Michael F. Dorsey (Endicott College), Melissa Rae Goodwin Romanowsky (Endicott College)
Abstract:

Self-injurious behavior (SIB) has been defined as behavior that produces physical injury to the own individual�s body (Tate & Baroff, 1966) and is a common behavior exhibited by individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). However, overall rates of SIB among those with IDD are varied. Many treatments have been studied to reduce SIB, with applied behavior analytic treatments showing robust efficacy. For example, Kahng et al. reviewed peer-reviewed studies on the behavioral treatment of SIB exhibited by individuals with IDD from 1964-2000. Their results showed that behavioral interventions are highly effective at decreasing SIB, particularly when based on the results of a functional assessment. The purpose of the current study is to update and extend the review by Kahng et al. We reviewed and analyzed the current treatment trends for SIB exhibited by individuals with IDD from 2001-2016. More specifically, treatment trends as they compared to Kahng and et al.�s original review will be discussed.

 

Achieving Socially Significant Reductions in Problem Behavior Following the Interview-Informed Synthesized Contingency Analysis

JOSHUA JESSEL (Child Study Center), Einar T. Ingvarsson (Child Study Center; University of North Texas), Rachel Metras (Child Study Center; University of North Texas), Hillary Kirk (Child Study Center), Ruth Whipple (Child Study Center)
Abstract:

Jessel, Hanley, and Ghaemmaghami (2016) recently evaluated the results of 30 interview-informed, synthesized contingency analyses (IISCAs) and found them to be an effective tool for identifying the functions of problem behavior across a wide variety of topographies, participants, and locations. However, Jessel et al. did not include data on the effectiveness of the corresponding treatments. In the current study, we collected and summarized 25 additional outpatient clinical cases, from analysis to treatment, in which the IISCA was applied during the assessment period. The IISCA identified socially mediated functions of problem behavior, which informed personalized treatments of functional communication training (FCT) with contingency-based reinforcement thinning. At least 90% reduction in problem behavior was obtained for every participant by the end of the treatment evaluation. The assessment and treatment process was socially validated by caregivers who rated the procedures highly acceptable and helpful, and the improvement in their childs behavior highly satisfactory.

 
Functional Communication Training: From Efficacy to Effectiveness
MAHSHID GHAEMMAGHAMI (University of the Pacific; Western New England Uni), Gregory P. Hanley (Western New England University), Joshua Jessel (Child Study Center; Western New England University)
Abstract: Functional communication training (FCT; Carr & Durand, 1985) is a common function-based treatment in which an alternative form of communication is taught to reduce problem behavior. FCT has been shown to result in substantial reductions of a variety of topographically and functionally different types of problem behavior in children and adults. The extent to which these reductions maintain in relevant contexts and result in socially meaningful changes in the lives of those impacted will be the focus of this paper. The goal of this review is to determine the degree to which the efficacy and the effectiveness of FCT have been demonstrated in the published research to date and whether FCT has been established as an evidence-based practice in psychology according to the definition set out by the American Psychological Association’s 2005 Presidential Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice.
 
 
Panel #241
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Ethicists Expound on Elaborate Ethical Events
Sunday, May 28, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: PRA/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jon S. Bailey, Ph.D.
Chair: Jon S. Bailey (Florida State University)
MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
THOMAS L. ZANE (University of Kansas)
JON S. BAILEY (Florida State University)
Abstract:

This panel is a continuation of previous presentations at ABAI on Behavior Analysts Behaving Badly. An ethicist is one who is sought after for ethical advice and counsel; For this panel we have brought together three such behavior analysis ethicists who are regularly consulted on a wide variety of complex cases concerning the practice of behavior analysis. Difficult cases covering: the use of evidence-based treatments, boundaries of competence, conflicts of interest, terminating behavioral services, conceptual consistency, gifting, supervisory competence and testimonials that have come through the ABAI Hotline as well as other sources will be discussed. To demonstrate the range of approaches used and opinions offered, recent cases will be tendered and each panelist will offer their guidance, we will then debate the merits of our various approaches. Toward the end of the session we will open the floor to questions from the audience and again each ethicist will respond so that the range of tactics and strategies will be apparent.

Instruction Level: Advanced
 
 
Symposium #243
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
In and Out: Contingency-Based Interventions for Addressing Food-Related Challenging Behavior
Sunday, May 28, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2C
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Dayton, M.S.
Chair: Casey Chauvin (Vanderbilt University)
Discussant: S. Shanun Kunnavatana (Texas A&M)
Abstract:

It is not uncommon for individuals with developmental disabilities to present challenging food-related behaviors that can lead to social isolation and may pose long-term health risks. For example, the excessive consumption of calories following food stealing poses health risks such as obesity and diabetes. By contrast, vomiting responses under operant control that frequently occur can include malnutrition, weight loss, dehydration, and tooth decay (Lang et. al., 2011). During this symposium, each talk will provide insight on effective interventions identified in previous literature and then applied in practice to address clinically significant food-related problem behaviors. The first presenter will discuss challenges associated with addressing the food stealing of a child diagnosed with Prader-Willi Syndrome and will highlight a function-based approach to intervention that incorporated differential reinforcement and schedule leaning. The second presenter will describe an iterative approach to intervention for projective vomiting when functional analysis results were inconclusive. Effective intervention ultimately consisted of a reprimand and positive practice and generalized across multiple staff throughout the school setting.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
 

Decreasing the Food Stealing of a Child With Prader-Willi Syndrome Through Function-Based Differential Reinforcement

NAOMI PARIKH (Vanderbilt University), Kristen Stankiewicz (Vanerbilt University), Joseph Michael Lambert (Vanderbilt University), Nealetta Houchins-Juarez (Vanderbilt University), Vivian Morales (Vanderbilt University), Molly Gilson (Vanderbilt University)
Abstract:

Given unrestricted access to food, individuals with Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) may consume as much as three times more calories than that of individuals matched on age and body mass index. When food is unavailable, it is not uncommon for individuals with PWS to engage in problematic food seeking behavior such as food-stealing or pica. Because food-related challenging behavior is not uncommon for individuals with PWS and can lead to obesity and other long-term health complications, intervention is often warranted. However, efforts to decrease these behaviors, such as isolation during meals and strict monitoring of food consumption, can be socially stigmatizing. Ideally, effective intervention would decrease problematic food-seeking behavior without isolating the child or restricting access to socially important events; such as eating dinner at the dinner table with family members. Our participant was a 7-year-old girl with PWS that engaged in mealtime food-stealing behavior that precluded her participation in traditional familial mealtime routines. We conducted a latency-based functional analysis of food stealing in a clinic setting and then implemented an intervention that included a token board, function-based differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO), and schedule thinning. The intervention generalized to the home setting across food preferences, therapists, and family members.

 

Decreasing Projectile Vomiting Through the Use of Positive Practice

Kristin LeFevre (Melmark), ELIZABETH DAYTON (Melmark)
Abstract:

Vomiting is a common symptom of many illnesses and disorders. Typically vomiting requires minimal intervention and is resolved once the offending agent has been resolved (Scorza et al., 2007). However, chronic vomiting can be associated with a variety of conditions. In order to get a better understanding of vomiting a thorough evaluation should be conducted. Through the evaluation, signs and symptoms should be identified along with the underlying etiology of nausea and vomiting (Scorza et al., 2007) Vomiting may lead to an increase in medical complications/concerns and social isolation. Azarin & Wezolowski (1975) utilized positive practice and self-correction to address habitual vomiting in two individuals and saw a reduction in vomiting across both participants. A similar treatment was developed to treat projectile vomiting in a 16 year old male. Ten minute trials were conducted across the day and percent of opportunities for each trial was collected. A multiple baseline across staff members was used to demonstrate experimental control. The treatment was effective in decreasing the overall frequency of vomiting. In addition, most of the vomiting that continued to occur occurred in the practiced location (i.e. toilet).

 
 
Symposium #272
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Projects from the Frontline: Training Transitional Skills Across the Lifespan for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities
Sunday, May 28, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2B
Area: PRA/DDA
CE Instructor: Kimberly Peck, M.A.
Chair: Austin Seabert (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Individuals with developmental disabilities (DD)often experience an increased need for instruction on transitional skills across their overall lifespan (The North Carolina Institute of Medicine, 2009). These skills often include independence in activities of daily living (ADLs), vocational skills, and complex social skills. The acquisition of these skills often leads to an increased quality of life, but due to the individualization required for training these types of skills, they can often be difficult to address. As such, this symposium will address issues in training three significant life skills. The first presentation will discuss a systematic replication of toilet training as conducted by LeBlanc et al. (2005). Recommendations for practice, and common oversights in the toilet training literature will be examined. The second presentation will address training vocational and job-related social skills. Considerations for training, and suggestions for future research will be highlighted. The final presentation will tackle issues related to sexuality. Methods for training healthy and safe sexual behaviors for individuals with DD will be discussed. Each author will emphasize overall implications of training these skills throughout development.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Developmental Disabilities, Sexuality, Social Skills, Transition Skills
 

Toilet Training Children With Developmental Disabilities: Procedural Changes and Generalization of Bowel Movements

(Applied Research)
Rebecca Kolb (Western Michigan University), REBECCA RENEE WISKIRCHEN (Western Michigan University), Denice Rios (Western Michigan University), Stephanie M. Peterson (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

The importance of independent toileting skills cannot be overstated due to the vast benefits for clients and all those involved in their care. Improvements in quality of life include increased sanitation and comfort, substantial monetary gain, and greater access to various services and settings. Toilet training usually involves a sit schedule, increased fluids, reinforcement, urine alarms, positive practice, and functional communication training. While many studies have utilized a combination of these procedures, methods of implementation have varied. Furthermore, few studies have reported generalization to bowel movements. The current study examined the effects of a toilet training procedure (LeBlanc et al. 2005) on five developmentally-disabled children, using a non-concurrent multiple baseline design. Moreover, the current study also examined the potential for generalization effects to bowel movements, which is rarely addressed in the literature. Results will be presented as well as a discussion on data based procedural changes and solutions to practical barriers.

 

Sexuality and Individuals With Developmental Disabilities: Not Just a Synonym for Abstinence

(Service Delivery)
KIMBERLY PECK (Western Michigan University), Jessica E. Frieder (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

A commonly-faced, but sometimes disregarded and understudied issue for individuals with developmental disabilities is sexuality (Realmuto & Ruble, 1999). As such, adolescents and adults with developmental disabilities often mistake or ignore social cues in their environment, inhibiting their ability to appropriately navigate sexual interactions. These deficits in healthy sexual habits can lead to abuse, criminal consequences, and decreased quality of life (Swango-Wilson, 2010). A better understanding of sexuality will help individuals to increase confidence, independence, and optimize the quality of their sexual/social interactions. Thus, behavior analysts practicing in a variety of environments, should be vigilant to the most effective, empirically-validated, and contextually-relevant approaches to teaching individuals about their own sexuality in relation to the world around them. The current presentation will discuss practical considerations for comprehensive sex education, training healthy sexual habits, and pursuing sexual relationships. Further, this talk will highlight resources and recommendations for training, successful strategies, and areas for future research.

 

Now Hiring: Practical Tips for Obtaining and Maintaining Paid Employment for Individuals With Developmental Disabilities

(Service Delivery)
KAYLA JENSSEN (Western Michigan University), Kimberly Peck (Western Michigan University), Jessica E. Frieder (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Despite a growing emphasis in autism-related services, a greater focus is needed on job-related skills training. Individuals with disabilities often struggle with social and other job-related skills, which may impact their marketability when applying for employment positions (Tomblin & Haring, 2000). Therefore, community-based transition programs and employment preparation need to be emphasized (Allen et al., 2010). In collaboration with a local intermediate school district, a Midwestern university developed the PROMOTES (Providing Realistic Opportunities to Mentor On-site Training for Employment Skills) Employment Project to support individuals with developmental disabilities, ages 16 and older, who are seeking or have obtained paid employment. Following year one of the PROMOTES Employment Project, the authors have identified a number of practical “do’s and don’ts” for clinicians seeking to prepare individuals with developmental disabilities for employment. Successful strategies and interventions identified during year one of PROMOTES will be examined in relation to the existing literature-base for employment-related skills training and instruction for individuals with developmental disabilities. Recommendations for job-related social skills and vocational training, implications for practice, and suggested research topics for job-related skills training will also be discussed for young adults with autism and developmental disabilities.

 
 
Symposium #297A
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Reducing Stereotypy in Children With Autism
Sunday, May 28, 2017
4:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2C
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jennifer L. Beers, Ph.D.
Chair: Jennifer L. Beers (The Chicago School, Los Angeles)
Discussant: Adel C. Najdowski (Pepperdine University)
Abstract:

Stereotypic behaviors are common in individuals with autism. Interventions to reduce stereotypy are often sought as stereotypy can be socially stigmatizing and interfere with the acquisition of other appropriate behaviors. For many individuals with autism, reducing stereotypy can be challenging as it is often maintained by automatic reinforcement. The specific reinforcer can vary based on the type of stereotypy and can often be difficult to identify, limiting replacement behaviors that may be targeted. This symposium presents four studies evaluating interventions to reduce stereotypy in children with autism. The first two studies evaluated the effects of noncontingent access to music on vocal stereotypy, examining different characteristics of the music used. The first study evaluated high-and low-preference music, and the second study evaluated different genres of music. The third study evaluated the effects of a self-managed differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) on various forms of stereotypy. The final study evaluated the use of a stimulus control procedure on the reduction of stereotypy.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): matched stimulation, self-management, stereotypy, stimulus control
 
The Effects of Noncontingent Access to Music on Vocal Stereotypy
RACHEL STROMGREN (The Chicago School, Los Angeles), Jennifer L. Beers (The Chicago School, Los Angeles)
Abstract: Vocal stereotypy is a behavior that is commonly observed in individuals with autism and can limit appropriate social interactions as well as have a negative impact on learning. Noncontingent access to auditory stimulation in the form of listening to music can serve as matched stimulation and has been shown to decrease vocal stereotypy. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of noncontingent access to music played through headphones on vocal stereotypy as well as to compare the effects of listening to high- versus low-preference music. The results suggest that noncontingent access to music played through headphones decreased engagement in vocal stereotypy for all participants. The effect of high- versus low-preference music varied across participants.
 

The Effects of Noncontingent Access to Different Genres of Music on Vocal Stereotypy

Sheila Goodman (The Chicago School, Los Angeles), JENNIFER L. BEERS (The Chicago School, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

Vocal stereotypy is a behavior observed in individuals diagnosed with autism and typically presents as episodes of acontextual repetitive vocal sounds, words, or phrases. Previous research has evaluated noncontingent access to music to reduce vocal stereotypy; however, little information is typically given about the type of music used. As such, the current study evaluated the effects of noncontingent access to different genres of music on vocal stereotypy in three young male children. Classical, pop, and rock music were evaluated. Preference of each genre was also assessed to identify possible correlations between preference and effectiveness. Noncontingent access to music was effective in reducing rates of vocal stereotypy. Differential effects based on genre were observed, and pop music was found to be most effective.

 

The Effects of Self-Management of a Momentary DRO on Stereotypy in Children With Autism

MIGUEL FLORES (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Jennifer L. Beers (The Chicago School, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

Individuals diagnosed with autism may engage in stereotypy, or repetitive patterns of behavior, throughout their day. Stereotypy may interfere with social and learning opportunities, affecting the individuals inclusion in typical settings; therefore, it is important to implement procedures that will reduce stereotypy. It can also be beneficial in an applied setting to have the individual manage his or her own intervention, allowing the clinician or caregiver to attend to other tasks. As such, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of self-management of a momentary differential reinforcement of other behavior procedure on stereotypy in children with autism. In this study, children were taught to independently self-manage a momentary differential reinforcement of other behavior procedure. The results demonstrated that upon implementation of the self-management procedures, a reduction in stereotypy was observed from baseline to the self-management condition as well as during follow-up. In addition, fidelity of the implementation of self-management procedures remained high. The results of this study support the use of self-management of a momentary differential reinforcement of other behavior procedure in applied settings to limit clinicians and caregivers need for continuous monitoring of the individuals behavior.

 
Stimulus Control to Decrease Stereotypic Behaviors
JILL L. MENGEL (Center for Autism and Related Disorders; Simmons College), Megan Maureen Maixner (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), Elizabeth Meshes (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), Angela M. Persicke (Center for Autism and Related Disorders)
Abstract: Stereotypy is a common behavior among individuals with autism (APA, 2013) and can interfere with skill acquisition (Koegel & Covert, 1972). A functional analysis of stereotypic behavior confirmed that the stereotypy of two boys with autism was maintained by automatic reinforcement. Activity assessments identified high preference items that evoked stereotypy for each participant. A changing criterion design was used to evaluate stimulus control of stereotypy using a signal (i.e., colored wristbands) and vocal rule during inhibition and access conditions. Access to items that typically evoke stereotypic behaviors was provided contingent upon inhibition of stereotypy for the target duration. Results suggested that stimulus control procedures were effective to increase the latency to stereotypy during the inhibition condition for one participant, despite variable responding during the access condition. The stimulus control procedure resulted in substantially longer latencies to stereotypy during the inhibition condition and near zero latencies to stereotypy during the access condition for the second participant. Test probes following treatment resulted in longer latencies for all of the inhibition conditions compared to baseline. Generalization to maintenance tasks resulted in more variable data, but ultimately resulted in consistent inhibition of stereotypy for 11-14 min during maintenance tasks. The results of this study have implications for the use of stimulus control procedures in combination with contingent access to stereotypy as an effective intervention to increase inhibition of stereotypy for some participants.
 
 
Symposium #371
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Structured, yet Flexible, Approaches to Teaching Receptive and Expressive Labels for Children Diagnosed With ASD
Monday, May 29, 2017
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: AUT/PRA
CE Instructor: Joseph H. Cihon, M.S.
Chair: Joseph H. Cihon (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College)
Discussant: Mary Jane Weiss (Endicott College)
Abstract:

Two components of discrete trial teaching (DTT) that have garnered attention of researchers and practitioners alike are prompting strategies and stimulus order and placement of stimuli. This attention has resulted in recommendations for best practice and comparative research. Despite the increase in research and publication of best practice recommendations, numerous questions still require empirical research. This symposium includes two papers which examine the conditions under which DTT is most effective and efficient to teach receptive and expressive language skills. The first presentation discusses the comparison of two different prompting procedures to teach expressive labels for individuals diagnosed with ASD. The second presentation explores effects of stimulus order and placement as it relates to the acquisition of receptive labels for individuals diagnosed with ASD. Practical implications and future research will be discussed. The discussant will provide further considerations on how this research can be used in clinical settings and what is needed in future research.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): counterbalance, DTT, language, prompting
 

The Relative Effectiveness and Efficiency of Flexible Prompt Fading and No-No-Prompting to Teach Expressive Labels to Children Diagnosed With ASD

(Service Delivery)
JEREMY ANDREW LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), Joseph H. Cihon (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College), Julia Ferguson (Autism Partnership Foundation), Justin B. Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), John James McEachin (Autism Partnership Foundation), Ronald Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), Mitchell T. Taubman (Autism Partnership Foundation)
Abstract:

Multiple prompting systems are available to the practitioner to teach expressive labels. Comparative studies provide the practitioner with information about the strengths and weaknesses of different prompting systems. This information can be invaluable when selecting a system that may work the best for each learner. This study compared the relative effectiveness and efficiency of no-no prompting to flexible prompt fading (FPF) for teaching expressive labels for children diagnosed with ASD. An adapted alternating treatment design was used to compare the two procedures and a concurrent chains schedule was used to assess the participants preference for the two procedures. The results are discussed in the context of practice and future research directions.

 

Evaluating the Effects of Stimulus Order and Placement to Teach Receptive Labels for Children Diagnosed With ASD

(Applied Research)
Aditt Alcalay (Autism Partnership Foundation), JULIA FERGUSON (Autism Partnership Foundation), Joseph H. Cihon (Autism Partnership Foundation; Endicott College), Justin B. Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), Mitchell T. Taubman (Autism Partnership Foundation), Ronald Leaf (Autism Partnership Foundation), John James McEachin (Autism Partnership Foundation)
Abstract:

Some have recommended counterbalancing the array of stimuli (i.e., target and non-target stimuli) and the order of targets when using discrete trial teaching to teach receptive labels (e.g., Grow & LeBlanc, 2013). Although this method of counterbalancing has been referred to as best practice (Grow & LeBlanc, 2013, p. 58), it remains unclear if counterbalancing leads to improved learning, maintenance, and/or generalization. The present study compared the acquisition of receptive labels across three teaching conditions (i.e., counterbalance, fixed, and teachers choice). The counterbalanced condition consisted of arranging the stimuli based on best practice recommendations (Grow & LeBlanc, 2013, p. 58). The fixed condition consisted of leaving the stimuli stationary throughout each teaching session. The teachers choice condition consisted of arranging the stimuli however the teacher chose. An alternating treatment design was used to evaluate the effects of each teaching condition across five children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The results are discussed in the context of practice and future research directions.

 
 
Symposium #389
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Learning to Play and Playing to Learn
Monday, May 29, 2017
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4C/D
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nancy J. Champlin, M.A.
Chair: Nancy J. Champlin (ACI Learning Centers)
Discussant: Andrew John Houvouras (Applying Behavior Concepts)
Abstract:

Play is one of the core deficits of children with autism. Impairments in play impact communication and language, cognition, and social and emotional interactions. Appropriate independent and sociodramatic play skills are critical to the development of social skills. Children who do not learn to play may miss out on opportunities for social interactions due to observable differences in their play. Increasing appropriate play has been shown to increase language skills while decreasing stereotopy and other problem behaviors. Play is an integral part of the development of typically developing children and should be an emphasis in behavioral intervention for children with autism. The ACI Play Protocol incorporates a systematic approach to teaching preschool-aged children appropriate play skills and language. Play components, which include appropriate play with figures (dolls/stuffed animals), adults, and peers are taught using individualized treatment packages. Specific skills included abstract play with and without objects, rotating between play schemes, combining items from 2 or more play schemes, initiating, responding and expanding on current play targets.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
 

Assessing Typical Children's Imaginary Play to More Effectively Program for Children With Autism

NANCY J. CHAMPLIN (ACI Learning Centers), Melissa Schissler (ACI Learning Centers)
Abstract:

There is a connection between high quality play and cognitive competence, language acquisition, and proficiencies in social abilities for individuals with autism. Wolery, 2002, states more appropriate intervention strategies are identified through assessment of play. Interventions to increase one aspect of play for children with autism have been the focus in the field of behavior analysis. Studies have utilized a variety of interventions (antecedent manipulations, system of least prompts, video modeling) to increase the complexity of functional play, decrease stereotopy, or engage in pretend play schemes. Play should be a separate domain and used as the primary emphasis in assessing and program development for children with autism (Lifter, K. 2011). Learning the play activities and corresponding vocalizations of typical peers identifies developmentally appropriate programming for individuals with autism. The purpose of this study was to assess the pretend play skills of typically developing preschool-age children, ages 2 -5. Typically developing boys and girls were video-taped playing in a designated play room with 15 play schemes (e.g. ice cream shop, camping) engaging in independent and sociodramatic play opportunities. Researchers coded the play using a specified developmental play sequence to identify the play actions and vocalizations across the age spans.

 

Teaching the Foundational Components of Pretend Play to Children With Autism

MELISSA SCHISSLER (ACI Learning Centers), Nancy J. Champlin (ACI Learning Centers)
Abstract:

Research identifies a number of complex stages in the typical developmental sequence of play (e.g. pretend-self, single scheme sequences). Teaching children diagnosed with autism appropriate play skills requires isolating the individual components within each stage of play to acquire, maintain and generalize the target skill. Deficits in play are linked to poor social relationships, limited expressive language and high rates of stereotypic behavior. The purpose of this study was to utilize the developmental sequence of play and evaluate the effectiveness of teaching a series of 9 components encompassing the first developmental stage of play. Least-to-most prompting was used to teach single play actions and vocalizations to 3 male children diagnosed with autism, ages 3-5. All 3 children were taught play actions to self, to figures, and acting as the figures across 3 categories; familiar (e.g. brush hair), observed (e.g. hold phone to ear), and community (e.g. give baby a shot). Abstract play, responding and initiating exchanges with peers were also targeted throughout the 9 components. A multiple baseline across participants was conducted. The outcome of this study demonstrated the efficacy of the 9 teaching components as steps to teach all 3 children single play actions with corresponding vocalizations.

 
Teaching a Sequence of Play Actions and Vocalizations to a Child Using Speech Generating Devices
WHITNEY WEHRKAMP (ACI Learning Centers), Nancy J. Champlin (ACI Learning Centers), Melissa Schissler (ACI Learning Centers)
Abstract: Speech-generating devices (SGDs) are electronic augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) that have assisted non/limited-vocal individuals to effectively mand. SGDs have also aided learners in expanding their verbal repertoires to include tacts and intraverbals, but have not been included in the acquisition of play skills. Research has established a correlation between language development and play skills. The inability to emit vocal output serves as a limiting factor in language and social development. SGDs should be incorporated in all areas of programming, including play and socialization. The purpose of this study was to teach a four year old non-vocal boy with autism to respond, initiate and expand on a peer’s play action utilizing a SGD to emit vocalizations. Three different play schemes were taught using a forward chain consisting of play actions and corresponding vocalizations. Maintenance and generalization probes were conducted. The outcome of this study demonstrates the effectiveness of using SGDs during play skills to improve appropriate engagement with toys, language skills, and socialization with peers.
 

The Use of PlayTubs™ to Teach Children With Autism to Expand Appropriate Play Sequences

MOLLIE ANN RICHERT (ACI Learning Centers), Nancy J. Champlin (ACI Learning Centers), Melissa Schissler (ACI Learning Centers)
Abstract:

Children with autism are often able to emit functional play skills under contrived circumstances, supporting that the deficit in spontaneous play is due to the acquisition, rather than the production of play. Individuals diagnosed with autism commonly engage in perseverative and stereotypic play. The purpose of this study was to utilize the developmental sequence of play and evaluate the effectiveness of using a systematic approach delineated into 9 teachable components. Individualized treatment packages incorporated the use of behavioral interventions including priming, script fading, or video modeling. Each participant was taught 7 play actions and corresponding vocalizations including responding, initiating, and expanding play while rotating and combining play schemes. A multiple baseline across participants study was conducted with 3 males diagnosed with autism, ages 5, 5 and 6. The outcome of this study demonstrated the efficacy of the 9 teachable components (independent play, active figure play and play with peers) from the developmental sequence of play to teach a chain of 7 actions and corresponding vocalizations to all 3 participants.

 
 
Invited Tutorial #407
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Applied Ethics for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Monday, May 29, 2017
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 4
Area: PRA/AUT
BACB/QABA CE Offered. CE Instructor: Steven Woolf, Ph.D.
Chair: John M. Guercio (Benchmark Human Services)
STEVEN WOOLF (Beacon ABA Services)
Dr. Woolf has been a BCBA-D for over 17 years and is the Senior Vice President of Beacon ABA Services, which is the largest home based EIBI service provider in the Northeast. He regularly communicates with state officials at Department of Public Health, Department of Developmental Services, special education directors, and state legislators on the funding and quality of ABA services. Dr. Woolf has authored publications and regularly presents ABA research at state and national conferences. He has extensive experience providing treatment to children and adults with disabilities. He is the former past president, one of the founders of MassABA, executive member on CTABA, executive member of MassABA, and chairperson of the ABAI Chapter leadership committee. Dr. Woolf's specialty areas include managing large scale home-based service delivery system and licensure of behavior analysts. He has served on state committees to define behavior analyst licensure standards and regulations. Dr. Woolf also has significant experience working with numerous health insurance providers relative to funding ABA treatment and presents regularly on the new AMA CPT codes.
Abstract:

This presentation addresses some of the most common ethical issues behavioral practitioners encounter when providing home-based and school services. As the numbers of BCBAs have grown over the last few years and ABA services funding increased, behavior analysts are increasingly exposed to ethical dilemmas that may jeopardize their certification or license. The presenter shall complete a data based overview of some of the most common ethical complaints encountered by related human service professionals enforced by state regulatory boards. The presentation also highlights survey data based on ethical challenges experienced by practicing behavior analyst. The presenter will also provide analysis of state behavior analyst licensing regulations cross referenced to the BACB compliance code. Finally, the presenter shall provide strategies for dealing and responding to ethical issues commonly encounter by practicing behavioral professionals. This workshop addresses a variety of ethical and best practice issues: in-field supervision of paraprofessional staff, appropriate discharge/termination of cases, fraudulent billing, school consultation, documentation of services, informed consent, misrepresentation, punishment as intervention, and maintaining of clinical records.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Licensed BCBAs, graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list the three most common ethical dilemmas encountered by practicing behavior analysts; (2) identify three sections of the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code most applicable to providing home- and school-based ABA-based treatment; (3) list three antecedent control strategies to avoid controversial ethical situations when delivering services in schools and homes.
 
 
Symposium #426
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Examining Treatment Procedures for Feeding Problems Exhibited by Children With and Without Diagnoses
Monday, May 29, 2017
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 3C
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jonathan K Fernand, M.A.
Chair: Jonathan K Fernand (University of Florida)
Discussant: Kathryn M. Peterson (University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Abstract:

The current symposium will focus on extending previous research on the treatment of pediatric feeding problems. The first presentation provides an evaluation of treatment components designed to treat rapid eating. The second presentation focuses on extending reinforcement-based treatments for children of typical development who engage in selective eating habits. The third presentation provides an overview of reinforcement and extinction used to treat food selectivity in children with autism and provides data on changes in food preferences following those treatments. The final presentation also examines reinforcement and extinction in the treatment of food selectivity with a focus on changes in preference and generalization to untreated foods. Participants will obtain an overview of various treatments for feeding problems across different presenting problems and populations. Directions for extending prior literature and the current studies will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Escape extinction, Feeding problems, Food selectivity, Rapid eating
 

Reduction of Rapid Eating in an Adolescent Female With Autism

Scott Page (California State University, Sacramento ), KRISTIN GRIFFITH (California State University, Sacramento), Becky Penrod (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract:

Rapid eating is exhibited by both typically developing persons as well as individuals with developmental disabilities and is considered to be a potentially dangerous and socially inappropriate behavior (Favell, McGimsey, & Jones, 1980). The rather limited behavior analytic research on rapid eating has demonstrated that the use of prompts and vibrating pagers (MotivAider) may be an effective and unobtrusive intervention package to reduce the pace of eating (Anglesea, Hoch, Taylor, 2008; Echeverria & Miltenberger, 2013). This study evaluated the use of a vibrating pager combined with a rule for reducing the pace of eating in one adolescent female diagnosed with autism in a multiple probe design across two settings (clinic and home). The primary dependent variable was inter-response time (or time between bites). Results indicated that inter-response time did not increase from baseline levels until after a vocal prompt to wait was introduced. The participants eating pace quickly came under control of the vibrating pager and prompts were naturally faded in the clinic setting. Implications for promoting autonomy in individuals with developmental disabilities will be discussed.

 

A Comparison of Simultaneous Versus Sequential Meal Presentation With Picky Eaters

COLLEEN WHELAN (California State University, Sacramento), Becky Penrod (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract:

This study extends the research on the effects of simultaneous and sequential food presentation methods with children who are picky eaters. The sequential presentation method examined in this study differs in portion size from previous examinations of this method. In this study, an age-appropriate sized portion of non-preferred food (NPF) is presented as an appetizer before the participants preferred food (PF) is presented. Participants were required to consume their NPF before gaining access to their PF (i.e., dinner). This Appetizer Presentation Method is compared to a simultaneous presentation method called, Total Meal Presentation. This presentation method closely resembles a typical meal in most households. In the Total Meal Presentation, a whole portion of both the PF and NPF were presented together on the same plate and the participants were allowed to eat what they choose. Two participants, Lars and Marshall are typically developing brothers, ages 6 and 3, participated in this study. The Appetizer Presentation Method, was effective in increasing consumption of NP foods for both participants. Data and participant characteristics will be discussed as they relate to the effectiveness of the Appetizer Presentation Method for varying levels of picky eating and food selectivity.

 
Evaluation of Extinction in the Treatment of Food Selectivity
JESSICA FOSTER JUANICO (The University of Kansas), Joseph D. Dracobly (Eastern Connecticut State University), Claudia L. Dozier (The University of Kansas), Pamela L. Neidert (The University of Kansas), Bertilde U Kamana (University of Kansas)
Abstract: Sequential presentation (i.e., differential reinforcement of alternative behavior) is a widely used procedure to increase consumption of non-preferred foods in individuals with food selectivity (e.g., Najdowski, Wallace, Doney, & Ghezzi, 2003). Extinction is a critical component of sequential presentation; however, there are often challenges associated with its implementation (e.g., Athens & Vollmer, 2010; Piazza, Moes, & Fisher, 2011). These challenges may make sequential presentation difficult to implement under certain situations (e.g., Pace, Ivancic, & Jefferson, 1994). Thus, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of sequential presentation with and without extinction. In addition, we conducted pre- and post-preference assessments to determine whether there were any shifts in preference of non-preferred foods following exposure to treatment. Results thus far suggest that sequential presentation is an effective treatment for increasing consumption of non-preferred foods; however, extinction is a necessary component. Additionally, for one participant, acceptance of the non-preferred foods increased during the post-preference assessment as compared to the pre-preference assessment.
 

An Evaluation of Generalization in the Treatment of Food Selectivity

JONATHAN K FERNAND (University of Florida), Varsovia Hernandez (Universidad Veracruzana), Timothy R. Vollmer (University of Florida)
Abstract:

Food selectivity and refusal behavior remain a prevalent problem especially in children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Differential reinforcement combined with escape extinction is often used to treat food selectivity (e.g., Piazza, Patel, Gulotta, Sevin, & Layer, 2003). Escape extinction is effective in treating pediatric feeding problems, yet is often implemented across several foods simultaneously. Thus, the purpose of the current project was to examine the generalization effects of a nonremoval of the spoon procedure on generalized consumption to nonpreferred foods with similar or dissimilar properties as the treatment food. The current study evaluated implementation across one food at a time for four separate subjects and measured pre- and post-treatment preference changes. Implications for research and clinical practice for long-term treatments will be discussed.

 
 
Symposium #427
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Verbal Behavior and Behavioral Interventions to Treat Articulation and Speech Sound Disorders in Children With Autism
Monday, May 29, 2017
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4A/B
Area: AUT/DDA
CE Instructor: Smita Awasthi, M.S.
Chair: Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India)
Discussant: Mark L. Sundberg (Sundberg and Associates)
Abstract:

Prevalence of speech errors in the autism population is placed between 24 and 33% ( Rapin, Dunn, Allen, Stevens and Fein, 2009; Cleland, Gibbon, Pepp, OHare, and Rutherford, 2010; Shriberg, Paul, et al., 2001). While several Behavior Analytic studies address early vocalizations and communication in the autism population, very few such studies address the profound articulation problems faced by children in the spectrum. Speech Sound Disorders present a formidable barrier to further speech development. This Symposium presents successes in this clinically important area with 3 experimental papers on specific behavioral technologies covering Sufficient Response Exemplar Training, Phonetic hand prompting methods and Precision Teaching procedures. A conceptual paper introduces a behavioral perspective to interpretation of speech sound disorders, their classification and assessment challenges.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
 

Using Sufficient Response Exemplar Training to Address Speech Sound Disorders in Children With Autism

(Applied Research)
SMITA AWASTHI (Behavior Momentum India), Sridhar Aravamudhan (Behavior Momentum India), Vidushi Sharma (ABA India)
Abstract:

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at a higher risk of being affected by speech disorders and often require remedial intervention. SufficientResponse-Exemplar Training of vocal imitation was used to successfully teach two typically developing children to articulate several Norwegian words with blends (Eikeseth and Nesset, 2003). The present study extends and adapts these procedures to children with Autism. Participants were a 11-year-old boy and a 15-year-old girl, both with ASD and speech sound disorders. For each participant 3 sets of 10 words, with specific blends they had difficulties with in the initial position were targeted for training. Within stimulus prompts, shaping, chaining and supplementary prompts were added to the intervention. A multiple baseline across behaviors (word sets with target blends) demonstrated improvement in articulation of trained words and generalization of correct articulation to untrained words in both participants. This study provides support for the value of sufficient response exemplar training in addressing speech sound disorders in children with ASD.

 

Improving Speech Production Skills in a Child With Autism and Apraxia of Speech Using Phonetic Hand Cues

(Applied Research)
TAMARA S. KASPER (The Center for Autism Treatment), Laura Biwer (53211)
Abstract:

Improving speech intelligibility in children with autism with limited vocal repertoires is the focus of many early intensive behavior programs. Phonetic hand cueing systems are commonly promoted in commercially available speech-language products (Carahaly, 2012; Kaufman, 2007; Strode, 1994), however; research on effectiveness is limited (Hall and Jordan, 1992, Jordan 1988, Klick, 1985, Stelton & Graves 1985). This study examines the effectiveness of phonetic hand cues as a stimulus control transfer procedure to improve articulatory precision in a six year old with autism and limited vocal behavior. Results revealed rapid acquisition of 20 hand cues, steady acquisition of 248 single word echoics when hand cues were used as an antecedent prompt, and an increase in words and phrases improved when hand cues were used as error correction during natural environment training. Results of formal assessment of speech production skills by an independent speech-language pathologist revealed a reduction in errors on the Hodson Assessment of Phonological Targets Third Edition from 194 to 57 errors over a 10 month period. Results confirm previous case study findings that phonetic hand cues may be an effective intervention in promoting speech production skills in children with autism with limited vocal repertoires.

 

Fluency Training Interventions to Address Speech Sound Disorders and Articulation in Children With Autism

(Applied Research)
SRIDHAR ARAVAMUDHAN (Behavior Momentum India), Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India)
Abstract:

Fluency Training emphasizes rate as a preferred response dimension (Binder,1996) with evidence that learning to perform a component skill accurately at high rates could lead to faster acquisition of composite skills (Binder 1996; Johnson and Layng,1994). KS a 17 year old girl with autism and profound speech sound disorder participated in this delayed multiple baseline across behaviors study. Single consonant- vowel sounds tu, and fu were targeted and trained using Precision Teaching procedures (Lindsley,1964) and Standard Celeration charting. Rate of correct responses accelerated from low levels in baseline to over 40 per minute with intervention. Errors decelerated to zero for tu and 8 per minute for fu. Non-timed assessments of articulation at the composite levels of words demonstrated improvement from 30% to 100% for words with tu and 0% to 47% for fu sounds. Intervention is scheduled to begin on ku sound with low baseline rates correct. Additional participants have been identified for replication. The role of cues within precision teaching sessions, setting a realistic aim, generalization to composite level or other untrained words will be discussed.

 

Collaborate To Win! Behavioral and Speech-Language Perspectives on Treatment of Speech Disorders

(Theory)
Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India), Sridhar Aravamudhan (Behavior Momentum India), VIDUSHI SHARMA (ABA India)
Abstract:

Articulation for better intelligibility in children with autism is a socially significant outcome for Behavior Analysts to target but has only a limited body of behavioral research. 24 to 33% of persons with ASD are likely to be affected by speech sound disorders (Rapin, Dunn, Allen, Stevens & Fein, 2009; Shriberg, Paul, Black and Santen, 2011). There have been clarion calls for Behavior Analysts to collaborate with Speech and Language pathologists given the unique expertise and insights each can bring to address the problem of profound articulation disorders in children with autism (Sundberg,2011; Hegde, 2010; Esch, B.E., La Londe and Esch, J. W, 2010). This paper will discuss the challenges Behavior Analysts face and offers insights from SLP literature on areas such as assessment of articulation disorders, transcription, data recording and development of task analyses to progress from sounds to words to intelligible phrase speech to sentence speech. A further examination of existing approaches to articulation problems and how they can be shaped for better client outcomes using behavioral principles and evidence based methods such as treating to optimal intensity, prompting, stimulus salience, shaping and chaining.

 
 
Symposium #443
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Recent Research in Skill Acquisition Programs to Teach Social and Safety Skills to Children With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
Monday, May 29, 2017
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1A/B
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: M. Fernanda Welsh, M.S.
Chair: M. Fernanda Welsh (The ABRITE Organization)
Abstract:

This symposium presents recent research related to teaching social and safety skills to individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. The first paper presents data on teaching children with autism spectrum disorder to identify the sensory perspective of others, as in, what they can see, hear, taste, smell, and feel. The second paper presents data evaluating and identifying the dose of instruction necessary for the Preschool Life Skills program curriculum to be a successful and efficient teaching tool for children with developmental disabilities. The third paper evaluates the use of teaching children with autism spectrum disorder to use a safe word in the acquisition of stranger safety skills.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): perspective taking, safety, social skills
 

Teaching Sensory Perspective to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

M. FERNANDA WELSH (The ABRITE Organization), Adel C. Najdowski (Pepperdine University), Danielle Strauss (The ABRITE Organization), Lindabeth Gallegos (The ABRITE Organization)
Abstract:

Children with autism spectrum disorder often have difficulty with inferring the private events of others, and in particular, they have been found to have difficulty with perspective taking (Baron-Cohen, Leslie, & Frith, 1985). This study is employing a nonconcurrent multiple baseline across participants design to investigate the use of a multiple exemplar-training package for teaching three children with autism to appropriately identify others sensory perspectives, that is detecting what others are experiencing through their five senses (i.e., touch, smell, taste, sight and hear). Data are currently being collected, and percentage correct responding to questions about what others can sense is being measured across sessions. Results thus far demonstrate that participants 1 and 2 responded at chance levels in baseline and participant 1 and 2 demonstrated an immediate increase in level and trend during training. Generalization to untrained stimuli and people is being programmed for and measured by saving exemplars and people used in baseline for retesting in posttraining and using multiple exemplar training during training. Participant 1 demonstrated generalization to untrained stimuli and people in posttraining.

 

Preschool Life Skills: A Systematic Replication With Children With Developmental Disabilities

MELINDA ROBISON (Child Study Center), Tracie B. Mann (Child Study Center), Einar T. Ingvarsson (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

The Preschool Life Skills (PLS) program was originally created to teach functional communication and social skills to typically developing children in an attempt to prevent the development of problem behavior. Children diagnosed with ASD and other developmental disabilities are also at risk for developing problem behaviors in daycare and school settings due to insufficient instruction and contingency management. Therefore, this population might benefit from PLS instruction. The current study aimed to evaluate and identify the dose of instruction necessary for PLS curriculum to be a successful and efficient teaching tool for children with developmental disabilities. We taught twelve preschool life skills to 9 participants across 4 instruction units. The units were instruction following, functional communication, tolerance of denial and delay, and friendship skills. Instruction was provided by means of a three-tiered instructional approach, which incorporated large group and class-wide instruction, followed by small group and individual instruction as necessary. Results indicated that intervention led to skill acquisition with all nine participants. The skills were also found to maintain four weeks after instruction ended.

 

It's Not Always a Stranger That's the Danger: A Safe-Word Intervention for Abduction Prevention in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders

CHELSEE RODRIGUEZ (California State University, Fresno), Marianne L. Jackson (California State University, Fresno)
Abstract:

This study addresses the statistic that most children are abducted by known individuals, not strangers, and examines the effects of a training package that employs the use of a safe-word. A safe-word is a tactic used to decrease the likelihood that a child will leave with a person not appointed by their parents. The study is being conducted in a lab room and various community settings (i.e., shopping mall, grocery store, parks, etc.) with five participants, ages 4-9 years old, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). A concurrent multiple baseline design across participants was used to measure participants responses to lures by way of a 5-point scoring system across conditions. Each participant was quasi-randomly exposed to a variety of different lures, each falling under one of the three different lure types: authoritative, assistance, and incentive. Intervention utilized a behavioral skills training to teach participants how to use the safe-word and to respond appropriately to a variety of known and unknown individuals who know and dont know the safe-word. Post-intervention probes suggest that this intervention was successful in teaching participants to respond differentially requests of adults who can provide the participant with the safe-word (trusted adults) compared to those who cannot provide the safe-word (familiar/unfamiliar adults). Follow-up probes will also be conducted to examine the maintenance of such an intervention.

 
 
Symposium #465
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Advancements in Teaching Appropriate Play Skills to Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, May 29, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4E/F
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Lorraine A Becerra, M.A.
Chair: Lorraine A Becerra (Utah State University)
Abstract:

The three presentations within this symposium describe the recent advancements in teaching appropriate play skills to individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Each paper describes systematic approaches to improve the effectiveness in teaching in the areas of independent and social play. The first presentation is a quantitative analysis of interventions used to teach play skills to children with ASD. The second presentation will describe the use of technology based activity schedules to teach independent play skills to preschool students. The final presentation describes the use of video modeling training to increase pretend play behaviors for two pairs of participants with ASD. Implications and future directions for teaching various play behaviors will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Play
 

Teaching Play Skills to Children With Autism: A Review of the Literature

HEATHER PANE (Caldwell University), Tina Sidener (Caldwell University)
Abstract:

The development of play skills is thought to be an important part of human development. Children spend the majority of their time engaged in play activities (Boutot, Guenther, & Crozier, 2005). Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often present with substantial delays in the development of play behaviors. To our knowledge, the literature on teaching play skills to children with ASD has not been fully reviewed. The purpose of the current review was to conduct a quantitative analysis of studies that evaluated interventions to teach play skills to children with ASD. Fifty-seven articles met the inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated across 16 parameters (e.g., participants, dependent variable, preference assessment, independent variable, generalization, social validity, type of play). The majority of the studies reviewed were effective in increasing the target play skill. Further evaluation of the social validity of the outcome is warranted. Determining a means of measuring the participants newly acquired play skill relative to a child of typical development would be valuable information in understanding how socially valid the results are. Another interesting finding is that only eight studies conducted some type of preference assessment to identify the toys used during the intervention. Consideration of a childs preference for a toy might aide in the development of the play skill. In addition, more consideration should be made in programming for and assessing generalization across toys, people, and environments. Identifying effective interventions is an important step in promoting play skills within the contexts of natural play environments.

 

An Evaluation of an iPad Based Photographic Activity Schedule to Increase Independent Play Skills for Young Children With Autism

KASSIDY REINERT (Utah State University), Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University)
Abstract:

A visual activity schedule is a set of pictures or words that can be used to teach an individual with disabilities to complete a set of tasks. These schedules can help individuals with disabilities to become more independent and complete tasks appropriately. Children with autism often engage in behaviors that are repetitive or not appropriate when playing. Visual activity schedules have been used to teach a variety of skill and teach appropriate play. Typically, activity schedules are paper based; this study examines the use of an activity schedule taught on an iPad. This study included three young boys with a diagnosis of autism who were attending a university-based early intervention preschool. This study found that technology-based activity schedules are an effective way to teach play and the technology-based activity schedule was preferred for two of the three participants.

 

Teaching Children With Autism Pretend Play Using Video Modeling

ASHLEY SIMMONS (Marcus Autism Center), Sarah Frampton (Marcus Autism Center), Sandra Shirk (Marcus Autism Center), Bethany Talmadge (Marcus Autism Center), Tom Cariveau (Marcus Autism Center), Whitney Trapp (Marcus Autism Center), M. Alice Shillingsburg (Marcus Autism Center, Emory University School of Medicine)
Abstract:

Video modeling has been used to teach a variety of play behaviors for children with ASD including solitary play (MacDonald, Clark, Garrigan, and Vangala, 2005; Paterson & Arco, 2007), and pretend play with typically developing peers and siblings (Reagon, Higbee, & Endicott, 2006; Macdonald et al., 2009). However, there is limited research on the utility of video modeling training when all participants have ASD. A multiple probe design across behaviors (pretend play scenarios) was used to evaluate the effects of video modeling for two pairs of participants. During all sessions, rate of vocalizations, play actions and completion of the targeted scenario was scored for all participants. In baseline, the participants did not engage in the targeted play scenarios and displayed low rates of contextually appropriate vocalizations and play actions. Following exposure to the video models, all participants displayed elevated vocalizations and play actions and completed the targeted play scenarios. Maintenance probes showed that play persisted once the videos were no longer viewed. These results extend the video modeling research by demonstrating that the intervention can successfully be provided to two children with ASD simultaneously.

 
 
Symposium #466
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Methods to Address Errors and Response Bias During Skill Acquisition for Learners With Autism
Monday, May 29, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 3B
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kimberly Sloman, Ph.D.
Chair: Kimberly Sloman (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University)
Abstract:

Individuals with autism may exhibit persistent errors and biased responding during academic tasks, which may slow the skill acquisition progress. The proposed symposium will present data from three research studies on the evaluation of procedures improve skills acquisition in learners with autism. In the first study, Audrey Toricelli will present a study that used functional communication to decrease biased responding in learners with autism during receptive identification tasks. In the second study, Stacy Lauderdale-Litton will present a study evaluating three error correction procedures in the acquisition of response chains in learners with autism. In the third study, Douglas Stracquadanio will present an evaluation of different error correction procedures during sight word reading and generalization of effects to naturalistic instructional contexts for individuals with autism.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Chaining, Error Correction, Functional Communication, Response Bias
 

Using Functional Communication Training to Decrease Biased Responding During Receptive Identification Tasks in Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder

AUDREY TORRICELLI (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University ), Robert W. Isenhower (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University), Lara M. Delmolino Gatley Gatley (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University), Kimberly Sloman (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University), Stacy Lauderdale-Littin (Monmouth University)
Abstract:

Biased responding is a common problem observed during academic instruction for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These learners may develop response patterns controlled by a different stimulus or an aspect of a stimulus rather than respond based upon programmed stimuli and contingencies. For example, when selecting from an array, the individual may always select the stimulus on the left. This faulty stimulus control often leads to stagnated progress during skill acquisition programming. Biased responding may be likely to occur during novel tasks because individuals with autism lack the means to effectively request help or additional information. The purpose of the present study is to a) demonstrate that biased responding can be a function of novel (unknown) stimuli and b) use functional communication training (FCT) to teach two learners diagnosed with ASD, who have demonstrated response biases, an expressive I dont know response when presented with novel instructional stimuli. Results indicate that responses biases emerge during presentation of novel instructional materials. In addition, FCT can be an effective tool to teach individuals with ASD a socially appropriate response to unknown instructional stimuli. Implications for generalizing FCT to natural settings will be discussed.

 

Evaluation of Error-Correction Procedures During Chained Tasks for Learners With Autism

STACY LAUDERDALE-LITTIN (Monmouth University ), Melanie Erwinski (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University ), Jennifer Stracquadanio (Rutgers University, Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center), Rachel Davis (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University ), Kimberly Sloman (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University), Douglas Stracquadanio (Rutgers University, Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center)
Abstract:

Many socially significant behaviors are taught to individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) by breaking a complex chain of responses into smaller, manageable steps. When teaching chained responses, various instructional strategies are used to promote independence. Past research suggests that the effectiveness of procedures may be idiosyncratic across learners (McGhan & Lerman, 2013). Therefore, individualized assessment is essential to determine the least intrusive, most effective strategy. Joe, a 14-year-old classified with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and Zander, a 17-year-old with ASD, participated in an error-correction assessment. The assessment compared acquisition of chaining tasks across three error-correction conditions: error feedback (i.e., instructor stated, No thats no right when error occurred and reset materials), overcorrection (i.e., error in chain was interrupted, materials were reset, and student was prompted through the entire chain 3 consecutive times) and reset (error in chain was interrupted, materials were reset, and student was prompted through the chain 1 time) using an alternating treatments design. When examining trials to acquisition, results indicated that error feedback resulted in the first chaining task being acquired more quickly for both learners. Implications for future generalization of these results in each students classroom programming will be discussed.

 

Evaluation of Error-Correction Procedures During Sight Word Reading for Learners With Autism

DOUGLAS STRACQUADANIO (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University), Kimberly Sloman (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University), Stacy Lauderdale-Littin (Monmouth University ), Audrey Torricelli (Rutgers University, Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center), Kyung Mo Nam (Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, Rutgers University)
Abstract:

Various error-correction procedures are used when teaching learners with autism. Procedures may involve providing feedback to the learner, prompting the correct response, or having the learner practice the response numerous times. Past research suggests that the effectiveness of the procedures may be idiosyncratic across learners. Therefore individualized assessment is paramount to find the least intrusive, most effective error-correction procedure. Two adolescents with autism participated in an adapted error-correction assessment (McGhan & Lerman, 2013). Baseline probes were conducted to identify three sets of three novel sight words for inclusion in the study. We compared acquisition of sight-word reading lists across two error-correction conditions: error-feedback (i.e., instructor stated correct response) and repeating trials until independent (i.e., student was prompted to say correct response and trials at independent were presented until student engaged in correct response) and a control condition (no reinforcement and no error correction) using an alternating treatments design. Results revealed that error-feedback resulted in higher rates of skill acquisition whereas no sight words were acquired during the repeat until independent or control condition. These results were replicated with the set of words that were previously trained using the repeat until independent condition. Implications for future generalization of these results to classroom programming will be discussed.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #469
CE Offered: BACB/QABA

We Can Teach You That Too! Using Behavior Analysis to Teach Reading, Maths, and Writing to Children With Autism

Monday, May 29, 2017
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 1
Area: AUT
CE Instructor: Corinna F. Grindle, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica L. Thomason-Sassi (New England Center for Children)
CORINNA F. GRINDLE (Bangor University)
Corinna Grindle, Ph.D., has over 20 years of experience working with children with autism and related developmental disabilities. She obtained her undergraduate degree at the University of Warwick, and her Ph.D. at the University of Southampton, in 2004. She is a director of the Centre for Behaviour Solutions, a not-for-profit social enterprise that offers evidence-based specialist support for children and young people whose challenging behaviour is impacting negatively on their quality of life. Corinna has been a lecturer on the MSc in ABA at Bangor University since 2004 and taught numerous university courses for behaviour analysts and specialists regarding autism, behaviour analysis, curriculum design and effective instruction. She is currently also an associate research fellow at the Centre for Educational Development Appraisal and Research, University of Warwick. She has been invited to present at national and international conferences regarding educational, behavioural and communicative issues relating to children and young people with autism. Corinna’s research interests include early intervention, challenging behaviour, and fostering academic learning for students with moderate and severe learning disabilities. Her research has been published in journals including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Modification, Behavioral Interventions, the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, and Research in Developmental Disabilities.
Abstract:

There has been considerable interest in the use of Applied Behaviour Analysis methods as a comprehensive intervention model for children with autism in home and centre-based or school-based settings. Recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggest positive outcome data, especially for cognitive, language, and adaptive skills. In addition to a focus on social, language and other adaptive skills, ameliorating academic skill deficits (in reading, writing and maths) is often a component of these programs. However, within the research literature on interventions for children with autism, investigating the best methods of teaching academics has received limited attention. In this presentation I will describe an approach for extending what we know about the psychology of learning to the teaching of academic skills to more fully account for the full range of skills that may be lacking in children with autism. I will describe three distinct strands of research that have effectively taught reading, maths and handwriting skills to children with autism. This talk will provide a new framework for developing and evaluating academic programs for children with autism.

Target Audience:

PENDING

Learning Objectives: PENDING
 

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