Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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49th Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2023

Program by Invited Events: Monday, May 29, 2023


 

Invited Paper Session #297A
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Toward a Science of Applied Animal Behavior Analysis: Experimental, Ethological, and Ethical Considerations
Monday, May 29, 2023
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom D
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Nathaniel Hall (Texas Tech University)
CE Instructor: Lindsay Renee Mehrkam, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LINDSAY RENEE MEHRKAM (Monmouth University)
Abstract: Behavior analysis has a rich history of using animals to study learning and environment-behavior relations. Applying this knowledge to improve the welfare of animals used in teaching and research, however, is a relatively recent and exciting area of exploration for behavior analysts. This talk will review the history of how behavior analytic approaches have been successfully extended to applied animal settings and describe the framework for current and future directions for the field of applied animal behavior analysis. Using the concepts and principles experimental analysis in behavior as a starting point, we will move beyond the operant chamber to see how ethology can give insight as to how to maximize the generality of applied behavior analysis procedures across species, settings, and stimuli. This will include highlighting successful examples of single-subject designs for evaluating enrichment practices in zoo animals, evaluating preferences and reinforcer efficacy for food, toys, and social stimuli for a wide range of species, and the creation and evaluation of shaping plans and behavior contracts for cooperative care programs to help prepare for veterinary exams through our university-based animal behavior research clinic for community dogs and cats. We will even see how teaching goldfish to play soccer can be a humane way to use live animals to teach learning principles to students while also benefiting student learning and well-being outcomes as well. Finally, we will discuss ways in which adopting a behavior analytic approach can help animal researchers meet important animal welfare requirements, aid professionals in improving the integrity of their training and enrichment programs, and emphasize the ethical considerations to be aware of when delivering behavioral services to animals and their caregivers to promote positive human-animal interactions.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Academics, practitioners, animal trainers, dog owners, zookeepers, animal researchers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe how single-subject designs can be applied to simultaneously teach classical and operant learning principles and promote animal welfare (2) Apply the seven dimensions of applied behavior analysis to animal settings (3) Recognize and address ethical considerations and situations when working in applied animal behavior settings in research and in practice.
 
LINDSAY RENEE MEHRKAM (Monmouth University)
Lindsay R. Mehrkam, Ph.D. is an associate professor of psychology and Principal Investigator of the Human & Animal Wellness Collaboratory (HAWC) at Monmouth University. As an animal welfare scientist and doctoral-level board-certified behavior analyst, her research focuses on the benefits of human-animal interaction with the aim of improving the welfare of both animals and people in society. Specifically, Dr. Mehrkam’s research examines how environmental factors influence play, aggression, and stereotypic behavior in companion and exotic animals, how to promote behavioral choices and welfare of captive animals, and how to best conduct formal evaluations of training and enrichment practices in a variety of animal settings and species (from goldfish to Galapagos tortoises). In her role as Chair of MU’s Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee, she uses behavior analytic approaches to and promote the humane use of animals in teaching and research and conducts evaluations of animal-assisted teaching interventions. Dr. Mehrkam is currently a faculty fellow with the Monmouth University Polling Institute, which focuses on developing nationwide assessments on pet owners’ behavioral services and data visualization in collaboration with the Applied Animal Behavior Research Clinic, a community-based clinic for pet dogs, cats, and their owners. Her teaching and research programs in applied animal behavior have led to publications, national and international conference presentations, seminars, and workshops as well as internships and service learning opportunities in animal shelters, zoos, aquariums, wildlife parks, and animal sanctuaries. She has been recognized through popular media outlets, grants, and scholarly and industry awards, including the Association for Professional Dog Trainers, Maddie’s Fund, and the Animal Behavior Society. Finally, Dr. Mehrkam serves as the president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International’s Applied Animal Behavior Special Interest Group for the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), which promotes applied animal behavior analytic research, set high standards in methods and techniques of animal training and enrichment, and promote the well-being of animals in society.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #302
CE Offered: BACB
The Role of Research Synthesis in Applied Behavior Analysis: Best Practices for Conducting Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses
Monday, May 29, 2023
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Mikhail Koffarnus (University of Kentucky College of Medicine)
CE Instructor: Michael Amlung, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MICHAEL AMLUNG (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

Advancing research and clinical practice in applied behavior analysis requires critical evaluation and integration of the scientific literature. Synthesizing research across published and unpublished studies enables behavior analysts to make evidence-based decisions in clinical practice, evaluate potential sources of bias in the literature, and identify critical gaps in our understanding of behavioral science. Two common research synthesis approaches include systematic reviews and quantitative meta-analyses. These types of studies are distinct from other literature reviews due to their adherence to strict guidelines for conducting comprehensive literature searches, article screening, data extraction, data analysis, and reporting of results. This presentation will discuss the strengths and limitations of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in behavior analysis, with an emphasis on methodological recommendations and practical tools. Specific topics will include choosing a research question and defining the scope of the review, pre-registration, and adhering to international guidelines for conducting literature searches, study selection, data extraction, evaluating study quality and publication bias. An overview of common quantitative analyses used in meta-analyses and effective ways to present results will also be discussed. Finally, the presenter will share his experiences with software and database management tools for increasing efficiency and transparency at each phase of the review. Examples from published systematic-reviews and meta-analyses from the presenter’s research on behavioral economics of substance use and psychiatric disorders team will be discussed to illustrate the promise and pitfalls of these studies. The overall goal of this presentation is to provide attendees with methodological techniques for conducting reviews which can be translated to their respective specialty areas in applied behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts and basic researchers with at basic, intermediate, and advanced experience levels. No prior experience with systematic reviews or quantitative analyses is required, but familiarity will be helpful for some of the advanced topics.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss the strengths and limitations of conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses to advance research and clinical practice in applied behavior analysis; (2) Evaluate the importance of transparency and scientific rigor by discussing international guidelines for conducting systematic reviews and the role of pre-registration; (3) Determine best practices for conducting a review from start-to-finish, including defining a research question, conducting literature searches, study screening, data extraction and analysis, evaluating bias, and presenting results; (4) Acquire basic familiarity with available software and database tools for conducting systematic reviews and meta-analyses.
 
MICHAEL AMLUNG (University of Kansas)
Dr. Michael Amlung is an Associate Professor and Co-Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas (KU). He also is the Associate Director for Training of the Cofrin Logan Center for Addiction Research and Treatment at KU. He received a M.S. and Ph.D. in psychology with a concentration in behavioral and brain sciences from the University of Georgia, followed by a NIH-funded postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Missouri. Prior to joining the faculty at KU, Dr. Amlung was a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University (Ontario, Canada). Dr. Amlung's research program examines the behavioral and neurobiological basis of addictive disorders and related mental health disorders, with an emphasis on behavioral economics and motivation for addictive substances. His research uses a variety of techniques including cue-exposure and self-administration studies in simulated bar and vaping cue laboratories, functional and structural brain imaging, and conducting research syntheses via systematic reviews and meta-analyses.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #318
CE Offered: BACB
Growing Applied Behavior Analysis Outside of North America: Examples of Culturally Competent and Sustainable Practices for Supporting Practitioners, Caregivers, and Children in Central/Eastern Europe
Monday, May 29, 2023
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 1
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Patrick Romani (University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus)
CE Instructor: Sheri Kingsdorf, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SHERI KINGSDORF (Masaryk University)
Abstract:

In the Czech Republic, as with many countries in Central and Eastern Europe, practices rooted in the science of applied behavior analysis (ABA) have had to fight to gain ground since the area's relatively recent rise from communist oppression. While there are services (e.g., early care centers, specialized schools, etc..), they customarily provide low intensity care or non-evidenced treatments. Generally speaking, governments have historically spent their limited public resources on unvalidated services. Unfortunately, the voice of science has been underused in selecting education or social services. As a result, the region has struggled amid the landscape of an ABA service desert, being plagued by misinformation, hosting overworked and under supported behaviors analysts, missing necessary funding, and facing the backlash of threatened professionals from other disciplines. Regardless, driven advocates of ABA have successfully propelled dissemination and built quality practical applications over the last decade. This presentation shares the burgeoning ABA projects of the region looking at: (1) the local Technology Agency of the Czech Republic's (TACR) two year ABA telehealth project, (2) the European Union Erasmus+ supported collaborative projects in ABA as EuroBA, the A Class, and Positive Parenting, and (3) a glimpse of the Czech Republic's process of legally recognizing the profession of behavior analyst. Discussing this modern trajectory of the science, including potential roadmaps for the advancement of ABA in similar locales, the development of culturally competent and sustainable practices, and applied research outcomes, aims to inspire not only those supporting ABA development beyond North America and Western Europe, but also those looking to reflect on best ethical practices in telehealth, caregiver training, teacher training, and practitioner standards.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analytic professionals currently working in, or planning to work in, areas where there is a dearth of ABA services. Behavioral professionals looking to reflect on best ethical practices in telehealth, caregiver training, teacher training, and practitioner standards.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Select strategies for disseminating the science of behavior to potential stakeholders in ABA deserts; (2) Identify steps for ethically advancing the science of behavior and profession of behavior analyst in regions with few behavioral services; (3) Create goals for supporting the development of telehealth, caregiver training, and/or teacher/pre-service teacher training that demonstrate cultural competence and sustainability; (4) Evaluate practitioner guidelines for applications of the science in regions of emerging ABA practice.
 
SHERI KINGSDORF (Masaryk University)
Dr. Sheri Kingsdorf is an Assistant Professor at Masaryk University in the Czech Republic and a doctoral-level Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA-D). Since 2002, she has actively worked in the fields of behavior analysis and special education. Her endeavors have included working in the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS) model, teaching in the US public school system in conjunction with her studies at Columbia University in New York City and the University of Miami in Miami-Dade County, providing early intervention services to a bilingual student population, delivering behavior analytic home-based and school-based direct and consultative care across the US, Australia, Africa, and Europe, educating youth and adults from diverse and underserved communities, consulting with adult service providers assisting clients with developmental disabilities, and making international transdisciplinary research contributions. Her current work focuses on utilizing culturally competent and sustainable practices in advancing the field of ABA in underserved locales, developing telehealth models for client-centered caregiver training, and supporting the emotional and behavioral health of school-aged children through teacher education.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #345
CE Offered: BACB
Pediatric Feeding Problems: Building Cross-Cultural Collaboration on Research
Monday, May 29, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1-3
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Michele R. Traub (St. Cloud State University)
CE Instructor: Varsovia Hernandez Eslava, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: VARSOVIA HERNANDEZ ESLAVA (Universidad Veracruzana)
Abstract:

Pediatric Feeding Problems (PFP) occur in a high number of children, especially in those with developmental disabilities. If untreated, these problems can have negative effects on a child’s health such as malnutrition, severe weight loss, and delayed growth. They can also negatively impact socialization and produce high levels of caregiver stress. In this talk, we will discuss some of our research done in this area emphasizing the development of cross-cultural collaboration. In order to do this, we will discuss the different steps followed for the treatment of PFP: assessment, intervention, and caregiver training and we will present some of our work conducted in each area. We will show data on the prevalence of PFP in the Mexican population using a small sample of kids with an ASD diagnosis, then we will describe evaluations using conditional probabilities of food refusal and acceptance in typically developed children and children with an ASD diagnosis. We will describe the implementation of antecedent (high-probability instructional sequences, pairing, and fading) and consequence-based strategies (reinforcement and escape extinction). Finally, we will describe the implementation of Behavioral Skills Training to teach caregivers to implement some of these procedures. We will make special emphasis on 1) considerations to select interventions, 2) cultural differences between México and USA that could impact treatment options, 3) the relevance of collaborating with other behavior analysts to advance our knowledge and quality of treatments, 4) futures lines of research, and 5) the future of services in México. Several studies were conducted in collaboration with Jonathan K. Fernand.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe Pediatric Feeding Problems; (2) describe some evaluation methods for PFP; (3) list at least two treatment options for Pediatric Feeding Problems; (4) identify cultural differences that could impact treatment options; (5) list at least two positive outcomes of collaborative work.
 
VARSOVIA HERNANDEZ ESLAVA (Universidad Veracruzana)
Varsovia Hernández Eslava received her Ph.D. in Psychology from the National Autonomous University of Mexico under the direction of Dr. Carlos A. Bruner. Later, she received post-doctoral training at the Behavior Analysis Research Clinic at University of Florida with Dr. Timothy Vollmer. In 2015 she returned to México as a Full-Time Researcher at Universidad Veracruzana, where she teaches and supervises students in the Behavioral Science program. Her research areas are Applied Behavior Analysis (with emphasis on pediatric feeding problems and parent training) and Experimental Analysis of Behavior (with emphasis on the effects of reinforcement schedules and MOs on different dimensions of behavior). Varsovia has authored several articles and book chapters in Spanish and English related to Behavior Analysis. She also co-developed the data collection software CounteeApp and the data analysis software Motus. In addition, Varsovia works on different projects to disseminate Behavior Analysis in Mexico and serves as an ambassador for Mexico of the World Behavior Analysis Day. In 2021 with another colleague, she received the SABA’s Public Awareness Grant to develop free resources for Technology-assisted ABA Education for Hispanic Communities (available at https://abacomunidadhispana.com). In the same year, in collaboration with a group of behavior analysts, she founded the Mexican Association of Practitioners of Behavior Analysis.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #348
CE Offered: BACB
When We Ought to Save the World, But Don’t Really Feel Like it: Motivating Avoidance Behavior when Consequences are Uncertain or Delayed
Monday, May 29, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: EAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Karen M. Lionello-DeNolf (Assumption University)
CE Instructor: Carla H. Lagorio, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CARLA H. LAGORIO (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)
Abstract: In recent decades, threats to the long-term survival of the human species have become clearer. A warming planet with slow efforts to curb emissions, looming extinction of critical species, energy or fossil fuel depletion, nuclear or environmental hazards are just a few notable concerns. Many environmental sustainability issues are behavioral – stemming from or exacerbated by our actions, and as such behavioral scientists are in a prime position to help describe, explain, and suggest ways to support more sustainable behavior. This talk will echo these aims, first by describing some of the barriers to engaging in sustainable practices. Why has society not progressed quickly over recent decades to help circumvent looming problems? Some degree of avoidance responding certainly can limit people’s contact with relevant environmental information but then, even for those who are attending, there can be additional motivational barriers limiting action. Many consequences of our current action or inaction are delayed or probabilistic. These far-removed and far-from-guaranteed outcomes can fail to motivate behavior, particularly when in competition with more immediately pressing wants, needs, and time demands. This talk will conclude by highlighting how behavioral scientists have contributed to sustainability efforts and will suggest some paths forward for better understanding and – importantly – addressing issues of environmental importance.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Students, Faculty, Other Professionals

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how delay discounting impacts our ability to make choices benefiting a distant future; (2) describe how probabilistic environmental outcomes impact our motivation; (3) outline several strategies for encouraging behavior that benefits a delayed or uncertain future
 
CARLA H. LAGORIO (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire)
Dr. Carla Lagorio is an Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire, where she co-coordinates an undergraduate major in Behavior Analysis. She is Board Director and Treasurer of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, past President of the Mid-American Association for Behavior Analysis and has served on the editorial boards of Perspectives on Behavior Science and Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Her research questions are focused on quantitative assessments of choice behavior, stemming from behavioral economics and pharmacology. In addition, Dr. Lagorio is passionate about several community and environmental sustainability causes – including increasing the adoptability potential of shelter dogs and researching ways to increase composting and reduce overall levels of student food waste on campus.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #349
CE Offered: BACB
School Teleconsultation: Enhancing Access and Collaboration to Support Students
Monday, May 29, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Renee Hawkins (University of Cincinnati)
CE Instructor: Aaron J. Fischer, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: AARON J. FISCHER (University of Utah)
Abstract: Students who need social-emotional and behavioral supports receive their education in a variety of educational settings, and many times the staff who in those settings require additional supports to effectively support student achievement and outcomes. Considering the need for additional supports with student behavior, and the shortage of qualified school-based behavior health providers, available school consultants should consider options for using technology to help provide access to services to rural and underserved communities. This presentation will provide an overview of the problem-solving teleconsultation framework as a way to address the need for behavior supports in schools and give guidance for behavior analysts on different applications of behavioral teleconsultation services. The presentation will also review ethical considerations related to teleconsultation practice including technology access issues, privacy and security.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Practitioners, Researchers, Supervisors, and Trainers

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) learn about the problem-solving teleconsultation framework; (2) understand different applications of behavioral teleconsultation services; (3) Identify ethical considerations related to teleconsultation practice including technology access issues related to telehealth; (4) Understand the benefits related to accessing telehealth supports, especially for individuals from marginalized communities
 
AARON J. FISCHER (University of Utah)
Dr. Fischer is the Dee Endowed Professor of school psychology and adjunct associate professor of psychiatry. He is the director of the University of Utah Technology in Training Education and Consultation Lab and the Huntsman Mental Health Institute's interdisciplinary feeding disorders clinic. Dr. Fischer is also the the co director of the of the University of Utah Huntsman Mental Health Institute's Utah School Mental Health Collaborative. He is a Licensed Psychologist and Licensed Board Certified Behavior Analyst. He has worked with individuals with mental and behavioral health concerns, and their families for over 15 years. His research focuses on the intersection of innovative technology, behavior, and school mental health, specifically telehealth and teleconsultation applications to support diverse students, caregivers, and educators.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #352
CE Offered: BACB
Literacy as Social Justice: The Importance of Reading in the Fight for Educational Equity
Monday, May 29, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 1
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Rocio Rosales (University of Massachusetts Lowell)
CE Instructor: Denise Ross, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: DENISE ROSS (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee)
Abstract:

The purpose of this presentation is to discuss how verbal behavior research on reading can positively impact children’s academic outcomes. Low reading proficiency significantly affects children, their families, and their communities. For instance, third grade children who cannot read proficiently are four times less likely to graduate from high school than those who can. When students do not graduate from high school, they are more likely to have lower wages and poorer health outcomes than high school graduates. In fact, over time, low literacy costs society billions of dollars in lost earnings, employability, and related social outcomes. For these reasons, ensuring that all children have access to effective reading instruction is critical. In this presentation, I will describe the importance of proficient literacy for historically marginalized children such as children with disabilities and economically disadvantaged children. I will then describe how research on reading in verbal behavior analysis has identified effective instructional practices that can impact children’s reading outcomes. This presentation will conclude with recommendations for addressing educational inequities by advocating for literacy as a form of social justice.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

The target audience for this presentation is behavior analysts and educators interested in PK-12 education and in reading instruction. The target audience also includes behavior analysts and educators who are interested in issues of social justice.

Learning Objectives: In this session, attendees will learn about: (1) The long-term impact of childhood reading proficiency; (2) Verbal behavior research on reading and its implications for reading instruction; (3) The importance of advocating for proficient literacy as a form of social justice
 
DENISE ROSS (University of Wisconsin Milwaukee)
Denise Ross-Page, PhD., BCBA-D, is Chair of the University of Wisconsin-System’s Institute for Urban Education, a program housed at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She is a certified special education teacher and a former elementary school principal. Her research applies behavior analysis to the development of language and literacy interventions for children with and without disabilities. Ross-Page has established or led approximately 20 professional development partnerships with school districts in Wisconsin, New York, Chicago, South Florida, and Kalamazoo, Michigan. Ross-Page earned master’s and doctoral degrees from Teachers College, Columbia University with a major in special education and a specialization in applied behavior analysis. She received her bachelor’s degree in secondary education from Spelman College.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #370
CE Offered: BACB
Have it Your Way: Preference for Single Outcomes and Event Sequences
Monday, May 29, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom D
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Jeanne M. Donaldson (Louisiana State University)
CE Instructor: John Borrero, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JOHN C. BORRERO (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Abstract:

Traditional wisdom suggests that consequential operations (e.g., positive reinforcement) should occur immediately following target behavior to promote acquisition, maintenance, or both. Further, state-of-the-art preference assessment technologies have been used to identify potential reinforcers, wherein items selected first are deemed to be the more effective potential reinforcers, than say, items selected last. However, recent research has shown that many individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) prefer to wait and have accumulated access to their reinforcers, rather than experience small but immediate access to their reinforcers. Similarly, an extensive, robust, and non-behavior analytic literature on human decision making has shown that when selecting the order of a sequence of events (e.g., meet with an abrasive family member, or have dinner at your most preferred restaurant), people typically prefer an improving series of events when the choice involves a sequence of outcomes. That is, people typically choose to meet with the abrasive aunt first, and to have the highly preferred dinner, last. The preference for “saving the best for last,” or preference for an improving sequence has been termed negative time preference. In this presentation I will present abbreviated summaries of our research on distributed as compared to accumulated access and factors that contribute to and work against negative time preference. Collectively, this work has involved typically developing preschool children, children and adolescents with IDD and college students.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Scientists, Behavior Analysts, Practitioners

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) distinguish between positive and negative time preference; (2) Identify some variables that contribute to negative time preference; (3) Describe one approach to determine whether one is choosing to save the best outcome for last in the context of a common preference assessment technology.
 
JOHN C. BORRERO (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Dr. Borrero earned his Ph.D. from the University of Florida. He is Professor of Psychology at UMBC, a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, and Licensed Behavior Analyst in the state of Maryland. At UMBC Dr. Borrero directs the Applied Behavior Analysis M.A. track and mentors doctoral students in Applied Developmental Psychology. Dr. Borrero has published over 60 articles and chapters and his work has addressed a variety of topics including the assessment and treatment of severe challenging behavior, choice, and strategies to promote infant development. Dr. Borrero is the 2008 recipient of the B. F. Skinner New Researcher Award and the 2021 recipient of the Don Hake Translational Research award, both presented by Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. Dr. Borrero serves of the Board of Directors of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #367
CE Offered: BACB
Creating an Environment for Organizational Behavioral Management (OBM) Solutions to Succeed
Monday, May 29, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D-G
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Nicole Gravina (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: John Austin, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JOHN AUSTIN (Reaching Results)
Abstract:

The field of OBM has done a tremendous job of documenting effective evidence-based procedures and techniques to improve performance at work. However, we do not always make the connection between our OBM techniques and what has been known since the early days of our science about how to reduce the likelihood of counter-control or strong negative reactions to behavior change techniques. In this presentation, Dr. Austin will describe a few areas of traditional OBM where the approach in implementation produces differential outcomes. Unfortunately, there is there are little data there are a few data to support these claims but sometimes experience must be our guide. Dr. Austin will discuss approaches to setting clear expectations, to having difficult conversations, delivering and receiving feedback, and delivering reinforcement that can help leaders build rapport and create behavior change more rapidly.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

BCBA/BCBA-D

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define OBM; (2) List 5 steps to use in solving performance problems; (3) Describe how we can reduce counter-control when using OBM interventions
 
JOHN AUSTIN (Reaching Results)
Dr. John Austin is an internationally recognized expert in human performance. He is CEO of Reaching Results, where he teaches leaders to create more effective work environments. Dr. Austin was also a Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University. He has consulted with organizations for 30 years to improve productivity and safety. John and his teams have been instrumental in delivering over 10,000 work improvement, quality, and safety projects that have generated millions of dollars in improvements to businesses. They have coached over 350 senior leaders from many companies and 19 countries to help them improve business performance. John coaches leaders, teaches courses on behavioral leadership, difficult conversations, and safety leadership, and is an event speaker on these topics.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #369
CE Offered: BACB
Conceptual Issues in Behavior Analysis: Do We Need to Tweak Them, or Is a Major Overhaul Required?
Monday, May 29, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Suzanne H. Mitchell (Oregon Health & Science University)
CE Instructor: Julian Leslie, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: JULIAN LESLIE (Ulster University)
Abstract:

Some of the most basic tenets of behavior analysis are that the explanation of all behaviour should be in terms of interactions with the environment, that behavior is changed by its consequences in the ways specified by a modern version of the law of effect, that those behavior changes contribute a great deal to the behavioral repertoire that is observed, and that these principles apply to the behavior of many animal species including humans, whose covert and verbal behavior is also determined by the same principles. Various areas of recent empirical and theoretical development may threaten some of these tenets. Consequent questions discussed in this paper will include: Is there evidence that response strengthening doesn’t occur, and does this have implications for the ubiquity of the law of effect? Can we maintain a strong version of phylogenetic continuity of learning principles given the evidence from animal cognition studies on the one hand, and relational frame theory on the other? And do studies of observational learning in human development suggest that we have overestimated the role of the law of effect?

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Those who have taken postgraduate course in behavior analysis

Learning Objectives: After attending this session, attendees shall: (1) be able to identify some basic tenets of behavior analysis; (2) be aware of the centrality of the law of effect to both experimental and applied behavior analysis; (3) be informed of some contemporary areas of research and theory that seem to modify the law of effect and challenge its breadth of application.
 
JULIAN LESLIE (Ulster University)
I obtained my doctorate from Oxford University in 1974, supervised in part by Jock Millenson who had been trained in operant conditioning at Columbia University, New York. Since then I have been in academic posts in Northern Ireland and have been a full professor since 1986. I published textbooks on behaviour analysis from 1979 to 2002, and some of these remain in print. As well as teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses, I have successfully supervised 50 students who have obtained PhDs in fields including, experimental analysis of behaviour, applied behaviour analysis, psychopharmacology, behavioural neuroscience, experimental psychology, applied psychology. Three PhD’s were concerned with behavioural strategies to address environmental issues. In 1977 I was co-founder of the group, Behaviour Analysis in Ireland which became a chapter of ABAI. In 2004, the group became the Division of Behaviour Analysis of the Psychological Society of Ireland, and I was the Division chair from 2009 to 2020. I organised the Third European Meeting for the Experimental Analysis of Behaviour in Dublin, Ireland 1999, and have co-organised 15 annual conferences of the Division of Behaviour Analysis from 2007 to 2023. I was on the program committee for the ABAI 11th International conference, Dublin 2022. In 2014, I was awarded a Doctorate of Science by Ulster University for career research on the experimental analysis of behaviour. In 2018 I was appointed as a Fellow, Association for Behavior Analysis International. From 2014 to 2023, I have given a series of papers on conceptual issues in behaviour analysis (including behavioural accounts of consciousness and the metaphysical basis of behaviour analysis). Recent empirical work is mostly on the application of behavior analysis in mainstream education.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #371A
CE Offered: BACB
Doreen Granpeesheh Speaker Series for the Interdisciplinary Approach to the Treatment of Autism: Considering the Medical Factors Contributing to Behaviors in Autism
Monday, May 29, 2023
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Doreen Granpeesheh (Autism Media Network)
CE Instructor: Timothy Buie, M.D.
Presenting Author: TIMOTHY BUIE (Harvard Medical School/Boston Children’s Hospital)
Abstract: TBD
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

All care givers for individuals with autism.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Recognize behavioral presentations that may be coming from underlying medical conditions; (2) Consider processes to test for medical contribution to behaviors; (3) Demonstrate the impact of data coming from behavioral care for the medical provider.
 
TIMOTHY BUIE (Harvard Medical School/Boston Children’s Hospital)
Timothy M. Buie, M.D. is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist and Autism medical specialist at Boston Children’s Hospital. Prior to that position, he worked in the pediatric gastroenterology department for18 years at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children based in Boston, MA. He also served as the Director of Gastrointestinal and Nutrition at Massachusetts General Hospital’s Lurie Center for Autism. Dr. Buie is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. He completed his training in Pediatric Gastroenterology at Yale University School of Medicine. In addition to managing a large patient population, Dr. Buie has published a variety of papers and book chapters characterizing gastrointestinal problems in children with autism and developmental disorders including clinical presentation and medical findings. His work includes translational research of the intestinal microbiome and the metabolic effects of the microbiome in a variety of conditions in pediatrics including autism and inflammatory disease. Dr. Buie has been featured in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal on PBS NewsHour, the BBC and media worldwide talking about gastrointestinal symptoms, diet and nutrition, and the microbiome differences seen in individuals with autism. He is currently featured on AutismSpeaks.org and YouTube in an online medical video series he developed and co-produced with Autism Speaks and has been a contributor to the advice column “Food for Thought” on the Autism Speaks Web site. Dr. Buie’s lecture on “Autism and the Impact of the Intestinal Microbiome; Exploring the Relationship of the Intestinal Micro Flora to Diet, Digestion and Disease” can be viewed in an online video produced by Quantum University and available on YouTube. Dr. Buie has been honored for his efforts in medicine and has been selected as one of Boston’s “Top Docs,” by his peers. He most recently received the Margaret Bauman Award for Autism Care presented in May 2017, which he also received in 2010. He has received the Professional of the Year by the Autism Society of America in 2010 and the Partners in Excellence Award 2014. In 2015, Dr. Buie received the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine’s Take Wing Award honoring his career achievements and professional excellence. He received the Boston Children’s Hospital GI Teaching Attending of the Year 2020, awarded by the GI Fellowship. For more information, please view Dr. Buie’s online profile on the Boston Children’s website: http://www.childrenshospital.org/directory/physicians/b/timothy-buie
 
 
Invited Paper Session #382
CE Offered: BACB
The Language of Politics and the Language of Science: A (Brazilian) Behavior-Analytic Perspective
Monday, May 29, 2023
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom D
Area: PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Michael D. Hixson (Central Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Alexandre Dittrich, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ALEXANDRE DITTRICH (Federal University of Paraná)
Abstract: Science is under attack – in Brazil and elsewhere. Most of the attacks are politically motivated: suddenly, science became part of a “great evil” of which citizens must be wary. The public image of science is thus being damaged, in spite of the fact that everyday life is pervaded by scientific achievements. What can behavior analysts do about this situation? In this presentation, I will identify some relevant variables that may explain the current distrust of science and suggest some measures we can take as behavior analysts and scientists to face it. The science under attack is a caricature – a verbally constructed image that does not correspond to what scientists actually do, but nonetheless grants abundant social reinforcement from morally and politically motivated groups. Scientists are the ones who must reconstruct a positive public image of science through education and science communication. In order to do that, we must “humanize” science, showing what scientists actually do, including all the limitations, doubts and failures of the scientific work. We must also show that science has its own ethics – one that may be useful and morally relevant in all aspects of life, including politics. Finally, as behavior scientists, we must be able to share our knowledge with the public at large, informing people about the many ways in which their own behavior may be controlled – even by politics.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts and scientists interested in the improvement of the public image of science

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe relevant variables that may explain the current distrust of science (2) Describe measures that scientists and behavior analysts can take to rebuild trust in science (3) Describe the importance of sharing behavior-analytic knowledge about the control of behavior with the public at large
 
ALEXANDRE DITTRICH (Federal University of Paraná)
Alexandre Dittrich is a psychologist with degree from the Regional University of Blumenau/Brazil (1999). He holds a Doctorate degree in Philosophy from the Federal University of São Carlos/Brazil (2004). He conducted postdoctoral research in collaboration with Dr. Henry Schlinger at California State University (2018). He founded and was the first coordinator of the Workgroup on Theoretical Research in Behavior Analysis, affiliated with the National Association for Research and Graduate Studies in Psychology (Brazil) (2020-2022). He was editor-in-chief of Interação em Psicologia (Interaction in Psychology; 2007-2013) and is currently executive editor of the Brazilian Journal of Behavior Analysis and part of the Editorial Board of Behavior and Social Issues. He is Titular Professor in the Department of Psychology at the Federal University of Paraná since 2004, and was chair of the same Department (2006-2009). He was chair of the Graduate Program in Psychology (Master’s and Doctorate degree) at UFPR (2019-2021). He carries out research on the historical, philosophical and theoretical foundations of Psychology and Behavior Analysis.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #395
CE Offered: BACB
From the Operant Chamber to The Boardroom: Four Secrets to Unlocking Behaviour at Scale
Monday, May 29, 2023
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Sharlet D. Rafacz (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Laura L. Methot, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LAURA L. METHOT (independent)
Abstract: What people do every day at work matters. Every business has a strategy and in today’s competitive environment most have significant change or improvement goals. The reality of business execution is that nothing changes until behaviour changes - it's the people at the frontlines who bring strategy to life. But behaviour change, even on an individual basis, is hard to achieve and even harder to maintain. Attempting large scale behaviour change in complex organisational structures can be daunting. In this presentation I will address four factors that together help us to unlock the power of consistent and focussed behaviour change across large and complex organisations. 1. EAB: a foundation in the experimental analysis of behaviour distinguishes consulting behaviour analysts from practitioners who have added a few behavioural tools to their traditional change kits 2. Business Acumen: consulting behaviour analysts must have a deep understanding of how business works, but you don’t need an MBA to get there 3. Data: Creating a data-based line of sight from individual performance to organisational outcomes is a game changer that requires both business acumen and EAB skills 4. Leadership: we can enable behaviour change en masse by helping leaders build fluency in some foundational practices that enable employees to succeed When leaders inspire the workforce and help them align day-to-day behaviours with long term business ambitions, employers can deliver improvement in up to half the time with twice the impact…and they’re motivated to continue, bringing their best to work every day.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behaviour analysts in academic and practitioner roles, from advanced undergraduate to postgraduate levels

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Understand the value of an EAB background in providing OBM consulting services to business clients; (2) Understand why business acumen is important for OBM consultants and ideas for developing sufficient acumen; (3) Learn an approach for connecting individual performance data to important organisational outcomes; (4) Learn a behaviour-based leadership foundation for unlocking behaviour change at scale
 
LAURA L. METHOT (independent)
Laura is a behavioural scientist whose career ambition has always been to improve the world of work. Along the way she’s learned a lot about the power of behaviour and why people do what they do. For over 30 years Laura has applied that knowledge to help leaders get better business results by focussing on behaviours and shaping supportive work environments. One of the most important lessons she’s learned is that most people want to do the right thing and leadership is often about clearing a path for them to shine. The reality of execution is that nothing changes until behaviour changes - it's the people at the frontlines who bring strategy to life. Laura’s expertise lies in helping executive teams connect the dots between their business ambitions and frontline execution. She has consulted internationally and across multiple industries learning what distinguishes the very best leaders from the rest. Laura holds an M.A. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology and a Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis from Western Michigan University where she is currently an adjunct professor. She also earned a B.A. in Psychology (Honours) from Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Canada. Laura has published in several peer-reviewed scientific journals, including Human Factors, Canadian Psychology, and the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and has been a guest reviewer for Canadian Psychology, a journal of the Canadian Psychological Association. She has presented at professional conferences and meetings for the Association for Behavior Analysis International, the Organizational Behavior Management Network, the Atlantic Conference on Ergonomics, the Canadian Psychological Association, the Canadian Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and the European Unleashing Change Management Summit. She is a contributing author to The Behavior Breakthrough: Leading Your Organization to a New Competitive Advantage as well as co-authoring multiple academic texts and industry white papers. She now spends most of her professional time extending her experience
 

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