Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Program by : Saturday, May 28, 2022


 

Invited Symposium #16
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Scholarly Contributions to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Paper Competition Winners
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: DEI; Domain: Translational
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Pepperdine University), Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Hughes Fong, Ph.D.
Abstract:

This competition is designed to encourage, promote, and reward behavior analytic scholarship on topics and issues in DEI, both in the field of behavior analysis and more broadly. Students (graduate or undergraduate) and post-graduate professionals who have completed empirical or conceptual papers relevant to DEI that are informed, at least in part, by a behavior-analytic perspective were invited to submit. This symposium includes presentations by the 2021 Student category winner, the 2022 Student category winner, and the 2022 Professional category winner.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the importance of measuring teacher-student interactions in the preschool setting; (2) state at least one reason why considering culture within behavior analysis is important; (3) identify at least one cultural adaptation that has been made within assessment, training, and intervention; (4) reflect on the importance language plays in the context of service delivery; (5) identify challenges in accessing services from the Latinx population and how to create learning opportunities.
 
Diversity submission 

A Behavioral Approach to Analyzing Bias-Based Behaviors in Public Schools

(Theory)
DAPHNE SNYDER (Western Michigan University), Sydney Marie Harmon (Western Michigan University), Nicole Hollins (EdBeeConsultations, LLC)
Abstract:

Students of color are more likely to receive negative teacher-student interactions compared to their peers. Some have attributed the inequalities of teacher-student interactions to implicit bias or bias-based behaviors. Given the impact of bias-based behaviors on student academic and social outcomes, it is critical for school-based practitioners to objectively measure bias-based behaviors to assist in providing culturally relevant and socially significant treatments. The most commonly cited procedure for assessing bias is the Implicit Bias Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). While the IRAP assessment has produced socially significant results, the utility and acceptability of the IRAP in school-based settings may be limited due to several factors. Moreover, there is limited research that extends the assessment of bias-based behaviors to treatment in primary educational settings. Practitioners must have an efficient data collection system to measure interactions and use the data collection system when providing feedback to school personnel. Thus, the purpose of this paper is to discuss considerations to current procedures being used to assess bias-based behaviors and propose the Teacher Student Interaction Tool (T-SIT) for school-based practitioners. The utility and considerations of the T-SIT will be discussed.

Daphne Snyder, MA, BCBA, LBA, is a doctoral student at Western Michigan University under the direction of Dr. Stephanie Peterson. She received her bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Global Health Studies at Allegheny College. Her main research interests include the assessment and treatment of challenging behavior in the school setting and training teachers to implement effective classroom management strategies. Currently, Daphne is the Project Coordinator for KRESA Classroom Consultations (KCC). KCC provides graduate and undergraduate students with the opportunity to learn about applied behavior analysis and collaborate with multi-disciplinary teams in the school setting.
 
Diversity submission 

Cultural Responsiveness in Assessment, Implementer Training, and Intervention: A Systematic Review

(Theory)
DANIEL KWAK (University of South Florida)
Abstract:

This systematic review consists of 22 peer-reviewed single subject and group design studies that used culturally responsive assessment, implementer training, and intervention to yield positive outcomes for children and adolescents from diverse cultural backgrounds. The studies were published across 15 journals (2010-2021) and included at least 281 implementers and 536 service recipients. The review identified culturally responsive interventions targeting behavioral, social skills, academic, and social-emotional outcomes. Results indicated that most studies considered race, ethnicity, nationality, or language for cultural adaptations in assessment, implementer training, and intervention and addressed the specific culturally sensitive elements suggested by the Ecological Validity Model to some degree. The studies addressed cultural responsiveness in conducting research suggested in the literature, mostly in the area of problem formulation; scant research adequately addressed cultural responsiveness in the area of dissemination. Recommendations, implications, and directions for future research and behavior-analytic practices are discussed.

Daniel Kwak is a Ph.D. candidate in the Applied Behavior Analysis program at University of South Florida under the advisement of Dr. Kwang-Sun Cho Blair. Daniel received his Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with minors in Education and History from University of California, San Diego in 2013. His interest in working with children and students developed when he gained experience in the assessment and treatment of students’ academic, behavioral, and mental health problems in public schools. Daniel received his Master of Arts in Education from University of California, Riverside in 2017. During his time in the program, Daniel found particular interest in behavioral assessment and interventions and began providing behavior-analytic services as direct staff. His passion for behavior analysis led him to receive his Master of Science in Behavioral Psychology from Pepperdine University in 2018. Upon graduating, Daniel was trained and certified as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). To pursue his interest in research and teaching, Daniel enrolled in the Ph.D. program at University of South Florida. In the Ph.D. program, Daniel served as the instructor for several courses including ABA in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, Research Methods and Ethical Issues in Behavior Analysis, Observational Methods and Functional Assessment, and Single Subject Experimental Design in both the undergraduate ABA minor and online master’s degree programs. Additionally, he mentored graduate students in teaching and research by assisting with course development and delivery as well as assisting with conducting literature reviews, developing research questions, running experimental sessions, and writing manuscripts. Daniel’s current research topics include social validity and cultural responsiveness, measurement and analysis, and efficiency and resource allocation. Some specific topics of interest include improving the methods in which social validity of interventions is assessed, determining appropriate ways in which values and cultures of families can be incorporated into service provision, and quantifying effects of interventions to investigate variables that moderate the effects. His dissertation focuses on several of these interests. The purpose of his dissertation is to develop a tool that will be used to culturally adapt behavioral training and interventions, and to evaluate culturally responsive behavioral parent training intervention that is informed by the tool. Through this research, he hopes to provide a tool that behavior analysts can use to take an individualized approach to considering the values and cultures of families. Understanding the lack of consideration of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in behavior analysis has led him to take an active role in starting research projects that address this issue. In the future, he hopes to continue incorporating the topic of DEI within his research, teaching/training, and clinical services as well as advocate for improved graduate training and fieldwork supervision in multiculturalism and diversity.
 
Diversity submission 

Understanding the Role of Cultural Values in Applied Behavior Analysis Service Delivery from Latinx Families

(Theory)
MARIELA CASTRO-HOSTETLER (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

The aim of this study was to identify and learn about the cultural values and beliefs held by Latinx families in Nevada. In addition, we also examined barriers faced by Latinx families when accessing ABA services. In Study 1, we distributed the Participant Demographic and Experience Survey to Latinx families who were currently receiving ABA services or had received services in the past. The survey included questions about the family’s cultural identity, their primary language spoken in the home, and parent educational level. The second part of the questionnaire asked the parents to share their experiences in receiving ABA services and the extent to which those services were received. In Study 2, we conducted structured interviews and focus groups with some of the families who participated in Study 1. From the structured interviews and focus groups, we identified four main themes: (1) family and cultural values; (2) reaction of receiving a diagnosis; (3) impact of ABA services (4) future recommendations for the field of ABA. From these themes, we found what aspects were meaningful in receiving ABA services, as well as barriers that families faced when seeking services.

Mariela Castro-Hostetler is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and Licensed Behavior Analyst in Nevada. She is a Project Coordinator at the Nevada Positive Behavioral Interventions at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and doctoral candidate in the behavior analysis program at UNR. In her role, she provides behavioral support services for families and children with disabilities and dual diagnoses in Nevada. Castro-Hostetler completed her MS in behavior analysis at Southern Illinois University in 2016. Castro-Hostetler’s experience includes more than 8 years working with children and adults across various settings including homes, treatment centers, and schools. Her current research interests include parent and staff training, Acceptance and Commitment Training, and cultural responsiveness for culturally diverse and linguistically diverse individuals.

 
 
Symposium #38
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission What's Technology Got to Do With It? Well Basically Everything Nowadays
Saturday, May 28, 2022
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 203
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Brandon M Franklin (Lee Specialty Clinic)
Discussant: Marc J. Lanovaz (Université de Montréal)
CE Instructor: Marc J. Lanovaz, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Behavioral principles and procedures have demonstrated their effectiveness when applied in the context of intensive interventions aimed at increasing skill acquisition and reducing challenging behaviors of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other neurodiverse populations. However, important limitations may prevent appropriate training of individuals implementing these procedures, such as the lack of regular face-to-face contact with qualified professionals. The current pandemic has only exacerbated this problem and emphasized the need to develop innovative yet practical technologies that facilitate access to evidence-based information and skills training. This symposium seeks to present the respective evaluations and outcomes of four studies examining the use of a) a self-directed online training program, b) telehealth, c) a mobile application, and d) virtual reality training (VRT). Across these studies, participants included experienced volunteers, parents, professionals, university students, and Board Certified Behavior Analysts. Overall results demonstrate that these methods are effective for training individuals possessing different levels of expertise on a wide variety of skill sets. Social validity measures also demonstrate the usefulness and acceptability of the technology employed. The clinical implications are significant in that these proposed methods may address training barriers related to access and cost, thus benefiting service providers and their clients.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): e-learning, telehealth, training technology, VRT
Target Audience:

The participants should be familiar with behavior analytic interventions and have a general understanding of their application via current and emerging technologies.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participants will be able to: 1) Identify and describe common barriers limiting access to expert trainers and early intensive behavioral interventions. 2) Describe the development and application of technologies, such as telehealth, online platforms, mobile apps, and virtual reality training to teach behavioral skills and procedures. 3) Describe the overall effectiveness of these technologies in terms of skill acquisition as well as perceived satisfaction and acceptability.
 
Diversity submission Evaluation of the Simple Steps Online Training Platform: Promoting Diversity and Inclusion in Autism Interventions
GENEVIÈVE N. ROY-WSIAKI (Université de Saint Boniface), Nicolas Gravel (University of Manitoba), Maria Pongoski (Manitoba Association for Behaviour Analysis, University of Manitoba)
Abstract: Over the past two decades, there has been a rapid increase in the prevalence rate of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Concurrently, there is a greater demand for evidence-based resources and intervention programs, such as early intensive interventions based on applied behavior analysis (ABA). This may create a challenge for families, especially where there are geographic or language constraints. The Simple Steps Autism online teaching platform aims to support parents and professionals by providing step-by-step training on autism and the principles of ABA in several languages. The purpose of this descriptive study was to develop and evaluate the French version of this platform. The evaluation was conducted with French-speaking parents, professionals, and university students in Manitoba, Canada. A total of 10 participants consulted the platform and provided feedback through an online survey. Overall results demonstrate a favorable impression of the site's components, its ease of use, and its usefulness as a pedagogical tool. The results of this study also contribute to existing data regarding the social validity of the Simple Steps platform. The presenter will review these findings and discuss clinical and research implications.
 
Diversity submission Training Behavior Analysts via Telehealth to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analysis Through Video Modeling
KARIE JOHN (University of South Florida), Sarah E. Bloom (University of South Florida), Alyssa Zak (University of South Florida)
Abstract: Functional analyses are considered the “gold standard” for assessing problem behavior, and although many behavior analysts recognize the value of conducting a functional analysis, some report being hesitant to conduct the assessment (Oliver et al., 2015). This may be because there are potential barriers to conducting functional analyses. Two of the most common barriers include setting limitations (Roscoe et al., 2015) and lack of trained staff to conduct the assessment. Researchers within the field of Applied Behavior Analysis have addressed these limitations by developing variations of the traditional FA and demonstrating that those procedures could be taught across various populations. Perhaps the issue related to training isn’t one of quality, but accessibility to quality training. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if a remotely delivered video modeling procedure would be effective at training Board Certified Behavior Analysts to conduct the trial-based functional analysis procedures. Results from this study demonstrated that the remotely delivered video modeling procedure was effective and all participants met mastery criteria.
 
Diversity submission 

Integrating Behavioral Skills Training and Video Modelling Within an E-Learning Modality to Train Volunteers Working With Neurodiverse Populations

KIRSTEN YOUNG (Brock University), Kendra Thomson (Brock University ), Priscilla Burnham Riosa (Brock University), Maureen Connolly (Brock University), Julia DeSantis (Brock University)
Abstract:

Volunteers supporting neurodiverse populations require adequate training on instructional strategies to ensure the safety of themselves and those they are supporting. While behavioral skills training (BST) is an empirically validated training framework, it has some constraints such as requiring an experienced trainer. Implementing a BST framework into a mobile application to train volunteers interacting with neurodiverse populations may help to increase volunteers’ implementation accuracy of pre-determined instructional strategies. This study evaluated the efficacy of a mobile application based on BST and voice over video modelling (VMVO) on volunteers’ implementation accuracy of three instructional strategies. Semi-structured interviews with experienced volunteers in an adaptive movement program informed which instructional skills were included in the app (visual schedules, modeling, and high-probability instructional sequence). A multiple probe design across behaviours demonstrated preliminary efficacy of the app for training two novel volunteers. Participants also reported the app to be highly acceptable.

 
Diversity submission Review of Artificial Intelligence Embedded Virtual Reality Trainings
AN AN CHANG (California State University, Northridge), Ellie Kazemi (California State University, Northridge), Roxana Lemus (California State University, Northridge), Matthew Davies (California State University, Northridge), Vahe Esmaeili (California State University, Northridge)
Abstract: Researchers have conducted studies on the integration of autonomous artificial intelligence (AI) in Virtual Reality Training (VRT); however, little is known about the effectiveness of these trainings and the types of skills that are typically taught. Out of the 1,357 related articles found, there were 18 articles that met our inclusionary criteria. We analyzed the 18 articles along the dimensions of participant demographics (e.g., age, disability, ethnicity); skills taught; measurement methods; components of VRTs (e.g., feedback, communication medium, degree of immersion); effectiveness; and social validity. Our results showed that VRT is effective in teaching social, safety, and professional skills (e.g., vocally initiate play, fire escape, job interview) to diverse populations. The results of the present review suggest that VRT is a viable option for scaling behavior skills training, significantly reducing training cost. In this symposium, we will compare the 12 VRTs mentioned in the present review, discuss ways for behavior analysts to leverage VRTs with autonomous AI, and recommendations for future research.
 
 
Symposium #45
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Social Justice, Quality of Life, and Other Essential Dimensions of Applied Behavior Analysis in 2022
Saturday, May 28, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 156B
Area: CSS/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Sarah E. Pinkelman (Utah State University)
Discussant: Ilene S. Schwartz (University of Washington)
CE Instructor: Sarah E. Pinkelman, Ph.D.
Abstract: Improvement of quality of life and the well-being of humanity is inherent in the spirit of the science of applied behavior analysis. From a human rights perspective, vulnerable persons (e.g., children, persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities, marginalized groups) are entitled to special protections to prevent or minimize harm and enhance quality of life. This session will (a) describe why quality of life should be the primary outcome variable of behavioral intervention, (b) explain how a focus on quality of life sets the occasion for ethical behavior analytic practice that upholds the full dignity and humanity of all persons, and (c) outline an abolitionist approach to promoting effective and equitable learning environments and improving quality of life for marginalized groups in a setting that all children experience—schools.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): abolitionism, equity, qualityof life, schools
Target Audience: symposium is being submitted at the "basic" level
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the importance of focusing on quality of life as a primary outcome variable, (2) describe how a focus on quality of life promotes ethical behavior analytic practice that upholds the full dignity and humanity of all persons, and (3) identify ways that behavior analysts working in schools can promote equitable outcomes and enhance quality of life for minoritized groups through an abolitionist approach.
 
Diversity submission Quality of Life for People with Disabilities: Why Applied Behavior Analysts Should Consider This a Primary Dependent Variable
Ilene S. Schwartz (University of Washington), ELIZABETH KELLY (University of Washington)
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a natural science dedicated to using behavioral principles to address socially important problems. One area in which behavior analysts have made compelling gains in the last 50 years is in developing, evaluating, and disseminating effective interventions for people with significant intellectual and developmental disabilities. As the science of ABA has matured, many practitioners, researchers, and consumers have questioned how our field should define appropriate outcomes of behavioral interventions. We propose an improved quality of life should be the ultimate outcome for consumers receiving behavioral interventions. We explore definitions of quality of life and suggest some strategies that behavior analysts can use to more clearly center quality of life as an outcome variable.
 
Diversity submission Behavior Analysis and Equity in Public Education: An Abolitionist Approach
MALIKA N. PRITCHETT (University of Kansas), Sarah E. Pinkelman (Utah State University), Shahla Susan Ala'i (University of North Texas), Dylan Murphy Zimmerman (Utah State University)
Abstract: It is increasingly clear that black and brown students encounter damaging learning environments that assault the dignity and humanity every child deserves. Behavior analysts working in schools can be part of the collective endeavor to uphold the rights of students by arranging environmental conditions that nurture growth, accelerate progress, and celebrate each child’s unique and valuable contributions. Behavior analysts in schools are often called to action to address “problem behaviors” that result from problematic contingencies. If behavior analysts fail to address problematic contingencies and focus on the result of these contingencies, they become complicit in perpetuating inequities. Behavior analysts can be of best service to students that are likely to be marginalized and excluded from classroom learning opportunities, if they identify, analyze, and dismantle systems that perpetuate inequities. Integrating the spirit and praxis of abolitionism, abolitionist teaching intervenes at a systemic level to dismantle conditions that perpetuate injustices and create systems that promote freedom-dreaming, thriving, and joy (Love, 2019). From an abolitionist view, joy is a directional guide to inclusive well-being. Freedom and liberation depend on designing environments where exposure to new and loving contingencies produces broad shifts, cusps, leading to enhanced quality of life for children and the collective.
 
 
Invited Panel #48
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Integrating Cultural Responsiveness Into Supervision: Understanding the Context, Meeting the Need, and Suggestions for Practice
Saturday, May 28, 2022
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Mary Jane Weiss (Endicott College)
CE Instructor: Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D.
Panelists: KIM EDWARDS (SIQS Educational Consulting, LLC), ADRIANA RODRIGUEZ (Rollins), BRIAN CONNERS (Seton Hall University)
Abstract:

In recent years, much more emphasis has been placed on cultural competence, humility, and responsiveness, as they relate to ABA service provision. These concepts have received attention in published literature, in discussions about issues facing the field, and in our new Ethics Code. The field is making progress in defining these skills, and much discussion exists around the teaching and training of this skill set for practitioners. In addition to these needs, there is an obligation to integrate the coverage of these issues into supervision. In this panel discussion, panelists will review the context and need for this expansion of supervision, the development of a tool to assess the extent to which supervision is culturally responsive, the associated issues in practice and mentorship that should be considered in this context, and future directions for mentoring.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) summarize the ways in which cultural responsiveness enhances the quality and effectiveness of supervision, and how it fulfills our ethical obligations to supervise; (2) describe a tool that has been developed to assess the extent to which cultural responsiveness has been integrated into behavior analytic supervision; (3) discuss a variety of strategies that can be used to model cultural responsiveness within supervision.
KIM EDWARDS (SIQS Educational Consulting, LLC)
Ms. Kimberly Edwards, M.Ed., is a Program Manager and educator in Washington, DC. Kimberly has worked in the field of education for more than 10 years. She received a Master of Education from the University of Virginia in 2011 and a Graduate Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis from George Mason University in 2018. Prior to moving to Washington, DC, Ms. Edwards worked in Richmond, VA, in therapeutic day schools and public schools. Her current work aligns with her research interests, centering on coaching staff on culturally responsive and impactful learning pathways; instructing behavior management; focused professional development; strategizing and developing school-wide anti-racism and effective social behavior practices.
ADRIANA RODRIGUEZ (Rollins)
Adriana Rodriguez is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). She earned her master’s degree in Applied Behavior Analysis and Clinical Science from Rollins College. Adriana has experience working with individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Fragile X syndrome, she has worked with a variety of age groups ranging from early intervention to young adults. Ms. Rodriguez’s graduate research focused on the effect of including cultural concerns when providing parent training on behavioral interventions.
BRIAN CONNERS (Seton Hall University)
Brian Conners, Ph.D., BCBA, is a New Jersey Department of Education certified school psychologist and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. He originally developed the graduate program in Applied Behavior Analysis at Seton Hall University, where he currently serves on their faculty and is their Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Education and Human Services. He has worked within various sectors as a behavior analyst and consultant including public and private schools, psychiatric hospitals, and community agencies. He has presented at state and national conferences and has published articles and book chapters in multicultural and diversity issues in behavior analysis, crisis intervention, and restraint and seclusion practices in schools. He was the editor for the first book ever to be published on diversity issues in the field of ABA entitled, Multiculturalism and Diversity in Applied Behavior Analysis: Bridging Theory and Application.
 
 
Panel #65
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Diversity submission Queering Our Science: How Behavior Analysts Can Work Toward LGBTQ+ Liberation
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 156B
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Fernanda Suemi Oda, M.A.
Chair: Fernanda Suemi Oda (The University of Kansas)
MATTHEW CAPRIOTTI (San Jose State University)
SARAH CAMPAU (University of Arkansas)
CODY MORRIS (Salve Regina University)
Abstract:

The last thirty years have seen enormous growth in the application of psychological science to better the lives of LGBTQ+ people. Behavior analysts have been largely absent from this movement (Morris, Goetz, & Gabriele-Black, 2021). There has been a recent discourse around harms that behavior analysts have enacted upon LGBTQ+ people in the past, accompanied by a discussion of steps we can take to “do better” in the future. This panel focuses on future actions that behavior analysts can take to support LGBTQ+ people’s wellbeing. Panelists have each done significant professional work in support of LGBTQ+ people; two are members of LGBTQ+ communities, and one has done this work in an ally role. We will discuss both what behavior analysts can do in the domains of research, practice, and organizational behavior and how they can do it. We will also discuss particular considerations behavior analysts at various career stages (e.g., graduate student, early career faculty) and spheres of professional practice. The panel will conclude with ample time for audience questions and discussion.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

N/A, level is beginner

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, attendees will be able to: (1) Describe behavior analysts' contributions to research on LGBTQ+ issues. (2) Discuss areas of applied research through which behavior analysts can contribute to knowledge about best practices for promoting the wellness of LGBTQ+ people. (3) Identify current best practices for supporting LGBTQ+ clients, staff, and students.
Keyword(s): diversity, ethics, LGBTQ, social justice
 
 
Panel #68
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission PDS: Navigating Graduate School as a Student of Color: Recommendations and Considerations From BIPOC in Academia
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 205C
Area: EDC/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stacha Leslie, M.Ed.
Chair: Stacha Leslie (University of Kansas)
ANITA LI (Western Michigan University)
MARREN MARIE LEON-BARAJAS (The University of Kansas)
KAREN A. TOUSSAINT (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) are underrepresented in graduate school programs and make up only 12% of certified behavior analysts (Behavior Analysis Certification Board; BACB 2020). BIPOC students are often met with challenges such as microaggressions, gaslighting, victim blaming, and other nuanced forms of discrimination. Additionally, the lack of representation may create feelings of isolation among peers and seclusion from community resources. Such challenges have potential to create an unbalanced learning environment in which students are still expected to make reputable contributions to the field. Given this, BIPOC students must have access to additional resources to ensure they are supported throughout their tenure and have the tools they need to confront and disrupt discriminatory behaviors. This panel serves to 1) highlight the importance of community through representation 2) discuss the need for mentorship and allyship, 3) promote self-care strategies that have proven effective at mitigating the effects of discrimination, and 4) offer a safe space and reprieve during an otherwise strenuous journey. The panelists will also share personal experiences and resources that proved successful as they navigated their own journeys through graduate school.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Target Audience: Graduate students (BCBAs), Graduate School faculty (associate and full professors, BCBAs and/or BCBA-Ds), individuals providing supervision services to prospective BCBAs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Acknowledge the importance of community through representation for BIPOC students (2) Identify specific challenges and discriminations faced by BIPOC students during graduate school (3) Identify self-care strategies and resources to support BIPOC students during graduate school
 
 
Invited Panel #72
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Students' Perspective on Diversity and Culturally Responsive Supervisory Practices and Feedback
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Fernande Deguenon (Brooklyn Autism Center)
CE Instructor: Tanya Lopez, M.S.
Panelists: MAJDI BUZOOR (Arab American University-Palestine; Florida Institute Technology), ANNABEL GARZA (The University of Texas at Austin), TANYA LOPEZ (Positive Behavior Supports)
Abstract:

A critical step in the preparation toward certification as a Behavior Analyst is supervision (Turner et al., 2016). The purpose of supervision is to equip applied behavior analysis (ABA) students with behavior analytic, professional, and ethical skills necessary for effective client treatment in practice (BACB, 2021). The rules for supervision are found in the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts, also known as “the Code” (Sellers et al., 2016b). A successful supervision experience involves clearly defined expectations at the onset of the relationship (Sellers et al., 2016a), and accurate training and feedback by the supervisor (Sellers et al., 2019). Factors that are considered include the supervisees’ beliefs and values originating from previous supervision experiences (Turner et al., 2016). Supervisees from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds may also require unique interactions with the supervisors while still satisfying the BACB’s objectives. One aspect of supervision that should be discussed and explored further are the modifications made to the supervision experience for supervisees from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds. These candidates may require unique interactions with supervisors while still satisfying the BACB’s objectives. This panel discussion will explore the importance of cultural diversity and responsiveness in the supervision experience, challenges that may be experienced by relevant supervisees, and suggested solutions to address them. References Behavior Analyst Certification Board (2016). 2022 Eligibility Requirements. https://www.bacb.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/BCBA-2022EligibilityRequirements_210513.pdf Sellers, T. P., Valentino, A. L., & LeBlanc, L. A. (2016a). Recommended practices for individual supervision of aspiring behavior analysts. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 274-286. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0110-7 Sellers, T. P., Alai-Rosales, S., & MacDonald, R. P. F. (2016b). Taking full responsibility: The ethics of supervision in behavior analytic practice. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 299-308. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0144-x Sellers, T. P., Valentino, A. L., Landon, T. J., & Aiello, S. (2019). Board certified behavior analysts’ supervisory practices of trainees: Survey results and recommendations. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 12(3), 536-546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-019-00367-0 Turner, L. B., Fischer, A. J., & Luiselli, J. K. (2016). Towards a competency-based, ethical, and socially valid approach to the supervision of applied behavior analytic trainees. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9(4), 287-298. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40617-016-0121-4

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe current and future states of BCBAs’ perceptions of supervisory practices; (2) identify at least three challenges and three practical solutions to supervisory practices; (3) describe components of supervisory practices that support cultural diversity and responsiveness.
MAJDI BUZOOR (Arab American University-Palestine; Florida Institute Technology)
Majdi Buzoor graduated in 2006 as an Occupational Therapist from Arab American University-Palestine. He is a certified Sensory Integration Specialist from USC 2012 and started his BCaBA course program at FIT last May and his fieldwork supervised experience with three “amazing” supervisors. Majdi loves his job as an OT, however, the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) has significantly augmented his professional practice, enriched, and improved the quality of his service delivery, which in turn has supported his passion to help many more children who need specialized, individualized effective interventions based on the science of ABA.
ANNABEL GARZA (The University of Texas at Austin)
Annabel Garza graduated from The University of Texas at Austin with a master’s degree in special education with a concentration in autism and developmental disabilities. She is currently working on finishing up her fieldwork experience hours at an early intervention center for children with autism in Austin, Texas. She is planning on sitting for the BCBA exam in the fall of 2022. Annabel enjoys working closely with families and coaching parents/caregivers during direct therapy sessions.
TANYA LOPEZ (Positive Behavior Supports)
Tanya Lopez graduated from Bay Path University with a master’s degree in applied behavior analysis (ABA). She is currently working as a board-certified behavior analyst (BCBA) for Positive Behavior Supports (PBS), providing in-home services for children diagnosed with autism in the state of Massachusetts. In her free time, Tanya enjoys spending time with her husband and son, shopping at Target and ordering Starbucks.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #77
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Diversity submission Defining, Measuring, and Ensuring the Social Validity of Skills in Interprofessional Collaboration, Compassionate Care, and Cultural Humility in Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 28, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 204A/B
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Peter F. Gerhardt (The EPIC School)
CE Instructor: Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
Abstract: In recent years, there has been some discussion of the need to increase the training of behavior analysts in soft skills. Examples of soft skills that have been discussed include active listening, engagement, empathetic statements, and the provision of support. Specifically, some sources of data indicate that behavior analysts may be less skilled in these areas than is ideal (e.g., Taylor et al., 2018; LeBlanc et al., 2019). Given the humanitarian foundations of the field, the focus on the improvement of the human condition, and the associations between consumer satisfaction and outcomes, it is important to maximize the extent to which behavior analysts master and demonstrate these skills. Challenges include operationally defining terms that may be mentalistic in nature, and measuring behaviors that are inherently somewhat subjective. Additional challenges include ensuring that there is a genuineness and authenticity to the demonstration of the skills, and that social validity measures support that they are received well by clients. In recent years, progress has been made in issuing calls to action in the realms of interprofessional collaboration (e.g., Brodhead, 2015), compassionate care (e.g., Taylor et al, 2018; LeBlanc et al, 2019) and cultural humility (e.g., Fong et al, 2016; Miller et al, 2019; Wright, 2019). Models from other fields have been reviewed, adaptations of existing tools and models have been suggested, and the BACB Code of Ethics has been expanded to include these obligations (BACB, 2020). Several recent empirical explorations of work in these areas will be shared, and directions for future research and training will be suggested. Reasons for enthusiasm and hope will be reviewed, as the field both returns to its roots and meets the challenges of the future in this endeavor to expand the skill sets of practicing behavior analysts.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate student.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list several component skills that have been suggested as lacking in the professional repertoires of behavior analysts; (2) describe how soft skill components might enhance outcomes of behavior analytic intervention and of collaboration with other professionals; (3) provide examples of how the component skills of compassionate care, interprofessional collaboration, and cultural humility might be defined for the contexts of collaboration and service provision; (4) review challenges in evaluating the mastery of these skills, including generalization to natural contexts, passing tests of authenticity, ensuing culturally responsive skill development, and obtaining social validity ratings from multiple stakeholders and experts; (5) identify future research questions and current strategies for student/staff training in these areas.
 
MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College)
Mary Jane Weiss, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LABA, is a Professor at Endicott College, where she has been for 10 years, and where she serves as the Executive Director of ABA and Autism Programs, including overseeing the master’s programs in ABA and directing the Ph.D. Program in ABA. She also does research with the team at Melmark. She has worked in the field of ABA and Autism for over 35 years. She received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Rutgers University in 1990 and she became a Board Certified Behavior Analyst in 2000. She previously worked for 16 years at the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center at Rutgers University. Her clinical and research interests center on defining best practice ABA techniques, exploring ways to enhance the ethical conduct of practitioners, teaching social skills to learners with autism, training staff to be optimally effective at instruction and at collaboration, and maximizing family members’ expertise and adaptation. She serves on the Scientific Council of the Organization for Autism Research, is on the board of Association for Science in Autism Treatment, is a regular contributor to the ABA Ethics Hotline, and is an advisor to the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. She is a regular reviewer for several professional journals, and is a frequent member of service committees for a variety of organizations.
 
 
Poster Session #85
CSS Saturday Poster Session: Odd-Numbered Posters
Saturday, May 28, 2022
1:00 PM–2:00 PM
Exhibit Level; Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Amanda N. Kelly (BEHAVIORBABE )
63. Improving Team Behaviors of Youth Cheerleaders using a Group Contingency and Public Posting
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
KELLY NORRIS (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Julie A. Ackerlund Brandt (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology ), Nicole Kanew (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Amanda N. Kelly (BEHAVIORBABE)
Abstract:

This study examined an intervention package using a group contingency and public posting to increase the on-task behaviors of youth cheerleaders. Previous research has used group contingencies and public posting to increase on-task behaviors. Additional research has used treatment packages including one of these interventions, but not both. We used an intervention package, using both a group contingency and public posting, to increase pro-social behaviors, including on-task behaviors. Currently, there is no research using these specific components in an intervention package to increase on-task behaviors in a sports team. In this current study, a withdrawal design was used with a team of junior high cheerleaders to increase on-task behaviors. Momentary time sampling was used to record the on-task behaviors of each member of the team. Public posting and an interdependent group contingency were used to reinforce the on-task behaviors of the participants. The results of the first intervention phase showed an increase in on-task behaviors, with a decline during return to baseline, and an immediate increase with the return to intervention. The results showed the intervention package using a group contingency and public posting was successful in increasing the on-task behaviors of youth cheerleaders.

 
Diversity submission 67. A preliminary investigation of political views: A relational flexibility perspective
Area: CSS; Domain: Basic Research
JESSICA M. HINMAN (University of Illinois at Chicago ), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois Chicago), Zhihui Yi (University of Illinois Chicago)
Discussant: Amanda N. Kelly (BEHAVIORBABE)
Abstract: A contextual behavior analytic framework can be utilized to understand how an individual perceives racial discrimination, LGBTQIA+ rights, climate change, and national security. Previous research has demonstrated the relationship between complex language and biases and found an association between derived relational responses and implicit biases. The current study expands upon prior research by utilizing contemporary and traditional behavior analytic methods to examine the relationship between political identity, complex language, psychological flexibility, and how individuals perceive various social justice topics. Sixty individuals across the United States completed a series of online self-report measures, including an online version of the PEAK Compressive Assessment Transformation-Expressive (PCA-T-E) subtest and psychological flexibility questionnaires. They completed a paired choice preference assessment of twelve social justice issues to determine which topics they found most important. Our findings suggest that individuals who identified as being more liberal scored higher on the PCA-T-E (r = -0.548, p = 0.0002) and were more mindful (r = 0.3659, p = 0.017) compared to those who identified as more conservative. These findings suggest a relationship between relational ability, political identity, and how one perceives various social justice issues and supports the need for more research examining this relationship between complex language and social justice.
 
 
 
Poster Session #91
AUT Saturday Poster Session: Odd-Numbered Posters
Saturday, May 28, 2022
1:00 PM–2:00 PM
Exhibit Level; Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Jessica Zawacki (PAAL)
119. Further Evaluation of Multiple Schedules to Rapidly Establish Discriminated Manding during Functional Communication Training
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
ALEXANDRA RAMIREZ (University of Miami), Yanerys Leon (University of Miami), Shermetrius Mack-Gray (University of Miami )
Discussant: Jessica Zawacki (PAAL)
Abstract: Multiple schedules are commonly used to thin the schedule of reinforcement following functional communication training (FCT; Hagopian et al., 2011). One method of schedule thinning involves slowly introducing periods of signaled extinction for the functional communication response (FCR) and gradually increasing the duration of the extinction period (Hanley et al., 2001). Betz et al., 2013 demonstrated that a two- part multiple schedule (60s/60s and 60s/240s) was effective in decreasing the overall level of the FCR while maintaining low rates of problem behavior without the lengthy schedule-thinning procedure. One limitation of Betz et al. is that all the participation had sophisticated language and responded well to verbal instruction. The purpose of this study was to systematically replicate the procedures described by Betz et al. with children with ASD with limited language. Additionally, we conducted a terminal probe as the first step in the exposure to the multiple schedule. Preliminary results show that the rapid stimulus control procedure described by Betz et al. was successful in decreasing the rate of the FCR and maintaining low levels of problem behavior one participant with moderate language skills.
 
121. An Evaluation of Robot-directed Prompts to Facilitate Interactions with Learners with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
ROBERT C. PENNINGTON (University of North Carolina-Charlotte), Karla Welch (University of Louisville)
Discussant: Jessica Zawacki (PAAL)
Abstract: In the current investigation, we used an alternating treatments design to evaluate the effects of a robot directed prompts on the percent of intervals with communicative interactions of dyads of children with autism spectrum disorder. Data indicated mixed results across participants. Implications for future research and practice will be described.
 
123. Comparison of Escape Treatments
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
JANAE' PENDERGRASS (Marcus Autism Center; Children's Healthcare of Atlanta), Catherine Williams (Marcus Autism Center; Children's Healthcare of Atlanta; Emory University School of Medicine), Sarah Slocum (Marcus Autism Center; Children's Healthcare of Atlanta; Emory School of Medicine)
Discussant: Jessica Zawacki (PAAL)
Abstract: Although prior research has demonstrated the effectiveness of several interventions for escape behaviors, the purpose of this study is to conduct a between-subjects comparison of three escape interventions for challenging behaviors. These interventions include demand fading, differential reinforcement of alternative behaviors (DRA) using edibles, and DRA using breaks. Even though all of these interventions have been successful at decreasing problematic behaviors, the relative effectiveness and efficiency of each treatment is unknown. We examined data for 13 participants, to date, who were randomly assigned to receive one of these treatments, where treatment duration and change in challenging behaviors were assessed. Three of 5 participants displayed an 80% reduction in challenging behavior with demand fading, 4 of 4 for DRA with Edibles, and 2 of 4 with DRA + Extinction. Overall, DRA with edibles may be more likely to be effective for individuals with escape behavior, at least in the short term.
 
125. Teaching Quality Engagement during Play in a Residential Setting
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
KATELYN MARIE ARRAIOL (May Institute), Robin K. Landa (May Institute), Danielle Cotton (May Institute)
Discussant: Jessica Zawacki (PAAL)
Abstract: The opportunity to engage in personally enjoyable, child-directed play has been internationally recognized as a fundamental right for all children (United Nations Council for the Rights of Children [UNRC], 2013). However, children with disabilities may face barriers to accessing play, some of which may stem from mistaken assumptions regarding their interests or capabilities, an overemphasis on play as a vehicle for instruction, or fears regarding the possibility of “risky” play. Residential staff serving children and adolescents with autism reported that residents preferred playing alone, and staff therefore often refrained from interacting with them during their play except to ask questions or provide instructions or redirection. We used behavioral skills training to teach staff to offer residents opportunities to play in a child-directed manner either with staff or alone. Measures included staff behavior (e.g., gaining assent, following the resident’s lead, refraining from instruction and interference) and student assent to play together versus alone. Staff performance improved following intervention, and assent data showed that residents chose playing with staff over playing alone. Considerations for providing protected times and spaces for child-directed play in residential settings will be discussed.
 
127. Examining the Use of In-vivo Feedback and the Effects of Generalization during Caregiver Training
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
XUEHUA ZHAO (Kennedy Krieger Institute ), Carrie S. W. Borrero (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Discussant: Jessica Zawacki (PAAL)
Abstract: A behavioral skills training package often includes multiple components that are commonly used during caregiver training for implementation of pediatric feeding protocols. Previous research has shown that using fewer behavioral skills training components during caregiver training was effective and produced high levels of correct implementation integrity. We examined the effects of using fewer behavioral skills training components (i.e., written instructions and in-vivo feedback) and added generalization components during caregiver training. The baseline condition included the provision of written instructions only. During the treatment condition, in-vivo feedback was provided and novel changes were systematically incorporated after caregiver demonstrated high levels of correct implementation integrity. Results showed moderate levels of correct implementation during baseline, but increased with the addition of in-vivo feedback. Levels of correct implementation by caregivers decreased when generalization components were introduced, however, caregiver performance improved to mastery criteria with continuous implementation of the protocol and in-vivo feedback.
 
129. Implementation of a Visual Choice-Making Schedule to Reduce Screaming Behavior
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
MARISSA DEL VECCHIO (University of South Florida ), Sheridan Tihista (Behavior Analysis Support Services (BASS) ), Mary Spivey (Behavior Analysis Support Services (BASS))
Discussant: Jessica Zawacki (PAAL)
Abstract: Antecedent strategies such as visual schedules and choice of tasks have been identified as effective methods to reduce problem behavior that is maintained by escape (Horner et al., 2002; Romaniuk et al., 2002). The combined use of visual schedules, verbal warnings and the alteration of environmental variables have been shown to increase appropriate transitions while simultaneously decreasing problem behavior (Cale et al., 2009). The implementation of a visual schedule with a choice-making component was introduced in attempt to decrease the screaming behavior of a 4-year-old male with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in a clinic setting in Florida. The client’s screaming behavior was maintained by access to tangibles and escape from nonpreferred activities and tasks. Results from the first phase of the intervention did not show to be effective in decreasing the frequency of problem behavior. Various limitations were present as staff members that worked directly with the client were inconsistent, the presentation of novel schedule changes occurred and the client was suffering from allergies. Future directions for this research include the incorporation of a “teacher’s choice” component as well as the client’s choice based on the level of problem behavior that occurs during identified problematic periods in the client’s day.
 
131. Assessment of Protective Equipment to Minimize Severe Self-Injurious Behavior: A Demonstration in a Hospital-Based Inpatient Setting
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
TYLER ROSADO (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Emily Ann Chesbrough (Kennedy Krieger Institute), John Falligant (Kennedy Krieger Institute; Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)
Discussant: Brittany Ruth Schmidt (BASS ABA Therapy)
Abstract: Although reinforcement-based interventions are the most preferred method to decrease severe self-injurious behavior (SIB), restrictive protective equipment is sometimes necessary to further decrease severe SIB (Powers et al., 2007). As such, it is important to identify a variety of protective equipment required to minimize problem behavior. In this clinical study, the participant was a 12-year-old male diagnosed with autism, whose problem behaviors were multiply controlled (e.g., attention, tangible, and escape maintained). Within a multielement design, various levels of arm-splint rigidity (e.g., 16 total flexible splints, 8 total flexible splints, 2 total flexible splints, 1 total flexible splint, no splints, and no arm restraint) and different protective helmets (e.g., Ringside helmet with and without a face cage, a Macho helmet, a weighted baseball hat, and a weightless baseball hat with and without an elastic chin strap) were assessed in order to identify the least-restrictive protective equipment required to minimize problem behavior and maintain high rates of engagement with toys (e.g., tablet and joke books). As a result of gradually thinning the protective equipment, this assessment revealed that the subject was able to tolerate the application of a baseball hat with an elastic chin strap without the application of arm restraints for 20 minutes with high rates of toy engagement. Clinical recommendations for practitioners and implications for future research will be discussed.
 
133. An Evaluation of Escape-Maintained Problem Behavior across Multiple Stimulus Classes of Demands
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
BRIANNA BLUE (Kennedy Krieger), Alexa Noppenberger (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Michelle A. Frank-Crawford (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Margaret R. Wright (Kennedy Krieger)
Discussant: Brittany Ruth Schmidt (BASS ABA Therapy)
Abstract: Demand assessments have been conducted to empirically determine demands to include in functional analyses. However, the assessments often include a variety of demands and it is unclear whether individuals with escape-maintained problem behavior exhibit a general tendency toward escape or whether only specific demand classes evoke problem behavior. This study systematically assessed different stimulus classes of demands in an abbreviated demand assessment and then validated the outcomes in an extended functional analysis with an adolescent female diagnosed with autism and an intellectual disability who was admitted to an inpatient program for the treatment of severe problem behavior. Demands for which the participant engaged in high rates of problem behavior and had a shorter latency to problem behavior in the demand assessment coincided with high rates of problem behavior in the escape condition of the functional analysis. Demands for which the participant engaged in low rates of problem behavior in the demand assessment and had a longer latency to problem behavior coincided with lower rates of problem behavior in the escape condition of the functional analysis. Results indicated that there were different rates of problem behavior exhibited in different stimulus classes of demands. These results support the need for a direct demand assessment in addition to conducting a functional analysis to ensure that no false positives occur.
 
135. Differential Reinforcement of Correct Responses during Baseline Conditions: A Preliminary Investigation
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
KAITLYN JUDTIH FRASER (TACT, LLC), Cory Whelan (The Autism Community Therapists, LLC), Rachelle de Saint Phalle (TACT, LLC), Kara LaCroix (TACT, LLC)
Discussant: Brittany Ruth Schmidt (BASS ABA Therapy)
Abstract: Behavior analytic practitioners often implement baseline conditions for skill acquisition programs by withholding differential consequences to evaluate the learners’ skills in the absence of reinforcement and prompting. A wide body of research has been conducted utilizing baseline conditions in this manner, but recent research has evaluated the effects of differentially reinforcing correct responses early rather than later in teaching conditions (Campanaro et al., 2020). The purpose of the current study is to compare the effects of differentially reinforcing correct responses in baseline conditions versus a more traditional baseline condition on the acquisition rate of a listener responding skill. Following three exposures to each baseline condition, acquisition rate will be compared via trials to mastery (e.g., 80% independent responding across two consecutive sessions). The first participant is a four-year-old male diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder who communicates using vocal verbal behavior. Results will be discussed by comparing the rate of skill acquisition on listener responding targets following exposure to each baseline condition. Companaro, A., Vladescu, J., DeBar, R., & Nippes, K. (2020). Comparing skill acquisition under varying onsets of differential reinforcement: A preliminary analysis. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 53(2), 690-706.
 
139. An Evaluation of the Number of Sessions in MSWO Preference Assessments for Social Interaction
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Samuel L Morris (Southeastern Louisiana University), ALVA ELIZABETH ALLEN (Southeastern Louisiana University; Rollins College), Madison Leigh Gallagher (Southeastern Louisiana University)
Discussant: Brittany Ruth Schmidt (BASS ABA Therapy)
Abstract: The multiple stimulus without replacement preference assessment (MSWO) has frequently been evaluated or utilized in research. Some research has evaluated how the number of MSWO sessions used to obtain a hierarchy of preference can impact the assessment’s outcomes. To date, no research has conducted such evaluations with MSWOs for social interactions or with a reinforcer assessment including all of the same stimuli as a point of comparison. In the current study, we utilized previously published data from MSWOs for social interactions to compare one, two, and three-sessions MSWOs to four-session MSWOs and a progressive-ratio reinforcer assessment. Results indicated that, relative to four-session MSWOs, two and three-session MSWOs produced hierarchies about as similar to the reinforcer assessment hierarchies and identified the same most reinforcing stimuli about as often. Results generated by comparing one, two, or three-session MSWOs to the reinforcer assessment were much different than those generated by comparing them to the four-session MSWOs. Implications for clinical use of, and future research on, MSWOs is discussed.
 
141. Treatment of Self-Injurious Behavior through Intervention on Precursor Behavior
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
MARIATU FORNAH (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Emily Ann Chesbrough (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Michelle A. Frank-Crawford (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Griffin Rooker (Mount St. Mary's University), Alyssa Fisher (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Discussant: Brittany Ruth Schmidt (BASS ABA Therapy)
Abstract: Severe problem behavior (SPB), such as self-injurious behavior (SIB), poses an imminent risk of harm. Thus, identifying treatments that intervene before SPB occurs are highly desirable. Research has suggested there may be responses that reliably precede and predict the occurrence of SPB, called precursors (e.g., Fahmie & Iwata, 2011). Intervening on the precursor may decrease the probability of occurrence of the SPB itself. This study reports on an assessment designed to disrupt the occurrence of automatically maintained SIB (ASIB) exhibited by a 17-year-old male diagnosed with autism by intervening on a precursor hypothesized to form a behavior chain culminating in SIB. The adolescent’s ASIB was categorized as subtype II, which is highly resistant to treatment involving reinforcement alone (Hagopian, Rooker, & Zarcone, 2015). Rates of the precursor and SIB were evaluated when no disruption procedure was in place and then compared to rates during the implementation of three different disruption procedures. Each was implemented for 5 s contingent on the precursor or SIB. Relatively lower rates of SIB were observed across the three disruption procedures. These data suggest that intervening on a precursor for ASIB may decrease the frequency of SPB and therefore reduce risk of injury.
 
143. Assessment of Intraverbal Errors in Children with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
NICOLE PANTANO (Caldwell University), Tina Sidener (Caldwell University), Jason C. Vladescu (Caldwell University), April N. Kisamore (Hunter College)
Discussant: Eric Shannon (Purdue University)
Abstract: Intraverbals are not easily acquired by individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Previous literature has included a qualitative assessment of intraverbal errors (Sundberg and Sundberg, 2011) and provided quantitative analysis of errors with neurotypical children (Devine et al., 2016). However, an assessment that includes a quantitative analysis of intraverbal errors for children with ASD has not been completed. The purpose of this study was to complete an analysis of errors children made in intraverbal responses. Modifications were made to the Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment Placement Program’s (VB-MAPP) intraverbal subtest. The Assessment of Intraverbal Repertoire was administered to children of typical development and children diagnosed with ASD. Data are presented on error types identified during intraverbal assessment. This information may be used to facilitate goal selection and teaching procedures for children diagnosed with ASD.
 
145. Qualitative Features of Synthesized Reinforcement Contingencies
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
RACHEL METRAS (Virginia Institute of Autism), Gregory P. Hanley (FTF Behavioral Consulting; Western New England University)
Discussant: Eric Shannon (Purdue University)
Abstract: Slaton and Hanley’s (2018) review revealed that synthesized reinforcement contingencies, or contingencies with multiple establishing operations, targeted responses, and reinforcers, have been used in function-based assessments and treatments of multiply-controlled problem behavior since 1997. This finding is significant because the term synthesized reinforcement contingency emerged relatively recently within the functional analytic literature (see Hanley et al., 2014). Given that synthesized reinforcement contingencies were documented in functional analytic research prior to Hanley et al.’s 2014 publication, it is likely that they are also documented in other areas of applied behavior analytic research. However, there are currently no reviews describing how synthesized reinforcement contingencies are used outside of the functional assessment and treatment of problem behavior. Therefore, the purposes of the present review are (1) to identify examples of synthesized reinforcement contingencies in applied behavior analytic research (2) published outside of the functional assessment and treatment of problem behavior literature, and (3) to describe common qualitative features of the synthesized contingencies.
 
147. Differential Reinforcement and Stimulus Fading to Teach Tolerance of a Polysomnography (Overnight Sleep Study) Setup
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
SARAH ELIZABETH MARTINEZ ROWE (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Seth Walker (Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Discussant: Eric Shannon (Purdue University)
Abstract: There are a growing number of publications supporting the use of behavior analytic strategies to increase compliance with medical procedures. However, little research has been conducted on the application of applied behavior analysis to the setup required for an overnight sleep study (i.e., polysomnography). The participant in the current study presented with autism, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and severe destructive behavior (i.e., aggression, property destruction, self-injury). These conditions combined with a poor sleep/wake schedule and gasping during the night necessitated a sleep study. The caregiver referred the participant to outpatient services due to a history of failed similar procedures (i.e., EEGs). We used an ABCBC design to evaluate the effects of differential reinforcement and differential reinforcement plus stimulus fading on compliance and reduction of destructive behavior with the 25-step sleep study procedure. Our approach successfully taught tolerance of the procedure and reduced problem behavior. The participant completed the scheduled sleep study and received a diagnosis of mild obstructive sleep apnea.
 
149. A Comparison of the Effects of Mastery Criteria on Skill Maintenance
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
AMBER R. PADEN (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Madison Schaller (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute), Mikayla Crawford (University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute ), Megan Marie Harper (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute), Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Discussant: Eric Shannon (Purdue University)
Abstract: Clinicians in early intervention often require a mastery criterion of a certain percentage across several sessions when teaching skills. A survey by Richling et al. (2019) found that clinicians commonly require three sessions at or above 80% accuracy. Selected criteria are often based on the clinician’s previous experiences but is not supported by empirical data. Previous researchers have compared the effects of 80%, 90% and 100% criterion across three sessions and found the skills assigned to the 100% criterion resulted in better maintenance (Longino et al., 2021). These findings suggest that the most common criterion chosen by clinicians may not lead to the maintenance of skills. Therefore, the purpose of the present investigation was to provide evidence to support the relationship between varying levels of mastery criteria and the effects on maintenance. The present investigation evaluated the effects of six different mastery criteria (one or three sessions at 80%, 90%, and 100%) on the maintenance of receptive skills taught using a prompt delay procedure. Preliminary results suggest some difference in maintenance across criteria for one high-level learner. We continue to implement this protocol with additional participants. Implications for clinical service delivery and related future research suggestions will be provided.
 
151. Guiding Medication Changes Based on the Results of a Functional Analysis
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
AMANDA MARIE FINLAY (Melmark), Lauren Carol Carson (Melmark)
Discussant: Eric Shannon (Purdue University)
Abstract: According to Spencer, et.al., 2013, 64% of children and adolescents with Autism are prescribed at least 1 psychotropic medication, 35% are prescribed at least 2 psychotropic medications and 15% are prescribed 3 or more. George, 17-year-old Male, presented with head directed self-injurious behavior which caused significant injuries resulting in hematomas to either side of his head. A functional behavior assessment including indirect assessments and ABC data concluded that George would engage in self-injury to escape demands. A function based treatment in the form of a break response was trialed however did not produce a significant reduction in self-injury. Through a functional analysis conducted by behavior analysts and collaboration with a psychiatric nurse practitioner a major reduction in self-injury was noted. The functional analysis (FA) was able to determine a social avoidance function, which then informed the introduction of an antidepressant to treat potential social anxiety. Overall, due to this collaborative approach George has since demonstrated a 71.6% reduction in self-injury since his admission. Spencer, D., Marshall, J., Post, B., Kulakodlu, M., Newschaffer, C., Dennen, T., Azocar, F., & Jain, A. (2013). Psychotropic medication use and polypharmacy in children with autism spectrum disorders. Pediatrics, 132(5), 833–840. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-3774
 
153. An Assessment of the Prevalence of Feeding Difficulties in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
ANGIE VAN ARSDALE (University of Florida), Vivian F Ibanez (University of Florida), Emma Grauerholz-Fisher (Salve Regina University), Kerri P. Peters (University of Florida), Timothy R. Vollmer (University of Florida)
Discussant: Eric Shannon (Purdue University)
Abstract: Many children have feeding disorders in the form of insufficient quantity, insufficient quality, or both. These difficulties have been observed in children with and without developmental disabilities; however, the prevalence is much greater in children with autism spectrum disorder (Twachtman-Reilly et al., 2008). Still, limited studies have assessed the prevalence of reported food selectivity, food refusal, inappropriate mealtime behavior, and other feeding related patterns in children with autism spectrum disorder enrolled in early intervention clinics. In this study, we collected data from 256 intake packets, including age, height, weight, diagnosis, and relevant feeding information, to determine the prevalence of feeding difficulties in this population. Data will be analyzed by calculating the correlation between feeding-related behaviors and other variables, such as age, diagnosis, other feeding-related behaviors, etc. The prevalence of feeding difficulties determined for the population in this assessment, as well as the implications for children with autism spectrum disorder as a whole, will be discussed.
 
155. Functional Relation between Modeled Communication to a Learner Using Their Primary Communication Modality and Expressive Communication
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Amira Ahmad (BASS ABA Therapy), brittany Nicole farrell (BASS Autism ), BRITTANY RUTH SCHMIDT (BASS ABA Therapy)
Discussant: Maria Jose Otero (Child Study Center, Cook Children's)
Abstract: Numerous studies have been conducted on the functional relation between alternative communication devices and verbal communication within the Autism Spectrum Disorder population. However, there is a current gap in the literature regarding the impact of caregivers’ use of an individual's primary communication modality on the individual's expressive communication. Using an ABA design, this study aimed to bridge this gap by solely communicating to the participant in his primary communication modality (Augmentative & Alternative Communication device) during their sessions. During baseline, the frequency of spontaneous mands emitted was collected, rate of acquisition was calculated, and the Sampling Utterances and Grammatical Analysis Revised (SUGAR) assessment and Expressive Vocabulary Test (EVT-III) were conducted. The intervention phase involved running a mand session, discrete training session with novel tacts, and a natural environment training session (NET) while exclusively using the participant’s primary communication modality. A second baseline was run following the intervention phase to assess progress. Hypothesized results will likely indicate that modeling an individual's primary communication modality is an effective intervention for increasing one’s expressive communication. The results of this study will benefit the field of Applied Behavior Analysis and support the current body of literature due to the similar findings and results.
 
157. The Effects of Behavioral Skills Training on Parental Implementation of a Positive Bedtime Routine with Children with Autism and Intellectual Disabilities to Increase Child Total Sleep Duration
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
JOSEPH DAVID PANNOZZO (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Amanda C. Philp (Teachers College, Columbia University), Chrystal Jansz Rieken (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Discussant: Maria Jose Otero (Child Study Center, Cook Children's)
Abstract: Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders often have difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep. These issues can be detrimental not only to the child, but the parents, as they are responsible for ensuring their children fall asleep and/or stay asleep. There have been many research studies looking at increasing sleep, and one common procedure is the implementation of consistent sleep routines. We examined the effects of parent training using Behavioral Skills Training (BST) on parental implementation of positive bedtime routines with their children who had disabilities on child total sleep duration. The study included two sets of parent-child dyads with the children ranging in age from 6 to 13 years old. Children participants all had a diagnosis of either autism spectrum disorder or intellectual disability and exhibited low levels of total sleep duration at the onset of the study. Results indicated parent implemented positive bedtime routines were effective in increasing sleep duration for both child participants. Limitations and future research were further discussed.
 
159. Effects of Practice-Based Coaching via Telehealth on Parent Implementation of Functional Communication Training
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Mandy J. Rispoli (Purdue University), CHARISSA DONN VOORHIS (Purdue University), Amanda M Austin Borosh (Purdue University), Rose A. Mason (Purdue University), Eric Shannon (Purdue University)
Discussant: Maria Jose Otero (Child Study Center, Cook Children's)
Abstract: Parent-mediated interventions are an important component of treatment planning to increase access to behavioral interventions for individuals with neurodevelopmental disabilities. Telehealth service-delivery is a useful and promising method for training caregivers to use evidence-based behavioral interventions. We conducted a single-case nonconcurrent multiple-baseline across participants design evaluating the use of a telehealth approach to coach parents of children with autism or Fragile X to implement functional communication training (FCT) during home routines. Researchers used a practice-based coaching (PBC) framework to collaboratively form weekly action plans and goals with parent participants to guide their implementation of FCT. Results indicate PBC via telehealth can be used to improve parent implementation of FCT, which subsequently effectively reduced target challenging behaviors while increasing the use of functionally communicative responses of young children with neurodevelopmental disorders. Across participants, different approaches and coaching intensity were required to reach mastery criteria for FCT implementation. While some participants successfully implemented FCT receiving weekly 30 min coaching sessions with researchers, others required more intensive support via in vivo bug-in-ear coaching with their child. Suggestions for future research and implications for practice are presented.
 
161. The Effect of Multiple Exemplar Training in Relational Training
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Zhihui Yi (Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago), Claire Holmes (University of Illinois at Chicago), Jessica M. Hinman (University of Illinois at Chicago ), Amanda N. Chastain (University of Illinois, Chicago), JASMINE RANDHAWA (University of Illinois at Chicago), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Discussant: Maria Jose Otero (Child Study Center, Cook Children's)
Abstract:

There has been an increasing interest in using relational training procedures during clinical interventions for autistic individuals. The current study investigated the effect of using multiple exemplar training (MET) in promoting the derivation of untrained stimulus-stimulus relationship for a 7-year-old autistic boy in teaching causality. The participant was first taught to answer five why- questions on providing the rationale for an action (A-B training). For example, the participant was asked, “why do you laugh,” and an acceptable answer was, “because I hear a joke.” After reaching the mastery criteria, probes were conducted in several 10-trial blocks where the participant was asked to answer five novel corresponding what- questions (B-A testing). For example, the participant was asked, “what do you do when you hear a joke?” Results showed that the participant failed to show derivation. MET was subsequently delivered with two stimulus classes serving as exemplars. Following the MET, the participant successfully derived the correct response for the three remaining class members during the B-A testing. Implications for using MET during clinical interventions were discussed.

 
163. Evaluating the Efficiency of Conducting a Brief Bidirectional Naming Assessment on CentralReach
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
KARLY COVALL (May Institute), Laura Eisen (May Institute), Sarah C Connolly (May Institute), Sarah Frampton (May Institute)
Discussant: Maria Jose Otero (Child Study Center, Cook Children's)
Abstract: Recent literature has focused on the critical elements of language programming that addresses the establishment of bidirectional naming (BiN; Frampton et al., 2017; Miguel 2016). Several studies have demonstrated that the establishment of a tact repertoire is equally or more efficient than listener training for promoting the emergence of responding in the opposite relation (Conine et al., 2020; Delfs et al., 2014; Frampton et al. 2020; Kodak & Paden, 2015; Sprinkle & Miguel, 2012). Such findings have been extended the demonstration of speaker training’s efficacy for promoting the emergence of listener responding in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; Contreras et al., 2019). Furthermore, researchers have developed assessment methods to determine the presence or absence of a BiN repertoire to maximize language programming efficiency (Miguel 2016). Despite these collective findings, practioners face numerous barriers translating research to daily practice with clients. Leveraging electronic data collection and shared program banks may be an effective means to disseminate practices within organizations. The present study utilized CentralReach to conduct a brief assessment of bidirectional naming with 3 young children with ASD. These data have implications for dissemination on a larger scale within organizations.
 
165. Using Progressive Ratio Functional Analysis to Understand Persistence in Extinction
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
BAILEY COPELAND (Vanderbilt University), Joseph Michael Lambert (Vanderbilt University), Jessica Lee Paranczak (Vanderbilt University), Margaret Jane Macdonald (Vanderbilt University)
Discussant: Maria Jose Otero (Child Study Center, Cook Children's)
Abstract: n the first study, researchers combined a progressive ratio schedule of reinforcement with the methods of a standard functional analysis to determine behavioral functions and reinforcer value for three participants who engaged in challenging behavior. In the second study, researchers assessed each participant’s caregiver’s tolerance in implementing two behavior reduction strategies, extinction and noncontingent reinforcement. Results depict that the relationship between a parent’s tolerance for ignoring challenging behavior and their child’s breakpoint in reinforcer value may provide insight into when extinction could be successful and implemented with greater fidelity. In cases in which extinction is necessary (e.g., severe destructive behavior, socially inappropriate behavior) but a child’s response output and breakpoint are greater than their parent’s tolerance, a motivating augmental training may increase a parent’s fidelity and tolerance (i.e., duration) in implementing extinction.
 
167. Identifying Sensitivity to Conversational Attention and Assessing Conversation Skills
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Sylvia Aquino (Marquette University ), JESEY MARIE GOPEZ (Marquette University), Stephanie A. Hood (Marquette University ), Michelle Castillo (University of Northern Texas)
Discussant: Michael P. Kranak (Oakland University)
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate an assessment to differentiate treatments to increase conversational skills (e.g., Stocco et al. 2020; and Hood et al., 2017). We replicated the functional analysis of on topic or restricted speech (Stocco et al., 2020) while collecting data on additional conversation skills (e.g., shifting the conversation given a progression of subtle to salient cues of uninterest). During a conversation, subsequent changes in the topic of conversation may be influenced by the topics initiated by both conversation partners. As demonstrated in Stocco et al., participants rarely changed the topic of conversation when the therapist reinforced any topic and did not initiate other topics of conversation. Thus, we compared participants conversational skills and preferences for conversations whether or not the therapist initiate topics of conversation. Participant 1’s speech was sensitive to conversational attention. That is, differential attention increased on topic speech, but skill deficits in following and shifting the conversation persisted. Participant 1 showed a preference for conversations wherein the therapist did not initiate conversations. Implications of preference and conversational arrangements will be discussed (e.g., balancing potential aversive properties of evocative situation to assess skill deficits).
 
Diversity submission 169. Non-medical intervention publication trends for individuals with autism spectrum disorder in China
Area: AUT; Domain: Theory
WENYONG QU (Tennessee Technological University), Krystal Kennedy (Tennessee Technological University), George Chitiyo (Tennessee Technological University)
Discussant: Michael P. Kranak (Oakland University)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis and autism spectrum disorder diagnosis are two emerging areas in China resulting in large responsibilities placed on new BCBAs. Like the US, China is creating a certification system, however, their system is a leveled, unique certification system with two additional technician-like certifications. Regardless of the credential, behavior analytic professionals must rely on literature when seeking effective and conceptually systematic interventions. Furthermore, practitioners in therapeutic and educational fields such as ABA often find themselves educating families on their child’s diagnosis while providing vetted resources with accurate information. In China, literature is typically accessed through a university or purchased on an individual bases. As such, Chinese practitioners of ABA need to be aware of trending and accessible literature. This poster will review trends related to behavior analytic interventions but will extend the review beyond ABA interventions by also reviewing trends related to additional non-medical interventions related to individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

 
171. Utilizing Telehealth to Improve Access to Social Skills Groups During and Post-Pandemic
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
Lilian Hernandez (360 Behavioral Health; California Psychcare), ELIZABETH ANNE PASCUAL (360 Behavioral Health; California Psychcare)
Discussant: Michael P. Kranak (Oakland University)
Abstract:

Social skills groups are used to provide opportunities for learners to practice social skills with peers regularly. Groups are typically organized based on age and interests, and are offered for kids, preteens, teens and young adults. Social skills groups are usually conducted face-to-face, however, during the COVID-19 crisis, conducting social skills groups in person presented many challenges. Telehealth has evolved as a new platform for participants to gather virtually to continue developing their social skills. Without the social interactions learners typically access while in school, participating in a social skills group virtually provides a safe and supportive environment where they can continue to learn the skills needed to improve social-emotional development. Compared to in-person social skills groups, through the use of Telehealth, we’ve been able to increase both the number of different social skills groups being conducted at a given time as well as the number of participants attending each group. Additionally, we have been able to increase the variety of groups we offer and further specialize them to their ages and needs. Social skills through Telehealth is a service delivery model that has offered us the opportunity to increase our outreach and will continue to post-pandemic.

 
173. Crisis Admissions Program: An Alternative Pilot Discharge Plan for Patients with Autism Presenting in Behavioral Crisis
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
EDIE GRACE BRUSH (Marcus Autism Center ), Alexis Constantin Pavlov (Marcus Autism Center; Emory University School of Medicine), Colin S. Muething (Marcus Autism Center), Joanna Lomas Mevers (Marcus Autism Center), Nathan Call (Marcus Autism Center)
Discussant: Michael P. Kranak (Oakland University)
Abstract: Children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are more likely to be admitted to the emergency department (ED) for behavioral or psychiatric reasons than their typically developing peers. These children have higher rates of inpatient psychiatric admissions and often require longer lengths of stay, ultimately incurring significantly larger medical costs. Additionally, specialized inpatient treatment centers for the assessment and treatment of challenging behavior are limited and most often consist of a purely pharmacologic approach to crisis intervention. Given the limited access to inpatient services and potentially inappropriate approach to care for these patients, a pilot program was developed to fill the gap in care for patients with ASD experiencing a behavioral health crisis. The Crisis Admissions Program focuses on identifying triggers through functional-behavioral assessment and individualized de-escalation strategies based on applied behavior analysis are developed and generalized to the home environment. The admissions also focus on parent training with an emphasis on environmental engineering, crisis prevention, and behavioral management to provide the caregivers tools to mitigate future hospitalizations. This poster will illustrate this unique treatment model and present preliminary clinical data on caregiver satisfaction ratings and 6-month readmission rate to the ED for 13 participants.
 
177. The Role Parental Stress Plays on the Intelligence Test of 5-year-old Children With Potential Autism Trait
Area: AUT; Domain: Basic Research
SHEOW YUN SIE (Queens College, City University of New York), Donato DeIngeniis (CUNY Queens College), Christine Ginalis (CUNY Queens College), Harold Butler (Fordham University), Yoko Nomura (CUNY Queens College)
Discussant: Michael P. Kranak (Oakland University)
Abstract:

Research on the effects of parental stress on a child’s cognitive function has insubstantial results, particularly among children with potential Autism trait. The current study examined whether parental stress is associated with cognitive scores among children with potential Autism trait relative to children without Autism trait. A subsample of 97 mothers and their 5-year-old children was extracted from the Stress in Pregnancy Study. Mothers completed a Parenting Stress Index, reporting magnitude of stress in the parent, and an Autism Spectrum Quotient questionnaire, disclosing possible Autism trait in their child. Children were administered the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence to assess different domains of cognitive function. A two-by-two Factorial ANOVA was conducted to compare main effects of predictors (parental stress and child’s potential Autism trait) and its interaction on child’s cognitive performance. The results showed a significant interaction toward the Children Full Scale IQ, F(1, 93)= 11.46, p= .001, Verbal Comprehension, F(1, 93)= 6.54, p= .01, Visual Spatial, F(1, 93)= 4.64, p= .03, Fluid Reasoning, F(1, 93)= 5.81, p= .02, and Working Memory, F(1, 93)= 13.25, p< .001. Notably, there was an increase in cognitive function among children with potential Autism trait and higher stress parent.

 
 
 
Poster Session #98
CSS Saturday Poster Session: Even-Numbered Posters
Saturday, May 28, 2022
2:00 PM–3:00 PM
Exhibit Level; Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Thomas G. Szabo (Touro University)
62. How Socially Controlled Are Protective Behaviors Against COVID-19?
Area: CSS; Domain: Basic Research
CRISTIAN YESID URBANO MEJIA (Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Centro de Investigación e Innovación en Análisis de la Conducta), Juan Pablo Molano Gallardo (Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Centro de Investigación e Innovación en Análisis de la Conducta), Julian Zanguña (Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Centro de Investigación e Innovación en Análisis de la Conducta), Alvaro A. Clavijo Alvarez (Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Centro de Investigación e Innovación en Análisis de la Conducta)
Discussant: Thomas G. Szabo (Touro University)
Abstract: Adherence to protective behaviors is fundamental to mitigating the COVID-19 pandemic. A behavior analyst framework could help understand the variables controlling those protective behaviors. Social interactions could be a relevant source of reinforcement. This study aimed to assess whether two social contexts with different operant contingencies predicted reported adherence to protective behaviors against COVID-19. 637 Colombian residents filled an online survey. They reported how much they had adhered to the protective behaviors and how much social reinforcement and punishment they had received. We measured four protective behaviors: mask-wearing, social distancing, hand washing, and correcting others in two social contexts: outdoors and indoors with visitors. In addition, we assessed four types of social consequences: to receive social approval, to avoid being judged, to receive social rejection, and to lose gratification in social relationships. We found people adhered more in an outdoor context than indoors with visitors. The more social approval received, the greater the adherence to protective behaviors, and the lesser gratification in social relationships, the lesser the adherence to protective behaviors. Also, the effect of social consequences was more significant in the indoor than in the outdoor context. These results support the use of social stimuli to increase protective behaviors.
 
64. Are You Unhealthy? Let’s Fix It: An Evaluation of Virtual Behavior Interventions on Increasing Healthy Lifestyle Choices
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
JANE GOODMAN TAMMIK (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Kristin McCoy (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Julie A. Ackerlund Brandt (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology ), Robyn M. Catagnus (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Nicholas Green (BehaviorFit)
Discussant: Thomas G. Szabo (Touro University)
Abstract: Being overweight and/or suffering from obesity are health issues that have been a topic of both basic and applied research for over 50 years. These are preventable health conditions that affect millions of people across the world. The industry for weight loss is astronomically large, yet overweight and obesity rates continue to rise despite the countless programs that promise results. Standard behavioral treatment (SBT) for weight loss includes monitoring and reducing caloric intake, increasing physical exercise, and training in behavioral strategies. The types of behavior strategies used in research have included self-monitoring, cognitive restructuring, stimulus control and goal setting, to name a few. Although a significant amount of research has been conducted to evaluate weight loss, the majority of research using behavioral strategies has been conducted in person. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, virtual interventions are more and more prevalent and needed. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of self-monitoring and virtual social interaction on weight loss and improved health outcomes.
 
Diversity submission 66. Examining the Impact of a Multicomponent Violence Intervention and Prevention Initiative on Participant Experiences of Violence
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
JOSHUA HARSIN (University of Kansas), Jomella Watson-Thompson (University of Kansas), Malika N. Pritchett (University of Kansas), Marvia Jones (Aim4Peace)
Discussant: Thomas G. Szabo (Touro University)
Abstract: Interpersonal violence is a significant behavioral and public health concern in the United States. Although violent crime has steadily decreased since the 1990s, these trends have begun to reverse in recent years. In Kansas City, Missouri (KCMO), the number of homicides has doubled since 2014; in 2021, the city had the 7th highest homicide rate in the country. Moreover, such violence disproportionately impacts people of color and those living in poverty, making it an issue of racial and economic justice. Aim4Peace (A4P), a comprehensive, multicomponent community-based initiative, supports violence prevention and intervention efforts in KCMO. This multicomponent intervention includes responding to ongoing conflicts to prevent escalation and to local hospitals to prevent retaliatory violence, offering service referrals to address the social determinants of health (e.g., stable housing), and creating a plan to address each of a participant’s risk factors (e.g., being a weapon carrier), to reduce the likelihood of future experiences of violence. Tracking experiences of violence represents an important metric in understanding the effectiveness of such a program. This poster examines this metric in relation to participant risk factors and risk level and will also demonstrate the importance of a multisectoral approach in addressing violence (i.e., applied behavioral science and public health).
 
 
 
Poster Session #100
CBM Saturday Poster Session: Even-Numbered Posters
Saturday, May 28, 2022
2:00 PM–3:00 PM
Exhibit Level; Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Kendra Thomson (Brock University )
76. Functional Analysis of Problem Behavior in Brazil: A Systematic Review
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
FELIPE MAGALHÃES LEMOS (Universidade Federal de São Carlos; Luna ABA), Christiana Almeida Goncalves Meira Goncalves Meira (Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos), João S. Carmo (Universidade Federal de São Carlos), Joshua Jessel (Queens College, City University of New York)
Discussant: Kendra Thomson (Brock University)
Abstract:

Functional assessment is a process for understanding environmental influences of problem behavior and can be conducted in practice using questionnaires with caregivers, direct observations of the individual, and systematic analyses. . We present a systematic review of empirical studies conducted in Brazil wherein we describe common functional assessment procedures of problem behavior and evaluate function-based treatment outcomes. This study includes peer-reviewed studies that have been conducted in Brazil containing functional assessment as pre-treatment through experimental procedures, direct or indirect observation, and measurement of behavior problems demonstrating a relationship between environmental events and behavior. The studies were primarily conducted with adults (66%). The school was slightly more utilized as a setting, with 21%. And the most common pathology associated with evaluations was schizophrenia (25%). The most studied topography was the inappropriate speech of schizophrenic patients (25%). Only five studies used functional analysis. Only one study was conducted with a single test. Only 40% of the five studies presented the results in line charts. Only one of the articles presented graphs with function differentiation in one phase of the research. We conclude that there is a scarcity of research on functional analysis of behavior problems conducted with the Brazilian public.

 
78. Not Just for Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Literature Review on the Effectiveness of Applied Behavior Analysis With Individuals of Different Disorders
Area: CBM; Domain: Theory
MONICA GILBERT (Crystal Minds New Beginning), Chanel Nunez (Crystal Minds New Beginning), Misleiny Acosta Valdes (Crystal Minds New Beginning), Bridgette Bayate (Crystal Minds New Beginning)
Discussant: Kendra Thomson (Brock University)
Abstract:

Historically, applied behavior analysis (ABA) has gained the connotation of being a therapy that solely treats individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, clinicians in the field have noted that the principles of ABA can be applied to children, adolescents, and adults of different disorders (and non-disorders). There is a concern with insurance companies in some states since they do not identify ABA as a therapy that meets medical necessity to treat disorders outside of autism. Therefore, funding sources for families of children with for instance; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety disorder, conduct disorder amongst others are in a disadvantage in that they have to pay for services out of their pocket. One way to change this is to stimulate more studies that demonstrate the effectiveness of ABA, not only with individuals diagnosed with ASDbut other disorders as well. The goal of this systematic literature review is to investigate whether there are empirical studies that show the effectiveness of ABA with other disorders and to provide a summary of the disorders that have gained the most studies that show a "good prognosis" for individuals treated with ABA.

 
Diversity submission 80. A Behavioral-Analytic Analysis of the Loneliness of Black Women in Brazil
Area: CBM; Domain: Theory
TÁHCITA MEDRADO MIZAEL (São Paulo University (USP - Brazil)), Maria Helena Leite Hunziker (Universidade de Sao Paulo)
Discussant: Kendra Thomson (Brock University)
Abstract:

There are more than 53 million Black women in Brazil. Studying the intersection of race, class, and gender can help us better understand the reasons why those women are oppressed in society (e.g., have less access to reinforcement related to social status and financial resources for centuries). Black women are the majority of individuals who seek psychotherapy in public services in Brazil, and they often describe a specific feeling of loneliness. Taking into account that behavior analysis is a science that could help understanding this type of suffering in a more precise way, i.e., looking into the variables that cause this behavior, the aim of this study was to interpret in behavior-analytic terms what processes may be involved in the feeling described as “Black women’s loneliness”. We reviewed the Brazilian literature on the phenomenon and hypothesize some behavioral processes that may be involved in this feeling (e.g., extinction), among other contributions from the field, such as deprivation and its role as motivating operations, leading to a higher chance to engage in exploitative romantic and work relationships. We hope these analyses could help counselors to a better understanding of this feeling and, consequently, interventions better suited for this population.

 
84. Functional Assessment of Social Media Use
Area: CBM; Domain: Basic Research
RINISHA NAIDU (California State University-East Bay), Elizabeth Kyonka (California State University - East Bay)
Discussant: Kendra Thomson (Brock University)
Abstract: The purpose of this pilot study was to develop a preliminary functional assessment of social media use. We designed the Social Media Use Consequences Questionnaire - Preliminary (SMCQ-P) to identify the consequences that maintained individuals’ use of social media. It includes five items putatively related to each of six possible functions: positive reinforcement in the form of tangible benefits, attention, or sensory reinforcement, and escape from demand, offline social interaction, or private events, with higher scores on each subscale indicating greater frequency. Thirty-one introductory psychology students completed the SMCQ-P and answered other questions about their internet use online via a web browser. The students reported using social media on an average of 15.34 hours per week and most (84%) reported that they want to change the way they use social media.Total scores on the SMCQ-P were correlated with scores on measures assessing consequences maintaining internet use (r = .54, p = .002), social media dependence (r = .41, p = .02), and internet addiction (r = .47, p = .01), which suggests that social media use and internet use may be functionally equivalent response classes. Means scores were relatively high for four subscales (attention, sensory, demand, and private events). They were relatively low for tangible reinforcement and social negative reinforcement. The pattern of subscale scores indicates that psychology students’ social media use is typically maintained by multiple consequences, but not financial gain or escape from offline social interaction.
 
 
 
Invited Panel #105
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Reflections on Our Journey Into DEI: A Conversation With the ABAI DEI Board
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: DEI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Pepperdine University), Ramona Houmanfar (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Hughes Fong, Ph.D.
Panelists: R. WAYNE WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University), JOVONNIE L. ESQUIERDO-LEAL (University of Nevada, Reno), JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

This panel represents the third annual DEI Board discussion in a series designed to provide the ABAI membership with: 1) updates on Board activities, 2) opportunities for considering specific topics of relevance to advancing DEI efforts within ABAI and more broadly, and 3) a mechanism for input and ideas from the audience. This year’s panel will focus on the potential contributions of behavior analysis theory and scientific research to improving diversity, equity, and inclusion in ABAI and, more generally, in society. A brief review of the Board’s actions over the past year will be provided by the Co-Coordinators of the ABAI DEI Board, Elizabeth Fong, and Ramona Houmanfar. In addition, ABAI DEI Board members will share perspectives on how DEI issues have impacted our ABA community. Time for questions and comments from the audience will be included to allow for sharing relevant experiences and lessons learned.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

intermediate - good grasp of ABA, some experience or interest in working on DEI issues, some experience or interest in working with diverse populations

Learning Objectives: 1. Name at least one step that behavior analysts are taking to address DEI in the field 2. Identify ways that they can engage in DEI practice 3. Identify ways that DEI issues have impacted our ABA community
R. WAYNE WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
JOVONNIE L. ESQUIERDO-LEAL (University of Nevada, Reno)
JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
 
 
Symposium #121
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Creating Action Circles to Advance the Use of Evidence-Based Practices
Saturday, May 28, 2022
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 156B
Area: CSS/EDC; Domain: Translational
Chair: Elizabeth Virginia Krulder (California ABA; Values to Action)
CE Instructor: Anthony Biglan, Ph.D.
Abstract: In recent years, behavior analysts have increasingly been concerned to extend the application of behavior analysis to problems that have traditionally not gotten as much attention as they deserve, given their deleterious impact on human well-being. This symposium consists of a set of presentations that describe how Action Circles can be used to foster the dissemination of evidence-based practices. Over the past two years, members of Values to Action, a nonprofit organization that was created to further the evolution of nurturing practices, have organized multiple Action Circles. An Action Circle Consists of 6 to 10 people who agree to work over a limited time-- 2 to 3 months-- to produce a product that will contribute to the solution of a specific problem. This symposium will present descriptions of the results of action circles working on the following problems: (a) the reform of juvenile justice; (b) reducing disparities in reading proficiency; (c) getting behavioral health services integrated into hospitals and clinics; (d) advocating for an increase in funding for research on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: People who are trained in behavior analysis. Specifically, people who are BCBAs
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to 1. Describe how action circles are organized to achieve specific objectives 2. Describe: the key features for reforming criminal justice, a strategy for reducing disparities in reading proficiency, a strategy for getting BCBA's placed in hospitals and healthcare clinics, the deficiencies in federal support for research on reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 3. Describe the Values to Action model for using action circles the widely disseminated evidence-based practices.
 
Diversity submission The Design of Action Circles to Reduce Disparities in Reading Proficiency
(Service Delivery)
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute; Values to Action)
Abstract: Children who are not proficient in reading by fourth grade are unlikely to ever become proficient readers. This makes it likely that they will fail academically and become consigned to low-paying jobs and lifelong poverty. Yet currently in the United States 52% of black children and 45% of Hispanic children lack basic skills in reading by fourth grade. Only 19% of Native American children are proficient in reading. This presentation will report on the design of a strategy that was developed by an Action Circle created by Values to Action. The strategy calls for the creation of local action circles in disadvantaged communities to reduce disparities in reading skill. These action circles will begin by organizing community support for a comprehensive effort to improve reading skill. Teachers who aspire to improve the reading skill of their students will be assisted in strengthening their instructional approach. At the same time, parents and local community organizations will be encouraged to test the proficiency of children in kindergarten and first grade and to provide supplemental instruction in reading using one of two well-established aids to instruction: the computerized system Funnix and the book, Teach Your Child to Read in a Hundred Easy Lessons.
 
Diversity submission Action Circles to Address the Problem of Climate Change
(Applied Research)
KYLEE DRUGAN-EPPICH (Insight Behavior Partnership, LLC)
Abstract: Climate change is a problem of human behavior. While comprehensive community-based initiatives are currently taking place to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, experimental evaluations of such initiatives do not exist. The climate change Action Circle, organized through Values to Action, has focused on investigating how much behavioral research has been done to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and begin advocacy for more federal funding for such research. Recent analyses have shown that the majority of studies aiming to curb the climate crisis involve the development of technologies (i.e. to measure and predict the changing climate). Consequently, our analyses have revealed an appalling lack of funding for behavioral science research that could reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This presentation will summarize the findings of the most recent reviews of behavioral research and its federal funding, as well as describe the current steps being taken by the action circle to continue addressing climate change from a behavior analytic perspective.
 
Diversity submission An Action Circle Guide to Reforming Juvenile Justice
(Service Delivery)
JULIANNE DICOCCO (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology/ Union School District)
Abstract: This presentation will describe the development of a guide to reforming the juvenile justice system in communities. Such reforms are vital to reducing the school to prison pipeline that harms the lives of many Black and Hispanic children. The guide was created by an Action Circle composed of members of Values to Action. The guide reviews the evidence on the high cost of incarcerating juveniles, the iatrogenic effects of traditional approaches to juvenile offenders, and the availability of more effective and less punitive approaches to reducing recidivism. But more than that, the guide makes the case for investing more in the prevention of offending. There are at least three types of programs that can prevent delinquency: family interventions, school programs, and community programs that engage youth in activities that promote prosocial behavior. Our guide to preventing juvenile delinquency was developed with the hope that communities and organizations will use this as a tool to begin addressing the issue in localized action circles in various geographic regions across the United States. Our next step will be to assist local communities in creating local action circles to promote the reforms that our guide calls for.
 
Diversity submission An Action Circle to Increase the Availability of Behavior Analysts in Healthcare Settings
(Service Delivery)
TONI ROSE AGANA (Caldwell University; Values to Action)
Abstract: Accessing quality healthcare is imperative for every individual’s health status, quality of life, and life expectancy. However, individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities may have medical fears and phobias compared to their typically developing peers. These fears and phobias are typically demonstrated by increased emotional reactions and avoidance behavior in the presence of healthcare providers in the healthcare setting. Emitting these behaviors poses difficulties for receiving quality healthcare services (e.g., routine-check-ups, dental cleaning). An Action Circle was created to devise a solution to increase behavioral services in the healthcare system. This presentation will discuss the following: (1) empirical evidence of behavioral strategies with proven benefit, (2) how applied behavior analysis (ABA) has successfully been integrated into medical practice, and (3) policies that can be implemented to expand ABA practices to improve healthcare delivery to individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #131
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Getting Unstuck: How Behavior Analysts Can Talk to Marginalized Communities, Behave Flexibly, and Change the World
Saturday, May 28, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jeanne M. Donaldson (Louisiana State University)
CE Instructor: Matthew Capriotti, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MATTHEW CAPRIOTTI (San Jose State University)
Abstract: As behavior analysts, we know the potential of our science to change the world. Behavior analysis points to powerful interventions for a range of individuals’ challenges and societies’ ills, without assigning stigmatizing diagnoses of personal or cultural deficits, such as character problems and broken brains. Our beloved science has made enormous impacts in a few areas. And yet, behavior analysis’ reach is far from what Skinner imagined possible. At the same time, we behavior analysts often bemoan feeling misunderstood by colleagues and by society. Our science, and our reputations, tend to get stuck within our research and practice communities, and within tried-and-true applications. I propose that we can get our science “unstuck” through thoughtful collaboration with underserved and oppressed communities, and with the professionals who have long served them. As an exemplar of a recent (and ongoing) success story that has leveraged these principles, I will discuss how behavior analysts have changed the landscape of treatment for people with tic disorders across the world. To exemplify an unfulfilled opportunity for such progress, I will discuss potential applications of behavior analysis into LGBTQ+ health and wellness. I will present my own work in these two areas, with particular attention to intentional professional actions outside the traditional bounds of behavior analysis. This will include honest discussion of both “wins” (wherein such work has led to increased impact) and “misses” (wherein such projects have led down the rabbit holes of mentalism). I will conclude with practical suggestions for behavior analysts looking to expand the scope of their work into new areas.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: faculty researchers, university educators, applied practitioners, graduate students
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss research strategies and tactics that enable pragmatic scaling of behavior analysis; (2) describe how non-behavior-analytic research approaches contributed to the successful dissemination of behavior-analytic treatments for tic disorders; (3) identify steps that may aid early career researchers in conducting community-partnered research in new areas.
 
MATTHEW CAPRIOTTI (San Jose State University)
Dr. Matthew Capriotti is an Associate Professor of Psychology at San Jose State University. He completed his BS in Psychology at the University of Florida in 2010, and he then earned his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee in 2015. Prior to joining the faculty at San Jose State University, Dr. Capriotti completed predoctoral and postdoctoral fellowships in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California San Francisco. His research interests lie in the behavioral treatment of Tourette Syndrome and in the study of processes that drive health and wellness among LGBTQ+ people. Dr. Capriotti has employed varied methodological approaches to conduct research across the basic-to-applied continuum. His earliest work investigated rats’ responding on multiple schedules. His subsequent programs of research on tic disorders and LGBTQ+ health have employed a range of methodological approaches and content foci, including within-case laboratory studies on behavioral processes in clinical populations, clinical trials, dissemination and implementation projects, phenomenological and epidemiological investigations of neurobehavioral and psychiatric conditions, experiments evaluating environmental determinants of stigma, survey- and interview-based qualitative research on facilitators and barriers of psychosocial treatment, and community-based participatory research. Dr. Capriotti is the author of 46 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference presentations.
 
 
Symposium #142
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Diversity submission Why So Racist? A Function-Based and Organizational Assessment and Interventions for Policing
Saturday, May 28, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 156B
Area: CSS/OBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Shawn Capell (Covenant 15:16 LLC )
Discussant: Ryan Sain (Mary Baldwin University )
CE Instructor: Ryan Sain, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The racial differentiation of policing in America has been widely researched and documented (Walker et al., 2008; Wilson et al., 1982; Eck et al., 1987; Braga et al., 1999). While these discrepancies have been largely documented, few changes have been made to the policies, procedures and law governing police officers, leading to the continuation of racist acts displayed by police officers across the country. The reasons for this are plentiful and the issues are symptoms of the larger problems of individual and institutional racism that increases the likeliness any police officer will engage in violence against a person of color. This symposium describes how individual racism is learned and strengthened and a functional perspective of the historical development of policing in America followed by suggestions about how these systems can be redeveloped and improved.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): police functions, racism
Target Audience:

This is appropriate for any level of behavior analyst or behavior analyst trainee who is interested in systems theory and how functional assessment can play a role in system and reinforcement of individual behavior.

Learning Objectives: 1. The learner will identify the common functions of policing in the United States. 2. The learner will identify how differential responding of officers to different groups of citizens develops and is maintained. 3. The learner will identify at least three ways behavior analysis can address the behavior of police officers to decrease differential responding between groups of individuals. 4. The learner will identify at least one organizational behavior management (OBM) strategy that can be used to decrease differential responding of police officers.
 
Diversity submission 

The Function of the Police Force: A Behavior Analytic Review of the History of How Policing in America Came to Be

NATALIE A. PARKS (Behavior Leader Inc.; Saint Louis University), Beverly Kirby (Team ABA LLC)
Abstract:

While the racial differentiation of policing in America has been widely researched and documented (Walker & Katz, 2008; Wilson & Kelling, 1982; Eck & Spelman, 1987; Braga, et al., 1999), there have been few changes within the policies, procedures and laws governing police officers. This has resulted in the continuation of individual acts of racism of police officers across the country and has upheld the systemic racism that results in the discrepancies between Black people and White people. To fully understand and develop effective interventions that will change policing behaviors and the racism observed within the police force, one must first understand the historical development and functional variables that maintain policing in America.

 
Diversity submission Solutions Addressing the Vulnerability of Individual and Institutional Racism in Police Departments
BEVERLY KIRBY (Team ABA LLC), Natalie A. Parks (Behavior Leader Inc.; Saint Louis University)
Abstract: Understanding the history and function of policing brings insight into the main areas to target for intervention when attempting to eliminate racism within policing and the the police force. This presentation focuses on suggestions regarding how to change and redevelop the system and functions of policing in America to decrease and eliminate specific and systemic acts of racism.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #150
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Current Landscape of the Global Dissemination of Applied Behavior Analysis: Perspectives on Supervision and Beyond
Saturday, May 28, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Lina M. Slim (ASAP - A Step Ahead Program, LLC; Endicott College; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
CE Instructor: Jacob A Sadavoy, M.S.
Presenting Author: JACOB A SADAVOY (Committed Behavior)
Abstract:

The field of behaviour analysis is growing exponentially in North America (Carr & Nosik, 2017; Deochand & Fuqua, 2016) however, there exists many barriers that impede similar expansion of the field internationally. This presentation will share survey results related to those barriers from six regions: Africa, Asia, Australia/New Zealand, Europe, the Middle East, and South America. We will compare and contrast the behaviour analytic landscape in these regions with a focus on challenges related to supervision (e.g., access, financial constraints, infrastructure, etc.). We will examine the respondents' answers to gain greater insights into these barriers and discuss national initiatives and action steps to respond to this crisis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; graduate students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify five barriers that impede effective, sustainable international dissemination; (2) identify areas of need per region and develop individualized recommendations informed by respondent data; (3) describe the three ways in which the international behaviour analytic community can be supported domestically, in North America.
 
JACOB A SADAVOY (Committed Behavior)
Jacob A. Sadavoy is a Board Certified Behaviour Analyst with over 20 years of experience applying the principles of applied behaviour analysis in home programs, clinical center-based programs, school environments as a teacher and educational consultant, businesses, and hospitals throughout North America. To date, Jacob has travelled to fifteen different countries to collaborate with local practitioners to develop culturally-informed, socially significant, behaviour analytic strategies dynamic to the local environment and culture. The ethical challenges and barriers of disseminating ABA effectively throughout the world culminated in Understanding Ethics in Applied Behavior Analysis: Practical Applications. Jacob also sat as the 2019 Vice President of the Ethics and Behavior Analysis Special Interest Group, Teamwork Healthcare's Clinical Board, and a member of the Behaviour Analysis Supervision Special Interest Group addressing international supervision. Jacob’s key areas of interest are ethics, supervision, sustainable dissemination, social justice, and services across the lifespan. Jacob's interest in social justice and compassionate care has culminated in a 2021 tome, A Scientific Framework for Compassion and Social Justice: Lessons in Applied Behavior Analysis.
 

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