Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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49th Annual Convention; Denver, CO; 2023

CE by Type: QABA


 

Workshop #W17
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
The Four Causes of Schedule-Induced Behaviors: Experimental and Applied Implications
Thursday, May 25, 2023
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 2A
Area: EAB/PCH; Domain: Basic Research
CE Instructor: Jeff Kupfer, Ph.D.
JEFF KUPFER (University of Colorado Denver), RON F. ALLEN (Simmons University)
Description: Adjunctive or schedule-induced behaviors (sometimes maladaptive and always excessive) are behaviors that are maintained at a high probability by stimuli that derive their reinforcing properties as a function of parameters governing the availability of some other class of reinforcement. In non-human subjects, some schedules of reinforcement have been shown to generate strange behaviors such as: polydipsia, attack against members of its own species, self-induced escape, pica, and hyperactivity; In human subjects, these same schedules can exaggerate behaviors such as fluid intake, aggression, pacing, grooming, eating, stereotypic behavior, smoking and, quite possibly-- “wretched excess”. This presentation provides a new framework for schedule-induced behaviors that organizes sixty years of research and theoretical literature. A video-tape will be shown demonstrating various types of schedule-induced behaviors in a rat and pigeon. Studies describing functional relationships with reinforcement schedules and “generator schedules” (i.e., schedules promoting schedule-induced behaviors) will be reviewed, as well as functional assessment and measurement strategies. Alternative reinforcement strategies in applied settings will be reviewed and case studies will be presented comparing fixed- vs. variable-DRO schedules
Learning Objectives: (1) Attendees will describe the Aristotelian four causes of schedule-induced behaviors (2) Attendees will describe methods to measure and assess schedule-induced behaviors (3) Attendees will describe pitfalls in using common schedules of reinforcement (4) Attendees will describe alternatives to minimize the influence of schedule-induced behaviors
Activities: Instructional strategies: lecture, discussion Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, video presentation, assessments. The format combines lecture and discussion
Audience: Masters level BCBAs or higher
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Verbal Operant Experimental Analyses for Speakers With Autism and Other Language Disorders
Friday, May 26, 2023
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1E/F
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lee Mason, Ph.D.
LEE MASON (Cook Children's Health Care System), ALONZO ALFREDO ANDREWS (The University of Texas at San Antonio)
Description: Individualized interventions are premised upon the accurate assessment of behavioral deficits and excesses. Forty years of research on functional analysis has shown it to be the most rigorous and precise method of behavioral assessment. Traditionally used to identify the environmental determinants of problem behavior, functional analyses are increasingly being used to assess a variety of different functional and academic skills. This workshop focuses on extending the technology of functional analysis to examining the verbal behavior deficits of individuals with autism. Even with early intensive behavioral intervention, a large number of individuals with autism fail to develop fluent speech. These individuals may require a more systematic approach to language acquisition. We provide an interactive approach to conducting verbal operant experimental (VOX) analyses, and using the results of this assessment for developing individualized treatment plans for individuals with autism and other language disorders. Specifically, we use multiple-exemplar training and guided practice to demonstrate the procedures and interpretation of a VOX analysis. The methodology described in this workshop is empirically supported, and conceptually systematic with a behavior-analytic approach to language assessment and intervention. Special attention will be paid to speakers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the strength of verbal operants in relation to one another; (2) conduct a VOX analysis; (3) develop individualized treatment objectives; and (4) demonstrate the process for abstracting stimulus control over each of the verbal operants.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video modeling, role-playing, and workbook demonstrations. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Guided notes will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop is geared towards Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts, Registered Behavior Technicians, special education teachers, school psychologists, speech language pathologists, and other professionals who provide direct services to strengthen the language of children with autism. Additionally, researchers who study verbal behavior may benefit from this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): errorless learning, functional analysis, stimulus overselectivity, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Teaching Students and Staff With the PORTL Laboratory
Friday, May 26, 2023
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4E/F
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Ph.D.
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas), MARY ELIZABETH HUNTER (Behavior Explorer), CRYSTAL FERNANDEZ (University of North Texas)
Description: PORTL, the Portable Operant Research and Teaching Lab, offers a convenient and fun way to experience the principles of behavior. This tabletop game is essentially a portable Skinner box for humans. However, unlike the Skinner box, students get to experience what it is like to be both the teacher and the learner. Through PORTL exercises, students can learn about reinforcement, extinction, discrimination, stimulus control, shaping, chaining, and other behavioral phenomena. PORTL teaches students how to design reinforcement systems, write teaching plans, collect data, and assess the learner’s progress during teaching. In this workshop, you will learn the fundamentals of PORTL, the parallels between PORTL and the Skinner box, and the basics of using PORTL as a teaching tool in the classroom or for staff training. You will also get to play several PORTL exercises as both the teacher and learner, which will further illustrate the power of PORTL as a teaching tool.
Learning Objectives: (1) Describe the basic components of the game PORTL and the relationship between PORTL and the Skinner box. (2) Describe how to use PORTL to teach basic behavioral principles to students or practitioners. (3) Set up a game of PORTL and carry out a PORTL exercise to illustrate a behavioral principle or teach a behavior.
Activities: This workshop will consist of lectures and hands-on activities. Lectures and videos will be used to describe the basics of PORTL and teach participants how to use PORTL to teach others about basic behavioral principles. Participants will have a chance to experience PORTL through a series of hands-on exercises. During the exercises, participants will play the roles of both teacher and student. Group discussions will be used to summarize and reflect on the experience gained by playing the exercises and to further discuss how to use PORTL as a teaching tool.
Audience: This workshop is designed for anyone who is interested in teaching others about basic behavioral principles and who is interested in teaching others about how to design and implement teaching programs. University professors will find the material useful for their undergraduate and graduate behavior classes. BCBAs and licensed psychologists will find the material useful for training practitioners and therapists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): basic principles, laboratory experience, shaping skills, staff training
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
How to Use Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Ethically With Parents and Caregivers
Friday, May 26, 2023
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1C/D
Area: CBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa N. Wilson, Ph.D.
ALYSSA N. WILSON (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology--SoCal)
Description: Parents of children with complex health needs require additional support beyond the integrity of implementing treatment plans. There is a plethora of empirical evidence supporting how to help parents implement treatment plans, yet less is known about how to embed other aspects of parental support to enhance the health and wellbeing of not only the parent but also the family. Recent research has shown the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment training within parent coaching contexts, particularly on parental stress, engagement in values-based patterns of actions, and the parent-child relationship. While promising, behavior analysts have minimal training opportunities to learn how to use ACT ethically within parent training or coaching contexts. Similarly, no training resource currently exists for behavior analysts to implement ACT within their scope of competence. Therefore, the current workshop seeks to provide attendees with an overview of how to use ACT in parent coaching contexts. The workshop will: 1) provide an empirically supported foundation on how behavior analysts can conceptualize ACT without relying on mid-level terminology; 2) outline step by step how to arrange an ethical ACT intervention for parents and caregivers; and 3) use video modeling help attendees establish repertories to use in their clinical practice.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify ACT components using behavior analytic language 2. Define key features of ethical ACT interventions 3. Select ethical ACT interventions when given an example of a presenting parent situation
Activities: The workshop will use the following activities: 1. Didactic lecture and group discussion 2. Guided practice through video observation and group discussion. 3. Video demonstrations of strategies will be provided.
Audience: The target audience is "intermediate", as they should have some general exposure to basic conceptual and empirical foundations of Relational Frame Theory. They should also have behavior analytic experience, and therefore should be certified or at least completed graduate training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ACT, Ethics, Parent training
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Training for Treatment Integrity: Interobserver Agreement is Not Enough!
Friday, May 26, 2023
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom C
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melinda Docter, Ed.D.
MELINDA DOCTER (myHHBs)
Description: Treatment integrity impacts the effectiveness of client progress. It is the ability to implement a program with the same intent as was written. Think about the following questions: 1.What happens if data is not valid, accurate or reliable? 2. What effects might your programmatic changes have on your client if based on untrustworthy data? 3. Goals may “seem” measurable and observable, but are they? 4. Where are the descriptors? 3. How can behavior therapists take believable data when they aren’t provided technological goals? 4. How can supervisors provide effective feedback for their therapists when they themselves are unable to implement the program with integrity? While IOA data determines the agreement of data collected between a supervisor and a therapist, how useful is it if two observers measure different aspects of the behavior? This workshop will identify and review well-written measurable and observable goals, environmental antecedent variables that must be both identified in the goal and in place prior to the expected response, and effective onboarding and training strategies for both new therapists and supervisors and those providers who can benefit from additional training.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will identify and describe the components of a well-written, measurable, and observable goal. 2. Participants will identify and describe antecedent descriptors and measurement over time necessary to implement a program with treatment integrity. 3. Participants will identify effective onboarding training practices to ensure the mastery and implementation of basic ABA concepts and principles.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, discussion, small group breakout, role play and modeling. Guided practice will be used to ensure mastery of both comprehension and implementation of the skills.
Audience: Participants should have at least 6 months experience in the field of ABA as a behavior therapist, supervisor or BCBA. Session is also appropriate for all supervisors, BCBA's that either provide onboarding training, ongoing clinical training and/or BCBA independent fieldwork supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): goal writing, supervision, training, treatment integrity
 
Invited Paper Session #46
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Cultural Responsiveness in Research and Mentorship Within Behavior Analysis
Saturday, May 27, 2023
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 1
Area: SCI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
CE Instructor: Sarah A. Lechago, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: CORINA JIMENEZ-GOMEZ (University of Florida)
Abstract:

Although scientific endeavors strive to be objective, they are the work of individuals whose unique perspectives and experiences impact their research and interpretations of the world and data. Institutionalized discrimination – based on race, gender, national origin, disability, and socioeconomic position, among others – persists in academic and scientific institutions. Further, such discrimination has created barriers for individuals from minoritized groups to participate in building and adding their perspectives to our science. For the field of behavior analysis to truly “diversify,” we must actively engage in behaviors that foster inclusive and safe learning environments for students, engage in collaborative work, and incorporate culturally responsive research and mentorship practices. This talk will review where we are as a field, showcase exemplars of culturally responsive practices, and propose steps for moving forward.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Students, Researchers, BCBAs

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify how research practices impact the scope and products of our science; (2) Identify how individuals in leadership positions shape the field; (3) Identify the current state of diversity in research and training in the field of behavior analysis; (4) Identify areas for growth and approaches to improve research and mentorship practices
 
CORINA JIMENEZ-GOMEZ (University of Florida)
Dr. Corina Jimenez-Gomez (she/her/ella) is an Assistant Professor in the Behavior Analysis program at the University of Florida. She earned a Licensure in Psychology at the Universidad Católica Andrés Bello in Caracas, Venezuela, and a doctoral degree in Psychology with an emphasis in Behavior Analysis from Utah State University. She completed post-doctoral training at the University of Michigan and was a Research Fellow at The University of Auckland, New Zealand. She has held faculty positions at the Florida Institute of Technology and Auburn University. In addition, she served as clinical supervisor at The Scott Center for Autism Treatment at Florida Tech and was the Director of the Center for Autism Research, Treatment, and Training (CARTT) at Auburn University. Dr. Jimenez-Gomez is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the doctoral level, whose professional interests include translational and applied behavioral research in the areas of choice and reinforcement processes, the use of technology in ABA settings, caregiver and staff coaching, and cultural responsiveness in Behavior Analysis. Dr. Jimenez-Gomez has served as a reviewer for various scientific journals and is currently on the editorial board of the Perspectives on Behavior Science and the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and is Associate Editor for Behavior Analysis in Practice. She is also the mom of two amazing humans and an elderly Labrador, and is married to a fellow behavioral scientist.
 
 
Symposium #94
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Advances in the Analysis of Behavior-Physiology Relations
Saturday, May 27, 2023
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1C/D
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas)
CE Instructor: Joseph D. Dracobly, Ph.D.
Abstract:

As the science of behavior advances, we seek new ways to understand the dynamic variables that influence behavior. With the advancement of technology, behavior analysts are better able to look "under the skin," and understand how a variety of physiological variables interact with other behavior-environment relations. In this symposium, researchers will present three recent advancements in the investigation of the interaction between physiology and behavior, including a method for identifying trauma-related stimuli in the everyday environment, an investigation of the relationship between heart rate and severe problem behavior, and a demonstration of the utility of measuring heart rate in the treatment of phobias. Each study will present unique insights into these dynamics and include practical strategies for including these measures to enhance more precise, wholistic interventions.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): heart rate, phobia, problem behavior, technology
Target Audience:

Intermediate to advanced; Attendees should have experience in the assessment and treatment of either severe behavior disorders or other psychological conditions (e.g., phobia).

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe a method to identify trauma-related stimuli present in the everyday environment through analysis of heart rate and various parameters of choice during preference assessments; (2) describe how to analyze the relationship between heart rate and problem behavior and functional properties of problem behavior; (3) describe the utility of measuring heart rate in the assessment and treatment of phobias.
 

An Evaluation of the Effects of Trauma-Related Stimuli on Behavior and Heartrate During Preference Assessments

AARON JOSEPH SANCHEZ (University of North Texas), Elizabeth Joy Houck (University of North Texas), Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas), Melanie Bauer (University of North Texas), Danielle Pelletier (University of North Texas), Richard G. Smith (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Traumatic events can result in persistent, undesirable behavior changes, detrimental to one’s quality of life. Some "triggers,” stimuli related to traumatic events, may be difficult or impossible to avoid. People with intellectual disabilities (ID) are often unable to tact their “triggers”. Objective procedures to identify “triggers,” not requiring advanced verbal behavior, represent an opportunity for effective and compassionate care. In this study, we evaluated a method to assess the effects of trauma-related stimuli on behavior of adults with ID. We measured heartrate, freezing, scanning, choice latency, and selection order during preference assessments in the presence and absence of trauma-related stimuli. Our results suggest these additional measures used during preference assessments could be useful in identifying “triggers” for people with limited verbal communication skills. Objective procedures that can be used to identify “triggers” could improve compassionate care for people with ID and a history of exposure to traumatic events.

 
Heart Rate as a Predictive Biomarker for Severe Destructive Behavior
LIAM MCCABE (Rutgers University), Brian D. Greer (Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School)
Abstract: Previous studies have examined the predictive validity of heart rate (HR) on severe destructive behavior, however such research has yet to improve clinical procedures or our understanding of physiology and destructive behavior. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive validity of HR on varying topographies and functions of destructive behavior while controlling antecedent and consequent events through functional analyses (FA). In Experiment 1, we assessed the reliability of the Polar H10 HR monitor and the feasibility of its use in an analog FA session using a confederate participant and found that the Polar H10 HR monitor was a reliable measure of HR. In Experiment 2, we examined the predictive validity of HR on destructive behavior and the patterns of physiological arousal across within-session intervals of reinforcer presence or absence in four children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results of Experiment 2 indicated that HR was not a reliable predictor of either automatically or socially reinforced destructive behavior. However, we found that measurement of reinforcer presence or absence was sufficient to predict socially reinforced destructive behavior. Although HR was not predictive of destructive behavior, we have provided a procedural framework for future assessment of other biological measures.
 
Measuring Heart Rate During Treatment of Needle Phobia
LINDSAY LLOVERAS (University of Florida ), Kerri P. Peters (University of Florida)
Abstract: There are many empirically validated treatments for needle phobia that have been evaluated with both participants with and without autism spectrum disorder, such as differential reinforcement and stimulus fading. These studies typically include problem behavior or questionnaire data as the primary dependent variables to demonstrate treatment effectiveness. However, some of the most socially valid dependent variables are not visible to the casual observer; they occur beneath the skin, but nonetheless can be directly measured. The current study used wearable heart rate monitors during treatment of needle phobia in participants with histories of problem behavior in the context of blood draws and medical procedures involving needles. We present these physiological data along with observable behavior data as dependent measures during treatment. Ethical implications for treatment of problem behavior in aversive contexts are considered. We discuss potential future applications including using heart rate monitors during treatment of phobias and problem behavior during aversive contexts.
 
 
Symposium #127
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Clinical Evaluations of PEAK Relational Training System and Related Assessments
Sunday, May 28, 2023
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 3C
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Allyssa Minick (Endicott College)
CE Instructor: Amanda N. Chastain, M.A.
Abstract:

The PEAK Relational Training System is a standardized behavior-analytic comprehensive treatment model that has been supported by over 70 published peer-reviewed studies. This symposium will present three papers extending previous work on PEAK by examining the impact of treatment dosage, exploring a play-based assessment for early-childhood learners, and evaluating its assessment tool in classifying autism symptom severity. Specifically, the first paper will present the outcome of a systematic literature review on using play-based unstructured assessment in early-childhood intervention and preliminary results on a new play-based assessment. The second paper will focus on parameters, such as dosage, that predicted the treatment outcome of PEAK-based intervention. The third paper will examine convergent validity on the PEAK Comprehensive Assessment’s (PCA) ability in classifying autism symptom severity. Implication on the assessment and treatment delivery of PEAK will be discussed.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Assessment, PEAK, Psychometrics, Symptom Severity
Target Audience:

It would be helpful for audience members to have a basic understanding of complex language and cognition from a behavior-analytic perspective (e.g., derived relational responding, equivalence, relational frame theory, PEAK).

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe factors impacting the treatment outcome of PEAK; (2) describe the differences between play-based and structured behavior-analytic skill assessment; (3) describe convergent validity between the PCA and common instruments for autism symptoms.
 

Play-Based Assessments in Early-Childhood Applied Behavior Analysis Intervention

JENNIFER POSEY (Endicott College), Mark R. Dixon (Endicott College)
Abstract:

This presentation seeks to examine the efficacy of play-based assessments as compared to highly structured skill-based assessments when identifying treatment areas for learners enrolled in early childhood ABA programs. In order to provide the most effective treatment, it is essential that providers accurately identify the skill repertoire of their learners to include foundational skills such as early communication and learner readiness, as well as more advanced social communicative repertoires that include derived relational responding. Young learners enrolled in early intervention programs may lack necessary prerequisite skills to engage in highly structured assessments and may be more appropriately assessed in a play based format. As such, it is essential that an assessment of skills is not only robust, but adequately engages the learner. Through a systematic literature review, the current paper argues that there is a lack of empirically validated play-based assessment tools available to behavior analysts. In addition to reviewing current research surrounding play-based behavior-analytic assessments, this presentation will also provide data supporting the use of play-based assessment according to learner repertoires and provide evidence that a new play-based behavior analytic tool is both effective and utilitarian to practitioners of early childhood behavior analytic programming.

 
Evaluating the Relationship between Dosage and Outcomes for Children with Autism Receiving PEAK Intervention
LINDSEY NICOLE HOLTSMAN (Emergent Learning STL Center ), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois at Chicago), Zhihui Yi (Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago)
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) has received wide support in its effectiveness in promoting socially significant changes. The intensity of such intervention is often left to the hands of clinicians. Although it is often assumed that a more intense intervention started at early stages of life would lead to better long-term outcome, very few study examined the relationship between the intensity of ABA treatment and learner outcome. The current study examined the relationship between dosage of ABA services and learner’s progression during standardized behavior-analytic testing. Using a cohort of 26 participants who all received center-based ABA services, the current study presents post-hoc analyses of learner’s data on parameters predicting learner’s progress. Results show that the weekly average of ABA services predicted learner’s improvements in the PEAK Comprehensive Assessment (PCA) through 6-month of PEAK-based intervention. Other parameters were also analyzed for potential predictors of treatment success. Implications for optimizing dosage for PEAK treatment delivery was discussed.
 
Evaluating Relationships Between the PEAK Comprehensive Assessment and Measures of Autism Symptomology
AMANDA N. CHASTAIN (University of Illinois, Chicago), Zhihui Yi (Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago), Meredith T. Matthews (University of Illinois at Chicago), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois at Chicago)
Abstract: The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule Second Edition (ADOS-2) is often used as a diagnostic tool used for evaluating symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The ADOS-2 is used in combination with other, often subjective, measures, such as Child Autism Rating Scale questionnaire for parents and caregivers (CARS-2), to formally diagnose an individual with ASD. The PEAK Comprehensive Assessment (PCA) is a standardized objective measure of language and cognition and includes the PEAK Autism Symptoms and Behavioral Observation Summary (PAS-BOS). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between scores on the PAS-BOS, ADOS-2, PCA, and CARS. Results indicate statistically significant correlations between the CARS-2 parent questionnaire and PAS-BOS, as well as between the CARS-2 and total PCA score. Analyses were also conducted evaluating the relationship between the above variables and the ADOS-2 autism classification. Implications and findings in PCA’s ability in classifying autism symptom severity will be discussed.
 
 
Symposium #137
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Behavior Analytic Approaches to Understanding the Effects of Psychotropic Medication on Challenging Behavior
Sunday, May 28, 2023
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Capitol Ballroom 5-7
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Matthew O'Brien (The University of Iowa; University of Iowa Stead Family Children's Hospital)
Discussant: M. Christopher Newland (Auburn University)
CE Instructor: M. Christopher Newland, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Psychotropic medications are commonly prescribed for individuals who exhibit severe and challenging behavior, but their effects on challenging behaviors are seldom evaluated with empirical data at the individual level and usually assessed with indirect methods (e.g., rating scales and interviews) at the group level. Although behavior analysts rarely receive training concerning medication and rarely take part in monitoring the effects of psychotropic medications, given their focus on data collection and behavioral monitoring, behavior analysts are well-suited to study the effects of psychotropic medications on challenging behavior. This symposium brings together four studies interested in the relationship between psychotropic medication and challenging behavior. Across these studies, individual (studies 1 and 2) and group (studies 3 and 4) analyses are conducted to demonstrate how the initiation of medication and/or changes in medication effect the behavior of individuals with intellectual and neurodevelopmental disabilities from childhood to adulthood. These studies highlight the interaction of psychotropic medications and environmental context on the occurrence of challenging behavior and subsequently the importance of collecting data and monitoring medication for individuals with challenging behavior. Dr. Christopher Newland will provide a discussion on these talks.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): challenging behavior, functional analysis, neurodevelopmental disabilities, psychotropic medication
Target Audience:

Audience should have a basic understanding of psychopharmacology and behavioral assessment and treatment.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this symposium, participants will be able to (1) describe some of the positive effects of psychotropic medications on challenging behavior; (2) identify strategies for monitoring the effects of psychotropic medications; and (3) state ways in which psychotropic medications and the environment interact to impact challenging behavior.
 

The Combined Effects of Antipsychotic Medications and Competing Stimuli on Psychotic Symptoms Exhibited by a Patient With Schizophrenia

SHANNA BAIKIE (Children's Hospital Colorado), Patrick Romani (University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus)
Abstract:

This presentation will describe results from a multidisciplinary model for treating youth diagnosed with psychotic disorders. We will highlight results from a 17-year-old patient diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Behavior analysts coordinated closely with psychiatrists to evaluate the function of responding to internal stimuli and corresponding behavioral treatment approaches following different dosages of antipsychotic medications. A functional analysis of responding to internal stimuli showed maintenance by automatic reinforcement. Within a reversal design, we evaluated the effect of response-independent delivery of competing stimuli as Zyprexa and Clozapine titrated to therapeutic doses. During medication-only conditions, psychotic symptoms occurred during approximately 200 s of a 300-s session. The addition of the competing stimuli along with Zyprexa decreased levels of responding to internal stimuli. Unfortunately, this behavior continued to be impairing and occurred variably during sessions. The addition of Clozapine plus competing stimuli produced the best treatment outcome with zero or near-zero levels of responses to internal stimuli occurring with this treatment package in place. In addition to discussing the role of behavioral strategies when evaluating medication-behavior relations, we will also discuss ways to engage with a multidisciplinary team when treating serious psychopathology.

 

The Effects of Stimulant Medication on Disruptive Behavior and Choice in Children With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

ALEX PAULS (University of Iowa), Matthew O'Brien (The University of Iowa; University of Iowa Stead Family Children's Hospital), Elizabeth Freiburger (University of Iowa ), Brendon Nylen (University of Iowa)
Abstract:

Many children and adolescents diagnosed with ADHD also display disruptive behavior, such as aggression and destruction (Strine et al., 2006) and even though stimulant medication is a first line treatment for ADHD symptoms, it has not been indicated to treat disruptive behaviors. Several large studies have suggested that stimulant medication may reduce disruptive behavior (e.g., Pringsheim et al., 2015) and single case studies have shown that stimulant medication may differentially effect disruptive behavior across functions (e.g., Torelli et al., 2019). Additionally, LaRue et al. (2008) demonstrated differential effects on social behavior and choice making for children taking stimulant medications. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of stimulant medication on (a) disruptive behavior, (b) social behaviors, and (c) delay discounting for children and adolescents diagnosed with ADHD. Using a reversal design, functional analyses, preference assessments, and a test of delay discounting were conducted on and off medication. The results will be discussed in terms of implications for behavioral intervention planning for children and adolescents who display disruptive behavior and take stimulant medication.

 
Psychotropic Medication Usage Among Patients in an Intensive Day Treatment Clinic for Severe Behavior
ANNA MARIE-KILZER CATES (University of Iowa ), Matthew O'Brien (The University of Iowa; The University of Iowa Stead Family Children's Hospital), Alex Pauls (The University of Iowa)
Abstract: Behavioral intervention is often recommended as a first line treatment for severe and challenging behavior (SCB) among individuals with intellectual and other neurodevelopmental disabilities. However, a large proportion of individuals with SCB are also prescribed psychotropic medications to address their SCB, many of which have never received behavioral intervention. Unfortunately, most research on psychotropic medication and SCB has been focused on the adult population. In this study, we summarize the prevalence and patterns of psychotropic medication usage among children and adolescents referred to an intensive day treatment clinic for (SCB) over a 10-year period. We assess the relationship between patient demographics and medication usage, with a particular focus on access to behavioral intervention services. Finally, we compare behavioral profiles between patients taking psychotropic medications and those who are not. The results are discussed in terms of current guidelines on best practice for prescribing psychotropic medication for children and adolescents with SCB.
 

Conditional Probabilities of Challenging Behavior in Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities During Psychotropic Medication Changes

CLAIRE ELIZABETH EPPERSON (Drake University ), Faith Hollihan-Moy (Drake University), Meg Dredge (Drake University), Carissa Johnson (Drake University), Maddie Jones (Drake University), Maria G. Valdovinos (Drake University)
Abstract:

Challenging behavior is common for individuals with intellectual disabilities, and psychotropic medications are prescribed as treatment (Cox, et al., 2022; Matson & Neal, 2009). However, little is known about the influence that psychotropic medication has on the presentation of challenging behavior and environmental events that occasion it (Cox & Virues-Ortega, 2021; Falligant & Bednar, 2021). The current study examines conditional, and background, probabilities of challenging behavior across psychotropic medication changes. Weekly one-hour observation sessions were conducted (and video recorded) for seven participants (range of 25-90 observations conducted with each). The observations were coded for antecedents (e.g., demands, restricted access, no attention), challenging behavior (e.g., problem vocalizations, physical aggression, self-injurious behavior), and consequences (e.g., attention, access to items, escape from demand). We used a parametric design to evaluate changes in probabilities following psychotropic medication alterations. Preliminary results revealed that the presentation of demands and delivery of attention (physical and verbal) were associated with higher conditional probability values than other variables coded. Following psychotropic medication changes, slight changes in these values were observed. These calculated probabilities give insight into the potential interaction between environmental events, challenging behavior, and changes in psychotropic medication regimen.

 
 
Invited Paper Session #147
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Community-Informed Practice: Engaging Communities We Serve to Inform Applied Behavior Analysis Services
Sunday, May 28, 2023
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 1
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau (Flamboyán Behavioral Services)
CE Instructor: Pablo Juárez, M.Ed.
Presenting Author: PABLO JUÁREZ (Vanderbilt University Medical Center)
Abstract:

Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) has encountered several challenges which have negatively impacted the application of behavior analysis and importantly, public trust in ABA. Community-Informed Practice (CIP) – developed by TRIAD, the autism institute at Vanderbilt Kennedy Center (VKC) – is a model for developing partnerships and seeking regular input and feedback from communities served by practitioners in human services fields to ensure those services reflect socially valid best-practice. CIP began as a conceptual model focused on understanding and categorizing common and increasing objections to ABA. Through substantive engagement with existing advocacy groups such as VKC’s Community Advisory Committee and The Arc Tennessee, as well as TRIAD’s Autistic Advisory Committee, we developed a set of guiding principles for a CIP-based implementation of ABA across various TRIAD service lines. In this way, CIP honors societal concerns about ABA and the ethics of its providers, as well as the professional expertise and judgement of behavior analysts. This balance can be elusive without direct and ongoing community engagement by a team devoted to reflecting the appropriate implementation of behavior analysis in their work and discussion of that work. This presentation will focus primarily on the work of TRIAD’s behavior analysts across Tennessee schools supporting students with intellectual and development disabilities who engage in complex and dangerous behavior; however, the processes of development and implementation of CIP will be discussed in a manner that will be applicable across different types of service models. The development of a strong CIP approach to ABA (or any other human services) can be challenging, resource-intensive, and time consuming, making it impractical for most, so additional discussion within this presentation will focus on considerations for taking CIP to scale at the state level and beyond. Finally, Community-Assessed Practice – a process by which a diverse advisory group provides ongoing feedback on service delivery, will be briefly highlighted.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Practitioners, Organizational Leadership, Public Policy

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Identify common criticisms about Applied Behavior Analysis; (2) Understand what community-informed practice (CIP) is and its utility in addressing concerns about ABA; (3) Learn about potential models for bringing CIP to scale
 
PABLO JUÁREZ (Vanderbilt University Medical Center)
Pablo Juárez received his undergraduate training in behavior analysis at University of North Texas and his graduate training in special education and behavior analysis at Vanderbilt University. He has over twenty years of experience in the field and is currently a Senior Associate in Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences, and Special Education (VU) at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC). He is Co-Director of TRIAD, the autism institute at Vanderbilt Kennedy Center (VKC), and Director of Behavior Analysis for VKC and Developmental Medicine. In his roles he oversees statewide behavior analytic and autism services, which are embedded within state systems of early intervention and education, clinical behavior analysis programming and expansion within VUMC, and the expansion of a practice-based behavior analysis research program. Additionally, he serves on local, statewide, and national disabilities-focused committees, work groups, and boards of directors.
 
 
Symposium #154
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Basic and Applied Advances and Digitization of Relational Framing Procedures for Persons With Autism
Sunday, May 28, 2023
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4E/F
Area: AUT/EAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Mikayla Campbell (Utah Valley University)
Discussant: Caleb Stanley (Utah Valley University)
CE Instructor: Zhihui Yi, M.S.
Abstract:

This symposium will span multiple novel and innovative areas in the delivery of relational training (RT) procedures. The presentations will include 1) basic research that compares fixed and mixed presentation during relational training and their efficacy in promoting the emergence of derived relational responding (DRR); 2) an applied study comparing traditional table-top RT and computer-assisted RT in learner engagement and robustness in DRR; 3) applied study using alternating treatment design comparing learner outcomes between table-top pen-and-paper RT and computer-assisted RT which involves a custom-built electronic data collection (EDC) system and computer-assisted RT instructions; and finally 4) an exploratory randomized controlled trial evaluating the effect of the same custom-built system on learner and staff outcomes among eight students receiving RT as part of their Individualized Education Programs (IEP) in a public school setting. Implications for improving and optimizing the delivery of RT procedures will be discussed. In sum, presentations 1-3 seek to expand research in parameters optimizing RT procedures through basic and applied research, while presentation 4 seeks to investigate the real-world impact of the above findings.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Electronic Data-Collection, PEAK, Relational Training
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts, students, and faculty

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe differing outcomes between mixed and blocked RT procedures; (2) describe outcomes of computer-assisted RT and EDC; (3) compare the differences between pen-and-paper table-top RT and computer-assisted RT with EDC.
 
Rates of Learning Under Fixed- and Mixed-Operant Arrangements: Adult Performance on Computer-Based Discrete Trial Tasks
CRAIG A MARRER (Endicott College), Mark R. Dixon (Endicott College)
Abstract: Discrete trial training remains a common intervention procedure within applied behavior analysis. However, a variety of procedural variations have arisen within applied practice, some of which do not appear to be directly related to applied research. The current study investigated the effects of fixed- and mixed-operant instructional arrangements on rates of learning with adult participants. A group design was used in which participants completed matching and listener discrimination training with arbitrary stimuli via a computer program across both operant arrangements. Results indicate that rates of learning were better during fixed-operant training compared to a mixed-operant training. These preliminary results suggest the need for additional examination of procedures commonly used within applied practice, especially those that do not seem to be emergent from the experimental literature.
 
Comparing the Effectiveness of Traditional and Automated Relational Frame Training on Client Engagement
MEREDITH T. MATTHEWS (University of Illinois at Chicago), Zhihui Yi (Univeristy of Illinois Chicago), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois Chicago), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University)
Abstract: Discrete trial training (DTT) is an extremely widely used and highly supported method of teaching skills by breaking them down into smaller, chain-like increments through the use of reinforcement using preferred items. Match to sample training procedures presented in a DTT format have been documented to promote derived relational responding. While traditional DTT is long supported, using physical stimuli can become repetitive and redundant, can reduce the efficiency during trial blocks, and often consumes far more time and resources when compared to similar gamified programs. We utilized an alternating treatment design across three programs to determine if a computerized version of PEAK reaches the same or better outcomes when compared to the traditional DTT delivery mode. The programs selected were novel to the learner to ensure that no previous relationships had been established, and each set contained unique stimuli to ensure that no symbols received reinforcement from the other trials. The present study sought to assess the effects of computer-assisted relational training against the traditional tabletop relational training delivery mode through the robustness of derived relational responding, percentage of independent correct responding, as well as frequency measures of inattention during trial blocks. Implications of applying an automated, computer-assisted form of relational training versus the traditional tabletop relational training delivery mode alone are discussed.
 
Comparing Traditional and Automated PEAK Programming on Client and Staff Outcomes: PowerPEAK
CLAIRE M ZUCH (Missouri State University), Meredith T. Matthews (University of Illinois at Chicago), Kaylee Liley (Missouri State University), Lindsey Nicole Holtsman (Emergent Learning STL Center ), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University)
Abstract: The long-standing traditional approach to DTT utilizes physical stimuli which can become monotonous for participants and can decrease efficacy in programming when compared to similar programs that has been gamified. While these effects are true for participants, traditional DTT programming can become redundant or repetitive to clinician while consuming more time than programs which have been automated. The first study utilized an alternating design across five participants comparing the robustness of derived relational responding (DRR), percentage of correct responding, as well as frequency of inattention through traditional DTT procedures against an automated form of DTT. Participant’s results demonstrated similar outcomes when using traditional and automated DTT programming. The second study provides an extension off the first by comparing fidelity of treatment implementation by clinicians, duration of individual program, and total programs completed through traditional DTT procedures against automated DTT procedures in an alternating treatment design. Efficiency in automated programming is demonstrated by the decrease of program duration and increase of total programs completed when compared to traditional programming. Both studies demonstrate the potential for automation to advance the field forward in the localized context of a clients programming and in the broader context of efficiency in programming for clinicians.
 

The Digital Revolution: Comparing Staff and Learner Outcomes of Computer-Assisted Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Relational Frame Training of Children With Autism and Related Disabilities

ZHIHUI YI (Univeristy of Illinois Chicago), Jennifer Koenig (Highland Community Unit School District #5), Mark R. Dixon (University of Illinois Chicago)
Abstract:

There has been an increasing presence using electronic data collection (EDC) among applied behavior analysis (ABA) services. Studies show that both generic and custom-built proprietary software can effectively and accurately collect behavior data similar to traditional pen-and-paper data collection. The current study extended previous findings in evaluating the efficacy of a custom-built EDC during relational frame training based on the PEAK curriculum, given its unique procedures (e.g., scoring, relational training procedures, etc.). Eight participants were randomly assigned to two groups (Experiment VS Control), and over the course of three weeks, participants received PEAK-based relational training as part of their Individualized Education Program (IEP). After week 1, participants in the Experiment Group transitioned to the EDC, where teachers and staff used the custom-built EDC in delivering ABA services. Results show a significant interaction between group assignment and time (p < .006). The total duration needed to complete all assigned programs for participants in the Experiment Group significantly decreased after the transition to EDC (p = .003) and maintained at the reduced level in week 3 (p = .862). No significant changes were observed for participants in the Control Group (p = .676). Implications for using EDC to assist relational training were discussed.

 
 
Symposium #175
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Helping Students to Read, Write, and Do Math with Frequency Building and Precision Teaching to Power Academic Skills in School-Going Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) in India
Sunday, May 28, 2023
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4C/D
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India)
CE Instructor: Smita Awasthi, Ph.D.
Abstract:

There is increasing evidence that fluency building and precision teaching can increase academic skills with school aged children which improves retention, endurance and generalization of skills (Gist & Bulla, 2022). In this symposium, we present the use of PT interventions to improve reading, math and writing skills of school going children in India who are diagnosed with autism. The first presentation illustrates the use of within stimulus prompts to help a student achieve discrimination in reading words with the letters ‘b’ and ‘d’, overcoming problems with spontaneous mirror invariance (Pegado et al., 2011). Fluency building exercises there after improved reading rates with an investment of less than 20 minutes. The second presentation addresses specific techniques used to improve component skills in ‘addition’ for three students and ‘multiplication’ in two students. The third presentation examines improvement in writing speeds and the fourth presentation demonstrates the effectiveness of joint control procedures in remediating discrimination errors while writing words with ‘b’ and ‘d’ and frequency building to improve rates of response. The effect of fluency building on composite skills are discussed

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Certified Behavior Analysts with knowledge of fluency training and celeration charts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) apply fluency building strategies to component skills in reading, writing and math (2) apply strategies for reducing reading errors with mirror images via tele-health (3) observe the effects on composite skills after training on component skills
 

Within Stimulus Prompts and Precision Teaching to Address ‘b’ and ‘d’ Discrimination in a 9-Year-Old Girl With Mild Autism

SMITA AWASTHI (Behavior Momentum India), Tejashree Gambhir (Behavior Momentum India), Sridhar Aravamudhan (Behavior Momentum India)
Abstract:

Primary school children with reading difficulties are prone to continue struggling with reading. Hence, new methodologies and interventions are required to help struggling readers (Forne et al., 2022). A 9-year-old girl in grade 3, diagnosed with mild autism, in a mainstream school participated in this study. An assessment showed that she had difficulties reading words with ‘b’ and ‘d,’ in three letter words. In phase 1, we used an intervention of presenting the letters ‘b’ and ‘d’ with within stimulus prompts, echoic prompts and periodic probes with three-letter words to monitor progress. After 630 trials the participant met the mastery criteria of reading 3 letter words with ‘b’ and ‘d’ in both positions. The skill generalized to novel three and four-letter words. In phase 2, we used precision teaching to increase the response rates. In 12 sessions, with 30s timed practices, her reading speed of three-letter words with ‘b’ and ‘d’ improved from 58 per minute to 76 per minute with no errors. The effect on performance of composite skill of reading passages will be discussed.

 

Math Without Tears – A Precision Teaching Intervention to Improve Component Math Skills of Pre-Primary and Primary School Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India), SRIDHAR ARAVAMUDHAN (Behavior Momentum India), Anupama Jagdish (Behavior Momentum India), Papiya Mukherjee (Behavior Momentum India)
Abstract:

Precision Teaching has been used successfully to teach math skills to school going children who were at risk of being left behind ( Stormgren et al., 2020; Vostanis et al., 2020). In the current study, five students aged 6 to 11 years with diagnoses of ASD participated. They were studying in kidergarten to fifth grade in mainstream schools. Three participants had only counting in their repertoire. As such their initial targets for the composite skill of addition operations were component skills such as add by one, add by two, addition of pairs of numbers and numbers that add to 10.One student, MR improved his performance in hear-say add 1 skill from zero corrects and 10 errors in baseline to 38 correct and 2 errors per minute in 23 sessions. A student AA also showed similar progress and a third is in baseline condition. Two other participants in grades 3 and 5 had difficulties with multiplication. With pre-session priming, reading aloud the tables from 1 to 15, they achieved a rate of 20 corrects per minute with no errors in completing hear-say simple multiplication sums (0-15). The effect of training component skills on composite skills, retention, endurance, and application are discussed.

 

Improving Writing Performance of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Attending Mainstream Classrooms in India

Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India), TEJASHREE GAMBHIR (Behavior Momentum India), Anupama Jagdish (Behavior Momentum India), Papiya Mukherjee (Behavior Momentum India), Sridhar Aravamudhan (Behavior Momentum India)
Abstract:

There are several examples within precision teaching (PT) literature where students at risk being left behind in class can be trained to perform academic skills either by addressing component skill deficits or by building frequencies to the level of competent peer performers (Kubina, Morrison, & Lee, 2002; Kubina & Wolfe, 2005;White & Neely, 2012) . In the current study, 4 students with ASD, aged 9 to 11 years with low rates of writing participated. The intervention started by improving the speed of copying words from the board and writing words heard (dictation) with daily timed practice. The first participant, MA, showed improvement in copying words from the board from 8 letters /min to 20 letters / min over 35 timed sessions and in writing down heard words from 9 letters per min to 18 letters per min in 36 sessions. Intervention has commenced on 2 other students with similar difficulties. Social validity in the form of feedback from school on these interventions helping the students cope better with class are discussed.

 
 
Symposium #215
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Recent Advancements in the Measurement, Assessment, and Treatment of Challenging Behavior
Sunday, May 28, 2023
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 1A/B
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Anthony Concepcion (University of South Florida)
CE Instructor: Anthony Concepcion, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Challenging behaviors emitted by individuals with autism and developmental disabilities can have detrimental consequences on quality of life for themselves and their caretakers. Although much is known regarding practices to create function-based interventions, many challenges in the treatment of challenging behavior remain. Therefore, it is imperative researchers continue to assess interventions to reduce challenging behavior, improve methods of analysis, and consider the social validity of interventions. This symposium consists of three presentations. Tiago and colleagues will demonstrate advancements in assessment and treatment of stereotypy and an extension of the subtyping model proposed by Hagopian et al. (2015) to stereotypic behavior. Bauer and colleagues will discuss challenges encountered with delay-tolerance training procedures and demonstrate a novel exchange program used to treat challenging behavior related to relinquishing items. Last, Sheppard and colleagues will present a comparison of the efficacy of momentary DRO and fixed-momentary DRO to reduce challenging behavior. Further, they will discuss caregiver preference and feasibility of the procedures.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): caregiver preference, functional analysis, problem behavior, Subtyping
Target Audience:

Audience members would benefit from prior experience implementing behavioral interventions for individuals with autism and/or developmental disabilities. Audience members would benefit from having prior competency in basic principles of applied behavior analysis and common assessments for assessing problem behavior.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Identify subtypes of automatically reinforced behavior thorough FA graphs and briefly describe the level of differentiation analysis. (2) Identify challenges to delay-tolerance training and describe an exchange program for increasing tolerance to delayed reinforcement. (3) Describe differences and similarities between momentary and fixed-momentary differential reinforcement of other behavior and discuss the importance of caregiver preference.
 
Subtyping stereotypy: Level of differentiation in the FA is predictive of responsiveness to treatment.
TIAGO SALES LARROUDÉ DE MAN (Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana/Western New England), William H. Ahearn (New England Center for Children), Julia Lynne Touhey (New England Center for Children), Haley Steinhauser (Melmark New England; Regis College)
Abstract: The general purpose of this study was to determine whether the subtyping methods developed to analyze automatically-reinforced self-injury (SIB), described by Hagopian and colleagues (2015/2017), apply to stereotypy. The criterion lines were applied to FAs of stereotypy, and the levels of differentiation (LoD) between the alone/no interaction conditions and each of the other conditions types (i.e., play/control, demand, and attention) were calculated. Fifteen students diagnosed with autism, between 3 and 18 years old, and who engaged in stereotypy were exposed to the following: Functional Analysis (FA); Augmented-Competing Items Assessment (A-CSA); and, Treatment Analysis (TA). The TA consisted of two condition types: 1) access to alternative sources of reinforcement; and, 2) prompting of functional/contextual engagement. The LoD analyses suggested that the maximum LoD between the FA conditions was predictive of responsiveness to treatment in the TA (R2 0.79 and R2 score up to 0.91, with an expanded model that included the max LoD between FA conditions). We discuss what type of data our visual analysis inspects and what treatments were predicted as being effective by the subtyping model and LoD analyses.
 

Evaluating an Exchange Program for the Treatment of Problem Behavior Maintained by Access to Tangibles

MELANIE BAUER (University of North Texas), Joseph D. Dracobly (University of North Texas), Elizabeth Joy Houck (University of North Texas), Danielle Pelletier (University of North Texas), Aaron Joseph Sanchez (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

Previous studies, typically with children, have used delay-tolerance training to treat problem behavior maintained by access to tangibles. This often involves physical prompting and waiting rather than exchanging, two practices that may not be possible or relevant to adults with intellectual disabilities (ID). For many adults with ID in residential settings, exchanging items, rather than waiting per se, may be evocative for problem behavior. In the current study, we evaluated an exchange program to treat problem behavior maintained by access to tangibles for adults diagnosed with ID at a residential facility. We measured the latency to exchange low- and high-preference items following a request for the item and the individual’s problem behaviors. Results demonstrated that the exchange program increased relinquishing of an item while decreasing the rate of problem behavior. This analysis provides another method to treat problem behavior maintained by access to tangibles for adults without using physical prompting.

 
A Comparison of FM-DRO to VM-DRO to Reduce Challenging Behavior
CHRISTINA MARIE SHEPPARD (Florida Institute of Technology), David A. Wilder (Florida Institute of Technology), Grant Michael Ingram (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) is commonly used to reduce behavioral excesses. Interval DRO schedules involve delivery of reinforcement contingent upon the absence of the target behavior during an entire interval whereas momentary DRO schedules involve delivery of reinforcement contingent upon the absence of the target behavior at a given moment. Two variations of momentary DRO exist: fixed-momentary (FM) DRO and variable-momentary (VM) DRO. In the current study, we directly compared FM-DRO and VM-DRO to reduce challenging behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement exhibited by four children with autism spectrum disorder. The results show that both DRO schedules were equally effective to reduce challenging behavior. However, most caregivers rated the FM-DRO as easier to implement.
 
 
Symposium #183
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Diversity submission Applied Behavior Analysis Across the Globe: An Overview of Research, Education, and Service Delivery in Different Countries
Sunday, May 28, 2023
4:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4E/F
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Andresa De Souza (University of Missouri-St. Louis)
Discussant: Caio F. Miguel (California State University, Sacramento)
CE Instructor: Andresa De Souza, Ph.D.
Abstract:

The applications of applied behavior analysis for the intervention of people with developmental disabilities have received recognition across the United States of America and Canada. Nonetheless, many other countries across the globe still have limited availability in terms of country-specific research, the presence of advanced education, and access to specialized services. This situation is even more prevalent in developing countries where financial barriers and public health policies might impede the dissemination of behavior analysis as a science and evidence-based intervention. This symposium will provide an overview of behavior analytic research, education, and service delivery in developing countries worldwide. First, Carlos Santos will present a literature review of applied studies conducted with participants with autism in Brazil. Next, Meral Koldas will provide an overview of the dissemination efforts in education and service delivery in Turkiye. In the third presentation, Dr. Zhichun Zhou Ostlund will describe the service delivery model in China and discuss the cultural barriers commonly encountered by practitioners. Finally, Dr. Daniella Pizzella will review the applications of behavior interventions in South Africa and Sub-Saharan schools. Dr. Caio Miguel will serve as the discussant for this symposium.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): diversity, international, research, service-delivery
Target Audience:

The audience should understand research methods, credentialing requirements, and behavior interventions in different contexts.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the status of applied research, training, and service delivery across different countries. (2) List dissemination efforts carried over in at least one of the countries included in this symposium. (3) Discuss the importance of considering cultural variables in research, training, and service delivery.
 
Diversity submission 

A Literature Review of Applied Behavior Analytic Interventions for People With Autism in Brazil

ANDRESA DE SOUZA (University of Missouri-St. Louis), Carlos Henrique Santos da Silva (Brock University), Renata Michel (Instituto de Pesquisa Conduzir)
Abstract:

The vast majority of research providing empirical support for the effectiveness of interventions based on applied behavior analysis (ABA) for people with autism has been conducted in the United States and Canada. The lack of diverse representation in ABA-based research can compromise the external validity of outcomes and the extent to which these intervention procedures are culturally sensitive to and equally effective for communities of diverse cultural backgrounds. Brazil is a country with a long tradition in the study of behavior analysis and basic research and currently has a large demand countrywide for behavior analytic interventions for children with autism. This literature review aimed to identify and analyze ABA-based research for people with autism in Brazil. We conducted a search in international and national databases using English and Portuguese keywords. We conducted reference and citation checks to identify additional articles that might not have appeared in the original search. Studies identified and included in the review were published in Brazilian and foreign peer-reviewed journals. We will present the findings in terms of journal language, participants' demographics, target behaviors and procedures, outcomes, and study quality. The implications for service delivery and policy change will be discussed.

 
Diversity submission 

Dissemination Efforts of Applied Behavior Analysis Education and Intervention in Türkiye

MERAL KOLDAS (Queen's University of Belfast), Elif Tekin-Iftar (Anadolu University), Demet Tavukcu (Maltepe University)
Abstract:

The Republic of Turkiye has a unique geographic position as a transcontinental country in Asia and Europe on the Balkan Peninsula. About 6.9% of the total population in Turkiye, ages 3 years and older, have some type of disability, including autism (TUIK, 2021). Policies related to the intervention for individuals with disabilities typically involve meeting that population’s free health care in state hospitals and basic educational needs, such as 2-hour one-to-one therapeutic intervention weekly at rehabilitation centers. Evidence-based interventions based on applied behaviour analysis (ABA; Leaf et al., 2021) for children with disabilities are an emerging field in Turkiye. Currently, there are both institutional and clinical efforts to disseminate ABA-based technologies in agencies and schools across the country. However, considering the total number of individuals with developmental disabilities, including autism, the dissemination of ABA-based interventions nationwide is far behind the ideal level. This presentation will discuss the historical development of behavior analysis in Turkiye from an educational and service-delivery perspective.

 
Diversity submission 

The Development of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Training, Credentialing, and Services in China: Local Solutions in a Global Field

ZHICHUN ZHOU OSTLUND (Webster University ), Tian Jiang (University of Rochester)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) has been recognized as an evidence-based practice for people with autism and related developmental disabilities nationally and internationally. As a result, behavior analytic services and credentials have rapidly increased in the USA, and behavior analytic techniques have been translated from English to at least twelve languages, including Chinese. This presentation will delve into the practice of ABA in China, one of the non-English speaking countries. We will provide an overview of (a) the current number of ABA training programs and agencies offering ABA services in the country; and (b) the cost and duration of obtaining a Chinese version of behavior analyst credentials (undergraduate and graduate level). We then will look into the quality of ABA services and the ethical implications of ABA practice in China in general. We will end the presentation with a question: While we can translate the techniques and strategies of ABA to the Chinese language, can we truly implement the practice of ABA in the current social and cultural context in China?

 
Diversity submission Research and Application of Behavior Interventions for Classroom Management in South Africa and Sub-Saharan Countries
Robin Katzen (University of the Western Cape), DANI PIZZELLA (University of Missouri-St. Louis), Andresa De Souza (University of Missouri-St. Louis), Nicolette Roman (University of the Western Cape)
Abstract: Globally, educators are challenged with barriers in facilitating sustained behavior management interventions in classrooms. In South African and Sub-Saharan African contexts, educators are inhibited due to being structurally disadvantaged (Theron & van Rensburg, 2018). Common barriers include educators' difficulties in employing evidence-based classroom management strategies, as well as a shortage of training, implementation materials, and funding (Gagnon et al., 2021). One approach to assist educators in a sustainable transition to effective classroom management is continuous research and facilitation of evidence-based classroom management (Hartnack, 2017). Contextual understanding and awareness of educators’ daily challenges and pressures (resource constraints and funding) can impact strategies to facilitate the implementation of strategies for classroom behavior management (Feldman, 2021). Furthermore, behavior intervention plans (BIP) focused on functional behavior assessments (FBA) adopted by trained educators can make significant improvements in overall classroom management (Ibigbami et al., 2021). This presentation gives a brief account of South African and Sub-Saharan research and applications of behavior interventions with a particular emphasis on educators working in mainstream and special needs schools.
 
 
Panel #243
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Diversity submission Embracing Virtual Opportunities: Bringing Multidisciplinary School-Based Consultation to Life
Sunday, May 28, 2023
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Convention Center 403/404
Area: EDC/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Heather Volchko, M.Ed.
Chair: Manuel Huecias Rodriguez (Threshold Learning Consultancy)
HEATHER VOLCHKO (Threshold Learning Consultancy)
MARLA WATTS (Threshold Learning Consultancy; Positive Behavior Supports Corporation)
ALLISON L HALE (Illinois School District U-46)
Abstract:

The world saw a spike in available technology during the global pandemic of 2020 and schools led the charge to provide continued access to education from beyond the classroom walls. Teachers learned new ways of fostering engagement and students learned all kinds of new skills. Professionals found new ways of working together as colleagues who used to be down the hall - and found new colleagues across the country and the globe while battling unfathomable personal and societal adversity. The mantra of lifelong learning was on full display in education! Leveraging this increased openness and comfort with collaborating in virtual spaces, this diverse panel of colleagues and friends continues to work together remotely to serve communities with a wide range of social and ethnic backgrounds. These school-based BCBAs will share their experiences consulting with schools as they answer your questions. Join them to explore how they have met organizational and individual needs by expanding their use of virtual school-based consulting.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

This session is appropriate for professionals who interface directly with the highly applied school setting. Basic understandings of behavior analysis and varied applications of principles will be assumed as part of this conversation.

Learning Objectives: (1) Participants will learn about different forms of education consultation positioned in diverse (e.g., socioeconomic, linguistic, racial) contexts; (2) Participants will learn how behavior analysis is applied individually, class-wide, and at the systems level of school settings based on presented and identified needs; (3) Participants will learn how one group of BCBAs leverage virtual methods to extend and scale their consultation capacity.
Keyword(s): consulting, multidisciplinary, school-based, virtual
 
 
Symposium #245
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Is There a Future for Behavior Analysis as a Science and a Practice?
Sunday, May 28, 2023
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom D
Area: PCH/VRB; Domain: Theory
Chair: Zhihui Yi (Univeristy of Illinois Chicago)
Discussant: RuthAnne Rehfeldt (Emergent Learning Center)
CE Instructor: Mark R. Dixon, Ph.D.
Abstract:

It has been decades since the debut of contextual behavior science. During this time a small proportion of behavior analysts have shifted their world view from a predominate Skinnerian science to a broader definition of what behavior analysis could be. Additionally, many outside the field have also embraced this modified version of behaviorism and by doing so have made significant progress in understanding the human condition. This symposium will describe the various similarities and differences in contextual and radical behaviorism and suggest that our path to a more successful future of saving the world will require movement from our past traditions.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Contextual Behaviorism
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts, students, and faculty

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe contextual behaviorism; (2) describe the differing views on human language and cognition from a Skinnerian and contextual behaviorism perspective; (3) describe arguments for the field to evolve and embrace contextual behaviorism.
 

Why Contextual Behaviorism is Needed for Behavior Analysis to Assume Its Rightful Role

STEVEN C. HAYES (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract:

Skinnerian Behavior Analysis has had a major and positive impact on the world. Skinner's Radical Behaviorism got many things right, including a naturalistic approach, a focus on the importance of the individual organism, a focus on processes, the contingency as an integrated unit of analysis, insistence that behavioral development was an evolutionary process and thus that behavior analysis belonged as a part of evolutionary science, a pragmatic truth criterion, and the willingness to apply behavioral principles to scientists themselves. These positive steps were undermined, however, by a failure to appreciate what was truly new about verbal behavior, and a resulting excessive reliance on principles derived solely from non-human animals. These mistakes were amplified by a lack of clarity about the role of theory, an excessive reliance on interpretation, methodological rigidity, disconnections with evolutionary science and mainstream psychological science, and professionalization driven by principles and methods that fail to respond in a timely way to advancements within the field. The result has been increasing intellectual isolation, the practical narrowing applied behavior analysis, and a crisis of sustainability within the field. This paper will argue that these problems are self-inflicted and are unnecessary given the state of the evidence. Contextual behaviorism is a proven and robust offshoot of classical radical behaviorism and BA / ABA with a body of empirical and practical products that prove that a bright future awaits behavior analysis if it can overcome the limitation of Skinner's approach to verbal behavior, and return to its rightful role as a driving force in the development of principles that help in modification of human behavior, including with those who are highly verbally competent, and doing so with high precision, scope, and depth.

 

Why I Am Not a Radical Behaviorist

MARK R. DIXON (University of Illinois Chicago)
Abstract:

After 25 years in the field of behavior analysis, it is now time to redefine what I believe is a successful and acceptable form of behaviorism. Movement beyond the ideas of “radical” behaviorism towards a contextual world view of “contextual“ behaviorism will be necessary in order to expand the impact of this approach to human behavior in any meaningful way. All sciences progress, adapt, or die. Our field is currently at a crossroads of holding onto antiquated traditions that risk the very elimination of our field. New discoveries and robust outcomes are occurring in contextual behavior science, and it is time for the current and future generations of behaviorists to adopt a contextual behaviorism, and leave behind radical behaviorism just as we have done before with methodological behaviorism.

 
 
Symposium #323
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Developing a Multilayered Evidence-Based Program for Individuals With Autism: Ensuring Collaboration Amongst All Stakeholders
Sunday, May 28, 2023
5:00 PM–6:50 PM
Convention Center Four Seasons Ballroom 4
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Translational
Chair: Mian Wang (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Discussant: Dimitrios Dimitriou (UCSB-University of California Santa Barbara)
CE Instructor: Dimitrios Dimitriou, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Providing quality therapy rooted in the principles of applied behavior analysis (ABA) to individuals with autism needs to be a multi-layered approach. While a trained behavior therapist (i.e., board certified behavior analyst, qualified behavior analyst) can develop an evidence-based program to help individuals with autism develop positive skills and extinguish problem behaviors, without: (1) parent-education, (2) sibling involvement, (3) school collaboration, and (4) proper on-going supervision, it will be difficult for the client to make meaningful progress. In this symposium, we will cover original research and published materials. Dr. Dimitriou will present key findings across his 13 published books on effective parent education support embedding elements of the eco-cultural theory. Incorporating key elements from each presentation will be pivotal in ensuring a well-rounded quality program for individuals with autism. Dr. Glugatch will review her research on providing a novel training program to siblings in order to help improve play strategies for children with autism. Dr. Kim will present her original research on how to support and train school personnel to facilitate social interactions between children with autism and their peers. Lastly, Dr. Ford will review her findings from a cross-sectional survey regarding supervision practices and satisfaction.

Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Autism, collaboration
Target Audience:

Professionals, practicing behavior analysts, teachers, parents, caregivers, graduate students, and undergraduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) recognize barriers for client progress; (2) identify solutions to increase parent/guardian and sibling involvement during therapy sessions; (3) improve collaboration with school personnel; and most importantly (4) identify strategies to foster a strong collaborative working relationship amongst all key stakeholders.
 
Multicultural Parent Education Training: Embedding Cultural Beliefs and Values
(Theory)
DIMITRIOS DIMITRIOU (UCSB-University of California Santa Barbara)
Abstract: Ensuring parent/guardian involvement and collaboration is pivotal in ensuring a child’s success. However, parents/guardians may be reluctant to participate in their child’s therapy for several key reasons. Based on the 13 published books by Dr. Dimitriou, he will explore key variables that are correlated with low parent/guardian participation/involvement. First, some cultural beliefs and values may limit a parent/guardian’s willingness to participate in their child’s therapy sessions. Second, parent’s may not believe in the value of therapy and may have negative preconceived ideas. Third, parents may feel inadequate and/or feel inferior supporting their child’s needs. Lastly, parents may view therapeutic time as an opportunity for “alone time.” These potential factors will be discussed in greater details and solutions for each of these variables will be addressed.
 

Sibling Techniques for Enhanced Play and Support (STEPS) for Strengthening the Sibling Bond of Children With Autism

(Applied Research)
LINDSAY GLUGATCH (University of Oregon)
Abstract:

Sibling relationships are a unique and special bond throughout the life span. Having a sibling with autism may present extra difficulties to form a close and meaningful relationship. While siblings play an important role in the child with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) life, there is no consistent method for involving siblings in treatment for individuals with ASD. This current study evaluated a novel treatment package including training siblings on play strategies (called play tips when communicating with the participants) in combination with a sibling support group to increase positive sibling play and perceived relationship quality. Using two concurrent multiple baseline designs, nine sibling dyads participated in the online STEPS program. Specifically, the intervention package included an online implementation of behavior skills training on simple play strategies and participation in a sibling support group. The intervention package improved quality of sibling play and increased the perceived quality of the sibling relationship.

 

Training Paraprofessionals to Target Socialization in Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD): Fidelity of Implementation and Social Validity

(Applied Research)
SUNNY KIM (University of California, Santa Barbara )
Abstract:

Although the literature suggests that it is feasible to train paraprofessionals to effectively implement social interventions for students with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), there is a paucity of research that addresses the social validity of these programs. The present study replicated and extended previous research on paraprofessional training, as well as assessed social validity. Our results suggest that (a) paraprofessionals can be trained to fidelity using a package consisting of lecture and performance feedback, (b) there are collateral gains for paraprofessionals following the training, (c) the social interactions between students with ASD and typically developing peers improve following paraprofessional training, and (d) there is strong social validity in regard to acceptability of the training program. Limitations and future directions are discussed.

 

Supervision Practices and Predictors of Supervision Satisfaction for Clinicians Providing Behavioral Services for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

(Applied Research)
KATERINA FORD (University of California, Santa Barbara )
Abstract:

Despite increasing empirical support for applied behavior analysis over several decades, little attention has been paid to the ways in which supervision is implemented among service providers for individuals with autism. In this study, a cross-sectional survey was designed based on the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) supervision guidelines and research literature. 125 clinicians from California service agencies completed a survey inquiring about supervision practices and satisfaction with (1) “typical” sessions and (2) sessions delivered through videoconferencing (VC) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Exploratory factor analyses were conducted to examine factor structure of supervision practice and satisfaction resulting in a three-factor model for supervision practice (i.e., supervision activities, supervisor proficiency, and clinician evaluation processes) and supervision satisfaction (i.e., satisfaction with supervision content, satisfaction with perceived level of support, and dissatisfaction with supervisory relationship). Supervision hours and individual and group meeting frequency were significant predictors of supervision practice, while supervision practice significantly predicted supervision satisfaction. Open-ended comments provided suggestions for improving supervision sessions and supervisor behavior in each delivery format. These findings provide a preliminary foundation of correlational evidence supporting the importance of specific supervision practices and how they predict clinician satisfaction, which can help prevent burnout and turnover.

 
 
Symposium #296
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Telehealth-Based Instructional Strategies for Promoting Learning for Young Children on the Autism Spectrum
Monday, May 29, 2023
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Convention Center Mile High Ballroom 4A/B
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Vincent E. Campbell (Utah State University)
Discussant: Karen A. Toussaint (University of North Texas)
CE Instructor: Vincent E. Campbell, M.S.
Abstract: In this symposium, multiple studies examining telehealth-based teaching strategies for skill acquisition with children on the autism spectrum will be presented. The first study discusses and compares the results and implications of discrete trial training procedures implemented face to face and via telehealth to teach tacting with preschoolers with autism. The second study discusses the results and implications of using matrix training to teach color-shape tacting via telehealth on generalization with preschoolers on the autism spectrum.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): DTT, generalization, matrix training, telehealth
Target Audience: clinicians, autism, practitioners, BCBAs, graduate students in behavior analysis
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1) Identify and describe implications of using face to face and telehealth procedures to teach skills to preschoolers with autism, 2) Identify and describe uses of matrix training to promote generative learning with preschoolers on the autism spectrum, and 3) Identify and describe how to implement DTT and matrix training via telehealth modality.
 
Comparing the Effectiveness of Discrete Trial Training Delivered via Telehealth and Face-to-Face on Skill Acquisition
NICK ALEXANDER LINDGREN (Utah State University), Jessica Anna Osos (Utah State University), Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University), Vincent E. Campbell (Utah State University), Beverly Nichols (Utah State University)
Abstract: The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the delivery of EIBI services. As a result, many EIBI service providers have shifted to either temporarily or permanently providing some or all of their services via telehealth. The majority of published research on behavior analytic approaches to telehealth has focused on training others to implement behavior analytic interventions in a face-to-face setting. In contrast, a relatively small number of researchers have evaluated direct EIBI service delivery via telehealth (i.e., professionals directly providing behavior analytic interventions to clients/learners using technology). Little is known about the effectiveness of behavior analytic interventions delivered directly to learners via telehealth compared to standard face-to-face intervention delivery. the purpose of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of DTT delivered via telehealth and face-to-face on the acquisition of tacts targets for children diagnosed with ASD in an EIBI program. The results and implications about the effectiveness of the different teaching modalities as well as observed generalization and maintenance will be discussed.
 
The Use of Matrix Training to Teach Color-Shape Tacts Through Telehealth
JESSICA ANNA OSOS (Utah State University), Nick Alexander Lindgren (Utah State University), Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University), Vincent E. Campbell (Utah State University)
Abstract: One teaching strategy to produce generative responding across various skill domains is matrix training (Curiel et al., 2020). Matrix training involves systematically arranging and selecting multi-component instructional targets (such as noun-verb and adjective-noun combinations). Instructional targets are arranged by organizing components in isolation on a minimum of two axes. Within matrix training, only a select few of the two-component combinations are directly taught; then, following mastery of the selected targets, a check is completed to test for the emergence of the rest of the combinations within the matrix. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to limited face to face instruction for children with ASD and increased the utilization of telehealth service delivery by clinicians and researchers. The present investigation examined the following: 1) What effect does matrix training, delivered via telehealth, have on acquisition of color-shape labeling skills? and 2) To what extent does matrix training with limited training targets lead to acquisition of untrained targets in the training matrix and generalization matricies? Following matrix training implementation via telehealth for color-shape tacting, all three participants acquired the training targets and generalized responding to all untrained targets.
 
 
Panel #322
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
PDS: Conflict of Interest (COI) in Scientific Publication: What it is and How to Avoid It
Monday, May 29, 2023
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Hyatt Regency, Centennial Ballroom H
Area: PCH/EDC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D.
Chair: Donald A. Hantula (Temple University)
DONALD A. HANTULA (Temple University)
STEPHANIE M. PETERSON (Western Michigan University)
MITCH FRYLING (California State University, Los Angeles)
Abstract:

The legitimacy of science is based on an unbiased, disinterested research and peer review system. Scientists are expected to pursue their research and publish their findings without regard to personal gain. Journal reviewers and editors are expected to perform their duties without bias due to personal gain and relationships. Conflicts of Interest (COI) arise in situations in which a person is in a position to derive personal benefit from actions or decisions made in their official capacity. COI is a critical ethical issue in scientific publications. This PDS introduces and defines COI, the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE) guidelines regarding COI, provides some general guidelines for identifying and avoiding COI in scientific publication, and delves further into the complexities of COI for reviewers and COI for practitioners who seek to publish their work. Calling ABAI members, and especially student members, to a thoughtful conversation about COI in scientific publications, especially ABAI publications is a central theme of this PDS. Ample time for questions and answers is provided.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Students, and professionals

Learning Objectives: (1) identify conflicts of interest (2) state the procedures for reporting conflicts of interest in publication (3) describe ways to avoid conflicts of interest as an author, editor, or reviewer
Keyword(s): Conflict interest, Ethics, Journal publication
 

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