Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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49th Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2023

Program by Invited Events: Saturday, May 27, 2023


 

Invited Paper Session #21
CE Offered: BACB
Using Contingency Management to Improve Attendance at Cardiac Rehabilitation Among Patients With Medicaid
Saturday, May 27, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom D
Area: BPN; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: August F. Holtyn (National Institutes of Health)
CE Instructor: Diann Gaalema, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: DIANN GAALEMA (University of Vermont)
Abstract:

Contingency management is based on the principles of positive reinforcement and has been used to improve a variety of health-related behaviors. In this talk I will review two NIH-funded trials on using contingency management to improve attendance at a secondary prevention program (cardiac rehabilitation) among patients enrolled in Medicaid. In the first trial, contingency management was tested for improving attendance at cardiac rehabilitation against a control condition. In the second trial, we tested the effects of contingency management, case management (informed by the community reinforcement approach), and their combination, on improving attendance. I will review the effects of contingency management on cardiac rehabilitation attendance across the two trials as well as comment on selected secondary outcomes of clinical interest such as improvements in cardiorespiratory fitness, changes in anxious and depressive symptomology, and hospitalizations. Additionally, I will share initial findings about the benefits of adding case management to the contingency management model.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Experimental/Applied/Clinical/Health

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Understand why secondary prevention is critical in patients with cardiovascular disease; (2) Learn why those who are enrolled in Medicaid are a population most in need of intervention; (3) Understand how contingency management can be applied to secondary prevention; (4) Identify how other interventions can work in conjunction with contingency management to improve outcomes.
 
DIANN GAALEMA (University of Vermont)
Dr. Diann Gaalema is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Vermont. Her current research interests include health-related behavior change and the use of tobacco in vulnerable populations such as those with chronic medical conditions. Currently she is the PI of a NHLBI funded study aimed at increasing cardiac rehabilitation participation among lower socioeconomic status patients and is the site-PI on a NIDA/FDA funded study examining the effects of cigarettes of varying nicotine levels and e-cigarettes on behavior in those with depression or anxiety disorders.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #22
CE Offered: BACB
Motivational Interviewing – Some Whats, Whys, and Hows for Behavior Analysts
Saturday, May 27, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1-3
Area: CBM; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Vivian F Ibanez (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: Carolynn S. Kohn, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CAROLYNN S. KOHN (University of the Pacific)
Abstract:

Motivational Interviewing (MI) has been used by clinical psychologists, social workers, licensed therapists, and others in the helping professions for many years. More recently, some behavior analysts have started using this strategy in their research and MI workshops have been offered to behavior analysts, although behavior analysts rarely receive the requisite training other types of licensed professionals receive prior to becoming licensed. The purpose of this talk is to (1) introduce the audience to the basic components of MI, (2) discuss behavioral principles that are compatible with MI strategies and that help us understand why and how MI might be effectively used, and (3) identify settings, populations, and conditions, with examples, under which MI might be ethically and effectively used by behavior analysts.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Graduate students, BCBAs, and BCBA-Ds

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the basic components of Motivational Interviewing (MI); (2) identify behavioral principles compatible with MI strategies and which help us understand the mechanisms by which MI might be effective; (3) identify settings, populations, and conditions under which MI might be ethically and effectively used.
 
CAROLYNN S. KOHN (University of the Pacific)
Carolynn S. Kohn is a tenured Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of the Pacific (Stockton, CA), a licensed clinical psychologist, and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst® (BCBA-D). She is currently serving on the editorial board for Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice. Her research interests include the application of single case design and repeated measures methodology to areas of importance to behavioral psychology which are typically examined with group designs and aggregate data, including self-report, alcohol consumption, infant behavior, and most recently, ethical decision-making models.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #27
CE Offered: BACB
In Praise of Methodological Agnosticism
Saturday, May 27, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: PRA; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Thomas J. Waltz (Eastern Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Anthony DeFulio, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANTHONY DEFULIO (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Behavior analysts have constructed constraints to limit the sorts of behavior that qualify as behavior analytic research. These community standards are primarily methodological in nature. That is, we limit the methods that are acceptable in behavior analytic research. For example, behavior analysts have a strong preference for single-subject research designs. If a study does not feature a single-subject design, then the community is more likely to judge it as non-behavior analytic. Behavior analysts have benefited enormously from the imposition of these constraints. They have helped to focus scientific inquiry within behavior analysis. They have also helped to differentiate behavior analysis from other related disciplines. And critically, the methodological preferences of the behavior analytic community have produced exceptionally strong empirical and conceptual foundations for the discipline. However, it is not clear that behavior analysts are currently taking full advantage of these strong foundations. Our concepts and procedures are now mature, and it is no longer necessary to appeal to methodology to define our discipline. We are in position to benefit from methodological expansion, but have underexploited this advantage for decades. This has been brought into sharper focus by the professionalization of the discipline and an increase in academic interdisciplinarity. In this social context, new kinds research questions become important to behavior analysts. Our traditional methods are not ideal for answering the full range of new questions. Calls for methodological expansion have increased in recent years, and there is evidence that more behavior analysts are starting to heed these calls. The primary purpose of this presentation is to convince listeners of this claim: Methodological constraints limit progress toward better prediction and control of behavior. An age of methodological agnosticism is upon us. Research questions will and should hold primacy over methods. We will answer our questions by whatever methods are best suited to do so, without heeding historical constraints. So freed, we will be able to answer new kinds of questions, better support practitioners, and increase our impact in modern behavioral science.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

All behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Identify typical methodological constraints and preferences within behavior analysis; (2) Differentiate between research questions that are ideally suited to traditional methodological approaches and those that are not; (3) Explain potential benefits of methodological agnosticism in behavior analysis; (4) Explain potential costs of strict adherence to traditional methodologies in behavior analysis; (5) Identify examples of methodological expansion in behavior analysis
 
ANTHONY DEFULIO (Western Michigan University)
Dr. DeFulio is an associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University, an internationally recognized institution for training and research related to Behavior Analysis, where he teaches a variety of behavior analysis graduate classes and mentors undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral students. Dr. DeFulio’s experiences in behavior analysis include provision of in-home services to children with autism, translational research on the development of reading skills in developmentally disabled adults, and conducting basic research on conditioned reinforcement in pigeons. Over the last 15 years, Dr. DeFulio’s research has principally focused on contingency management interventions for promoting drug abstinence and medication adherence. His most recent work involves delivering these interventions remotely, and includes collaboration with DynamiCare Health, Inc., a Boston startup that is dedicated to provision of contingency management services on a national scale. Dr. DeFulio has been the principal investigator of five NIH grants and a co-investigator on many others. His current NIH grant project involves a novel method for disseminating smartphone-based contingency management. He was the 2014 recipient of the APA’s B.F. Skinner Young Researcher Award, and has served on the board of editors for JABA and JEAB. He is currently an associate editor for Frontiers in Psychiatry – Addictive Disorders, and on the board of editors for Perspectives on Behavior Science.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #36
CE Offered: BACB
From HAL 9000 to Wall-E: How Artificial Intelligence Can Improve Clinical Decision-Making in Autism
Saturday, May 27, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Regina A. Carroll (University of Nebraska Medical Center Munroe-Meyer Institute)
CE Instructor: Marc J. Lanovaz, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: MARC J. LANOVAZ (Université de Montréal)
Abstract:

Artificial intelligence and machine learning are currently revolutionizing how we work and interact in our daily lives. In behavior analysis, one specific area of application that shows tremendous potential involves the assessment and treatment of autism. However, behavior analysts have been slow to adopt machine learning algorithms despite their promising nature. This presentation aims to provide a gentle introduction to artificial intelligence and machine learning while discussing potential applications to autism services. First, the invited session will define and describe what are artificial intelligence and machine learning. Then, the talk will cover recent exemplars of machine learning in autism research from the presenter’s work. Some exemplars include the monitoring of treatment progress, the identification of behavioral function, the selection of behavioral interventions, and the measurement of stereotypy. Finally, some benefits and drawbacks of applying machine learning to solve problems of social significance will be discussed. Overall, the presentation should provide a balanced overview of what artificial intelligence and machine learning may do (and not do) to support both practitioners and researchers in autism.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Currently practicing behavior analysts and advanced graduate students

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the session, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the basic methodological logic underlying supervised machine learning; (2) Explain at least one potential application of machine learning to improve services in autism; (3) Name at least one benefit and one drawback of using machine learning in autism.
 
MARC J. LANOVAZ (Université de Montréal)
Marc J. Lanovaz, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is a professor at the École de psychoéducation of the Université de Montréal and Researcher at the Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Montréal in Canada. The work in his lab has been funded by several major granting agencies such as the Canadian Institutes for Health Research, the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, and Québec’s Research Funds. His research program currently involves the use of artificial intelligence, machine learning, and technology to improve the delivery of behavior analytic services. Dr. Lanovaz has authored more than eighty publications on diverse topics such as clinical decision-making, parent training, early intervention, and challenging behavior in individuals with developmental disability.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #40
CE Offered: BACB
Informing Policies to Promote Social and Health Equity
Saturday, May 27, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall D-G
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kathryn M. Roose (University of Nevada, Reno)
CE Instructor: Roberta Freitas-Lemos, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ROBERTA FREITAS-LEMOS (Virginia Tech Carilion)
Abstract: A pressing policy problem in many countries is the aberrant pattern of social and health inequities among adolescents and adults. Social and health inequities are frequently a result of discriminatory practices and unjust policies that increase the vulnerabilities experienced by socially disadvantaged groups. For example, child labor decreases school enrollment rates and cigarette smoking reduces life expectancy, conditions that are more prevalent among those in the lower socioeconomic class. This presentation will explore the role of Behavior Analysis in building a more equitable society. More specifically, we will discuss ways policy can be designed to promote change in decision-making behaviors among individuals in the lower socioeconomic. We will illustrate how Behavior Analysis can inform: 1) intersectoral actions to decrease child labor via the provision of adequate social services to alter the options faced by lower socioeconomic status families, and 2) experimental research to forecast the consequences of regulatory tobacco policies on consumer behaviors and inform novel policies to decrease tobacco-related health disparities.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

The target audience includes those who are interested in promoting equity through large-scale social changes.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) describe ways Behavior Analysis can inform policies to promote social and health equity; 2) discuss possible government interventions to incentivize individuals in the lower socioeconomic class to change their decision-making; 3) identify government actions that could alter lower SES familial options to address poverty and social exclusion; 4) discuss how research could be conducted prospectively to forecast the effects of regulatory policies on health disparities
 
ROBERTA FREITAS-LEMOS (Virginia Tech Carilion)
Roberta Freitas Lemos, PhD, is a Research Scientist in the Addiction Recovery Research Center at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at Virginia Tech Carilion. In her current position, Dr. Freitas Lemos leads three in-laboratory multi-week experiments examining decision making, behavioral economics, and policy in cigarette smokers. Dr. Freitas Lemos has over 10 years of experience acting on a range of municipal, state, and federal government programs developing opportunities to improve public policy based on behavioral principles. She has personally coordinated the implementation of large-scale social programs directed to vulnerable groups in different municipalities in Brazil. Dr. Freitas Lemos most recent position was as an advisor of the Vice-Minister at the Ministry of Social Development in Brazil (current Ministry of Citizenship). She has also worked as a social policy expert at the Ministry of Human Rights and the Ministry of Health in Brazil. Her interests include Translational Research, Behavioral Science, and Social Protection and Health Policies. Dr. Freitas Lemos has a BA in Psychology from Pontifical Catholic University in Sao Paulo and a BA in Sports Sciences from the University of Sao Paulo. Dr. Freitas Lemos received a Masters in Experimental Psychology with a focus on Behavior Analysis from Pontifical Catholic University in Sao Paulo. In addition, she took a graduate course in Public Management from Cândido Mendes University. Dr. Freitas Lemos received her PhD in Behavioral Sciences from the University of Brasília. Dr. Freitas Lemos was a Postoctoral Associate prior to her current position at the Fralin BIomedical Research Institute at Virginia Tech Carilion.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #46
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Cultural Responsiveness in Research and Mentorship Within Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 27, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 1
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
CE Instructor: Sarah A. Lechago, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CORINA JIMENEZ-GOMEZ (University of Florida)
Abstract:

Although scientific endeavors strive to be objective, they are the work of individuals whose unique perspectives and experiences impact their research and interpretations of the world and data. Institutionalized discrimination – based on race, gender, national origin, disability, and socioeconomic position, among others – persists in academic and scientific institutions. Further, such discrimination has created barriers for individuals from minoritized groups to participate in building and adding their perspectives to our science. For the field of behavior analysis to truly “diversify,” we must actively engage in behaviors that foster inclusive and safe learning environments for students, engage in collaborative work, and incorporate culturally responsive research and mentorship practices. This talk will review where we are as a field, showcase exemplars of culturally responsive practices, and propose steps for moving forward.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Students, Researchers, BCBAs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify how research practices impact the scope and products of our science; (2) Identify how individuals in leadership positions shape the field; (3) Identify the current state of diversity in research and training in the field of behavior analysis; (4) Identify areas for growth and approaches to improve research and mentorship practices
 
CORINA JIMENEZ-GOMEZ (University of Florida)
Dr. Corina Jimenez-Gomez (she/her/ella) is an Assistant Professor in the Behavior Analysis program at the University of Florida. She earned a Licensure in Psychology at the Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Caracas, Venezuela, and a doctoral degree in Psychology with an emphasis in Behavior Analysis from Utah State University. She completed post-doctoral training at the University of Michigan and was a Research Fellow at The University of Auckland, New Zealand. She has held faculty positions at the Florida Institute of Technology and Auburn University. In addition, she served as clinical supervisor at The Scott Center for Autism Treatment at Florida Tech and was the Director of the Center for Autism Research, Treatment, and Training (CARTT) at Auburn University. Dr. Jimenez-Gomez is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the doctoral level, whose professional interests include translational and applied behavioral research in the areas of choice and reinforcement processes, the use of technology in ABA settings, caregiver and staff coaching, and cultural responsiveness in Behavior Analysis. Dr. Jimenez-Gomez has served as a reviewer for various scientific journals and is currently on the editorial board of the Perspectives on Behavior Science and the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and is Associate Editor for Behavior Analysis in Practice. She is also the mom of two amazing humans and an elderly Labrador, and is married to a fellow behavioral scientist.
 
 
Invited Panel #205
CE Offered: BACB
SQAB Panel: Billy Baum: Contributions to the Experimental and Theoretical Analysis of Behavior
Saturday, May 27, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 4
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Chair: Leonard Green (Washington University in St. Louis)
CE Instructor: Julian C. Leslie, Ph.D.
Panelists: SARAH COWIE (University of Auckland, New Zealand), JULIAN LESLIE (Ulster University), TIMOTHY A. SHAHAN (Utah State University), CARSTA SIMON (University of Agder, Norway)
Abstract:

This panel briefly describe the work of Dr. Billy Baum as they discuss how it has influenced their own work and perspectives on Behavior Analysis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe at least one way in which Dr. Baum’s work contributed to the experimental analysis of behavior, (2) describe at least one way in which Baum’s work contributed to theoretical perspectives about applications of behavior analysis, and (3) describe how his contributions have been important for the work described by at least one of the panelists.
SARAH COWIE (University of Auckland, New Zealand)
JULIAN LESLIE (Ulster University)

I obtained my doctorate from Oxford University in 1974, supervised in part by Jock Millenson who had been trained in operant conditioning at Columbia University, New York.  Since then I have been in academic posts in Northern Ireland and have been a full professor since 1986. I published textbooks on behaviour analysis from 1979 to 2002, and some of these remain in print. As well as teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses, I  have  successfully supervised 50 students  who  have  obtained PhDs  in fields including, experimental analysis of behaviour, applied behaviour analysis, psychopharmacology, behavioural neuroscience, experimental psychology, applied psychology. Three PhD’s were concerned with behavioural strategies to address environmental issues. In 1977 I was co-founder of the group, Behaviour Analysis in Ireland which became a chapter of ABAI. In 2004, the group became the Division of Behaviour Analysis of the Psychological Society of Ireland, and I was the Division chair from 2009 to 2020. I organised the Third European Meeting for the Experimental Analysis of Behaviour in Dublin, Ireland 1999, and have co-organised 15 annual conferences of the Division of Behaviour Analysis from 2007 to 2023. I was on the program committee for the ABAI 11th International conference, Dublin 2022.   In 2014, I was awarded a Doctorate of Science by Ulster University for career research on the experimental analysis of behaviour.  In 2018 I was appointed as a  Fellow, Association for Behavior Analysis International.  From 2014 to 2023, I have given a series of papers on conceptual issues in behaviour analysis (including behavioural accounts of consciousness and the metaphysical basis of behaviour analysis). Recent empirical work is mostly on the application of behavior analysis in mainstream education.  

TIMOTHY A. SHAHAN (Utah State University)

Dr. Shahan received his Ph.D. in Psychology from West Virginia University in 1998. He was a postdoc at the University of Vermont, and then a Research Assistant Professor at the University of New Hampshire. He was the recipient of the 2006 B.F. Skinner Young Researcher Award and the 2023 Distinguished Contribution to Basic Behavior Analysis Award, both from Division 25 of APA. He is presently a Professor in the Psychology Department at Utah State University. Dr. Shahan’s research focuses on fundamental processes in learning, adaptation, and behavioral regulation with an emphasis on development, testing, and translation of quantitative theories of operant behavior. Much of his research has used animal models to examine how reinforcement and reinforcement-related stimuli contribute to attention, decision making, persistence, and relapse. His research has been supported for more than 20 years by various institutes at NIH including NIMH, NIAAA, NIDA, and NICHD. Dr. Shahan is a Fellow of ABAI and has served as an Associate Editor and Guest Editor for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, president of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior, and chair of the Biobehavioral Regulation, Learning and Ethology study section at NIH. 

CARSTA SIMON (University of Agder, Norway)
Carsta Simon is full professor at the University of Agder (Norway). She holds a Ph.D. degree in Behavior Analysis and a master's degree with distinction in Psychology. She is alumna of the German Academic Scholarship Foundation. In her empirical and conceptual work, she investigates what qualifies as meaningful behavioral units of analysis. She aims at understanding how behavior is selected by its effects on the organism’s environment in ontogeny and in phylogeny, how an organism's behavior shapes the environment, and the interplay between the two. Dr. Simon’s experimental work focuses on the molar dynamics of verbal behavior in conversations. She aims at contributing to an interdisciplinary integration of behavior analysis, behavioral ecology, and evolutionary theory. She co-organizes an open access zoom-based journal club on the Philosophy of Behavior Analysis and teaches university courses on a plethora of topics in English, the Scandinavian languages, and German.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #58
CE Offered: BACB
Process-Based Analysis of Defusion and Self-Based Exercises in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Saturday, May 27, 2023
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 1-3
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Kieva S. Hranchuk (Brock University)
CE Instructor: Francisco José Ruiz Jiménez, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: FRANCISCO JOSÉ RUIZ JIMÉNEZ (Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz)
Abstract:

A unique characteristic of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is the possibility of being updated and enhanced according to clinically-relevant conceptualization and research conducted within Relational Frame Theory (RFT). Defusion and self-based exercises are distinctive components of ACT. However, they might be seen as interactions only suitable for individuals with sophisticated verbal repertoires. This presentation will discuss different RFT conceptualizations of the processes involved in defusion and self-based exercises and the empirical evidence obtained from experimental analogs. First, we will present examples of different types of defusion and self-based exercises. Second, different theoretical proposals of the processes involved in these exercises will be discussed. Third, we will review laboratory research conducted to understand defusion and self-based exercises. Fourthly, we will discuss how RFT conceptualization and research could help to improve the efficacy of these types of exercises. Lastly, we will suggest how defusion and self-based exercises can be adapted to individuals with less sophisticated verbal repertoires.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Researchers and practitioners interested in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Relational Frame Theory

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) List types of defusion and self-based exercises; (2) Identify research results on basic processes involved in defusion exercises; (3) Identify research results on basic processes involved in self-based exercises; (4) Integrate research results within an RFT conceptualization of psychological flexibility.
 
FRANCISCO JOSÉ RUIZ JIMÉNEZ (Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz)
Francisco J. Ruiz received his doctoral degree in Psychology in Universidad de Almería (Spain) under the supervision of Dr. Carmen Luciano. He worked in several Spanish universities before accepting a professor position in Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz (Colombia) in 2015. In this position, he designed a Ph.D. program with a high emphasis on behavior analysis. He has been also awarded as “Distinguished Researcher” of Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz twice and has been inducted as a Fellow of Association for Contextual Behavioral Science. He has published about 100 scientific articles focused on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT).
 
 
Invited Paper Session #59
CE Offered: BACB
Induction and the Provenance of the Activity Anorexia Cycle
Saturday, May 27, 2023
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: EAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Marco Vasconcelos (University of Aveiro)
CE Instructor: Ricardo Pellon, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: RICARDO PELLON (Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia)
Abstract:

Anorexia nervosa is a disorder characterized by the high failure of treatment approaches, both psychological and pharmacological. The low rate of clinical success may be due to a mischaracterization in most commonly used classifications, which implies a therapeutic approach focused on non-nuclear symptoms and delayed diagnosis. Some authors point out that core symptomatology of food rejection and distortions in the body image could develop in late stages and be the result of the neurological affectation of malnutrition, rather than the cause of the disorder. The activity-based anorexia protocol has been widely accepted as an animal model of the disorder and has been used to test possible treatments for anorexia nervosa. There is experimental evidence in activity anorexia suggesting that excessive activity is a crucial factor in the development of the phenomenon. The aim of this presentation is to review the results from animal research using the activity-based anorexia model with an emphasis on the evidence and possible explanatory mechanisms of excessive activity. Results obtained in our laboratory suggest that the combination of food restriction and exercise is the way to develop anorexia. Increased activity is a common foraging response in mammals subjected to food restriction. This activity is expressed more frequently under diet, which facilitates its subsequent increase by mechanisms of reinforcement and induction. It has been proposed that the contingencies established by western culture encourage people to be involved in exercise and diet regimes, which in some individuals may lead to the combination of strong food restriction and hyperactivity, initiating the cycle of anorexia. These results are in line with historical descriptions of the disorder and new clinical and research evidence that reports an excessive physical activity in a high proportion of diagnosed patients. The proposed theoretical view will be based on basic and clinical research data of several studies that point in a similar direction, to propose a framework that can guide future research and clinical approaches to anorexia nervosa.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

People interested in behavioral approaches to eating disorders.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) evaluate the validity of an animal model of anorexia nervosa; (2) distinguish different theoretical interpretations and their key components; (3) predict results from the conceptual understanding of the phenomenon of activity anorexia.
 
RICARDO PELLON (Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia)
Ricardo Pellón got the Degree in Psychology in 1980 and in 1987 defended his PhD in the area of Experimental Psychology, both at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain). He has held research positions at University of Wales College of Cardiff, UK (1981-1984) and the Addiction Research Centre of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, USA (1990-1991). In 2005-2006 he spent a sabbatical leave at Arizona State University, USA. He is currently Professor of Psychology at Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid, Spain, where he directs an Animal Learning and Behaviour Lab working predominantly (but not exclusively) on animal models of excessive behavior, such as schedule-induced polydipsia and activity-based anorexia, both using laboratory rats as experimental subjects. He has published in international journals in the areas of learning and behavior, behavioral pharmacology, and neural substrates of behavior. He has supervised 14 PhD thesis in different Spanish universities and is currently supervising 7 PhD students at UNED. He has served as external examiner in many committees, including 43 PhD dissertations. For more information, please check the website: http://portal.uned.es/portal/page?_pageid=93,698044&_dad=portal&_schema=PORTAL
 
 
Invited Paper Session #72
CE Offered: BACB
Motivation in Working Dogs: Problems, Myths, and Forgotten Solutions
Saturday, May 27, 2023
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 2/3
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Nathaniel Hall (Texas Tech University)
CE Instructor: Simon Gadbois, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SIMON GADBOIS (Dalhousie University)
Abstract: The past few decades have seen the overdue rise of force-free, pain-free, fear-free (also known as “positive”) training methods in training animals, and dogs in particular. This new Zeitgeist has helped change the way we train dogs for the better, yet, it has also contributed to some theoretical and practical disconnects with modern Learning Theory, ideas about reinforcement, and conditioned reinforcers and seems to have mostly ignored the neurobiology of learning. There are missed opportunities, especially if we are willing to consider modern theories of motivation, i.e., to consider what neuroscience and the motivation construct in the behavioural sciences have to offer. I will discuss old (seemingly forgotten, ignored or unduly rejected) and new theories of motivation, reinforcement and conditioning that may offer some help in addressing motivational issues with our canine research assistants, trainees and helpers. Contrasting examples from two different fields of working canines will be given: Wildlife Conservation Canines, and Biomedical Alert Canines. The importance of incentive motivation and the development of intrinsic motivation will be discussed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Academics, practitioners, animal trainers, dog trainers.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Get a better understanding of the theories of motivation from neuroscience and psychology; (2) Reconsider methods to enhance and mostly maintain motivation in working dog; (3) Apply both incentive motivation and intrinsic motivation principles in training dogs.
 
SIMON GADBOIS (Dalhousie University)
Simon Gadbois is a researcher in animal behaviour and behavioural neuroscience at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. Early in his academic career he integrated biology (ethology), experimental animal psychology and neuroscience within a post-cognitivist perspective. A true generalist, he has studied olfaction, learning and social behaviour in species of insects, molluscs (slugs and snails), fish, reptiles, birds (pigeons) and mammals (rats, dogs, red foxes, coyotes and wolves). He has studied wild canids for over 20 years and established the Canid and Reptile Behaviour and Olfaction lab at Dalhousie in 2006, prior to that he had studied the behavioural endocrinology of social behaviour in wolves and behaviour patterns in foraging behaviours comparatively in foxes, coyotes and wolves. Since 2007 his lab has been engaged mostly in research on biomedical detection, diagnosis and assistance as well as tracking and trailing of species-at-risk with his wildlife conservation canines. The lab has a strong applied and methodological focus.
 

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