Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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  • AAB: Applied Animal Behavior

    AUT: Autism

    BPN: Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroscience

    CBM: Clinical/Family/Behavioral Medicine

    CSS: Community, Social, and Sustainability Issues

    DDA: Developmental Disabilities

    DEV: Behavioral Development

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    EDC: Education

    OBM: Organizational Behavior Management

    PCH: Philosophical, Conceptual, and Historical Issues

    PRA: Practice

    TBA: Teaching Behavior Analysis

    VRB: Verbal Behavior

    SCI: Science

    OTH: Other

45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Program by Invited Events: Sunday, May 26, 2019


 

Invited Panel #190
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Nonviolent Action for Social and Environmental Justice: Contemporary Options
Sunday, May 26, 2019
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Kathryn Roose, M.A.
Chair: Mark A. Mattaini (Jane Addams College of Social Work-University of Illinois at Chicago)
JAMILA RAQIB (Albert Einstein Institution; Center for International Studies at Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
RICHARD RAKOS (Cleveland State University)
KATHRYN ROOSE (University of Nevada, Reno)
Jamila Raqib, an Afghan native, was a nominee for the 2017 Nobel Peace Prize, and is Executive Director of the Albert Einstein Institution in Boston, which promotes the study and strategic use of nonviolent action worldwide. From 2002 until his recent passing, Ms. Raqib worked directly with political scientist Gene Sharp, the world’s foremost scholar on strategic nonviolent action. In 2009, she and Sharp jointly developed a curriculum called Self-Liberation: A Guide to Strategic Planning for Action to End a Dictatorship or Other Oppression drawing extensively on that literature, to provide in-depth guidance for groups planning or engaged in nonviolent struggle for democracy and human rights. She is also a Director’s Fellow at the MIT Media Lab, exploring how innovations in technology and education can make the collection, sharing, and application of knowledge of nonviolent action more effective, timely, and secure. In addition, she is currently doing research on nonviolent social change grounded in Gandhi’s “constructive programme,” which is similar on multiple dimensions to constructional work as outlined in Israel Goldiamond’s work. Ms. Raqib’s TED talk on nonviolent resistance has been translated into 29 languages and has more than 1 million views; many of her presentations are also widely shared on YouTube, making her work accessible especially to young people. She is among a handful of people in the world who has studied the extensive literature on nonviolence social change in real depth and has been working directly with the groups who have been applying that knowledge in conflicts around the world. Raqib regularly gives presentations and conducts educational workshops for activists and organizers, human rights organizations, academics, and government bodies concerned with diverse objectives including challenging dictatorship, combatting corruption, and attaining political rights, economic justice, environmental protection, and women’s empowerment. She also serves as commentator on nonviolent action for multiple media outlets and oversees the dissemination of extensive resources on the topic through the Einstein Institution. She therefore has much to contribute to behavior scientists and practitioners interested in expanding their involvement and participation in social change, human rights, and sustainability efforts, particularly from a constructional perspective.

Dr. Rakos received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Kent State University and now is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Cleveland State University. He retired in 2016 after 37.5 years at CSU, most recently as associate dean for faculty and program development in the College of Sciences and Health Professions. Dr. Rakos is widely published in the areas of assertiveness training, self-management, law and psychology, and cultural analysis.  He served as Editor of Behavior and Social Issues (and its predecessor journals Behaviorists for Social Action Journal and Behavior Analysis and Social Action) from 1981-1993 and as associate editor of BSI from 1993 to the present. He also served on the editorial board of Law and Human Behavior from 2000-2016 and is a fellow of the American Psychological Association. Since retiring from CSU, Dr. Rakos has maintained his behavior analytic scholarly activities while expanding his private clinical practice significantly, focusing on the behavioral treatment of persons experiencing difficulties with anxiety, stress, depression, self-control, obsessions and compulsions, and social/interpersonal relationships.

Kathryn Roose, M.A., BCBA, LBA(NV), CADC is administrative faculty in the College of Education and a doctoral student in behavior analysis at the University of Nevada, Reno. She has experience as a drug and alcohol counselor, and as a practicing clinician with children and adults with and without disabilities and their families, adults with neurocognitive disorders and their families, and organizations. She currently manages data and evaluation for a federally funded grant implementing Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports in Nevada, and works as a consultant for the State Juvenile Justice System updating state policy and revising systems, practices, and data collection. Her current research projects include an experimental analysis of teamwork and cooperation in organizational settings, and conceptual analyses of social issues including the fake news phenomenon, employee wellbeing, environmental sustainability, and a behavioral science perspective of nonviolent action. Ms. Roose is the Student Representative to the ABAI Executive Council and is active in the ABAI SIGs OBM Network and Behaviorists for Social Responsibility.
Abstract:

This panel offers an opportunity for convention attendees to interact with Jamila Raqib, the 2019 ABAI Presidential Scholar who will make opening comments, and behavior analysts with long interests in nonviolent social action. In some cases traditional approaches to nonviolent struggle have become less successful than previously; for this reason, emphases in this panel will be on exploring nonviolent scientific 21st century alternatives. A particular focus will be on contemporary approaches to understanding and shaping what Gandhi discussed as the “Constructive Programme”—which overlaps substantially with the seminal behavior analyst Israel Goldiamond’s “constructional” approach. The panel will include an audience-driven question and answer period, with time allotted for interactions amongst the panelists and the audience.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define and discuss at least three alternative strategic options for nonviolently and effectively supporting social and environmental justice in the 21st century; (2) identify several commonalities between Israel Goldiamond’s “constructional” approach, and Gandhi’s “Constructive Programme;” (3) list at least three specific steps that they could take to prepare for, and participate effectively in, collective action for social and environmental justice. 
 
 
Invited Paper Session #204
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Effort Manipulations to Increase Recycling and Reduce Waste

Sunday, May 26, 2019
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Jennifer Fritz, Ph.D.
Chair: Todd A. Ward (bSci21 Media, LLC)
JENNIFER FRITZ (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Jennifer Fritz is an Associate Professor of behavior analysis at the University of Houston-Clear Lake. She serves as Director of the Severe Behavior Disorders Research Clinic and Co-Director of the Connecting the Dots program at UHCL's Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities, as well as Director of the Behavior Analysis Program at Texas Children's Hospital's Autism Center. Dr. Fritz serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, as a member of the Advisory Board for the TxABA Public Policy Group, and is the Program Chair for the Professional Track of the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis annual conference. In the past, she has served as President of TxABA and Secretary of the TxABA Public Policy Group, as well as Program Chair of the Autism Track for the TxABA annual conference and co-chair of the Autism Track for the Association for Behavior Analysis International. Her research interests include the assessment and treatment of behavior disorders, caregiver training and coaching, and sustainability issues such as increasing recycling and reducing use of single-use materials.
Abstract:

Human reliance on plastic, especially single-use plastic items, has produced devastating effects on the environment. Extensive change and clean-up is needed to improve current conditions; however, behavior analysis is well-suited to provide direction and data on strategies to change human behavior in more environmentally friendly ways. Strategies to effectively increase recycling and reduce reliance on single-use plastics are urgently needed. This talk will discuss studies conducted in a university setting to increase recycling behavior and reduce plastic waste. Both studies involved manipulations of effort to produce desirable change in behavior. Advantages and disadvantages of both approaches will be discussed, and suggestions for avenues of future research and collaboration will be offered.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts, researchers, organizations seeking to improve recycling.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how the placement of recycling bins influences recycling behavior; (2) describe the impact of signs posted by the door on recycling behavior; (3) describe the advantages and disadvantages of different effort manipulation approaches to increase recycling.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #213
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Don Baer Lecture: A Better Mousetrap is Not Enough: Rethinking the Dissemination of Behavior Analysis

Sunday, May 26, 2019
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom EF
Area: PRA; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Ronnie Detrich, Ph.D.
Chair: Mark D. Shriver (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
RONNIE DETRICH (Detrich and Associates)

Ronnie Detrich has been providing behavior analytic services for over 50 years. His work can be characterized as thorough-going behavior analysis drawing from the conceptual, experimental, and applied branches of our discipline. From 1970-1977, he worked at a pioneering Family Service Agency in Flint, Michigan providing behavior analytic services for anyone requesting help. Later, he developed and was the director of a state-wide educational and residential program for school-aged children with autism in South Dakota. In the 1980s, Ronnie was the director of a residential program based on the Teaching Family Model for adjudicated juvenile offenders in West Virginia. From 1986-2004, he was the clinical director for a large non-public school in the San Francisco Bay Area serving children with intellectual disabilities and serious behavior challenges. In addition, he also co-directed a public-school consultation project supporting students with academic and behavioral challenges. From 2004-2018, Ronnie was a Senior Fellow at the Wing Institute, an education policy think tank that focuses on the implementation of evidence-based practices in public schools. Currently, he is the proprietor of Detrich and Associates, a consulting project based in Logan, Utah. He also holds an appointment as adjunct faculty at Utah State University.

In recent years, Ronnie’s work has focused on the challenges of achieving adequate levels of treatment integrity in large systems, the role of the evidence-based practice movement in behavior analysis, and the large-scale implementation of effective practices in public schools. He is a trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and is on the editorial boards of Perspectives in Behavior Science and Exceptional Children. He serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Positive Behavior Intervention. Ronnie has also served on the editorial board of Behavior Analysis in Practice and was the Coordinator of ABAI’s Practice Board.

Abstract:

One of the ambitions of behavior analysis is “better living through behaviorism.” Many scholars in behavior analysis have been concerned about the slow adoption rate of effective behavior analytic practices. Perhaps the problem lies not in our practices but in our dissemination efforts. There are two aspects to disseminating our practices. The first is when we are working with families, educators, or businesses and we have identified an intervention to be implemented. In many instances, even though our services have been sought out, the individuals responsible for implementing the intervention do not do so with sufficient integrity to yield benefit. This represents a limited dissemination effort and the failure to achieve promised gains has the potential to harm the reputation of the individual behavior analyst, the organization providing the service, and the discipline of applied behavior analysis.

The second aspect of dissemination is the effort to increase broad scale adoption of the science and technology of behavior analysis. It is often the case that our dissemination efforts, such as publication in journals and presentations at conferences, at this level are passive. We have a 60-year baseline suggesting that these approaches have been largely unsuccessful. A re-thinking of our dissemination strategies may be warranted. Behavior analysis is the science of social influence and dissemination is a social rather than a technical challenge. It involves, at a minimum, someone disseminating and someone adopting what is being disseminated. It may be worthwhile to frame dissemination as a speaker-listener relation and more closely analyze the variables that influence both the speaker and listener.

A first step in doing this requires that we move away from our topographical definition of dissemination to a functional one. The ultimate criterion for judging dissemination is that a practice is adopted. Without adoption, there is no dissemination. Drawing from our own literature as well as the literature from implementation science and dissemination, an approach will be proposed that has the potential to increase the adoption rate of our practices.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) provide a functional definition of dissemination; (2) describe two levels of dissemination; (3) describe how treatment integrity can influence dissemination; (4) describe the limitations of publications and conferences presentations as dissemination strategies.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #270
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

Behavior Analysis and Relational Frame Theory: Implications

Sunday, May 26, 2019
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Carmen Luciano Soriano, Ph.D.
Chair: Jonathan J. Tarbox (University of Southern California; FirstSteps for Kids)
CARMEN LUCIANO SORIANO (University Almería, Spain; Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology (MICPSY))
Carmen Luciano, PhD, is Full Professor of Psychology and Director of the Functional Analysis Doctoral Program at University of Almeria, Spain. And she is Director of Master in Contextual Psychology in Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology (MICPSY). She received her doctoral degree from the Universidad Complutense, Madrid in 1984. She got a Post-doc-Fulbright fellowship in Boston University and Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies (USA) to do research in the emergence of problema-solving in 1985. She has focused her work in tracking the integration of philosophical, basic and applied areas as a dimensional contextual tree of knowledge. She has directed thirty doctoral theses and has published pivotal papers in Behavior Analysis, RFT and ACT. She is mostly focused in analyzing the deictic and hierarchical framing that might be implied in bringing emotions, thoughts, and valued functions to the present to doing possible flexibility responding. She has a vibrating and creative style while teaching, doing research or working with clients.
Abstract:

Behavior Analysis (BA) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT) are integrated in a continuum dimension that is rooted to the functional and contextual perspective of behavior. The implications are simply huge. In this presentation, I will travel back to those times where BA began to provide formulas about how contingencies organized behavior. These effective experiences accounted for part of the enormous variability shown in behavior and very soon B.F. Skinner realized the impact of rules on contingencies. Even more, the relevance of generative self-rules and self-knowledge as well as how we respond to the one`s own behavior were on the table. This door was identified to further scientific inquiry, however it took some time for an insightful behavior to occur in the middle of practical experiences, an insight pointing to the emergent or derived responding. It was when the door was clearly opened to the analysis of further and more sophisticated forms of variability as generativity or derived responding as altering the meaning of contingencies. Relational Frame Theory was a step forward into the analysis of such behavioral phenomena. Consequently, an extension of the functional dimension was in place to account for relevant behaviors as those pointing to human suffering or, conversely, responding to living in peace with oneself. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is nowadays the contextual Therapy more compromised with the identification of the interactions involved in moving from suffering to living. Very good news for the functional and contextual perspective of behavior with the focus in the emergence of insightful behavior in the days to come that might connect still isolated points.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students. 

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify BA and RFT as part of the same functional dimension; (2) discuss the emergence of insight in behavioral science; (3) discuss ACT strategies based on RFT.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #290
CE Offered: PSY/BACB

Canine Sense and Scent Ability: Applications of Behavior Analysis to Working and Pet Dogs

Sunday, May 26, 2019
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Nathaniel Hall, Ph.D.
Chair: Valeri Farmer-Dougan (Illinois State University)
NATHANIEL HALL (Texas Tech University)

Dr. Hall is an Assistant Professor of Companion Animal Science at Texas Tech University and the Director of the Canine Olfaction Research and Education Laboratory in the Department of Animal Science. Dr. Hall earned his Ph.D. at the University of Florida, specializing in the study of Behavior Analysis and canine olfaction. As a post-doc, he continued his studies at Arizona State University investigating the optimization of training to enhance canine’s detection of Homemade Explosives. At Texas Tech, his work continues to explore canine olfactory perception and how experience influences odor perception. His lab also investigates predictors and correlates of problem behavior, behavioral predictors of working aptitude, and canine health.

Abstract:

Domestic dogs are utilized worldwide for the detection of explosives, narcotics, wildlife, and missing persons. Further, dogs are utilized by numerous private and governmental organizations such as the military, customs, border patrol and police departments for critical detection and apprehension tasks. Importantly, key basic research measuring detection limits, developing optimal training methods, and selection of dogs are largely lacking. Our lab aims to apply basic behavioral research to address relevant questions for working and pet dogs. This talk will highlight our lab’s research, addressing basic questions on how olfactory sensitivity varies across breeds, the degree to which olfactory sensitivity changes with training, the effects of training method on compound odor stimulus processing, and simple measures to enhance the selection of optimal working dogs. Audience member will learn about the current state of knowledge of detector dog science and where behavioral research can be leveraged to improve the performance of working dogs. The same behavioral principles will also be applicable to pet owners interested in training scent work with their pet dogs, or would simply like to learn more about canine olfactory perception.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to (1) discuss key issues facing the detection dog community; (2) discuss key issues behavioral research can facilitate the performance of working dogs; (3) discuss how a canine behavioral lab can be beneficial in teaching behavioral principles while providing community service.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #302
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Applied Behavior Analysis as a Teaching Technology for Inclusion

Sunday, May 26, 2019
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Fairmont, Second Level, Gold
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Jeremy H. Greenberg, Ph.D.
Chair: Lin Du (Teachers College, Columbia University)
JEREMY GREENBERG (The Children's Institute of Hong Kong)
Dr. Jeremy H. Greenberg has joined The Children’s Institute of Hong Kong as Director in 2009. He also works with The Harbour School as a consultant and on its Senior Management Team. In his previous position, he served as Educational Coordinator at the Manhattan Children’s Center in New York, New York, USA where he has retained his role on the faculty advisory committee. Throughout his work in the field, Jeremy has worked as a special educator, supervisor, administrator, and behavior analyst where he has effectively and efficiently provided teacher training and consultation to both public and private schools in New York and New Jersey. Dr. Greenberg’s professional certifications include Board Certified Behavior Analyst, New York State Education Department Permanent Special Education, School District Administrator, and Supervisor and Administrator of Schools. Dr. Greenberg earned three Masters’ degrees in special education and his doctorate in Special Education Applied Behavior Analysis from Teachers College Columbia University after earning a Bachelor’s of Arts in Psychology. In 2010, Dr. Greenberg founded the Hong Kong Association for Behavior Analysis where he has served as President and other Board positions. In 2012 Dr. Greenberg established the first Verified Course Sequence from the Behavior Analysis Certification Board Inc. in Hong Kong. He presents annually at the International Association for Behavior Analysis Convention where he has been a member since 1993. Dr. Greenberg has multiple publications in professional and international journals in fields of applied behavior analysis and education. Dr. Greenberg has been an invited as a lecturer in Hong Kong Polytechnic University. His research areas of interest include verbal behavior, teacher training, cost benefit analysis, and systems management of behavior analysis applied to schools.
Abstract:

We have come a long way since the adoption of the Handicapped Children’s Act of 1975. Inclusion of students with special education needs (SEN) is gaining traction, albeit slowly, in and out of the US. This presentation will review various successful behavioral strategies and tactics and include outcome data from a systems perspective. Greenberg & Greenberg (2014) have described a successful model of inclusion in a complex international school setting in Hong Kong. Applied behavior analysis components were and continue to be used extensively there. A detailed description of those components will be provided in this presentation. It is the aim of this presentation to share the program description and its parts using verbal behavior about the science and terms associated with the research literature in applied behavior analysis. Participants familiar with an intermediate to advanced level of understanding in the field may consider the implementation of some or all of those components in their own schools around the world.

Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) use an assessment and screening tool to determine a given student’s appropriateness for inclusion into a mainstream educational environment; (2) discuss the various roles and responsibilities for general education teachers and special education teachers in an inclusive setting across four behavioral areas (i.e. safety, behavior management, academics, and social skills); (3) discuss a number of strategies and tactics from applied behavior analysis literature that have been found successful for various students in inclusive settings.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #326
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA

Breaking New Ground: ABA in South Korea

Sunday, May 26, 2019
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Fairmont, Second Level, Gold
Area: TBA; Domain: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Jinhyeok Choi, Ph.D.
Chair: Gabrielle T. Lee (Western University)
JINHYEOK CHOI (Pusan National University)
Dr. Choi is an associate professor of special education and director of the Autism and Developmental Disorder Treatment Center at Pusan National University Hospital, South Korea. He obtained his MA and Ph.D. in Applied Behavior Analysis at Columbia University under the direction of R. Douglas Greer. He also has teaching experiences in the CABAS model of schooling (www.cabasschools.org)at the Fred S. Keller School, Rockland BOCES, and the Faison School for Autism. He has served on the editorial boards of 10 journals including Korean Journal of Behavior Analysis and Behavior Support, has published over 50 research articles, and has published three books on behavior analysis and special education in South Korea. He is the recipient of the 2018 award for the Outstanding New Scholar by the Pusan National University, and the 2018 Commendation Award by the Ministry of Health and Welfare, South Korea.
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is the “cutting-edge and traditional” application of behavioral science in real-world settings such as clinics and schools with the aim of improving socially important behavior. ABA has been active in South Korea for the last 10 years. More and more medical doctors, teachers, therapists, and stakeholders are interested in ABA beyond “behavior modification.” The science and practice of a behavioral approach has taken hold in South Korea in a variety of ways, including (a) Positive Behavior Support in schools, (b) legislation for people with developmental disabilities, and (c) training behavior analysts via graduate-school level programs. In this presentation I describe a significant growth in the number of clinics/schools using ABA, BCBA’s practicing, and ABA training programs, in South Korea. Additionally, the current limitations and the future of ABA in South Korea are discussed.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: Pending
 
 
Invited Panel #369
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Promoting Diversity and Inclusion in Behavioral Science
Sunday, May 26, 2019
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer R. Zarcone, Ph.D.
Chair: Jennifer R. Zarcone (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
JOMELLA WATSON-THOMPSON (University of Kansas)
TRACI CIHON (University of North Texas)
DIANA WALKER (Trinity Services; Illinois Crisis Prevention Network)

Dr. Jomella Watson-Thompson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science, a Senior Faculty Associate with the Center for Service Learning. and an Associate Director for the Center for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas.  She attained a Ph.D. in Behavioral Psychology and a Masters of Urban Planning from the University of Kansas. She applies behavioral science methods and interventions to improve how communities address issues related to community health and development. Her research has focused on neighborhood development, substance abuse prevention, and youth and community violence prevention. Dr. Thompson uses a community-based participatory approach to address social determinants or factors that may contribute to disparities, particularly for marginalized groups and communities. She has researched the effects of community-based processes and interventions to promote mobilization and change in communities.  Dr. Thompson has co-authored articles on community capacity-building, youth development, and prevention and received numerous federal, state and local funding awards.  She is as an Associate Editor with Behavior and Social Issues.  Dr. Thompson serves as a Principal with Ad Astra Community Innovations Group, and has extensive experience providing training, technical support and evaluation for coalitions and community-based initiatives.

Traci M. Cihon, Ph.D., BCBA-D is an Associate Professor in the Department of Behavior Analysis at The University of North Texas (UNT). She teaches graduate level courses in Behavior Principles; Verbal Behavior; and Legal, Ethical and Professional Issues. She oversees the Teaching Science Lab, which is a system that designs, delivers, and evaluates the undergraduate Introduction to Behavior Analysis courses and she co-supervises the Cultural Selection Lab. Dr. Cihon has worked in several clinical and academic systems including public and private sectors in both school and home settings in and outside of the US with a variety of individuals with disabilities, children who are at-risk for school failure, and university students. Her scholarship focuses on verbal behavior, international and interdisciplinary dissemination of behavior analysis, behavior analysis as applied to social issues – namely education, and cultural selection and has published in a number of peer-reviewed journals both within and outside of the field of behavior analysis. Dr. Cihon serves on the editorial boards for several major disciplinary and non-disciplinary peer-reviewed journals such as The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, the American Annals of the Deaf, Perspectives on Behavior Science, and she is an Associate Editor for Behavior and Social Issues.
Diana Walker received her Ph.D. in Psychology (Behavior Analysis focus) from the University of Florida in 1996, where she studied basic behavioral principles and behavioral pharmacology in nonhumans under the mentorship of Dr. Marc Branch. She also helped out with Dr. Brian Iwata’s research on the treatment of self-injurious behavior of adults with intellectual disabilities. She then spent ten years conducting NIH-funded research with Dr. Jim Zacny on reinforcing and other abuse liability-related effects of medically used drugs in humans at The University of Chicago. In 2004 Diana began teaching in The Chicago School of Professional Psychology's Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Department, becoming Chair of the department in 2011. Diana still teaches for the department and advises doctoral students, but her full-time job is with the Illinois Crisis Prevention Network, providing crisis-intervention services to people with intellectual disabilities and mental illness who engage in severe challenging behavior. Diana is currently interested in making behavioral services more accessible, effective, and compassionate; mentoring new behavior analysts to be conceptually systematic and essentially empathic; and using a radical-behaviorist approach to addressing social and cultural concerns. Diana has a strong commitment to diversity and social justice and to applying behavior analysis to those issues
Abstract:

Behavior analysis has addressed issues of social justice since the early formation of its field. Early basic and theoretical work provided promise for addressing such issues, while the advent of applied behavior analysis explicitly demonstrated the power of behavioral science in addressing issues of societal concern. Despite the celebrated social validity of behavior analysis, issues of diversity and inclusion persist. This panel features three scientists who have effectively addressed issues of diversity and inclusion in their own laboratories. The discussion will highlight ways to foster diversity and inclusion in the operations and makeup of lab groups, in addition to discussing ways behavior analysis can leverage its science to answer research questions regarding issues of diversity and inclusion in broader cultural contexts. Questions from the audience will be welcomed and encouraged.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe current limitations in behavior analyst’s science communication, (2) describe contemporary methods of engaging the public with science communication via social media, and (3) operationalize ways behavior analysts can change their dissemination tactics to better communicate science.
 

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