Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Program by : Friday, May 27, 2022


 

Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Ethics Regarding Sexuality Issues for Those on the Autism Spectrum
Friday, May 27, 2022
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 252B
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Joanne Sgambati, Ph.D.
JOANNE SGAMBATI (Eden II/Genesis Programs NYSABA), NATASHA TREUMAN (Eden ll/ Genesis Programs), AMANDA HAYES (Eden ll/ Genesis Programs)
Description: This presentation will focus on the treatment intervention and the importance of BACB ethicall standards as it relates to supporting individuals on the autism spectrum and sexuality issues. The workshop will give an overview of ASD symptomolog and sexually related challenging behaviors. It will discuss ethic and sexual consent and related human rights issues.The workshop will discuss case examples and practical ethical solutions to various challenging sexual behaviors. Autism LGBTQIA+ issues will be reviewed along with helpful ethical solutions. Lastly, best practices and advocacy will be discussed. Materials will be supplied and interactive audiance activities will be used for audiance participation. A Q&A session will follow.
Learning Objectives: (1) Participants will learn and review the Current BACB Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts. (2) Participats will learn current sexual issues and challanging behaviors in those with autism based on several case examples and how they were addessed ethically by application of the current BACB ethics and related codes. (3) Participants will have opportunities to ask questions and problem solve through various interactive activities that target ethics, human rights, sexuality , and LGBTQIA+ issues in the autism community.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, small group break out, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials for identifying ethical issues and solutions will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: Intermediate level - Partcipants should have rerequisite skills such as a general knowledge of BACB ethical standards and appled behavior analysis as it relates to autism spectrum disorder. This workshop is good for Behavior Anaylsts, Psychologists, Social Workers, Graduate Students, and Educators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Contributing to the Creation of Open Access Educational Materials in Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 27, 2022
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Meeting Level 2; Room 256
Area: TBA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Margaret Pavone Dannevik, Ph.D.
MARGARET PAVONE DANNEVIK (Lindenwood University)
Description: This workshop will provide information and encouragement for individuals in the behavior analysis field to contribute to open educational resources related to the science of human behavior. OER creation can not only be a valuable teaching or supervision activity but also allows for increased representation of underserved populations and a more culturally sensitive view of the ways behavior analysis can impact the world. Participants will walk away with tools to create open educational resources with their supervisees and trainees and also have opportunities for future collaboration.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to : (1) Identify the ways in which open educational resources increase diversity, equity, and inclusion in the field of behavior analysis (2) Describe how OER/OEP can be integrated into coursework, training, and supervision to disseminate the science and represent underserved populations (3) Collaborate with other content creators to produce more behavior analytic open educational resources while reducing individual response effort and capitalizing on unique contributor strengths
Activities: The workshop will combine lecture, group discussion, small group guided practice, and also provide supplemental materials to participants wanting to continue working on goals established during the training.
Audience: Individual participants should have fluent knowledge of basic behavior analytic principles. The workshop will be most appropriate for those in teaching, training, or supervision roles.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Diversity, Higher Ed, OEr, Teaching
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Ethics Without Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion is Unethical
Friday, May 27, 2022
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 156B
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Natalie A. Parks, Ph.D.
NATALIE A. PARKS (Behavior Leader Inc.; Saint Louis University), CHARDAE RIGDON (Rockwood School District), CHELSEA LAXA (Behavior Leader, Inc.), ELIZABETH HARRINGTON (Behavior Leader)
Description: The Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts specifies that behavior analysts should provide services that are culturally responsive, be aware of their own biases, and provide supervision that focuses on developing these skills in trainees. Several behavior analysts have investigated various diversity and inclusion topics including the development of racism, the need for additional diversity and inclusion training in the field, and the discrepancies between behavior analysis and other social science fields. This workshop provides participants with a behavior analytic framework of the principles and concepts of diversity, equity, and inclusion, encourages participants to review and reflect upon their own biases and privileges and how these intersect with the delivery of services, and guides participants through the steps necessary to develop culturally responsive services. Participants will operationally define the most common terms in diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) work, explore how each concept and principle applies to their work as a behavior analyst, and practice developing programming and services that are culturally responsive. Participants will be challenged to examine their own biases and identities and how these intersect with the individuals served. Finally, participants will explore why DEI is necessary to provide ethical services.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Operationally define at least 5 common terms of diversity, equity, and inclusion. 2. State what it means to have culturally responsive services. 3. Identify their own biases and identity and how they intersect with the delivery of services. 4. Create services that are culturally responsive. 5. Identify why DEI is necessary for the provision of ethical services.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, video review, small group discussions and activities, individual activities, and large group activities. Core content will be taught through lecture and videos that illustrate examples and models and participants will practice and apply their learning through the various individual, small, and large group activities.
Audience: Participants should be BCBAs, BCaBAs, or BCBA-Ds that have a strong foundational knowledge of concepts and principles in behavior analysis. Background knowledge of cultural practices and interlocking behavioral contingencies will aid in understanding, but not necessary.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): diversity, equity, ethics, inclusion
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Acceptance and Commitment Training for Applied Behavior Analysts: This is Great, But How Would I Do This?
Friday, May 27, 2022
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 104A
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, Ph.D.
THOMAS G. SZABO (Touro University, Autism Care West), AZIZULL KAUR DHADWAL (Pepperdine University), YUKIE KURUMIYA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), ASHLEY PETT (Achievement, Balance, Community LLC), JACLYN TRUJILLO (Florida Institute of Technology), SEHAR MOUGHAL (University of Auckland), LARISA SHEPERD (Endicott College), DESIRAE WINGERTER (Collaboration Center Foundation), Jennifer J. McComas (University of Minnesota)
Description: Evidence for the utility of acceptance and commitment trainin (ACT) in applied behavior analysis (ABA) is growing. Most researchers publishing in this area are highly skilled academics with their most experienced graduate students, so it is not surprising that they are successful and operating within an ABA scope of practice. But how does the average ABA practitioner gain access to the coaching needed for successful, ethical implementation of ACT in ABA settings? It does not help that ABA practitioners leave ACT workshops saying, “This is great, but how would I do this?” In fact, it is highly problematic for our field if any training does not result in skill acquisition and sensitivity to the nuances of acceptable conduct when using any intervention. This workshop will offer training in two skills – ACT assessment and intervention. Using a BST format, participants will learn to conduct descriptive functional assessment of the six ACT repertoires and apply a 10-step task analysis to the development of novel, idiosyncratic ACT exercises. Participants will receive intensive coaching in small groups from seven seasoned facilitators and access to an online folder with sample self-guided training material to continue to practice with after the workshop, clinical decision-making trees to guide practice, video exemplars, and relevant research.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to (1) code dialogue for six core indirect-acting contingencies (2) apply a 10-step task analysis to the design of a function-based ACT intervention (3) develop data collection for learner practice of ACT skills and ABA dependent variables
Activities: BST - rationale, modeling, rehearsal, feedback. Also, lecture, small group breakout, large group discussion.
Audience: Participants should be familiar with the ACT model. Having previously participated in an ACT workshop, read ACT research, or read ACT books would help. This content is appropriate for BCBAs and for BCaBAs under supervision of BCBAs with ACT in ABA background. This content is also appropriate for students and practitioners of clinical behavior analysis (behavioral counseling, therapy, and so forth).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ACTraining, BST, Intensive Coaching
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Diversity submission Trauma: The Invisible Elephant Underlying Challenging Behavior
Friday, May 27, 2022
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: EDC/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University), PAULA Y FLANDERS (Rethinked.com), DANIELLE WEBB (East Carolina University)
Description: Behavior analysts are often charged with the responsibility of dealing with challenging behaviors and may be unaware of the impact of underlying trauma on these behaviors. These challenging behaviors are frequently not amenable to traditional functional behavioral assessments (FBAs) and positive behavioral interventions (PBIs). This may be because behavior analysts are reluctant to incorporate distal setting events, discriminative stimuli, and motivating operations into their FBAs, which is essential to the incorporation of trauma into these analyses. Further, it is necessary to acknowledge the impact of verbal behavior in implementing effective interventions, as covert thoughts and feelings often are the establishing operations that motivate challenging behaviors. This workshop will familiarize participants with FBAs that incorporate trauma as well as with strategies that use verbal behavior in conducting interventions. They will see role-play demonstrations of these strategies and have the opportunity to practice these strategies with feedback and correction. They will also be provided with PBIs specific to their own caseloads.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Explain why youth who have experienced trauma are more likely to exhibit challenging behaviors. 2. Describe how to incorporate distal setting events, discriminative stimuli, and motivating operations into functional behavioral assessments of youth who have experienced trauma. 3. Describe how covert thoughts and feelings often serve as establishing operations that motivate challenging behaviors. 4. Explain why verbal behavior is important in implementing effective interventions for youth who have experienced trauma. 5. Describe some of the verbal behavior strategies that could be effective interventions for youth who have experienced trauma.
Activities: Participants in this workshop will receive didactic information as well as modeling, role play, feedback and practice of specific trauma-based interventions. Supplemental materials such as written scenarios, fidelity checklists, and sample FBAs and PBIs will also be provided.
Audience: Participants can include BCBAs, teachers, school administrators, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, counselors, therapists, and social workers. Participants should be familiar with terms including verbal behavior, discriminative stimuli, establishing and abolishing operations, and positive and negative reinforcement, and have experience and examples dealing with those terms.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Self Reflective Practices
Friday, May 27, 2022
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 253A-C
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Roxanne Gayle, Ph.D.
NOOR YOUNUS SYED (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College), MARY JANE WEISS (Endicott College), ROXANNE GAYLE (Trumpet Behavioral Health, Endicott College, Pepperdine University), JESSICA PIAZZA (Endicott College ), COLLEEN SUZIO (Center for Children with Special Needs (CCSN))
Description: This workshop will investigate the importance of self-reflection in behavior analytic practice and research. We will review literature on self-reflection and biases both within and outside the field with an emphasis on these concepts as related to social significance and validity. Attendees will review self-reflective frameworks and will use these to create responses to real and contrived ethical scenarios. Finally, we will discuss cultural systems change theories, with an emphasis on metacontingencies as proposed by Glenn and colleagues (2016). Attendees will consider practices to facilitate systems change toward social justice at individual and organizational levels. It should be noted that topics covered in this workshop may be highly sensitive. The delivery of respectful bidirectional feedback, for who those feel comfortable, is highly encouraged.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion of the talk, the attendees will be able to: (1) Discuss behavior analytic frameworks to aid in self-reflective practices.; (2) Identify tools outside of the behavior analytic field that aim to increase humility and reflection.; (3) Describe the importance of engaging in reflective practices to increase social significance and validity of our research and practice.; (4) Analyze ethical scenarios related to biases through a reflective lens.; (5) Review behavior analytic cultural change theories and discuss ways to engage in systematic cultural movement towards social justice.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, guided practice, large group discussion, small group discussion, and individual feedback
Audience: Practitioners and researchers in the field
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): cultural humility, ethical scenarios, metacontingencies, self reflection

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