Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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  • AAB: Applied Animal Behavior

    AUT: Autism

    BPN: Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroscience

    CBM: Clinical/Family/Behavioral Medicine

    CSS: Community, Social, and Sustainability Issues

    DDA: Developmental Disabilities

    DEV: Behavioral Development

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    EDC: Education

    OBM: Organizational Behavior Management

    PCH: Philosophical, Conceptual, and Historical Issues

    PRA: Practice

    TBA: Teaching Behavior Analysis

    VRB: Verbal Behavior

    SCI: Science

    OTH: Other

45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Program by Invited Events: Monday, May 27, 2019


 

Invited Paper Session #404
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

Novel Behavioral Targets and Outcomes in Treating Cocaine Use Disorder

Monday, May 27, 2019
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: BPN; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: William Stoops, Ph.D.
Chair: Sally L. Huskinson (University of Mississippi Medical Center)
WILLIAM STOOPS (University of Kentucky)
Dr. William Walton Stoops, a Professor in the Departments of Behavioral Science, Psychiatry and Psychology at the University of Kentucky, earned his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Davidson College in Davidson, NC and his Master’s degree and Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Kentucky. His research evaluates the behavioral and pharmacological factors that contribute to drug use disorders, focusing especially on cocaine use disorder. Dr. Stoops’ research contributions resulted in receipt of the 2016 Psychologist of the Year Award from the Kentucky Psychological Association, the 2013 Joseph Cochin Young Investigator Award from the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and the 2008 Wyeth Young Psychopharmacologist Award from Division 28 (Psychopharmacology and Substance Abuse) of the American Psychological Association (APA). Dr. Stoops currently serves on the ABAI Science Board, chairs the Program Committee for the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and is Editor of Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.
Abstract:

Cocaine use disorder presents an enduring and significant public health concern. Despite decades of research, a widely effective and accepted treatment for cocaine use disorder remains to be identified. The failure to identify treatments may be due, in part, to the only accepted indicator of treatment efficacy: complete abstinence from cocaine. This presentation will provide an overview of human laboratory and clinical trial research that has identified other potential treatment targets that can be adopted as indicators of efficacy. These behavioral targets include attentional bias, inhibitory control and decision making. As the clinical relevance of these novel targets is demonstrated, they may become acceptable treatment outcomes and can be used to identify novel effective interventions for cocaine use disorder.

Target Audience:

Graduate students, Researchers, Board certified behavior analysts, Licensed psychologists

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the current state of treatment development for cocaine use disorder; (2) understand how novel treatment targets are evaluated in the human laboratory and in clinical trials; (3) appreciate how novel outcomes can change cocaine treatment development.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #427
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

Positive Reinforcement: Not Always "Positive"

Monday, May 27, 2019
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Christine Hughes, Ph.D.
Chair: Elizabeth Kyonka (University of New England)
CHRISTINE HUGHES (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Dr. Christine Hughes received her MS and Ph.D. from the University of Florida in behavior analysis and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. She currently is a Professor in Psychology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where they have a Ph.D. and a Master’s program in applied behavior analysis. Dr. Hughes conducts translational research in the areas of punishment, schedules of reinforcement, and behavioral pharmacology, specifically the effects of drugs of abuse on impulsive choices and on punished behavior. Dr. Hughes has been program chair for Behavioral Pharmacology and Toxicology for the ABAI, program chair, secretary, and president of the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis, and President of Division 25 – Behavior Analysis of the American Psychological Association. She also was an Associate Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and was a member of the Society of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior Board and the Science Board of ABAI.
Abstract:

Transitions from favorable to less favorable positive reinforcement conditions (i.e., rich-to-lean transitions) can produce aberrant behavior during the transition before work is initiated, such as disruptive behavior, aggression, and self-injurious behavior. In the laboratory, these type of transitions are studied most often under fixed-ratio schedules, in which extended pausing occurs during rich-to-lean transitions before the ratio is begun. In this presentation, I will discuss a series of experiments in which we systematically analyzed the aversive functions of signals of rich-to-lean transitions and variables that might attenuate the behavior produced during the transitions. I also will discuss the need for further research in this area overall and translational implications.

Target Audience:

Experimental and applied behavior analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the potential aversive aspects of positive reinforcement; (2) describe rich-to-lean transitions; (3) describe post-reinforcement pauses and how they can be viewed as a measure of escape.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #444
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Applied Behavior Analysis for All: Building Systems to Help Children Through Transdisciplinary Behavioral Approach

Monday, May 27, 2019
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Swissôtel, Event Center Second Floor, St. Gallen 1-3
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Nirvana Pistoljevic, Ph.D.
Chair: R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
NIRVANA PISTOLJEVIC (Edus-Education for All)
Nirvana Pistoljevic received her B.A. in Psychology from Rutgers University. Then, from Teachers College she received an M.A. in General and Special Education, Ed.M. in Instructional Practices in Special Education and an M.Phil. in Behaviorsim. In 2008, she received a Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis in Education from Columbia University, where she has been teaching for the past 9 years at the Graduate School of Education. Dr. Pistoljevic has achieved the rank of Assistant Research Scientist through the CABAS® system and is a published researcher and invited lecturer in the fields of education, psychology, behavioral science, e-learning, early childhood development, and language development. Her current research interests include development of early childhood sevices, science of teaching, behavioral approach in assessment, early childhood development, language development, observational learning, inclusion, behavior-environment interactions, teacher training and behavioral systems. Also, Dr. Pistoljevic is committed in helping children with Autism and other developmental disorders in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where she is one of the founders of an NGO “EDUS-Education for All” committed to advancing educational practices in this country. She is currently spending most of her time in Bosnia and Herzegovina, where she is working with the UN agencies (UNICEF and UNDP) and USAID, training her staff of 60 professionals, providing education and services for over 200 children through 4 different EDUS programs, running first Early Intervention program in BiH, conducting research and writing. With the support of a UNICEF grant, she created first B&H developmental behavioral screening and monitoring tool for detection of developmental delays and/or monitoring children’s’ development birth through start of school, also an evaluation and educational program creating tool for children with and without developmental disorders, and curricula for parent education and future parent education. Currently, in partnership with UNICEF in B&H, she is conducting preschool and schoolteachers training, developing early detection and intervention systems, and developing materials for transdisciplinary teams “around the child”.  She is also working with UNICEF- Palestine on different modalities on implementation of National Early Detection and Intervention Policy, creating the early detection and intervention system, and training the professional staff from health, education, higher education and social care sectors. In B&H with the support of an USAID research grant, with the transdisciplinary team of professors form UK and USA, she is work on the validation of the developmental screening and monitoring app, development of protocol for ASD diagnostics, and research on the best model of early intervention services for B&H and low and mid-income countries.  With the Public Health Institute and Ministry of Health of Montenegro, she is working on developing a first Center for Children Diagnosed with Autism, where all children in additoin to diagnostics will be able to receive education and support services. With UNICEF Serbia, she is working on traning preschool and kindergarten teachers on best evidence-based practices for sucessful inclusion of all chidren, and creating a model for development and implementation of Serbian version of IFSP and IEP. She is also a president of a Bosnian-Herzegovinian-American Academy of Arts and Sciences (BHAAAS), and organizes and chairs a largest multidisciplinary scientific conference in Balkans every year. She  is also one of 9 nominees for 2019 Brock International Prize in Education.
Abstract:

EDUS-Education for All is a non-for-profit organization trying to bring science, newest methods and conduct research in the fields of early detection, diagnostics, intervention, and inclusion of children with developmental disorders. EDUS creates systematic approaches and trains transdisciplinary teams of service providers using behavioral principles to advance health, education and social care systems in low resource countries. In partnership with UNICEF, USAID and relevant ministries in Bosnia and Herzegovina, EDUS was able to work on developing Early Detection and Intervention concepts for the country, and to provide services based on a behavioral but transdisciplinary approach for thousands of children through health, education and social care systems. We have created and standardized a behavioral developmental instrument, to detect and monitor early childhood development and tested it on over 2500 children in order to create developmental norms for the country. Now as an easy to use App, this behavioral tool will aid pediatricians in early detection and monitoring. Same process has now been started with UNICEF-Palestine for children in Gaza and West Bank, creating their developmental norms and behavioral approach to screening, monitoring, and advancing development. I will also talk about our research in application of technology and molecular biology to help detect and diagnose children with ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders, and our research on methodologies for inducing language and other developmental milestones when they do not develop naturally. Our goal is development of reliable and evidence based methods for low and mid-income countries in order to advance health and education practices for children with and without disorders. We focus on transdisciplinary research and projects based on collaboration of medical, technical and social sciences. I will show you how using the science of Applied Behavior Analysis across several mid-income countries with limited resources can promote early childhood development with concrete steps, measures, tools and applications. It’s a showcase of the power behavioral science has for advancement of outcomes for all human kind.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify critical components of Early Detection and Intervention Systems needed for a country to be able to provide services to children with developmental disorders in early childhood; (2) apply concrete steps in order to create a behavior-based transdisciplinary approach to intervention; (3) communicate with professionals from other fields using behavioral tools; (4) use applied behavior analysis in collaboration with other fields to promote early childhood development.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #445
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CANCELED:

Selection, Reinforcement, and Behavior

Monday, May 27, 2019
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Marco Vasconcelos, Ph.D.
Chair: Erik Arntzen (Oslo and Akershus University College)
MARCO VASCONCELOS (University of Aveiro, Portugal )

Marco Vasconcelos is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Aveiro, Portugal. He received his doctorate in Psychology from Purdue University. His research interests center on decision making and rationality. He integrates concepts and techniques from operant and developmental psychology and comparative cognition research with normative theoretical models from optimal foraging theory and microeconomics. He usually endeavors to develop a model of the causative process under investigation, if possible in mathematical language, and then test it by experiment.

Abstract:

The parallels between the effects of reinforcers and the effects of natural selection have been noted repeatedly. The basic idea is that an initial pool of behaviors is afforded by principles analogous to those of genetics and heredity. Then, similarly to natural selection, reinforcers select specific behaviors from the available pool. Thus, non-reinforced behaviors extinguish whereas reinforced behaviors remain in the population of available variants. Even though the analogy is straightforward, behavior analysis and evolutionary biology have kept independent paths. Here, I argue that much can be gained from cross-fertilization between disciplines. To illustrate, I discuss in detail an experimental protocol in which animals systematically incur substantial losses by preferring a lean but informative option to a rich but non-informative one. To understand how adaptive mechanisms may fail to maximize gains, I review a behavior-analytic model and a model inspired by optimal foraging principles. Remarkably, the models showcase a sort of “scientific convergent evolution,” for they require the same assumptions and predict the same results.

Target Audience:

Researchers and professionals interested in fundamental behavioral processes.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how a selectionist approach can explain the effects of reinforcers; (2) state the critical elements of a selectionist approach to reinforcement; (3) assess the need for cross-fertilization between behavior analysis and evolutionary biology.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #447
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Why are the Behavioral Sciences Not More Effective: Reprise

Monday, May 27, 2019
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Area: SCI; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Ph.D.
Chair: Stephanie M. Peterson (Western Michigan University)
RUTH ANNE REHFELDT (Southern Illinois University)
Dr. Ruth Anne Rehfeldt is a Professor in the Rehabilitation Services undergraduate program and an affiliated faculty in the Behavior Analysis and Therapy program. She holds a Ph.D. (1998) and MA (1995) from the Behavior Analysis Program (in Psychology) at the University of Nevada, and a BA (1993) in psychology from the University of Puget Sound. She is also a Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the doctoral level. Dr. Rehfeldt has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in research methods, behavioral assessment, principles of behavior, introduction to behavior analysis, verbal behavior, and radical behaviorism. Dr. Rehfeldt has authored nearly 100 articles and book chapters, primarily in the areas of derived stimulus relations and verbal behavior. Dr. Rehfeldt has served as the editor of The Psychological Record for 12 years and has been an editorial board member for a number of behavior analytic journals over the years.   She has co-edited one textbook with Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, entitled Derived Relational Responding: Applications for Learners with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: A Progressive Guide to Change, and is currently co-editing a textbook tentatively entitled, Applied Behavior Analysis of Language and Cognition, with Mitch Fryling, Jonathan Tarbox, and Linda Hayes.
Abstract:

The controversy over whether behavior analysts should not only examine, but intervene on, private events has not ended. Reluctance to incorporate analyses of covert language processes into applied behavior analyses has limited our field’s scope. Moreover, applied behavior analysis continues to focus its energies predominantly on small-scale studies in highly controlled environments while larger societal problems flourish. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss how the concepts encompassed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy can be applied to several very diverse areas of social concern, including: 1) human service agency staff training; 2) health prevention behaviors; and 3) marine conservation. I will articulate the often underappreciated relationship between relational learning and psychological inflexibility and experiential avoidance, and will describe how concepts such as acceptance, values, and committed actions can have an impact in building the adaptive repertoires needed to resolve a number of small and large-scale issues of social significance.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain the relationship between ACT and Relational Frame Theory; (2) discuss an overview of procedures and results from staff training studies on components of ACT; (3) conceptualize possible areas of application of behavioral principles to health-related and conservation behaviors.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #458
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Evolving Organizationally: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as Organizational Behavior Management in a School-Based Partial Hospital Program

Monday, May 27, 2019
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Stuart Libman, Ph.D.
Chair: Amy Murrell (University of North Texas)
STUART LIBMAN (PLEA)
Stuart Libman, M.D. is a Child, Adolescent and Family Psychiatrist, with further sub-specialization in Sports Psychiatry. After graduating from Ohio University and the School of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University, he completed training in Pediatrics, General Psychiatry, and Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh. In addition to serving as the Medical Director of the PLEA School Based Partial Hospital Program (SBPHP), he has experience providing executive coaching and organizational consultation in school districts, law firms, hospitals, business corporations, universities and sports teams. He has presented at such conferences as the Annual Meeting(s) of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and the International Precision Teaching Conference, on topics ranging from a Developmental Framework for Adult Participation in Youth Sports, to a Psychiatric Perspective on ABA as Precision Teaching and ACT, to ACT Workshops for audiences in these as well as various other professional settings.
Abstract:

Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) is evolving from clinical intervention into Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) at PLEA, a public sector, non-profit agency in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. PLEA’s School-Based Partial Hospital Program (SBPHP) serves a population of children and adolescents with diagnoses on the Autistic Spectrum. The SBPHP has grown over the past fifty years from a preschool started by parents desperately seeking services for their Autistic children to a program using principles of Applied Behavior Analysis in three main forms: Precision Teaching, Relational Frame Theory, and Acceptance and Commitment Training. ACT’s model of Psychological Flexibility as reflected in the ACT Matrix diagram has undergone progressive transformation from clinical to administrative functions. The “Prosocial” method, an approach integrating the ACT Matrix with the Core Design Principles of Successful Groups for which Elinor Ostrom won the 2009 Nobel Prize in Economics, also has been introduced at various levels within the organization (https://www.prosocial.world/). “Prosocial” is being broadly conceived as providing a platform for studying the evolutionary theory of multilevel selection. The impact of selection by consequences was discerned by B.F. Skinner not only for natural selection but also for operant conditioning of individual behavior as well as cultural evolution. In their recent book, Evolution and Contextual Behavioral Science: An Integrated Framework for Understanding, Predicting and Influencing Human Behavior, David Sloan Wilson and Steven C. Hayes elaborate Evolutionary Science as a multilevel process of variation, selection, and retention. The ACT Matrix will be used throughout this presentation to explicate this multilevel process of ACT evolving into OBM at PLEA.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts and other mental health professionals working in community-based organizations, particularly if interested in CBM, AUT, OBM, and/or CBS in the forms of RFT, ACT, and/or “Prosocial.”

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, attendees will be able to: (1) define “Psychological Flexibility” as used within Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT); (2) explain the ACT Matrix in terms of the two key discriminations represented by its horizontal and vertical axes and in term of the questions that accompany each of its four quadrants; (3) explain how ACT can be viewed as an evolutionary model; and (4) describe how ACT can be applied organizationally.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #462
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

An Analysis of the Components of Bidirectional Naming, the Naming Experiences to Occasion the Incidental Acquisition of Language and Protocols to Induce Bidirectional and Complex Naming Repertoires

Monday, May 27, 2019
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Swissôtel, Event Center Second Floor, St. Gallen 1-3
Area: DEV; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Jennifer Longano, Ph.D.
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
JENNIFER LONGANO (Teachers College, Columbia University)

Dr. Jennifer Longano received her BS in education from the State University of New York at Geneseo. She then earned her MA M.Phil, and Ph.D. in applied behavior analysis from Teachers College, Columbia University. Jennifer Longano is a supervisor of the Early Intervention Program for the Fred S. Keller School located in the suburbs of New York City. She has worked for the Fred S. Keller School, a CABAS® model school, since 2008 supervising both preschool and early intervention classrooms for children with and without disabilities. She also is an Adjunct Assistant Professor for Teachers College and has taught courses in Applied Behavior Analysis, Single-Case Design, and Inclusion for the Health and Behavior Studies Department. She has earned several CABAS® ranks and currently holds a Senior Behavior Analyst and an Assistant Research Scientist rank. Her research has focused on verbal developmental cusps including: the source of reinforcement for naming, procedures to test for and induce naming, pre-foundational verbal developmental cups and capabilities, and conditioned reinforcement related to observing responses.

Abstract:

I will discuss the acquisition of bidirectional naming from the verbal developmental perspective. Observing responses selected out by conditioned reinforcers can set the occasion for the acquisition of verbal developmental cups and capabilities. These observing responses establish a history of stimulus-stimulus pairings, which set the occasion for the listener and speaker repertoires to be joined. Once joined, more complex cusps and capabilities can be acquired allowing for the emergence of incidental language, bidirectional operants, and advanced naming repertoires. For some individuals, listener and speaker repertoires are not joined naturally. Thus, protocols that can arrange the environmental contingencies to occasion the acquisition of bidirectional naming can be implemented. In CABAS® model schools, which are affiliated with Teachers College Columbia University, ongoing research has focused on identifying when bidirectional naming is present or missing, the types of naming repertoires, protocols to induce bidirectional naming, and the best instructional practices to accelerate learning when bidirectional naming is present.

Target Audience:

The following presentation will be for individuals interested in verbal behavior and verbal behavior developmental theory with a heavy focus on the source of reinforcement for incidental language acquisition or bidirectional naming. The presentation will also discuss how to identify when Naming is present or absent, different types of naming experiences, and procedures to induce naming. The audience should have some understanding (intermediate level) of verbal developmental theory and naming.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the components of bidirectional naming and once acquired how other more complex naming repertoires can emerge; (2) provide detailed descriptions of different types of Naming experiences to test for the presence or absence of naming; (3) review protocols to induce bidirectional naming; (4) discuss best instructional practices once bidirectional naming is present to accelerate learning.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #464
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

What Evolutionary Theory Tells Us About Behavior

Monday, May 27, 2019
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: William Baum, Ph.D.
Chair: Carsta Simon (Oslo Metropolitan University, Norway)
WILLIAM BAUM (University of California, Davis)
Dr. Baum received his BA in psychology from Harvard College in 1961. Originally a biology major, he switched to psychology after taking courses from B. F. Skinner and R. J. Herrnstein in his freshman and sophomore years. He attended Harvard University for graduate study in 1962, where he was supervised by Herrnstein and received his Ph.D. in 1966. He spent the year 1965–66 at Cambridge University, studying ethology at the Sub-Department of Animal Behavior. From 1966 to 1975, he held appointments as post-doctoral fellow, research associate, and assistant professor at Harvard University. He spent two years at the National Institutes of Health Laboratory for Brain, Evolution, and Behavior and then accepted an appointment in psychology at the University of New Hampshire in 1977. He retired from there in 1999. He currently has an appointment as associate researcher at the University of California, Davis and lives in San Francisco. His research concerns choice, molar behavior/environment relations, foraging, cultural evolution, and behaviorism. He is the author of a book, Understanding Behaviorism: Behavior, Culture, and Evolution.
Abstract:

Why do organisms and behavior exist? Organisms exist because genes that make organisms increase reproductive success. An organism’s behavior is its interactions with its environment. Behavior, on average and in the long run, functions to serve reproducing. Surviving usually serves reproducing, and other activities like maintaining health, maintaining relationships, and gaining resources usually serve surviving and sometimes directly serve reproducing. When phylogenetically important features of the environment vary in ways that can be tracked by physiological mechanisms, selection favors phenotypic plasticity. Part of phenotypic plasticity is behavioral plasticity. Phylogenetically important events (PIEs), such as presence of potential mates, predators, or prey, impact reproductive success and underpin selection for behavioral plasticity. PIEs induce activities that tend to mitigate threats and enhance benefits. Additionally, selection favors phenotypes that respond to covariance in the environment between PIEs and other events and between activities and PIEs. Events that covary with a PIE come to induce the same activities as the PIE, and activities that covary with a PIE come to be induced by the PIE. Induction is the mechanism of the Law of Allocation that governs the allocation of time among an organism’s activities.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) understand why organisms exist; (2) understand why behavior exists; (3) understand why behavior must be extended in time.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #484
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

Behavioral Economics of the Marketing Firm: Bilateral Contingency, Metacontingency, and Agency

Monday, May 27, 2019
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Area: OBM; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Gordon Foxall, Ph.D.
Chair: Byron J. Wine (The Faison Center)
GORDON FOXALL (Cardiff University; University of Reykjavik)
Gordon R. Foxall is Distinguished Research Professor at Cardiff Business School, Cardiff University (UK), and a Visiting Professor in economic psychology at the University of Reykjavik (Iceland). He holds a Ph.D. in industrial economics and business studies (University of Birmingham); a Ph.D. in psychology (University of Strathclyde); and a higher doctorate (DSocSc) also from the University of Birmingham. He is the author of some 300 refereed papers and chapters and over 30 books. He has held visiting appointments at the Universities of Michigan, Oxford, South Australia and Guelph, and is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences (FAcSS); a Fellow of the British Psychological Society (FBPsS); and a Fellow of the British Academy of Management (FBAM). His principal research interests include consumer behavior analysis, the philosophical implications of the neurophilosophy of consumer choice, and the theory of the marketing firm.
Abstract:

The theme of this talk is the nature of the organizations that meet consumer demand, the susceptibility of their behavior to operant explanation, and the consequences of treating them as operant systems. All firms market. Marketing, moreover, provides the raison d’être of firms. Just as consumers can be shown to maximize the utilitarian and informational reinforcement they receive from commodities, so firms maximize similar sources of reward through the generation and implementation of marketing mixes that influence consumer choice. But over and above the operations involved in marketing functions, firms are compelled by the imperatives of modern economies to engage in customer-oriented management in order to compete within and between traditional industries for the dollars over which customers have discretion. This talk draws on ideas from microeconomics and marketing science, as well as behavior analysis, in a nontechnical exploration of the sensitivity of corporate activity to contingencies of reinforcement. I argue that the concept of metacontingency is central to understanding the behavior of organizations such as marketing firms and that the idea of bilateral contingency is central to understanding why they exist and what their function is.

Target Audience:

All those interested in the behavioral economics of organizations and their publics; organizational management; public policy with respect to business firms; the interaction of operant analysis and other disciplines and the implications of using economics to understand human behavior.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss how organizations that meet consumer demand can be analyzed in operant terms; (2) discuss the economic and marketing imperatives that explain the existence of prevalence of these marketing firms; (3) discuss the concept of bilateral contingency and how the interrelationships of marketing firms and their customers can be analyzed as interlocking contingencies; (4) discuss marketing firms as metacontingencies and the implications of this for their acting as economic and social agents; (5) discuss the policy implications of marketing firms as they interact with different kinds of customer (e.g., other business organizations vs. aggregates of individual consumers.
 
 
Invited Panel #487
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Science Communication and Behavior Analysis: Correcting Missed Opportunities
Monday, May 27, 2019
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Jonathan W. Pinkston (Western New England University)
CE Instructor: Jonathan W. Pinkston, Ph.D.
Panelists: MATTHEW NORMAND (University of the Pacific), RYAN O'DONNELL (RYANO, LLC), MATTHEW CICORIA (Positive Behavioral Outcomes, LLC)
Abstract:

Behavior analysts have long lamented the relative ignorance from the general public regarding our science. While the field has made efforts to address our dissemination, many still believe we have much work to do. On the contrary, other disciplines within the social and behavioral sciences have captured public interest, leveraging social media to garner attention and disseminate to large audience. Many of these audiences include stakeholders and policymakers with the power and authority to bring scientific influences into the mainstream. Despite a relative dearth of behavior analysts on social media platforms, there is a small group of highly effective communicators that have tips and strategies to share. This panel includes three effective behavioral science communicators who will share their experiences and expertise in the hopes of promoting others to more effectively communicate their own work in behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe current limitations in behavior analyst’s science communication, (2) describe contemporary methods of engaging the public with science communication via social media, and (3) operationalize ways behavior analysts can change their dissemination tactics to better communicate science.
MATTHEW NORMAND (University of the Pacific)
Dr. Normand is a Professor of Psychology at the University of the Pacific and serves on the Board of Directors of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. His primary scientific interests, broadly defined, are the application of basic behavioral principles to problems of social significance (including obesity and community health issues), verbal behavior, and the philosophy and methodology of science. He is the former editor of The Behavior Analyst, a former associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Behavior Analyst, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, and Behavior Analysis in Practice. Currently, he serves as an associate editor for the European Journal of Behavior Analysis and is on the editorial boards of Behavioral Interventions, The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, Behavior and Philosophy, and Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice. Dr. Normand was the 2011 recipient of the B. F. Skinner New Researcher Award from the American Psychological Association (Div. 25).
RYAN O'DONNELL (RYANO, LLC)
Hey, I'm Ryan. I usually go by Ryan O or RYANO. I hail from northern Nevada in the grungy, yet surprisingly classy, (and newly renovated) Reno, Nevada . I like my climate like I like my data: evolving, uncompromising, and progressive. I am a master of science; that is, I have an M.S. in Applied Behavior Analysis, however my interests have grown to include many other interests, including entrepreneurship and capturing perspectives and stories through various mediums. These interests and skills have allowed me to work with a lot of great people. I've started three businesses, started numerous active joint venture agreements, a behavioral think-tank, a podcast, a professional development movement, helped organizations that support people with Intellectual Disabilities, to list a few. Currently I am on a "gap year" creating content about behavior analysis as I ready for my next venture in 2019. I focus outside this role on building a community of thought leaders and doers to create content that increases the transparency of behavior analytic technologies with the hopes of creating a platform that truly saves the world. My interests are all over, from artificial intelligence and machine learning applications to the theory and philosophy behind Why We Do What We Do (wwdwwdpodcast.com). In my spare time you can find me consuming social media, prepping/climbing a giant mountain, or walking around with my camera in my hand (and, occasionally, all simultaneously). Connect with me personally on most all social platforms via @TheDailyBA and @TheRyanoDotCom and let me know what drives you to pursue the Behavior Analysis vision.
MATTHEW CICORIA (Positive Behavioral Outcomes, LLC)
Matt Cicoria is a behavioral and educational consultant in private practice, providing services to school and community settings in New Hampshire and Vermont. Matt earned his B.A. in Psychology at the University of New Hampshire, and then his M.S. in Psychology at Auburn University under the supervision of Dr. Jim Johnston. After graduate school, Matt went to work in the field of Developmental Disabilities, with tenures at large organizations such as AdvoServ and the Institute of Professional Practice. In 2002, Matt earned his BCBA certificate, and in 2007, he started his independent consulting practice, Positive Behavioral Outcomes, LLC. His clinical interests include the assessment and treatment of problem behaviors in public school settings, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Precision Teaching. As a dissemination project, Matt created The Behavioral Observations Podcast, in February of 2016. The podcast publishes long-form interviews with leading behavior analysts, in which current topics in the field are discussed in a casual format. Since its inception, the show has been downloaded over three-quarters of a million times, and has reached audiences in over 100 countries. Matt, along with Dr. Lisa Britton, has co-authored the forthcoming book, Remote Fieldwork Supervision for BCBA© Trainees.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #515
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Behavior Analysts: Shaping the Future of Work

Monday, May 27, 2019
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Judy Johnson, Ph.D.
Chair: Douglas A. Johnson (Western Michigan University)
JUDY JOHNSON (Aspirant)

Judy Johnson received her Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis and Masters in I/O Psychology from Western Michigan University. Judy partners with executives and leadership teams to engage and inspire employees in a way that delivers sustainable strategic results. She brings deep expertise and creative ideas to solve organizational effectiveness issues and closely collaborates in a way that builds internal capabilities. As an independent consultant, and then consultant at The Continuous Learning Group, The Boston Consulting Group and now Aspirant, Judy has spent over 25 years working in a variety of industries from banking to mining. She brings her expertise in behavior to a wide range of organizational issues including organizational behavior change, leadership, change management, culture and engagement.

Abstract:

Today’s workplace is in a state of constant change. By 2030, trends in localization, technology, and engagement will create dramatic shifts in how we approach employment and performance. These trends will change the complexion of organizational effectiveness, creating new and different requirements for companies and opening the door for Behavior Analysts to create change the rules of the workplace. Behavior Analysts can see beyond typical solutions to breakdown the components of organizational effectiveness and build a workplace ready for the future. This presentation discusses the 10 most significant trends affecting the workplace, and behavior analysts’ unique position to help companies prepare for those trends. As part of the discussion, Dr. Johnson will share examples of how the multi-disciplinary team at Aspirant has combined behavioral science, artificial intelligence and new technology solutions to assess and address a company’s organizational effectiveness. This presentation seeks to inspire all OBMers by sharing real world case examples of how behavioral tools and techniques can be applied to the toughest business challenges.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the developing trends that will impact workplace effectiveness in the next 10-15 years; (2) discuss the role of Behavior Analysts in helping companies prepare for those trends and determine how your work can play a role; (3) discuss new, different ways to apply the principles of behavior analysis to some of the biggest organizational challenges.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #534
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

A Behaviour Analysis of Theory of Mind: Conceptual and Applied Implications

Monday, May 27, 2019
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: PCH; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Advanced
CE Instructor: Francesca Degli Espinosa, Ph.D.
Chair: David C. Palmer (Smith College)
FRANCESCA DEGLI ESPINOSA (ABA Clinic, UK)
I fell in love with behaviour analysis in 1996, when I began working as a tutor for a child with autism. Almost immediately I became interested in interventions that could both define and establish generalised learning: the ability to demonstrate novel responses within an operant class without each individual response having been previously reinforced. I was given the opportunity to explore this question when I worked as the Lead Clinician for the first UK-based EIBI outcome study (Remington et al., 2007) at the University of Southampton. Within that context, I developed the Early Behavioural Intervention Curriculum (EBIC) an intervention framework derived from functional analyses of language, which subsequently formed the principal focus for my Doctoral thesis (2011). My clinical and research interests eventually settled, and continue to be, on advanced applications of contemporary analyses of verbal behaviour (Horne & Lowe, 1996; Michael, Palmer, & Sundberg, 2011) as a basis for teaching generalised verbal repertoires, and, thereby, as a means of minimising the need to teach specific individual verbal responses. Currently, I divide my time between the UK, where I live, and Italy, my home country, where I teach behaviour analysis to postgraduate students at the University of Salerno and support professionals in developing effective interventions.
Abstract:

The term Theory of Mind has come to refer to a collection of responses that involve one’s ability to predict another person’s behaviour based on understanding that person’s perspective. One of the most studied topics in the field of psychology for the past 30 years, Theory of Mind is considered not only an important developmental milestone in childhood, but also a theoretical system to explain additional social and cognitive processes in both typical and atypical children and adults. Despite the importance of the topic, behaviour analysis has yet to provide a satisfactory account of Theory of Mind (i.e., of the variables that control the types of behaviour commonly held to denote Theory of Mind). In this presentation I set out to provide the beginning of such an account. Firstly, I will argue that Theory of Mind is not an “entity” that is either present or absent, but rather, is a developmental verbal process that begins in early childhood with the establishment of tacting public and private events during social interactions. Secondly, I will provide an analysis of the controlling variables of the component verbal skills that are said to denote Theory of Mind. Thirdly, I will illustrate a hierarchical sequence of instructional activities derived from such an analysis to establish perspective taking in children with autism, a syndrome with known deficits in these skills. The application of a teaching technology derived from a conceptual and experimental analysis both validates and extends the basic approach.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the verbal controlling variables involved in Theory of Mind Tasks; (2) provide a behavioural interpretation of perspective taking; (3) delineate a programme of instruction to establish component Theory of Mind skills.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #536
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Utility of Operant Conditioning to Address Poverty-Related Health Disparities

Monday, May 27, 2019
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Kenneth Silverman, Ph.D.
Chair: Cynthia J. Pietras (Western Michigan University)
KENNETH SILVERMAN (Johns Hopkins University)
Kenneth Silverman has been in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine since 1989 and is currently a Professor in the department. His research has focused on developing operant treatments to address the interrelated problems of poverty, drug addiction, and HIV. His primary research has focused on the development and evaluation of abstinence reinforcement interventions for the treatment of heroin and cocaine addiction in low-income, inner city adults; financial incentives to promote adherence to antiretroviral medications and viral suppression in people living with HIV; the development of the therapeutic workplace intervention and the use of employment-based reinforcement in the long-term maintenance of drug abstinence, adherence to addiction treatment medications, and employment; and the development of computer-based training to establish critical academic and job skills that unemployed adults need to gain and maintain employment and escape poverty.
Abstract:

Poverty is a pervasive risk factor underlying poor health, including drug addiction and HIV. This presentation will review research on the utility of operant conditioning to address the interrelated problems of poverty, drug addiction, and HIV. Our research has shown that operant reinforcement using financial incentives can promote abstinence from cocaine and heroin in low-income adults with long histories of drug addiction and adherence to antiretroviral medications in low-income adults living with HIV. Our research has also shown that financial incentives are most effective when high-magnitude incentives are used, and that long-duration abstinence reinforcement can serve as an effective maintenance intervention. The utility of operant conditioning to promote behaviors needed to escape poverty is less clear, but research on an operant employment-based intervention called the therapeutic workplace shows some promise. In the therapeutic workplace, low-income or unemployed adults are hired and paid to work. To promote drug abstinence and/or medication adherence, employment-based reinforcement is arranged in which participants are required to provide drug-free urine samples and/or take prescribed medication to maintain access to the workplace and maximum pay. Because many low-income adults lack skills needed for gainful employment, the therapeutic workplace offers job-skills training and employment phases through which participants progress sequentially. Our research has shown that employment-based reinforcement within the therapeutic workplace can promote and maintain drug abstinence, medication adherence, work, and other adaptive behaviors that people need to move out of poverty. The therapeutic workplace could serve as a model anti-poverty program, particularly for people with histories of drug addiction or other health problems, although more research on the therapeutic workplace is needed that targets poverty directly.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how operant conditioning can be used to promote drug abstinence and adherence to medications; (2) describe parameters of operant conditioning that are critical to promoting drug abstinence in refractory patients and maintaining drug abstinence over time; (3) describe the main features of the therapeutic workplace; (4) describe how the therapeutic workplace uses contingent access to employment (i.e., employment-based reinforcement) to promote drug abstinence, medication adherence, work, and productivity; (5) describe three models for arranging long-term exposure to employment-based reinforcement in the treatment of drug addiction.
 

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