Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Program by B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Events: Sunday, May 29, 2022


 

B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #194
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Equitation Science and the 5-4-3-2-1 Framework for Ethical Animal Training
Sunday, May 29, 2022
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Erica N. Feuerbacher (Virginia Tech)
CE Instructor: Paul McGreevy, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: PAUL MCGREEVY (University of New England NSW, Australia)
Abstract:

This presentation describes the complex nature of human-animal interactions and captures the dynamic interconnection of five constructs, some established and some novel, to characterise safe, ethical and sustainable [best] practices in the management, handling and training of non-production animals. It interdigitates the Five Domains Model for animal welfare assessment, four possible operant mechanisms that interactions may follow, the three influences of attachment, arousal and affective state, and the two contrasting ethologies (human and animal), with a One Welfare approach. This 5-4-3-2-1 framework reveals that while arousal and affective state influence behavioural outcomes of operant conditioning, the trainer’s choice and application of the operant quadrants have a further and cumulative influence on attachment, arousal and affective state. The power of this approach is that, on one hand, it marries optimal interactions with the highly prized attribute of trust in animal–trainer dyads, which may be, at times at least, a manifestation of trainers as attachment figures. On the other hand, it reveals sources of disruption of human-animal and animal-human attachment that promote negative affective states which are incompatible with safe, ethical and sustainable practices. By bringing these constructs together, the 5-4-3-2-1 Framework aligns the Five Domains Model with the ultimate animal welfare aim of One Welfare. As such, it may also serve as a notional checklist for reflective practitioners who ascribe to the One Welfare approach and aim to achieve safe, ethical and sustainable animal management, handling, training and keeping practices.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Animal trainers, animal behavior therapists, and learning theorists
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the applications of operant conditioning in horse training; (2) question the use of gear designed to impose discomfort on horses and deny normal behaviour; (3) identify sustainable animal training techniques that align with the nascent 5-4-3-2-1 framework.
 
PAUL MCGREEVY (University of New England NSW, Australia)
Paul McGreevy BVSc, Ph.D., FRCVS, is a veterinarian and ethologist. He is the author of over 300 peer-reviewed scientific publications and seven books. With expertise in learning theory, animal training, animal welfare science, veterinary behavioural medicine and anthrozoology, he is a co-founder and honorary fellow of the International Society for Equitation Science. He led the VetCompass Australia initiative that brought together all of the Australian veterinary schools to provide ongoing national disease surveillance for companion animals and horses. With the additional involvement of Massey University (NZ), the same schools collaborated under Paul’s leadership to create the One Welfare teaching portal.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #214
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Reimagining Solutions to the Persistence of Gun Violence in K-12 Schools
Sunday, May 29, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jo Ann Pereira Delgado (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Sonali Rajan, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SONALI RAJAN (Columbia University)
Abstract:

Gun violence in the United States (U.S.) persists as a public health crisis. Over 40,000 individuals die from firearm-related injuries each year and another 60,000 are shot. Of these, nearly 8,000 are children. And gun violence specifically within K-12 schools continues. Indeed, recent data have underscored that over 250,000 children in the U.S. have been exposed to gun violence specifically in K-12 schools since the Columbine High School mass shooting tragedy in 1999, with Black children disproportionately impacted in comparison to their White peers. And rates of gun violence have increased precipitously since the onset of the Covid19 pandemic.

The impact of gun violence on children is particularly concerning as exposure to gun violence is considered an adverse childhood experience (ACE). ACEs are potentially traumatic events that occur during childhood. An extensive body of research on exposure to ACEs has been linked to dozens of negative outcomes over the life course (poor mental health, increased risk for chronic disease, asthma, poor oral health, cancer, injury, suicide, premature mortality, and even decreased school success). They’re also highly prevalent: an estimated 30% of children report experiencing at least one ACE. Thus, preventing this kind of violence is of utmost importance. Despite this urgency, meaningful responses to the prevention of gun violence in K-12 schools over the past decade have been lacking and largely not informed by evidence.

In this presentation, I draw on existing research, novel data, and a child-centric framework to present a new model that reimagines what solutions to the persistence of gun violence in K-12 schools looks like. In pursuing this work, I seek to answer the following question: what if our collective response to school gun violence did not prepare our schools for the inevitability of the next school shooting, rather treated the eradication of gun violence in schools as a genuine possibility? Knowledge, support, prevention, policy, engagement, commitment, leadership, and consistency are guiding principles we can use to reimagine how our schools can be kept safe, while ensuring that our children thrive.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Researchers (e.g. in the behavioral sciences, public health, education, school psychology), school leadership (principals, superintendents), school health professionals, K-12 teachers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify a comprehensive of "gun violence" as it pertains to child health and development; (2) describe the specific relationship between exposure to gun violence, child health, and learning outcomes; (3) identify specific and evidence-informed school safety strategies that are known to effectively reduce rates of gun violence in K-12 schools.
 
SONALI RAJAN (Columbia University)

Dr. Sonali Rajan is an Associate Professor of Health Education in the Department of Health and Behavior Studies at Teachers College, Columbia University. She also holds a secondary faculty appointment in the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. Rajan is a school violence prevention researcher, studying gun violence, school safety, and adverse childhood experiences. She holds faculty affiliations with the CDC-funded Columbia Center for Injury Science and Prevention, the Columbia Scientific Union for the Reduction of Gun Violence, and the Institute for Urban and Minority Education. She also co-produces Re(Search) for Solutions, a podcast hosted by the Media and Social Change Lab at Teachers College devoted to amplifying creative and evidence-based solutions to the persistence of gun violence. For over a decade, Dr. Rajan has conducted research in K-12 public schools across the U.S.  And for nearly 15 years, Dr. Rajan has collaborated closely with the non-profit organization Girls on the Run; she currently serves on their National Board of Directors. Dr. Rajan has published over 50 peer-reviewed journal articles in additional to multiple talks, book chapters, and other written pieces. Her work has also been featured in multiple national media outlets (including National Public Radio, the Hechinger Report, and CSPAN).

 

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #220
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Aversive Effects of Methamphetamine as Arbiters of Risk for Use
Sunday, May 29, 2022
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Suzanne H. Mitchell (Oregon Health & Science University)
CE Instructor: Tamara Phillips, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: TAMARA JEAN RICHARDS (Oregon Health & Science University)
Abstract:

This presentation will address the role of sensitivity to aversive drug effects in risk for unhealthy drug use. Considerable research has focused on drug use disorders as motivational disorders involving inherent or drug-induced reward pathway function. Human and animal research support a critical role for circuitry underlying sensitivity to rewarding and reinforcing drug effects in risk for continued use, neuroadaptation and relapse. However, less attention has been paid to the protective role of sensitivity to aversive drug effects. Dr. Phillips will present data proving that the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) as an arbiter of the aversive effects of methamphetamine, which when experienced, reduce methamphetamine intake. More broadly, she will discuss the importance of considering drug avoiders in clinical studies of psychostimulant addiction, which could lead to the identification of a new class of therapeutics.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Basic and clinical researchers and therapists in addiction and reward-related disorders
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the importance of sensitivity to acute aversive drug effects in reducing risk for addiction; (2) describe the use of genetic models in behavioral research and criteria that meet the burden of proof; (3) explain the role of the trace amine-associated receptor 1 (Taar1) in methamphetamine intake and effects.
 
TAMARA JEAN RICHARDS (Oregon Health & Science University)

Tamara Phillips is Professor and Interim Chair of the Department of Behavioral Neuroscience at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), Senior Research Career Scientist at the Veterans Affairs Portland Health Care System, and Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism-funded Portland Alcohol Research Center. She received her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from the State University of New York in Albany and completed Postdoctoral training at the Rutgers University Institute of Animal Behavior. She joined OHSU and the Portland VA in 1987, rising through the ranks to Professor in 1998. She has received several honors and awards, including teaching awards, research achievement and mentoring awards, and distinguished scientist and lectureship awards. She has served as the President of three different research societies: the International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society; the Research Society on Alcoholism; and the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism. She currently serves as Vice-President on the Board of the non-profit local chapter of Sigma Xi, the scientific research honor society. Mentoring has been one of her passions and she directed the Behavioral Neuroscience graduate program for many years. She has published numerous peer-reviewed papers, book chapters and reviews and is funded by two NIH institutes and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Her research focusses on the genetic dissection of behavioral traits associated with risk for the development of alcohol and drug use disorders.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #255
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Power and Empowerment: Honoring by Decision and Design
Sunday, May 29, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Sarah M. Richling (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: Sarah M. Richling, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANDRATESHA FRITZGERALD (Building Blocks of Brilliance)
Abstract:

Equitable and inclusive learning environments are built on the choices of individuals. This session will explore the notions of power and empowerment that are made evident in our decisions, our designs, and our outcomes. With antiracism and Universal Design for Learning we can begin inviting every voice to powerful positions by honoring identity, culture, and learning needs.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Anyone interested in deepening and solidifying the partnership toward creating equitable learning environments.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define honor and power; (2) evaluate power-filled choices and examine the implications of power in equitable access to learning; (3) co-create a community of educators who are conscious of how to use power to honor learners.
 
ANDRATESHA FRITZGERALD (Building Blocks of Brilliance)
Andratesha Fritzgerald is the author of Antiracism and Universal Design for Learning: Building Expressways to Success (CAST, 2020), winner of a Benjamin Franklin Award from the Independent Book Publishers Association. She has worked as a teacher, curriculum specialist, administrator, and director. As an international speaker, presenter, and facilitator, Fritzgerald exhibits an audacious perseverance that calls organizations to evolve into inclusive antiracist safe zones for all learners. As a book nerd, Jeopardy enthusiast, and imagination expert, she loves writing and dreaming out loud with her husband, two children, and committed educators who believe in academic success for all. She is the founder of Building Blocks of Brilliance Educational Consulting Firm. For more information, go to www.buildingblocksofbrilliance.com. Twitter: @FritzTesha
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #257
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Laboratory to Clinic: Dysfunctional Behaviors Cannot be Erased From the Behavioral Repertoire, but a Growing Stable of Modification Techniques Collectively can Reduce Such Behaviors and Impede Relapse
Sunday, May 29, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: EAB; Domain: Theory
Chair: Karen M. Lionello-DeNolf (Assumption University)
CE Instructor: Ralph R. Miller, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: RALPH R. MILLER (State University of New York at Binghamton)
Abstract:

A number of behavioral pathologies arise in part from aversive associations (e.g., anxiety disorders) and cue-drug reward associations. Enormous efforts have been made over several decades trying to identify procedures to decrease these behaviors, including extinction-like exposure therapy, counterconditioning, and related techniques. Most these treatments are initially of some effect, but relapse, with long retention intervals, change in context (i.e., renewal), and re-exposure to the initial affective experience, is frequently observed. Newer treatments such as presenting the target cue some minutes before starting a session of massed exposure/extinction trials (i.e., so-called disruption of reconsolidation) have proven no more effective in eliminating dysfunctional behaviors or preventing relapse when some initial benefit of treatment is observed. The observed recovery of the dysfunctional behaviors, in conjunction with experimental laboratory data concerning associative interference, suggest that irrevocably erasing memories is difficult if not impossible. Improved behavioral outcomes appear to reflect impaired retrieval of the problematic memories. Rather than seeking erasure of these associations, more realistically, we should be seeking to impede their retrieval, using conjointly as many different techniques as possible to impair subsequent retrieval (i.e., a “kitchen-sink” approach).

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts, clinical psychologists, behavior analysis students, graduate students in clinical psychology programs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) reduce dysfunctional acquired behaviors by combining small-to-moderate effect-size training manipulations, rather than using any one silver-bullet technique; (2) delay and reduce relapse following behavior modification by both properly combining manipulations in initial treatment and, when necessary, in periodic refresher treatments; (3) design treatments that allow shorter behavior modification sessions by increasing trial frequency while more-than-comparably reducing trial duration.
 
RALPH R. MILLER (State University of New York at Binghamton)
Miller's specific area of specialization is elementary information processing in humans and nonhuman animals, including learning, memory, and decision making. Although his research team in recent years has worked in the framework of Pavlovian conditioning, integration with both the physiological and human cognitive literature is sought at the theoretical level. His research is concerned with dissociating processes impacting perception, acquisition, retention, retrieval, and response generation, using impediments to performance such as contingency manipulations, stimulus competition, and associative interference (including extinction). His laboratory has found that training and test contexts (i.e., background stimuli) play central roles in modulating the expression of acquired information. Present research examines how retrieval processes can explain phenomena that are traditionally attributed to differences in acquisition. Experiments are being conducted to determine whether the retrieval rule that they have formalized based on a modified form of contingency theory (the Extended Comparator Hypothesis) can explain sufficient behavioral variation to allow simplification of contemporary theories of conditioning. For example, with this retrieval rule, behavior indicative of conditioned inhibition can be explained in terms of a decrease in US likelihood as opposed to associations to the absence of a US per se, i.e., negative associations. A second avenue of research is concerned with the role of temporal relationships between events in elementary learning. Their data indicate that temporal proximity not only fosters the formation of associations, but is invariably part of what gets encoded within the association. Moreover, this temporal information is a critical determinant of how the association will later be expressed in behavior. Their work in this area is summarized in what they call the Temporal Coding Hypothesis. With the intent of informing practitioners of exposure therapy in clinical situations, other studies are examining the variables that influence relapse following exposure therapy, as modeled by extinction of conditioned fear. Additional research focuses on similarities and differences in Pavlovian conditioning, contingency judgment, and causal attribution by animals and humans. Professor Miller has served as editor-in-chief of the two leading journals in his field, chaired NIH study sections, lectured extensively on five continents, and has been widely cited in the professional literature (over 20,500 citations, h-index of 71, and i10-index of 286). His current research is collaborative with laboratories in England and France and his own laboratory is staffed by postdoctoral fellows and undergraduate research assistants.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #261
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Embedding Behavior into an Organization: A Blueprint for Success
Sunday, May 29, 2022
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Chair: Nicole Gravina (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: Nicole Gravina, Ph.D.
Presenting Authors: ALAN CHEUNG (Costain), CLAIRE FRYER (Costain)
Abstract:

Alan and Claire will share Costain’s behavioural journey over the last 15 years. They will talk about the importance and challenges of keeping on the path and share how Costain has successfully managed to roll out and embed a truly sustainable behavioural safety programme, which has been designed to address the specific issues of a continually changing workforce, with multiple business sites and varying project durations. They will speak about the importance of the programme achieving Platinum Accreditation Status with the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and how one of the keys to success has been to ensure that the programme is and remains a leadership focused programme that looks at making things simple, getting the simple things right, and providing outreach to their supply chain and clients. Alan and Claire will share real examples of the tools they use, how they apply it to all aspects of Costain, including wellbeing, carbon, IT security, quality and change management, where they are going next, and how the programme has moved from behavioural safety to behavioural management and more importantly to behavioural leadership.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

OBM researchers, practitioners, business owners, safety professionals. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation participants will be able to: (1) describe the key components of a practical behavioural management programme; (2) apply behaviorally sound approaches for workplaces with transient workforces; (3) utilize simple and effective behavioural management tools and techniques in the workplace.
 
ALAN CHEUNG (Costain)
Alan is operationally responsible for the Safety, Health and Environmental (SHE) performance of Costain, this includes responsibility for a team of 160 SHE Professionals and a team of 12 Behavioural Management Professionals. Alan has been instrumental in the development and implementation of the Costain Behavioural Safety (CBS) Programme, which began in 2006. In 2011 he successfully took the CBS Programme through third party accreditation with the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, making CBS the first third party accredited behavioural safety programme in the UK. In 2018 CBS was re-accredited for the third time and became one of only two programmes to achieve Platinum Status. In 2010 he developed a Behavioural Management Consultancy for Costain which helps clients apply the principles of behavioural science to improve all aspects of their business. Costain is a smart infrastructure solutions company, based in the United Kingdom, whose purpose is to improve people's lives by deploying technology-based solutions to meet urgent national needs across the UK's energy, water and transportation infrastructures. The company turns over c£1.0Bn per year delivering integrated consulting, complex project delivery, technological solutions and operations and maintenance services to major blue-chip customers in targeted market sectors such as highways, rail, water, power, nuclear and oil and gas. Alan has a degree in Civil Engineering from Loughborough University, is a Chartered Civil Engineer and Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers and has over 30 years’ experience of working in the UK Construction Industry.
CLAIRE FRYER (Costain)

Claire Fryer is the Director of Behavioural Management and leads the team of Behavioural Management Team of consultants, practitioners, coaches, and advisers. She also leads the external consultancy, working closely with clients and specialises in the design and delivery of behaviourally sound programmes using accelerated learning techniques. She has over 20 years’ experience in the practical application of behavioural science and coaching principles to improve business and individual performance. Claire regularly presents at conferences, including Highways UK with Highways England Social Research and Behavioural Change Team, and in 2019 the UK Project Controls Expo, which focussed on leadership behaviours, exploring aspects such as the culture created during project revies and the impact of behaviour on programme delivery. She has played a key role in how the Costain behavioural programme has moved from Safety through to Management and through to Leadership. She has been an executive coach since 2004, blending traditional coaching techniques with applied behavioural science.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #300
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
I Looked But I Did Not See: The Science of Missing What is Right in Front of Your Eyes
Sunday, May 29, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 151A/B
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Suzanne H. Mitchell (Oregon Health & Science University)
CE Instructor: Jeremy Wolfe, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JEREMY M WOLFE (Brigham and Women's Hospital / Harvard Med School)
Abstract:

"Looked but failed to see" errors are a real-world problem with psychological roots. When someone hits a pedestrian in the crosswalk or misses a tumor in a mammogram, it is often clear that the critical stimulus was clearly visible. It may be clear that it was fixated by the eyes. Why, then, did the driver or the radiologist fail to respond appropriately? The answers are found in fundamental limits on human perception and cognition. We cannot simultaneously recognize every object in our field of view. As a result, we deploy attention from object to object or place to place, searching for what we need. This is true whether we are watching a movie or driving downtown. Fortunately, we do not need to search at random. Our attention is guided by the features of the targets we seek and by the structure of the scenes in which those targets are embedded. Unfortunately, our search engine does not work perfectly and so our eyes can be pointed at or near an item of interest and we can fail to recognize its presence. When those missed targets are such things as tumors or bombs, these errors are socially significant. The problem is worth understanding and, if possible, worth correcting. In this talk, I will illustrate some of the basic principles of human visual attention and I can promise that you will fail to see some things that you would think you should have seen.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the basic organization of the human "search engine;" (2) explain how a clearly visible, important stimulus could be missed, (3) discuss possible interventions to address the problem of "looked but failed to see" errors.
 
JEREMY M WOLFE (Brigham and Women's Hospital / Harvard Med School)

Jeremy Wolfe is Professor of Ophthalmology and Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. He is Director of the Visual Attention Lab at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Wolfe received an AB in Psychology in 1977 from Princeton and his PhD in Psychology in 1981 from MIT. His research focuses on visual search and visual attention with a particular interest in socially important search tasks in areas such as medical image perception (e.g. cancer screening), security (e.g. baggage screening), and intelligence. His lab has been funded since 1982 by NIH (NEI, NIMH, NCI), NSF, AFOSR (Air Force), ONR (Navy), ARO (Army), Homeland Security, and the Nat. Geospatial Agency as well as by IBM, Google, Toshiba, Hewlett-Packard, & GE. Wolfe taught Intro. Psychology and other courses for 25 years, mostly at MIT. Leadership: Past President or Chair: Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences (FABBS), Psychonomic Soc, APA Division 3, Eastern Psychological Assoc, NAS Panel on Soldier Systems. Boards: Vision Sciences Society, APA Div 1, 6. Founding Editor-in-Chief of Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications (CRPI). Past-Editor of Attention, Perception, and Psychophysics. Wolfe also serves on the Oversight Committee of the North American Board of the Union for Reform Judaism. He was elected to American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2019.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #301A
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Healing the Wounds of Racial Trauma: Moving Toward Liberation
Sunday, May 29, 2022
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Meeting Level 1; Room 102B
Area: DEI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Pepperdine University)
CE Instructor: Thema Bryant Davis, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: THEMA BRYANT DAVIS (Pepperdine)
Abstract:

This presentation will illuminate ways the field of psychology and student services can serve communities who live with the psychological effects of racism. Insights from liberation psychology, decolonial psychology, Black psychology, and womanist psychology will be presented. This 90-minute training is for beginner and advanced clinicians, educators, and administrators, as most training programs have not offered training in addressing racial trauma. The training will encompass both theory and practical application of anti-racism therapy, teaching, and student service. The training also touches on sustainability, self-care, and community-care as clinicians may be affected by vicarious trauma when working with students/clients in the aftermath or continued exposure to racial trauma. Topics discussed will include: • The need for anti-racism therapeutic practice as an ethical mandate given the prevalence of racism-related stress and trauma • The overlapping theoretical frameworks of liberation psychology, decolonial psychology, and anti-racism psychology • Anti-racism in assessment and treatment, as well as education and administration.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Clinicians, educators, and administrators, as most training programs have not offered training in addressing racial trauma.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) List at least three potential mental health consequences of racism; (2) apply decolonial, trauma-informed principles to assessing racial trauma; (3) describe an appropriate liberation, trauma-informed framework to racial trauma intervention.
 
THEMA BRYANT DAVIS (Pepperdine)

Thema Bryant is a professor of psychology at Pepperdine University and director of the Culture and Trauma Research Lab.  She is a past president of the Society for the Psychology of Women and past psychology representative to the United Nations.  The California Psychological Association honored her as Scholar of the Year for her work in the cultural context of trauma recovery and the Institute of Violence, Abuse, and Trauma honored her for mentorship in the field of trauma psychology.  She published one of the first frameworks and models for the treatment of racial trauma and has provided trainings for associations, Universities, counseling centers, and non-profit organizations nationally and internationally.  The APA division of International Psychology honored her in 2020 for contributions to international psychology for her global work on women.  She also gave an invited address at the APA 2020 convention on racial trauma. 

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #325
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
The Case of the Disengaged Learner
Sunday, May 29, 2022
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Ballroom Level 3; Ballroom East/West
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
Chair: Daniel Mark Fienup (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Karl Kapp, Ed.D.
Presenting Author: KARL KAPP (Bloomsburg University)
Abstract:

Engaging learners is a difficult task. They are constantly confronted with distractions and demands on their time. So how can we create instruction that pulls learners into the content and helps them gain the knowledge required to be successful? How do we grab and hold a learner's attention? How do we motivate them to engage with the content we are teaching? There are techniques and factors that can be borrowed from games which are shown to influence the behavior of individuals. Incorporating these techniques and factors from games into learning is often called “gamification.” This decidedly unacademic presentation will model using those technique to engage and educate the learners. Attendees will discover firsthand how research-based practices and game-thinking are used to engage learners, increase learning, and lead to performance driven results.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: Engaging learners is a difficult task. They are constantly confronted with distractions and demands on their time. So how can we create instruction that pulls learners into the content and helps them gain the knowledge required to be successful? How do we grab and hold a learner's attention? How do we motivate them to engage with the content we are teaching? There are techniques and factors that can be borrowed from games which are shown to influence the behavior of individuals. Incorporating these techniques and factors from games into learning is often called “gamification.” This decidedly unacademic presentation will model using those technique to engage and educate the learners. Attendees will discover firsthand how research-based practices and game-thinking are used to engage learners, increase learning, and lead to performance driven results.
 
KARL KAPP (Bloomsburg University)

Karl M. Kapp, Ed.D., is an award-winning professor of Instructional Technology at Bloomsburg University in Bloomsburg, PA. where he teaches instructional game design, gamification classes and online learning design.  He is the Director of Bloomsburg’s Institute for Interactive Technologies and is recognized internationally as an expert in the application of games, game-thinking and gamification to learning.  Karl earned his doctoral degree from the University of Pittsburgh.

He is currently a senior researcher on a grant sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) which involves the application of microlearning and gamification to help childcare workers identify child abuse. Karl has co-founder of Enterprise Game Stack, a company that has created a digital card game tool for instructional designers. He is also the creator of the popular web video series, “The Unauthorized, Unofficial History of Learning Game.”

Karl has authored or co-authored eight books including The Gamification of Learning and Instruction, its accompanying fieldbook and the widely popular, Play to Learn. His latest co-authored book with Robyn Defelice is Microlearning: Short and Sweet. Karl is author of ten LinkedIn Learning courses including Learning How to Increase Learner Engagement and has been a TEDx speaker. In 2019, he received the ATD Distinguished Contribution to Talent Development Award. The award is presented in recognition of an exceptional contribution that has had a sustained impact on field of the talent development.

Karl’s academic and practitioner work explores the research, theoretical foundations and practical application of gamification, game-thinking and activity-based learning to organizational performance issues. His goal is to help organizations create engaging learning experiences through intelligent, research-based application of instructional strategies and techniques. He shares his expertise and knowledge through consulting, workshops and one-on-one mentoring with start-up firms, Fortune 100 companies and various governmental agencies. Follow him on Twitter @kkapp or check out his website at www.karlkapp.com

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #363
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Supporting Educator Effectiveness: Measurement, Coaching, and Technology
Sunday, May 29, 2022
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Meeting Level 2; Room 203
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Renee Hawkins (University of Cincinnati)
CE Instructor: Linda Reddy, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LINDA REDDY (Rutgers University)
Abstract:

Professional development resources for educators that are highly reliable, valid and practical for routine educational practices are warranted. Evidence-based resources are particularly needed for teachers and paraprofessionals who work in high-poverty schools as they experience higher rates of stress and turnover, as well as rates for classroom disruptive behaviors approximately three times higher than national averages. Dr. Reddy presents the development of new assessments and coaching models designed to support teacher and paraprofessional instructional and behavior management practices that maximize student learning and behavior. Specifically, she will describe the theory, reliability and validity of the Classroom Strategies Assessment System, a multi-method teacher assessment designed to measure empirically-supported instructional and behavior management practices. Dr. Reddy presents the theory and evidence of new data-driven coaching models, Classroom Strategies Coaching for Teachers and Behavior Support Coaching for Paraprofessionals supported by four randomized controlled trials conducted in diverse school settings.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Researchers, university trainers, psychologists, behavior analysts, and school personnel
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe theories and key components of data-driven coaching models; (2) describe conditions and processes for effective implementation; (3) describe evidence of the Classroom Strategies Coaching for Teachers; (4) describe evidence of the Behavior Support Coaching for Paraprofessionals.
 
LINDA REDDY (Rutgers University)

Linda A. Reddy, Ph.D., is a Professor of School Psychology and Assistant to the Dean for Research and Innovations at Rutgers University who is passionate about helping schools maximize educator effectiveness and student success. She received her PhD in School Psychology from the University of Arizona and has published over 140 peer-reviewed publications and six books on coaching, school/classroom assessment, teacher effectiveness, disruptive behaviors, and educational technology. Her work has received awards and has been funded (over 60 million dollars) by the US of Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, Office of Special Education Programs, Office of Innovation and Improvement through Teacher Quality Programs, and private foundations. Dr. Reddy is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Fellow of the American Educational Research Association and inducted member of the Society for the Study of School Psychology. Dr. Reddy has held numerous national leadership roles (e.g., President of APA Division 16 School Psychology, member of APA Board of Professional Affairs, APA Council Representative, APA Task Force for Violence Againist Teachers). She is a licensed psychologist and nationally certified school psychologist. Most importantly, she is a proud mother of twin daughters, avid runner, hiker and alpine skier who lives in New Jersey.

 

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