Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

49th Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2023

CE by Content: Supervision


 

Workshop #W6
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Applied Behavior Analytic Acceptance and Commitment Training: Functional Analysis PART ONE
Thursday, May 25, 2023
1:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: CBM/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Yukie Kurumiya, Ph.D.
THOMAS G. SZABO (Capella University), LARISA SHEPERD (Endicott College), ASHLEY PETT (Achievement, Balance, Community LLC), CELIA HEYMAN (New Jersey ABA), YUKIE KURUMIYA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), TYLER-CURTIS CORY ELLIOT (University of Georgia), Kristy Park (George Mason University), ELISE PRACHAR (The Florida Institute of Technology)
Description: Evidence for the utility of acceptance and commitment training (ACT) in applied behavior analysis (ABA) is growing. Most researchers publishing in this area are highly skilled academics with their most experienced graduate students, so it is not surprising that they are successful and operating within an ABA scope of practice. But how does the average ABA practitioner gain access to the coaching needed for successful, ethical implementation of ACT in ABA settings? It does not help that ABA practitioners leave ACT workshops saying, “This is great, but how would I do this?” In fact, it is problematic for our field when training does not result in skill acquisition and sensitivity to the nuances of acceptable conduct when using an intervention. This workshop (Part 1 of 2) will offer training in two skills – ACT assessment and therapeutic alliance. Using a BST format, participants will learn to conduct descriptive functional assessment of the six ACT repertoires and apply a 14-step task analysis to the development of a compassion-focused therapeutic relationship with clients. Participants will receive intensive coaching in small groups from seven seasoned facilitators and access to an online folder with self-paced training material, videos, and relevant research.
Learning Objectives: Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) code dialogue for six core indirect-acting contingencies; (2) discriminate steps in a 14-step task analysis to the development of a compassion-focused therapeutic alliance; (3) conduct descriptive ABA ACT functional assessment with attention to the therapeutic relationship.
Activities: BST - rationale, modeling, rehearsal, feedback. Also, lecture, small group breakout, large group discussion.
Audience: Participants should be familiar with the ACT model. Having previously participated in an ACT workshop, read ACT research, or read ACT books would help. This content is appropriate for BCBAs and for BCaBAs under supervision of BCBAs with ACT in ABA background. This content is also appropriate for students and practitioners of clinical behavior analysis (behavioral counseling, therapy, and so forth).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): BST+ Roleplay, Descriptive ACT-FBA, Therapeutic Alliance
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Applied Behavior Analytic Acceptance and Commitment Training: Functional Analysis PART TWO
Friday, May 26, 2023
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1A/B
Area: CBM/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Yukie Kurumiya, Ph.D.
THOMAS G. SZABO (Capella University), LARISA SHEPERD (Endicott College), ASHLEY PETT (Achievement, Balance, Community LLC), CELIA HEYMAN (New Jersey ABA), YUKIE KURUMIYA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), TYLER-CURTIS CORY ELLIOT (University of Georgia), Kristy Park (George Mason University), ELISE PRACHAR (The Florida Institute of Technology)
Description: ABA interventions tailored to the needs of an individual are both function-based and individualized. If ACT is to be a staple tool that ABA practitioners use, assessment and intervention using this approach should satisfy both criteria. In this workshop, we will introduce a model for combining direct with indirect contingency management strategies. Next, we offer participants opportunities to use indirect and descriptive tools for generating hypotheses related to covert behavior that may be interfering with direct contingency management. After that, we introduce the ABA ACT analog functional analysis procedure for verifying previously generated hypotheses and we offer opportunities for practice in small groups with coaches. Subsequently, we introduce a 10-step task analysis for creating unique, in-the-moment ACT interventions. There will be multiple opportunities in this section of the training to practice component and composite skills in small groups. This workshop (part 2 of 2) assumes some prior knowledge of ACT and ABA. We will use a behavior skills training approach throughout. (Attendance in Part 1 is highly recommended. Contact presenters if you would like to attend Part 2 only).
Learning Objectives: Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) use an analog ABA-ACT functional analysis procedure to verify hypotheses about ACT repertoires in need of intervention; (2) use a 14-step task analysis for developing a compassion-focused therapeutic alliance with clients (3) use a 10-step task analysis for designing function-based ACT interventions uniquely tailored to the needs of individual clients.
Activities: BST - rationale, modeling, rehearsal, feedback. Also, lecture, small group breakout, large group discussion
Audience: Participants should be familiar with the ACT model. Having previously participated in an ACT workshop, read ACT research, or read ACT books would help. This content is appropriate for BCBAs and for BCaBAs under supervision of BCBAs with ACT in ABA background. This content is also appropriate for students and practitioners of clinical behavior analysis (behavioral counseling, therapy, and so forth).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ACT Intervention, Analog ACT-FA, BST+ Roleplay
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Sowing Seeds of Encouragement: A Behavioral Approach to Leadership
Friday, May 26, 2023
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom C
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Danielle Micera, M.Ed.
DANIELLE MICERA (Compass ABA), MAYA OLIVIA STANG (Compass ABA Assessments Coordinator New York State Applied Behavior Analysis Member), Jaira Esthel Forman (Compass ABA Board Certified Behavior Analyst Supervisor New York State Applied Behavior Analysis Member)
Description: This presentation will use foundational concepts rooted within behavioral principles to help those in leadership positions better enable staff to reach their greatest potential. Utilizing strategies derived from research in the field of organizational behavior management, leaders will be able to identify core competencies required to perform essential functions within an ABA company. Using behavioral skills training, leaders can train staff on essential skills and be able to assess performance. Additionally, leaders will be able to provide performance-based feedback to ensure quality services.
Learning Objectives: 1. State the reasons for using behavior analytic supervision and the potential risks of ineffective supervision 2. Identify how Behavioral Skills Training can improve supervisee performance 3. Identify effective methods for delivering feedback to staff using pairing and reinforcement procedures
Activities: The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, data collection, data review, and frequency building exercises.
Audience: Attendees must be a BCBA or BCaBA and perform regular job duties of supervising one or more supervisees.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): competency, obm, performance management, supervision
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Beyond Performance Management: How Anyone Can Navigate a Flawed System Through Process Improvement
Friday, May 26, 2023
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom B
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Andressa Sleiman, Ph.D.
ANDRESSA SLEIMAN (Florida State Unviersity ), ALLISON KING (ABA Technologies, Inc.)
Description: Behavior analysts usually learn the basics of Performance Management (PM) when first introduced to Organizational Behavior Management (OBM). But PM is just one part of applying OBM in an organization. Organizations often re-engineer their processes to become more effective and efficient and must respond effectively to ever-changing environments internal and external to the organization. Responding to these pressures often requires changes to the organization’s processes (or “the way the work gets done”), whether it is to better meet customer requirements or support a change in the organization’s strategy. Behavior analysts in management positions, or BCBAs supervising RBTs may be responsible for implementing and managing these process changes. Yet many do not have formal training in this area, and it is considered the least understood level of performance. This workshop will begin with an overview of behavioral systems analysis – the organization, process, and performer level. The remainder of the workshop will focus on how to analyze, improve, and manage performance at the process level. Participants will learn how to use tools at this level, such as process maps and metrics chains, to teach them how to effectively redesign processes, manage performance through the changes, and achieve process outcomes linked to organizational goals.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1. List and describe the three levels of analysis in Behavioral Systems Analysis. 2. Analyze existing processes using a process mapping tool. 3. Define process level goals linked to organization goals. 4. Identify the process steps that need to be changed based on the analysis of the existing process. 5. Design a desired process using a process mapping tool. 6. Set process and sub-process goals using a metrics chain tool. 7. Describe common pitfalls of process changes and strategies to avoid them. 8. Describe strategies to navigate a flawed system, regardless of role. 9. Implement strategies for managing new behaviors required by the new process.
Activities: -Discuss examples of process change initiatives -Create a process map of an existing process -Create a process map of a desired process -Set process and sub-process goals using a metrics chain tool
Audience: This workshop is intended for individuals who have a basic understanding of OBM and would like to influence performance with a behavioral systems analysis approach, particularly the process level of analysis and improvement.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Leadership, OBM, Supervision, Systems Analysis
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Training for Treatment Integrity: Interobserver Agreement is Not Enough!
Friday, May 26, 2023
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom C
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melinda Docter, Ed.D.
MELINDA DOCTER (myHHBs)
Description: Treatment integrity impacts the effectiveness of client progress. It is the ability to implement a program with the same intent as was written. Think about the following questions: 1.What happens if data is not valid, accurate or reliable? 2. What effects might your programmatic changes have on your client if based on untrustworthy data? 3. Goals may “seem” measurable and observable, but are they? 4. Where are the descriptors? 3. How can behavior therapists take believable data when they aren’t provided technological goals? 4. How can supervisors provide effective feedback for their therapists when they themselves are unable to implement the program with integrity? While IOA data determines the agreement of data collected between a supervisor and a therapist, how useful is it if two observers measure different aspects of the behavior? This workshop will identify and review well-written measurable and observable goals, environmental antecedent variables that must be both identified in the goal and in place prior to the expected response, and effective onboarding and training strategies for both new therapists and supervisors and those providers who can benefit from additional training.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will identify and describe the components of a well-written, measurable, and observable goal. 2. Participants will identify and describe antecedent descriptors and measurement over time necessary to implement a program with treatment integrity. 3. Participants will identify effective onboarding training practices to ensure the mastery and implementation of basic ABA concepts and principles.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, discussion, small group breakout, role play and modeling. Guided practice will be used to ensure mastery of both comprehension and implementation of the skills.
Audience: Participants should have at least 6 months experience in the field of ABA as a behavior therapist, supervisor or BCBA. Session is also appropriate for all supervisors, BCBA's that either provide onboarding training, ongoing clinical training and/or BCBA independent fieldwork supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): goal writing, supervision, training, treatment integrity
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Behaviors Skills Training (BST): Train Your ABA Clinicians Through BST and Really Make an Impact
Friday, May 26, 2023
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1A/B
Area: OBM/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lilyan Willemijn Johanna Campbell, M.S.
LILYAN WILLEMIJN JOHANNA CAMPBELL (ABA Works)
Description: Behavior Skills Training (BST) has earned its credibility, as proven through many years of positive study outcomes. BST is used around the globe in ABA and its popularity is increasing. Many clinicians - including experienced ones - know about BST, but surprisingly, they do not know how to implement this. Through this workshop, we are going to change that. During this workshop, you will learn the theory behind BST. You will receive highlights of various study outcomes that examined the results of BST. Central in this workshop, is practice. You will get plenty of opportunities to practice BST in small groups. During this practice, we will use worksheets, and you will get instant feedback. In addition, you will learn a variety of key situations when you can use BST. For example, you can use BST directly with a learner, but also when training your clinicians. The content of this workshop has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, or theoretical concepts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe what Behavior Skills Training is (2) Identify key situations to use BST (3) Describe the results of using BST (4) Identify and apply BST to relevant situations
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of a brief lecture; guided practice; video-modeling; group discussions; small group activities and frequency building activities.
Audience: Clinicians who want to apply BST with their learners, and individuals who want to apply BST with their clinicians (e.g., supervisors, managers, directors)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Retention Staff, Staff Management, Staff Training
 
Symposium #32
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Optimizing Employee Performance at Multiple Organizational Levels
Saturday, May 27, 2023
11:00 AM–12:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall A-C
Area: OBM; Domain: Translational
Chair: Sharlet D. Rafacz (Western Michigan University)
Discussant: Nicole Gravina (University of Florida)
CE Instructor: Sharlet D. Rafacz, Ph.D.
Abstract:

There are a number of assessments and interventions that are utilized to improve performance in organizations. However, how and when to use these assessments and interventions requires further research. The current symposium looks at several studies aimed at optimizing employee performance, that is, knowing what to intervene on, in what way, and at what organizational level to make the best use of resources. The first two studies will focus on treatment integrity – first at the performer level and second at the systems level. We will provide data on how procedural errors impact treatment integrity and discuss how analyzing them at the systems (organizational) level informs intervention. The second two studies will then highlight how we can utilize untapped resources and customize multi-component interventions. Specifically, we will present research on using co-worker communication to motivate employee performance and how priority weighting and goal difficulty affects behavior and results on performance scorecards. Implications for how these findings can influence decisions and interventions organization-wide will then be discussed. Overall, these studies will highlight how data can be utilized to enhance employee behavior and provide guidance to organizations on how to select and customize interventions for optimal employee performance.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Organizations, Performer, Systems, Wokplace
Target Audience:

Intermediate – Background and/or education in ABA, familiar with single-subject and group design research methodology, understanding of rule-governed behavior

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Describe how procedural errors affect learning post-mastery 2. Identify the benefits of aggregating and analyzing treatment integrity data and several actions supervisors can take with these results 3. Describe how motivational statements impact performance and the benefits of incorporating co-workers as a source for these statements 4. Critically evaluate the priority weight component of performance scorecards
 
A Parametric Analysis of Procedural Integrity Errors Following Mastery of a Task: A Translational Study
(Basic Research)
LEA JONES (California State University, Sacramento), Denys Brand (California State University, Sacramento), Galan Falakfarsa (California State University, Sacramento), Joshua Bensemann (University of Auckland (New Zealand)), Caio F. Miguel (California State University, Sacramento), Megan R. Heinicke (California State University, Sacramento)
Abstract: Procedural integrity can best be described as the extent to which interventions are implemented as intended. Previous research has shown that errors involving consequences can delay or impede skill acquisition. However, not much research has been conducted to evaluate the extent to which such errors affect performance for skills that have previously been mastered under conditions of perfect integrity. To further examine this question, a group design was used to administer a computerized match-to-sample task to 100 undergraduate students. Participants first completed 250 trials with no programmed errors, which was followed by an additional 250 trials with varying levels of errors delivered across conditions (i.e., 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% integrity). The results showed that, on average, those assigned to higher integrity conditions performed better, while performance for those in the lower integrity conditions deteriorated rapidly. These results extend the findings of prior studies and further demonstrates how consequence-based errors affect behavior across various stages of learning.
 

An Analysis of Large-Scale Procedural Integrity Data

(Applied Research)
ABIGAIL BLACKMAN (Behavior Science Technology), Tricia Glick (Behavior Science Technology), Troy Glick (Behavior Science Technology )
Abstract:

Procedural integrity is the extent to which an intervention is implemented as designed (Gresham, 2004). Research shows that integrity impacts clinical outcomes (e.g., DiGennaro et al., 2005; Gresham et al., 1993). That is, higher clinical outcomes are associated with higher levels of integrity. Supervisors are tasked with the responsibility to collect integrity data on their team’s performance, as required by the board (BACB, 2020). However, it is unknown how these data are collected, or what analysis and subsequent action supervisors or organizational leaders take once the data are collected. With the permission of our customers, deidentified integrity data were aggregated and analyzed across a few hundred employees. All data were collected electronically and aggregated to display performance over time. Based on these data, suggestions for subsequent supervisor and organization-wide action are provided to improve their organization-wide and team’s performance, and ultimately impact clinical outcomes. We posit that organizations must use their integrity data to guide their individual, team, and organization-wide supervision efforts. The benefits of aggregating and analyzing integrity data, as well as recommendations for what supervisors should do with those data are discussed.

 

Does Source Matter? Examining the Differential Effects of Supervisor Versus Co-worker Delivered Motivational Statements

(Applied Research)
SEAN BORBOA (California State University, Fresno ), Sharlet D. Rafacz (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

Recent research suggests that statements by supervisors may function as verbal motivating operations and alter employee performance, but it is unknown if similar effects would be seen if delivered by another source. The supervisor is usually the primary agent of change in performance management practices. However, given the numerous job responsibilities of a supervisor, it would be beneficial to examine the potential effects of interventions delivered by a source other than the supervisor, such as a co-worker. The current study used an analogue work setting with a simulated new hire orientation, a confederate supervisor and co-worker, and concurrently available work tasks. There were 10 participants and a single-subject, counterbalanced reversal design was used to investigate the effects of alternative sources of rule statement delivery on employee performance. Despite some mixed results, overall findings support the performance-enhancing effects of motivational statements. Additionally, responding to the different sources delivering the motivational statements (i.e., co-worker versus supervisor) was comparable and suggests the source of rule delivery in organizations may not matter. As such, it is possible that motivational statements delivered by co-workers is a viable, cost-effective way to motivate employee performance, though additional research is needed to confirm these findings.

 

The Effects of Priority Weights on Performance Scorecards

(Applied Research)
SHARLET RAFACZ (Western Michigan University), Alfonso Hernandez (California State University, Fresno)
Abstract:

The field of Organization Behavior Management (OBM) frequently utilizes multi-component interventions, one of which is the performance scorecard. The performance scorecard combines elements such as goal setting, feedback and reinforcement to increase 3-5 behaviors or results. In addition, these behaviors/results are weighted so that some types of performance receive more credit than others. It has been suggested that this is beneficial and communicates relative priorities to employees, but how this affects performance has yet to be empirically tested. Therefore, the present study investigated manipulation of priority weighting and the effect on performance on concurrently available tasks in a workplace analogue. The study included five participants and utilized a single-subject multiple baseline and reversal design to compare equally-weighted and priority-weighted scorecards. Overall, there was an increase in performance when a scorecard was introduced relative to baseline (no scorecard condition). Results also suggested that priority weighting had some influence on behavior, including increases in behavior weighted more heavily but also decreases in behaviors weighted less heavily. However, additional variables such as goal difficulty and task preference, also influenced the effects of the priority weights and deserve further consideration.

 
 
Panel #38
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Integrating Applied Behavior Analysis Into the Hospital: Some Perspectives on Navigating the System and Training Staff
Saturday, May 27, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 5-7
Area: CBM/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alec M Bernstein, Ph.D.
Chair: Alec M Bernstein (Children's Mercy Kansas City Hospital; University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine)
SARA R. JEGLUM (Blank Children's Hospital)
RACHEL HOLDEN (Cincinnati Children’s Hospital)
OLIVIA MILLER (Boston Children’s Hospital; Simmons University)
Abstract:

Children with neurodevelopmental disabilities are twice as likely to be admitted to the hospital and almost three times as likely to have multiple admissions to the emergency department compared to their neurotypical peers. Many children with neurodevelopmental disabilities also engage in behavior that poses a risk of harm to themselves or others and impedes their access to medical care—both contribute to lengthy inpatient admissions. The effects of improperly managing such behavior in the hospital can be extensive. Staff encounter higher rates of injury and greater levels of stress. Hospitals experience large financial deficits. Caregivers report decreased satisfaction in services with continued delays to their child accessing medical care. The invited panelists will share their perspectives on overcoming the barriers to serving these patients by presenting avenues for navigating the hospital system. The discussion generally will entail training and supervising staff, accounting for various stakeholders’ needs, and identifying tactics to disseminate the importance of science.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

Advanced; necessary requisite skills and companies for attendees to gain the most from the panel discussion included (a) completion of graduate-level work focusing on applied behavior analysis, (b) licensure and credentials as someone able to legally and ethically provide behavior-analytic services, (c) some experience beyond graduate school working in the healthcare setting.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to identify (1) common barriers to providing behavior-analytic care, (2) strategies that have proven useful for navigating these barriers, and (3) methods for training staff in the hospital setting.
Keyword(s): behavioral pediatrics, hospital, program development, staff training
 
 
Invited Paper Session #46
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Cultural Responsiveness in Research and Mentorship Within Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 27, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 1
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
CE Instructor: Sarah A. Lechago, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CORINA JIMENEZ-GOMEZ (University of Florida)
Abstract:

Although scientific endeavors strive to be objective, they are the work of individuals whose unique perspectives and experiences impact their research and interpretations of the world and data. Institutionalized discrimination – based on race, gender, national origin, disability, and socioeconomic position, among others – persists in academic and scientific institutions. Further, such discrimination has created barriers for individuals from minoritized groups to participate in building and adding their perspectives to our science. For the field of behavior analysis to truly “diversify,” we must actively engage in behaviors that foster inclusive and safe learning environments for students, engage in collaborative work, and incorporate culturally responsive research and mentorship practices. This talk will review where we are as a field, showcase exemplars of culturally responsive practices, and propose steps for moving forward.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Students, Researchers, BCBAs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify how research practices impact the scope and products of our science; (2) Identify how individuals in leadership positions shape the field; (3) Identify the current state of diversity in research and training in the field of behavior analysis; (4) Identify areas for growth and approaches to improve research and mentorship practices
 
CORINA JIMENEZ-GOMEZ (University of Florida)
Dr. Corina Jimenez-Gomez (she/her/ella) is an Assistant Professor in the Behavior Analysis program at the University of Florida. She earned a Licensure in Psychology at the Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Caracas, Venezuela, and a doctoral degree in Psychology with an emphasis in Behavior Analysis from Utah State University. She completed post-doctoral training at the University of Michigan and was a Research Fellow at The University of Auckland, New Zealand. She has held faculty positions at the Florida Institute of Technology and Auburn University. In addition, she served as clinical supervisor at The Scott Center for Autism Treatment at Florida Tech and was the Director of the Center for Autism Research, Treatment, and Training (CARTT) at Auburn University. Dr. Jimenez-Gomez is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the doctoral level, whose professional interests include translational and applied behavioral research in the areas of choice and reinforcement processes, the use of technology in ABA settings, caregiver and staff coaching, and cultural responsiveness in Behavior Analysis. Dr. Jimenez-Gomez has served as a reviewer for various scientific journals and is currently on the editorial board of the Perspectives on Behavior Science and the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and is Associate Editor for Behavior Analysis in Practice. She is also the mom of two amazing humans and an elderly Labrador, and is married to a fellow behavioral scientist.
 
 
Symposium #136
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Intentional Engagement and Learning Activities in Supervision and Clinical Practices: Outcomes and Considerations
Sunday, May 28, 2023
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4C/D
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Caitlin Fulton (University of Nebraska Medical Center)
Discussant: Alice Shillingsburg (Munroe-Meyer Institute, UNMC)
CE Instructor: Alice Shillingsburg, M.S.
Abstract:

The Behavior Analyst Certification Board, Inc.® (BACB®) established a platform for supervisors to direct and implement learning and training activities in alignment with practice standards and ethics requirements. In this symposium, authors present key topics related to skill acquisition and practice corresponding to the BACB’s® task list and ethics code. Salvatore and colleagues target collaborations with providers and present results of completed hospital provider knowledge surveys related to knowledge of behavioral function, autism knowledge, and stigma. In addition, they review key considerations to optimize quality of care received and providers. Shanker et al., address considerations related to trainee and supervisor preference in virtual supervision timing across measurable dimensions of supervision in fixed and open-ended conditions. Supervision behaviors (i.e., questions asked, feedback provided) showed different patterns between conditions across participants. Loder and colleagues present results of a program evaluation project targeting skill acquisition in constructing behavior-analytic treatment protocols. Sherman et al., present results for an evaluation of the accuracy of staff implementation of multiple stimulus without replacement preference assessments when trained via a program developed in Articulate Rise. Dr. Alice Shillingsburg will provide comments on consideration for clinicians, supervisors, and supervisees in clinical practice and supervision.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): skill development, supervision, training
Target Audience:

BCBA's

Learning Objectives: 1.) Supervision- Ethical Requirements 2.) RBT Training 3.) Skill Development
 
Measuring Hospital Provider Knowledge of Behavioral Function and Autism
GIOVANNA SALVATORE (Rowan University), Christina Simmons (Rowan University)
Abstract: Research consistently documents deficits in physician knowledge and confidence in treating patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Qualitative data analysis from focus groups suggests that medical trainees and physicians demonstrate poor understanding of behavioral function and often rely on restraint (Salvatore et al., 2021). Although there is a need to assess behavioral function and incorporate function-based treatment across settings, there is no existing measure in the literature to assess provider knowledge of behavioral function. In this study, a measure assessing hospital provider knowledge of behavioral function was developed by the research team using an iterative development process, including (1) Stage 1: Item writing; (2) Stage 2: Expert review (feedback solicited from BCBAs, RBTs, psychologists, individuals with ASD/caregivers and medical providers); and (3) Stage 3: Cognitive interviews (i.e., provider thoughts while completing the measure). A total of 200 physicians will complete (1) the newly developed survey measuring knowledge of behavioral function and (2) the Autism Stigma and Knowledge Questionnaire to measure knowledge of ASD. We hypothesize that results will demonstrate the need for greater knowledge of behavioral function in hospital settings to maximize the quality of care received by patients with ASD. Implications for behavioral training across settings will be discussed.
 

A Comparison of Fixed Versus Open-Ended Supervision Timing on Trainee and Supervisor Satisfaction

MAYA SHANKER (Rowan University), Christina Simmons (Rowan University), Abigail Moretti (Rowan University), Morgan Caione (Rowan University), Taylor Pankiewicz (Rowan University), Michelle Ennis Soreth (Rowan University)
Abstract:

Effective supervision in the field of applied behavior analysis relies on the professional development of trainees during practical fieldwork experiences; however, research evaluating virtual supervision delivery is limited. Trainee preference and satisfaction with supervision timing could result in increased skill development for trainees and positive treatment outcomes for their clients. This study explores trainee and supervisor preference in virtual supervision timing and compares measurable dimensions of supervision across methods. Using a multiple baseline with embedded reversal design, this study compared two conditions of weekly virtual supervision timing: a fixed condition (i.e., same time per client session determined by supervisor) and an open-ended condition (i.e., same percentage of client session duration at time(s) requested by the trainee). Results with five trainees demonstrate higher trainee and supervisor satisfaction scores in the open-ended condition and greater variability in scores during the fixed condition, with consistent supervisor engagement ratings across conditions. Both the supervisor and the trainees indicated a preference for the open-ended condition. Supervision behaviors (i.e., questions asked, feedback provided) showed different patterns between conditions across participants. Findings suggest that the opportunity for the trainee to request the supervisor’s presence during critical times of a client’s session may lead to more effective supervision.

 
An Assessment of Skill Acquisition and Skill Generalization in Constructing a Comprehensive Protocol in a Graduated Instructional Format
BRITTANY HOPE LODER (University of Nebraska Medical Center- Munro-Meyer Institute ), Kyle Dawson (Munroe-Meyer Institute), Desiree Dawson (UNMC-Munroe Meyer Institute), Amanda Zangrillo (University of Nebraska Medical Center, Munroe-Meyer Institute)
Abstract: Previous research demonstrates the effectiveness of behavioral skills training in teaching core skills and behavior-analytic procedures to adult trainees. Developing efficient and impactful training for staff to acquire and master skills related to the registered behavior technician task list® (RBT®). In the current evaluation we conducted a program improvement project to teach RBT® staff to construct comprehensive skill acquisition and behavior reduction protocols in an outpatient clinic setting. The main aims of the project included assessing the extent to which components of graduated instructional strategies facilitated mastery of the core features of protocol development. In addition, we tested generalization of this skill when asked to construct a new protocol. Findings suggested that for all participants, the combination of textual + didactic instruction + feedback was required for mastery on the protocol construction task. For individuals who completed the generalization test, all participants maintained mastery. Additional research is warranted to determine the extent to which each training component impacted skill development and what combination of instructional strategies are required to reach mastery. Considerations will be discussed.
 
An Assessment of Interactive Computer Training on Staff Acquisition of MSWO Preference Assessment Implementation
JAMES SHERMAN (Evergreen Center), Joseph M. Vedora (Evergreen Center), Rebecca Hotchkiss (Evergreen Center, Cambridge College, CABAS)
Abstract: Abstract Interactive Computer Training (ICT) is an increasingly popular way to train employees on job-related skills. Advantages of interactive computer training include consistency in training, fewer resources needed in training, and flexibility for the person learning the target skill (Gerencser et al., 2018). ICT applications in applied behavior analysis have, thus far, been primarily used to teach staff discrete trial procedures (Erath & DiGennaro-Reed, 2020). In the current study, a multiple baseline across participants design was used to evaluate the effects of a program developed in Articulate Rise on the accuracy of staff conducting a multiple stimulus without replacement preference assessment. Participants were newly hired staff members with no background or formal training in applied behavior analysis who attended orientation for a residential treatment school that provides services to children with severe and significant disabilities. Results indicate that while staff did show improvement, ICT alone may not be sufficient for training staff to implement multi-step procedures. No participant demonstrated mastery of the procedure without the addition of other behavior skills training components (i.e., feedback, modeling). Limitations and recommendations for future research and practice are explored.
 
 
Symposium #156
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Engaging in Ethical and Effective Supervision Practices
Sunday, May 28, 2023
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Mineral Hall A-C
Area: OBM/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Melissa L. Olive (Self-Employed)
Discussant: Melissa Saunders (Creative Interventions)
CE Instructor: Melissa Saunders, Ph.D.
Abstract:

With 36 states requiring licensure in behavior analysis and over Board Certified Behavior Analysts (hereafter behavior analysts), the demands on our growing field could not be greater. Less than half of those behavior analysts have been certified 5 years or longer leaving few experienced supervisors to train the next generation of behavior analysts. Moreover, very few behavior analysts receive training in how to supervise. At best, behavior analysts complete the BACB required 8-hour training prior to providing supervision. Luckily, future behavior analysts will receive formal training as part of the coursework requirements for the 5th Edition task list (BACB, 2017). Given the importance of and need for quality supervision, this symposium on will focus on ethical issues in supervision, completing 360 evaluations as part of supervision, elements of effective supervision, and effective tiered supervision in large organizations. Disclaimer: This session will not prepare you to become a supervisor but may be used in conjunction with additional training and experiences to become a supervisor.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Supervision, Supervision, Supervision Evaluation
Target Audience:

This session is for BCBAs who supervise RBTs, Trainees, and other BCBAs. Supervision at all levels will be covered.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Participants will identify ethical considerations regarding supervision of independent fieldwork and they will be able to identify the problem-solving process for resolving ethical dilemmas. 2. Participants will identify how to set up and track 360 feedback evaluation data 3. Participants will describe the importance of structuring supervision sessions with an agenda and measurable and targeted goals. 4. Participants will describe how to complete clinical audits as one measure of supervision effectiveness
 
Ethical Considerations When Supervising
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Self-Employed)
Abstract: This session will apply the Ethics Code for Behavior Analysts to various ethical situations that arise as a supervisor and supervisee move through the independent fieldwork process. Strategies for problem solving ethical dilemmas will be presented and finally procedures for preventing subsequent ethical missteps will be discussed.
 
Conducting Effective 360 Evaluations as a Component of Supervision
PAMELA M. MARTIEN-KOCH (Clear Creek Behavior Services, LLC)
Abstract: The BACB Supervision Curriculum 2.0 states that several types of supervision evaluations are required as part of the supervision process. This includes both knowledge and performance-based evaluations. However, it also includes supervision performance evaluations, competency evaluations, professionalism evaluations, child progress evaluations, on-going effects of supervision, and supervisor evaluations. The process of completing evaluations while also receiving performance feedback is known as 360-degree evaluations. 360 evaluations help both the supervisee and supervisor understand their strengths and weaknesses from a variety of perspectives. This session will discuss the 360 evaluation process as well as review possible forms that may be used for the evaluations. Pros and cons of this process will be discussed.
 

CANCELLED: Effective Elements of Supervision

Melissa Saunders (Creative Interventions)
Abstract:

Given the limited number of Behavior Analysts and the high demand for services derived from the science of applied behavior analysis, services are often delivered using a tiered model. This tiered model is typically made up of a Behavior Analyst providing supervision to a behavior technician. In this model, the supervising Behavior Analyst is expected to design individualized interventions for the consumer of the treatment while also ensuring the behavior technician is implementing those interventions to fidelity. While the tiered model does allow for more access to treatment there are many challenges. This session will highlight some of those challenges and provide practical real-world strategies that can be applied to overcome them. In addition, participants will learn the importance of structuring supervision to include a structured supervision plan for supporting effective treatment implementation and supervisee work enjoyment.

 
Effective Tiered Supervision in Large Companies
STEPHEN WOOD (Cultivate Behavior Management Corporation )
Abstract: This session will focus on the role of higher-level clinical leadership. Participants will learn strategies for managing oversight of clinical services in larger and/or growing organizations. Specifically, the presentation will focus on the role of tiered supervision in including the role of a Clinical Supervisor, Clinical Manager, and Clinical Director. Supervision of BCBAs will be discussed including the structure and function of 1:1 meetings including the development of an agenda and measures of progress and goal attainment. The role of compliance audits will also be discussed including documenting 5% RBT supervision and completion of session note audits.
 
 
Symposium #220
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Structured, Supportive, and Competency-Based Approaches to the Supervision of Behavior Analytic Trainees
Sunday, May 28, 2023
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Janice Frederick (The ABRITE Organization)
CE Instructor: Janice Frederick, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Over the last 15 years, the field of behavior analysis has experienced accelerated and unprecedented growth with the Behavior Analysis Certification Board® (BACB®) reporting that less than half of its certificants have been credentialed for more than 5 years. There are many implications for these data including that an increasing number of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) are taking on the role of supervisor for those individuals seeking a credential. Both the roles of supervisor and supervisee can be challenging particularly in the presence of formal guidance and a literature base related to behavior analytic supervision that is growing in detail and volume but remains lean. The current symposium examines competency-based models for supervision of behavior analytic trainees and offers considerations and tools for supervisors and supervisees that may support their success in their respective roles. A primary purpose of the symposium is to encourage those that function as supervisors to participate in dissemination and empirical analyses of their supervision practices. The presentations will include detailed descriptions of supervision processes and resources, competency-based assessments, and measures of supervision quality.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Individuals who hold or pursuing a credential in behavior analysis

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the symposium, participants will be able to: (1) describe components of a competency-based model of behavior analytic supervision, (2) detail methods for measuring content mastery by behavior analytic trainees and (3) describe an evidence-based coaching process designed to improve the performance of supervisees.
 

A Competency-Based Model for the Provision of Supervision to Aspiring Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs)

MATTHEW CHRISTOPHER PETERSON (The ABRITE Organization; Brite Horizons), Janice Frederick (The ABRITE Organization)
Abstract:

Currently, there are 4 different pathways to Board Certified Behavior Analyst® (BCBA®) certification, all of which require between 1500 and 2000 hours of practical fieldwork in applied behavior analysis. Rapid growth in our field has resulted in an increasing number of Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) providing supervision to future applicants. Sellers, Valentino, Landon & Aiello (2019) distributed a survey on current supervisory practices and barriers to effective supervision. One identified area of improvement relates to using a structured system to track trainees’ mastery of skills with a specific focus on competency-based training. The Behavior Analyst Certification Board, Inc.® has built out requirements related to the nature of supervision, content of supervision, acceptable activities for supervision, tracking supervision, and the supervisor-supervisee relationship, but there are not yet requirements for assessing mastery of content covered during supervision. The current paper summarizes the evolution of the model of supervision within a clinical organization and provides detailed descriptions of its components including curriculum sequence, format for group supervision meetings, terminology and practical-based competencies, self-assessment on learning outcomes related to the BCBA task list items, check-in meetings, regular evaluation of the supervisory relationship, and opportunities for individual and group supervision. Methods used to support and measure learning outcomes, supervisee self-assessment on content mastery, quality of supervisor-supervisee relationships, and performance of the supervisor will also be reviewed.

 

Decreasing Burn Out in Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Supervision: How Mock Exams and Banked Resources Can Increase Supervisor Satisfaction, Supervision Quality, and Supervision Consistency

CAS BREAUX (Central Reach)
Abstract:

In applied behavior analysis, supervision responsibilities are often combined with an active case load, management, and other responsibilities. In organizations without formal supervision models and banked resources, supervisors are responsible for assessment, training deficit competencies, and ensuring quality services are delivered by their trainees. In many organizations, supervisors are additionally responsible for their own supervision process and resources, making supervision quality inconsistent, even within the same organization. The use of competency assessments in supervision is also limited, due in part to the time-consuming nature of creating and updating questions that are similar to those on certification exams. Assessments designed to identify deficits within and across items listed on the Behavior Analyst Certification Board® (BACB®) 5th ed. task-list are then less likely to be used in supervision. Similarly, the time required to create and maintain a bank of supervision resources for task-list items can limit the quality of supervision offered, especially when additional resources are needed to address trainee deficits in within and across task-list items. This manuscript will explore increasing supervisor satisfaction and increasing supervision quality and consistency across organizations, using partial mock exams for competency assessment and banked supervision resources.

 

Maximize Supervision Impact With Accomplishment-Based Coaching

SHANE ISLEY (Performance Thinking Network)
Abstract:

In most Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) treatment programs using a tiered-service delivery model, behavior analysts are responsible for providing ongoing supervision of assistant behavior analysts and behavior technicians. This type of supervision aims to enable each supervisee to produce valuable contributions (e.g., positive, therapeutic relationships, clients who meet frequency aims on instructional programs) that help the organization improve service quality and client progress while strengthening employee engagement. Clinical supervisors (i.e., Board Certified Behavior Analysts® who oversee supervisees in ABA organizations) typically learn what is expected of them as supervisors in graduate school, supervised fieldwork, and the required Behavior Analyst Certification Board® (BACB®) 8-hour supervision training program. However, they often do not learn how to improve the performance and engagement of employees through coaching and evidenced-based management practices. In this presentation, we will provide an overview of a coaching process that clinical supervisors can employ to help them manage individuals and teams while continuously improving the quality of services delivered by their supervisees. Influenced by Thomas Gilbert and other thought leaders in Human Performance Technology, this accomplishment-based coaching process helps supervisors sharpen their focus on improving the valuable contributions of those they manage and optimize conditions to ensure that they produce the accomplishments as expected.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #262
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Establishing Pivotal Professional Skills in the Course of Supervision
Sunday, May 28, 2023
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Convention Center 401/402
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kerri L. Milyko (CentralReach)
CE Instructor: Linda LeBlanc, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: LINDA LEBLANC (LeBlanc Behavioral Consulting LLC)
Abstract:

A pivotal skill is one that, when acquired, produces beneficial changes across a wide range of other skills as an ancillary effect. For a practicing behavior analyst, organization and time management skills, problem solving skills, and interpersonal skills moderate many other repertoires in both work (e.g., academic success, clinical effectiveness, productivity) and personal life (e.g., household management, money management) and are pivotal to success as a clinician and supervisor. However, at least some behavior analysts become certified without explicit training in these skills and refinement of these repertoires. When these skills are weak, the transition to full time employment can be stressful and the risk of poor performance or burnout is increased. This presentation will review strategies for establishing core professional effectiveness skills in the course of supervision.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBA Supervisors

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify at least 3 pivotal professional skills; (2) identify 5 steps of a structured problem solving approach; (3) identify the effects of perspective taking on various professional behaviors.
 
LINDA LEBLANC (LeBlanc Behavioral Consulting LLC)
Linda A. LeBlanc, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Licensed Psychologist is the President of LeBlanc Behavioral Consulting and the past Editor in Chief of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. Her 25 year career has included academic positions at Claremont McKenna College, Western Michigan University and Auburn University as well leadership positions in human services organizations. She established LeBlanc Behavioral Consulting in 2017 and consults to technology companies, universities, and behavior analytic human service organizations. Her professional interests include behavioral treatments, supervision and mentoring, and ethics. She is a Fellow of ABAI and is the 2016 recipient of the APA Nathan H. Azrin Award for Distinguished Contribution in Applied Behavior Analysis.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE