Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Event Details


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Symposium #31
CE Offered: BACB
Technologies Effective in Evoking Speech in Non-Vocal Children With Autism
Saturday, May 25, 2019
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Lobby Level, Plaza Ballroom AB
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Translational
Chair: Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India)
Discussant: Per Holth (OsloMet -- Oslo Metropolitan University)
CE Instructor: Smita Awasthi, Ph.D.
Abstract:

Nearly a quarter of individuals with a diagnosis of autism, remain non vocal-verbal even after 8 years of age (Lord, Risi, & Pickles, 2004; Wodka, Mathy & Kalb, 2013) and those with speech impairments and minimal verbal skills have less favorable outcomes in life (Anderson,2007). A 6-year 8 months study (2010-2016) with children with autism (n=126) was successful in inducing 7 first instances of speech in 105 (83%) of the participants, Awasthi (2017), using Mand and Intraverbal Training procedures. Drawn from this large cohort study, the first 3 studies in this symposium offer newer perspectives on the technologies that minimize the number of children remaining non-vocal, and reviews its effect on older non-vocal children. Details on the form of 734 first speech instances as words and syllables are also discussed. The fourth study, building upon previous research from behavioral sciences and Speech Language Pathology literature Presents video self-monitoring to improve procedural integrity in speech production training.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Intraverbal Training, Mand Trainiing, Speech Production, Video Self-monitoring
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts and Speech Language Pathologists

Learning Objectives: 1. Mand Training protocols to induce speech production in non-vocal children with autism 2. Intraverbal training protocols to induce speech production in non-vocal children with autism 3. Classifying forms of speech and planning additional interventions based on form of speech data 4. Improving treatment integrity in training speech production using video modelling
 

The Role of Sign Mand Training and Intraverbal Training in Inducing First Instances of Speech in 126 Children With Autism

(Applied Research)
SMITA AWASTHI (Behavior Momentum India), Karola Dillenburger (Queen's University Belfast)
Abstract:

The current study spanning 6 years and 8 months, reviews the technologies developed for the emergence of speech in non-vocal children with autism and examines the effectiveness of sign mand training and intraverbal training and the role of stimulus stimulus pairing and motivating operations in inducing first instances of speech in non-vocal children on the autism spectrum. A total of 126 non-vocal children between the ages 1.4 years to 13.5 years participated in 4 experiments that used delayed non-concurrent multiple baseline design across subjects. The technologies were effective in inducing first instances of speech in 83% participants. The time to vocalization, vocals across operants, type of vocal emergence, age of vocalization and the relative successes of the technologies used are explored.

 

An Analysis of First 735 Speech Instances in 105 Children With Autism

(Applied Research)
SRIDHAR ARAVAMUDHAN (Behavior Momentum India), Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India), Karola Dillenburger (Queen's University Belfast)
Abstract:

A 6-year 8 months study (2010-2016) with children with autism (n=126) was successful in inducing 7 first instances of speech in 105 (83%) of the participants (Awasthi, 2017). This retrospective study examines a) the form of speech emergence (syllables, word approximations, words) in this large cohort and b) the form of emergence under different stimulus conditions. A total 735 first instances of speech were recorded (first 7 vocals of each participant). Of these, initial vocals emerged as words in 341 instances (46%) and as word approximations or syllables in 394 (54%). When speech emerged as mands, 66% were words and only 34% were word approximations or syllables. The percentages were 57% and 43% respectively for intraverbal fill ins. With part echoic-part mands, only 19% were words and 81% were word approximations or syllables. Sounds that started with /b/, /m/, /p/, /c / /k/ and /o/ accounted for 54% of the first instances of speech. These results suggest a pattern of speech emergence in children with a diagnosis of autism undergoing behavioral interventions for speech emergence. Identifying, recording and classifying the type of emergence could help with clinical decision making for further interventions and serve as a starting point for new lines of research.

 

Inducing First Instances of Speech in Older Children With Autism Using Mand and Intraverbal Training

(Applied Research)
RAZIA ALI (Behavior Momentum India), Smita Awasthi (Behavior Momentum India), Karola Dillenburger (Queen's University Belfast)
Abstract:

Non-vocal-verbal children with Autism, aged between 1.8 years to 13.5 years participated in a large cohort study (n=126) spanning 6 years and 8 months, that was successful in inducing first instances of speech using mand and intraverbal training procedures in 105 (83%) participants, Awasthi (2017). Of these, 7 were older children with autism (8y 2m to 13y 5m). Of these 6 acquired first instances of speech while 1 left the study thirty weeks into intervention. Vocals emerged for 3 with mand training alone, 2 with delayed addition of intraverbal training and for 1 with simultaneous introduction of both. Of the 6 who were successful, the first speech instance emerged within 30 days of intervention with 4 but took more than 150 days with 2 others. The mean days to acquisition of all 7 instances of speech was 181 days (range 58 days to 359 days) taking an average of 25 days/ vocal. A recast of their data in 2 non-concurrent, delayed, MBL graph format confirms the effectiveness of these interventions in inducing first instances of speech in older non-vocal children with autism.

 
Using Video Self-Monitoring to Promote Staff Performance and Procedural Integrity: Applications to Speech Production Training
(Applied Research)
LINA M. SLIM-TOPDJIAN (ASAP - A Step Ahead Program, LLC), Lina M. Slim-Topdjian (ASAP - A Step Ahead Program, LLC), Tamara S. Kasper (The Center for Autism Treatment)
Abstract: Interprofessional collaboration to improve procedural integrity of speech production for learners with autism with limited vocal repertoires is essential to effective and efficient intervention programming (Brodhead, 2015; Cardon, 2017; Cox, 2012; Garbacz, et al., 2016; Griffin, 2017). It is within the scope of practice of speech-language pathologists (SLP) to assess and develop interventions addressing speech production (ASHA.org). An interprofessional collaborative approach to intervention between speech-language pathologists and behavior analysts will enhance staff performance during speech production training and promote effective learner outcome. This presentation examines the effectiveness of a Staff Training Procedure (STP), consisting of Video Self-Monitoring (VSM), Performance Feedback (PF) and Reflection (R) on sustained and generalized teacher performance and Procedural Integrity, on two Dependent Variables – application of the Learn Unit (LU) and Rate of Effective Instruction (ROI). Results are in support of the literature (DiGennaro-Reed et al., 2010; Gartmeier et al., 2008; Greer et al., 2008; Jansen et al., 2008; LeBlanc et al. 2005; Lerman, et al., 2008; Pelletier et al., 2010) that VSM and PF may enhance teacher/therapist performance and sustainability of procedural integrity. VSM and PF may be an effective skill acquisition procedure to implement during speech production training to improve procedural integrity.
 

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