Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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  • AAB: Applied Animal Behavior

    AUT: Autism

    BPN: Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroscience

    CBM: Clinical/Family/Behavioral Medicine

    CSS: Community, Social, and Sustainability Issues

    DDA: Developmental Disabilities

    DEV: Behavioral Development

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    EDC: Education

    OBM: Organizational Behavior Management

    PCH: Philosophical, Conceptual, and Historical Issues

    PRA: Practice

    TBA: Teaching Behavior Analysis

    VRB: Verbal Behavior

    SCI: Science

    OTH: Other

45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Program by Invited Events: Saturday, May 25, 2019


 

Invited Paper Session #19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Teaching Safety Skills to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder

Saturday, May 25, 2019
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom EF
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Elif Tekin-Iftar, Ph.D.
Chair: Nicole Heal (Margaret Murphy Center for Children)
ELIF TEKIN-IFTAR (Anadolu University)

Elif Tekin Iftar, Ph.D, is a professor in Special Education at Anadolu University in Turkey. Dr. Tekin-Iftar received her Ph.D. degree in 1999 from Anadolu University. During her doctorate studies she received a scholarship from Turkish Academy of Sciences and pursued part of her doctoral education at University of Kentucky. Dr. Tekin-Iftar received her full professorship in 2009. She served as a director of Research Institute for the Handicapped in Anadolu University between 2007-2014. Her current research and clinical interest include the behavioral treatment of children with autism spectrum disorder and developmental disabilities, single case experimental research methods, and professional development. Dr. Tekin-Iftar received Distinguished Young Scientist Award and Scholarship from Turkish Academy of Sciences in 2003. Dr. Tekin-Iftar has published over 25 international peer-reviewed journal articles, over 20 book chapters, coauthored a book, and served as editors in three books named as Single Case Research Methods in Educational and Behavioral Sciences, Applied Behavior Analysis, and Educating Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Her research has been published in Exceptional Children, Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, Journal of Special Education, Research in Developmental Disabilities, and Autism. Dr. Tekin-Iftar currently serves on the editorial board for Exceptional Children. Dr. Tekin-Iftar teaches research methods in education, applied behavior analysis and single case experimental designs at graduate levels. She served as supervisors for many doctoral students in Turkey. She founded Association for Behavior Analysis Turkey (ABATurkey) Chapter as an affiliation of Association for the Behavior Analysis International and she serves as president of ABA Turkey. She founded a graduate program entitled as “Applied Behavior Analysis in Autism” which is the first and only program in its kind in Turkey. She received a postdoctoral scholarship from The Scientific and Research Council of Turkey and visited University of North Caroline in Charlotte for a year. She is the mother of two daughters.

Abstract:

“Safety skills” is an umbrella term consisting of a wide variety of skills. Research has shown that all children have the risk of being injured perhaps fatally because of the intentional and unintentional accidents. Children with autism spectrum disorder face two or three times the risk of injury or abuse compared with those of their same age peers. Ensuring children’s safety is, and should always be, a concern for parents, teachers, and society. However, it is well-documented that teaching safety skills to children with autism spectrum disorder is often neglected both clinically and experimentally. In a relatively new study, it is indicated that (a) although parents and teachers found safety skills instruction important and necessary, they use natural occurrences as teaching opportunities and prevention behaviors rather than providing systematic instruction and (b) neither parents nor teachers have enough knowledge and experience for teaching safety skills (Sirin & Tekin-Iftar, 2016). However, research has shown that when taught systematically, children with autism spectrum disorder could acquire safety skills and perform them over time and across persons and settings. During the presentation, Turkish parents and teachers’ opinions about teaching safety skills to children with autism spectrum disorder and a series of research studies investigating the effectiveness of prompting strategies, videomodelling, and Social Stories in teaching safety skills will be shared with the audience. Implications of these research studies will be discussed.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts; Psychologists; Special education teachers; Graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the opinions of parents and teachers about safety skills instruction; (2) identify instructional procedures for teaching safety skills to children with autism spectrum disorder; (3) describe the outcomes of research designed to teach safety skills to children with autism spectrum disorder; and (4) describe the implications of research designed to teach safety skills to children with autism spectrum disorder.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #25
CE Offered: BACB

Preparing for a New Role: The School-Based Consultant

Saturday, May 25, 2019
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Fairmont, Third Level, Crystal
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Edward Daly, Ph.D.
Chair: Scott P. Ardoin (UGA Center for Autism and Behavioral Education Research)
EDWARD DALY (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Edward J. Daly III, BCBA-D, conducts research on functional assessment methods. He has co-authored numerous chapters and journal articles on this topic. Dr. Daly is Professor of Educational (School) Psychology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he teaches course work in Applied Behavior Analysis, school-based consultation, and single-case experimental designs.
Abstract:

As schools witness what behavior analysts are capable of doing, they are hiring behavior analysts in increasing numbers to help develop and evaluation interventions with students experiencing behavior and academic problems. In some cases, behavior analysts are delivering direct services, a professional role for which they are well prepared. In a lot of cases, however, schools are calling on behavior analysts to serve as consultants, which is a new role for many of us. A consultant serves in an indirect role by trying to help someone else (e.g., a teacher) help a third party (the student). A consultant typically has no authority over the consultee, but must engage the consultee in such a way that their combined efforts empower the teacher to improve students’ academic achievement and behavioral self-control. The purpose of this presentation will be to help behavior analysts adapt their assessment and instruction/intervention skills to a school-based consultative role. I will present research-based strategies for (a) how to efficiently embed functional assessment principles and practices in the consultation process, and (b) manage the contingencies under which teachers are operating to maximize effectiveness.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts practicing in schools

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) guide teacher consultees in a strategic, efficient, and structured decision-making process that prioritizes improving academic performance; (2) integrate observational data, basic skill assessment data, work samples, and performance-deficit analyses into the functional assessment process; (3) support teacher implementation of empirically derived treatments through antecedent control strategies and performance feedback.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #43
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Pain: An Update From the Applied Front--Conditioning and Measuring Behavior Still Matter

Saturday, May 25, 2019
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom AB
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Frank Symons, Ph.D.
Chair: Kelly M. Schieltz (University of Iowa)
FRANK SYMONS (University of Minnesota)
Dr. Frank Symons is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor in Special Education and Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota where he also serves as the Associate Dean for Research and Policy in the College of Education & Human Development. His research agenda positions him in the crossroads of interdisciplinary inquiry in behavioral disorders and neurodevelopmental disabilities. His specific focus has been on the behavioral mechanisms and pathophysiology underlying chronic self-injurious behavior occurring among individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders including Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, autism, and intellectual disability. His work has also advanced by addressing issues specific to pain and intellectual and developmental disabilities. He holds current appointments in the Department of Educational Psychology and the Center for Neurobehavioral Development. Symons has been P.I. or a Co-Investigator on several NIH R series grants the majority involving bench and bedside/clinic components and their integration.
Abstract:

Pain is a classic or, perhaps, rather a modern scientific conundrum. It is, by definition, a subjective experience. One of the confusing or difficult problems comes about by reducing the experience to a singular objective entity that can be quantified. How and why this is done will be discussed in two ways. One in relation to contemporary accounts of basic pain research agendas and what seems like the (re)discovery of the brain and conditioning (respondent, operant) mechanisms. The other by placing the issue in the applied context of trying to reliably and validity measure pain experience in individuals with communicative difficulties associated with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Target Audience:

Behavioral scientists; practitioners providing services to individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, attendees will be able to: (1) define pain; (2) describe the specific problem of the definition of pain for individuals with communication disabilities; (3) describe common features of non-verbal pain rating scales.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP

Explaining Emergent Tact Control

Saturday, May 25, 2019
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom EF
Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Advanced
CE Instructor: Anna Petursdottir, Ph.D.
Chair: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
ANNA PETURSDOTTIR (Texas Christian University)
Anna Ingeborg Petursdottir received her Ph.D. from Western Michigan University. She is currently an associate professor of psychology and chair of the psychology department at Texas Christian University (TCU), where she teaches courses and supervises doctoral students in Experimental Psychology. She also holds an appointment as a part-time lecturer at Reykjavik University. Anna is a previous editor of The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, a previous associate editor of JABA and a current associate editor of JEAB. She is president-elect of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, a board member of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, a member of the ABAI science board, and a past president of the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis. Anna’s research encompasses both basic and applied interests and focuses primarily on verbal behavior acquisition and the relationship between verbal behavior and derived stimulus relations.
Abstract:

Skinner (1957) defined the tact as a verbal response under the functional control of a nonverbal antecedent stimulus due to a history of generalized conditioned reinforcement. However, control by nonverbal stimuli over vocal verbal responses often emerges in the apparent absence of prior reinforcement. This phenomenon has been documented, for example, in research on on receptive-to-expressive generalization, stimulus pairing observation procedures, and instructive feedback, and it requires explanation in an operant account of language. It is commonly proposed that undocumented reinforcement of overt or covert echoic responses in the presence of the nonverbal stimulus plays a role in emergent tact control. In this presentation I will review research from my own lab and others that has addressed this hypothesis by measuring or manipulating the occurrence of echoic responses during learning trials. I will evaluate the extent to which the results support a functional role of echoic responding in emergent tact control and discuss alternative explanations of the phenomenon, including relational operants and stimulus correlation effects.

Target Audience:

Behavior analysts; scientists

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the proposed role of the echoic in emergent tact control; (2) discuss which findings do and do not support involvement of echoic responding in emergent tact control; (3) describe two alternative explanations of emergent tact control.
 
 
Invited Panel #66
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
The Potential of Statistical Inference in Behavior Analysis: A Panel With Discussion
Saturday, May 25, 2019
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Derek Reed (The University of Kansas)
CE Instructor: Derek Reed, Ph.D.
Panelists: CHRISTOPHER FRANCK (Virginia Tech), SHAWN GILROY (Louisiana State University), AMY ODUM (Utah State University)
Abstract:

This panel will be a discussion of Dr. Jonathan Friedel and Dr. Brady DeHart’s SQAB Tutorial on the utility of statistics in behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe contemporary applications of statistical analyses in behavior analysis, (2) describe the research questions to be addressed by inferential statistics, and (3) describe the controversy of using statistical inference in behavior analysis.
CHRISTOPHER FRANCK (Virginia Tech)
Christopher Franck received his Ph.D. from the Department of Statistics at North Carolina State University in 2010 and is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Statistics at Virginia Tech. Dr. Franck's research interests include the statistical modeling of behavioral data, Bayesian inference with an emphasis in model selection, and spatial statistics.
SHAWN GILROY (Louisiana State University)
Dr. Shawn Gilroy is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Louisiana State University. Dr. Gilroy received his PhD from Temple University, completing his predoctoral training at the Munroe-Meyer Institute and his postdoctoral training at the Kennedy-Krieger Institute. Prior to his post at Louisiana State University, Dr. Gilroy served as a Marie Sklodowska Curie international research fellow at the National University of Ireland, Galway. His work centers on the development and evaluation of evidence-based treatments using technology for children with developmental disorders and the translation of applied behavioral economic methods to clinical populations.
AMY ODUM (Utah State University)
Amy Odum is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Utah State University. Her research interests are in basic behavioral phenomena, such as response persistence, sensitivity to delayed outcomes, conditional discriminations, and environmental influences on drug effects. Her work has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Mental Health. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Vermont’s Human Behavioral Pharmacology Laboratory after earning her Ph.D. and M.A. in Psychology, specializing in Behavior Analysis, from West Virginia University. She received a B.S. in Psychology from the University of Florida. Dr. Odum has been Associate Editor for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and President of the Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. She is a Fellow of ABAI and is currently Editor in Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #70
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

Correspondence of Verbal Reports: An Experimental Analysis

Saturday, May 25, 2019
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom EF
Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
Instruction Level: Advanced
CE Instructor: Julio De Rose, Ph.D.
Chair: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
JULIO DE ROSE (Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos), Mariéle Cortez (Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos)
Julio de Rose received his Ph.D. at the University of São Paulo, Brazil, in 1981, and was a postdoctoral Fulbright fellow at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center for Mental Retardation. He is now Professor of Psychology at the Federal University of São Carlos, Brazil, and Research Director of the Brazilian National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition and Teaching, of which he is one of the founders. He is the author and co-author of more than 130 articles and chapters on experimental, applied, and conceptual Behavior Analysis, and has served in the editorial boards of several international journals in the field of Behavior Analysis.
Abstract:

Skinner remarked that verbal responses are “true” or “objective” when the correspondence with a stimulating situation is sharply maintained. Lanza, Starr, & Skinner (1982) developed an “animal model” for the study of variables involved in correspondence: a pigeon “reported” to another about the color of a hidden disc, by pecking a specific key. Having access to the color, the experimenter could investigate contingencies leading to distorted reports. This presentation will address a series of studies with human participants recently conducted in our lab, with variations in this method. Participants reported about previous behavior or played card games in which they reported the value of their cards. A recent study developed a videogame with different audiences asking about the participant’s previous behavior. Several independent variables have been investigated. Correspondence was enhanced by reinforcement of corresponding responses, punishment of non-corresponding responses, probability of response checking, and modelling of corresponding reports by confederates. Non-corresponding reports increased with reinforcement for specific reports (reinforcing reports of correct responses regardless of correspondence), punitive audiences, and modelling of non-corresponding responses by confederates. This series of studies has progressively refined experimental methods and increased the range of variables investigated, contributing to clarify the determinants of correspondence.

Target Audience:

Researchers or students interested in basic and translational research on verbal behavior.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe and discuss Skinner’s conceptualization about correspondence between verbal response and stimulating situation; (2) identify independent and dependent variables in experiments about verbal correspondence; (3) analyze critically methods, results and conclusions of a sample of correspondence experiments; (4) identify variables that increase or decrease correspondence; (5) relate the conceptual and experimental analysis of correspondence to the lay notions of truth and lie.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #96
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA

Common Mistakes Behavior Analysts Make When Working in Schools (and What to Do Instead)

Saturday, May 25, 2019
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom EF
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Jennifer Austin, Ph.D.
Chair: Bobby Newman (Proud Moments)
JENNIFER AUSTIN (University of South Wales)

Jennifer L. Austin, Ph.D., BCBA-D has been applying the science of behavior analysis to improve outcomes for children and their teachers for over 20 years.  Both her research and clinical work focus on how behavior analytic assessment and intervention strategies can be applied with typically developing children, as well as examining what adaptations may be necessary for making our science “work” in mainstream classrooms.  She has worked with numerous schools in the US and the UK, focusing primarily on those in disadvantaged communities.  Dr. Austin received her PhD from the Florida State University and currently serves as Professor of Psychology and Head of Behavior Analysis at the University of South Wales.  Prior to moving to the United Kingdom, Dr. Austin served as faculty at the University of South Florida, California State University, Fresno and the University of Houston, Clear Lake.  She is the President of the UK Society for Behaviour Analysis and a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice.

Abstract:

Current statistics regarding problem behavior and academic attainment confirm that schools need behavior analysts more than ever. However, many schools that could benefit from our services do not know we exist (or have misconceptions about what we do). Further, our enthusiasm for helping schools enact meaningful changes in student and teacher behavior may cause us to miss some important contingencies that might impact our effectiveness as behavioral consultants. Drawing on work conducted at the University of South Wales, this presentation will identify some tips for “opening the school doors” for behavior analysis. It also will identify some common mistakes that behavior analysts make in schools, including such areas as functional assessment strategies, intervention planning and approach, and data collection. Importantly, it will provide some potential solutions to these problems, as well as identifying some interpersonal skills that might be useful in improving our efficacy in both mainstream and special education settings.

Target Audience:

Behavior analytic practitioners working in schools (particularly early career behavior analysts)

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify common mistakes that behavior analysts might make when working in schools, including mistakes related to assessment, intervention, and data collection; (2) describe some solutions to common mistakes; (3) identify interpersonal skills that may affect school personnel’s willingness to use behavior analytic strategies; (4) describe some strategies for gaining entry to schools that could benefit from behavior analytic consultation.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #112
CE Offered: BACB/NASP — 
Supervision

Providing Effective Supervision to Clinical Practitioners Pre- and Post-Certification

Saturday, May 25, 2019
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom EF
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Tyra Sellers, Ph.D.
Chair: Tiffany Kodak (Marquette University)
TYRA SELLERS (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Dr. Tyra Sellers received her Ph.D. in Disabilities Discipline –Applied Behavior Analysis from Utah State University in 2011 and is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst. She earned a B.A. in Philosophy and M.A. in Special Education from San Francisco State University, and J.D. from the University of San Francisco. Dr. Sellers has over 20 years of clinical experience working with individuals with disabilities, spanning from EIBI through adult services in a wide variety of settings (public and non-public schools, vocational settings, in-home, clinics). Her research interests include behavior variability, choice, functional analyses, and behavioral interventions.
Abstract:

By the end of 1999, the first year in which the Board Certified Behavior Analyst® certification was available, there were 4,707 Board Certified Behavior Analysts® (BCBA®), and by the 10th year, in 2009 there were 5, 731 BCBAs. Fast forward to August of 2018, and there were 29,104 BCBAs; a 400% increase in the past nine years. This means that not only are there increasing numbers of individuals actively pursuing certification, but a flood of novice certificants in the workforce. Whereas our field places a particular emphasis on providing high quality supervision during an individual’s accrual of practical experience hours, it is equally critical to ensure that individuals, post-certification, continue to provide excellent clinical services. It is especially true when one considers that 76% of individuals who responded to a 2016 job task survey from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board® reported their primary-practice areas were providing clinical services to individuals with Autism and Developmental Disorders. Merriam-Webster defines supervision as: “the action, process, or occupation of supervising; especially: a critical watching and directing (as of activities or a course of action).” This is a functional definition, not topographical. In other words, supervision is not defined by the level or title of the parties involved (e.g., pre or post-certification), but by the purposeful activities that take place. This talk focuses on a tiered conceptualization of, and approach to, providing effective supervision that ensures the initial and continued development of robust clinical repertoires.

Target Audience:

This talk is targeted to individuals who are responsible for providing supervision of fieldwork experience, on-going supervision of clinical services, and designing or managing supervision practices, as well as for individual who will become supervisors in the near future.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss strategies for providing effective supervision to individuals accruing their practical experience hours; (2) discuss strategies for providing effective supervision to individual post-certification; (3) be familiar with available resources related to effective supervisory practices.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #132
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP

Consequences of Violence and Neglect in Children: The Risks of Neurobiological and Psychological Impairments

Saturday, May 25, 2019
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Swissôtel, Event Center Second Floor, St. Gallen 1-3
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Willy-Tore Morch, Ph.D.
Chair: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
WILLY-TORE MORCH (The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø)
Small children who live in long-lasting stress and anxiety, whether they be victims within their own homes or refugees suffering on a more global level, develop neurobiological impairments. The brain is plastic and “user dependent”. A child is born with 100 billion nerve cells, but only 15% are connected to other cells. During the first three years, 250.000 new connections are performed per hour in the child’s brain. The architects are the genes, but the constructors are the parents and the child’s social network. Positive experiences stimulate the myelination process in the cells axons and the myelin sheets increase the velocity of the nerve impulse. Long-lasting stress and anxiety reduces the myelination process and influences brain activity. Four brain structures are important for the brain’s reactions to stress and anxiety. The presenter will discuss the specific impacts that stress and anxiety have on each of these brain structures and the ensuing affect they have on the child’s development of crucial abilities necessary to successfully navigate the world. It is of great importance that sources of stress and anxiety, e.g. violence, abuse and neglect, but also war- and refugee experiences are quickly brought to an end. The role of child protection agencies, either by parent training interventions or by taking the child out of the family, is crucial. Likewise, the reception and caretaking of refugee children preventing neurobiological impairments will have life-long consequences for these children’s schooling, education, employment and mental health. The presenter will also briefly highlight parenting strategies and therapeutic interventions that can help to reduce the risk for these vulnerable children.
Abstract:

Small children who live in long-lasting stress and anxiety, whether they be victims within their own homes or refugees suffering on a more global level, develop neurobiological impairments. The brain is plastic and “user dependent”. A child is born with 100 billion nerve cells, but only 15% are connected to other cells. During the first three years, 250.000 new connections are performed per hour in the child’s brain. The architects are the genes, but the constructors are the parents and the child’s social network. Positive experiences stimulate the myelination process in the cells axons and the myelin sheets increase the velocity of the nerve impulse. Long-lasting stress and anxiety reduces the myelination process and influences brain activity. Four brain structures are important for the brain’s reactions to stress and anxiety. The presenter will discuss the specific impacts that stress and anxiety have on each of these brain structures and the ensuing affect they have on the child’s development of crucial abilities necessary to successfully navigate the world. It is of great importance that sources of stress and anxiety, e.g. violence, abuse and neglect, but also war- and refugee experiences are quickly brought to an end. The role of child protection agencies, either by parent training interventions or by taking the child out of the family, is crucial. Likewise, the reception and caretaking of refugee children preventing neurobiological impairments will have life-long consequences for these children’s schooling, education, employment and mental health. The presenter will also briefly highlight parenting strategies and therapeutic interventions that can help to reduce the risk for these vulnerable children.

Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; social workers; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the user dependent brain; (2) understand the effects of long-lasting stress and anxiety experiences in the brain; (3) discuss parent training.
 
 
Invited Panel #142
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Derived Stimulus Relations: A Panel With Discussion
Saturday, May 25, 2019
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Area: SCI; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Anna I. Petursdottir (Texas Christian University)
CE Instructor: Anna I. Petursdottir, Ph.D.
Panelists: ERIK ARNTZEN (Oslo and Akershus University College), KAREN LIONELLO-DENOLF (Assumption College), DANIEL FIENUP (Columbia University)
Abstract:

This panel will be a discussion of Dr. Caio Miguel’s SQAB Tutorial on derived stimulus relations.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe current directions of derived stimulus relations research, (2) describe future directions of derived stimulus relations research, and (3) describe similarities between basic and applied derived stimulus relations research programs
ERIK ARNTZEN (Oslo and Akershus University College)
Dr. Erik Arntzen received his Ph.D. from University of Oslo, Norway, in February 2000. Arntzen’s dissertation focused on variables that influenced responding in accordance with stimulus equivalence. He also holds a degree in clinical psychology. He is currently a full-time Professor in Behavior Analysis at Oslo and Akershus University College (OAUC). His research contributions include both basic and applied behavior analysis, with an emphasis on research in relational stimulus control and verbal behavior. Lately, he has started research projects with a focus on (1) remembering functions in patients with dementia and (2) conditional discrimination of melanoma detection. He has also been interested in ethical considerations and core values in the field of behavior analysis. Furthermore, he has ongoing research projects within the areas of gambling behavior and consumer behavior. He also runs a Behavior Analysis Lab at OAUC. Dr. Arntzen has published papers in a number of different journals including Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB), Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), The Psychological Record, Behavioral Interventions, European Journal of Behavior Analysis (EJOBA), Experimental of Analysis of Human Behavior Bulletin, Analysis of Gambling Behavior, the Analysis of Verbal Behavior, American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & other Dementias, and Psychopharmacology. Dr. Arntzen has served as the president and past-president of the European ABA (2008–2014). Dr. Arntzen has been a member of the board of the Norwegian Association for Behavior Analysis from 1987–1993 and from 2006 to present, holds the position as the secretary of international affairs. Dr. Arntzen is a trustee of Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. He has presented papers at conferences worldwide. Dr. Arntzen has been recognized with awards, including the SABA award for the dissemination of behavior analysis, ABAI award for outstanding mentoring, the research award at Akershus University College, and publication award at OAUC. Dr. Arntzen is one of the founders and the editor of European Journal of Behavior Analysis. He has also served as the editor of Behavior & Philosophy. He has served on the editorials board of several journals, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, The Psychological Record, International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the Behavior Analyst, and The Behavior Analyst Today.
KAREN LIONELLO-DENOLF (Assumption College)
Dr. Lionello-DeNolf is an assistant professor of psychology and the director of the undergraduate and graduate programs in applied behavior analysis at Assumption College. She is also an adjunct faculty member at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She holds a doctorate in psychology from Purdue University with an emphasis in learning and memory, and she is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the doctoral level. Dr. Lionello-DeNolf has taught undergraduate and graduate courses in research methods, learning and behavior, behavioral assessment, behavioral interventions, and the experimental analysis of behavior. For more than a decade, Dr. Lionello-DeNolf was a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Shriver Center, where she conducted translational research in the areas of experimental and applied behavior analysis, autism spectrum disorders, developmental disabilities, discrimination learning, stimulus equivalence, behavioral momentum, and choice. She has led several research projects funded by the National Institutes of Health that investigated the learning processes that may underlie some of the language and other deficits in autism and related developmental disabilities. Her research has been published in leading journals, such as the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, The Psychological Record, and Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Dr. Lionello-DeNolf is past Associate Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and The Psychological Record, she has served on the editorial review board or as a guest reviewer for a number of journals, and she has served on the Science Board of the Association for Behavior Analysis International. Dr. Lionello-DeNolf is the current Associate Editor for Translational Research for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
DANIEL FIENUP (Columbia University)

Daniel M. Fienup is an Associate Professor of Applied Behavior Analysis at Teachers College, Columbia University.  He received his Master’s in Applied Behavior Analysis from Southern Illinois University and his Ph.D. in School Psychology from Illinois State University.  Dr. Fienup and his students conduct research on instructional design and educational performance.  Dr. Fienup is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Behavioral Education and The Analysis of Verbal Behavior.  He also serves on the editorial board for Behavior Analysis in Practice, Perspectives on Behavioral Science, the Psychological Record, and Behavior Development.  He serves on the Licensed Behavior Analyst New York state board and is a past board member of the New York State Association for Behavior Analysis.

 

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