Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Online; 2020

Program by Workshops: Friday, May 22, 2020


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Workshop #W33
CE Offered: BACB
Clinical Decision Making for Skill-Acquisition Programs
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Erica Jowett Hirst, Ph.D.
ERICA JOWETT HIRST (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Dallas)
Description: This workshop covers essential skills for behavior analysts and special education teachers who are working with individuals in a one-on-one context. The content of this workshop includes selecting appropriate skills, making data-based decisions, maximizing learner performance, and making program changes. Content encompasses findings of peer-reviewed research as well as over 15 years of clinical experience.
Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to select skills that are most appropriate for the learner. Attendees will be able to make decisions based on the learner's data. Attendees will be able to maximize correct responding and minimize errors. Attendees will be able to make appropriate changes to their learner's skill-acquisition programs.
Activities: The format combines lecture and discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts and special education teachers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Improving Classroom Behavior Support Through Applied Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM EDT
Virtual
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert F. Putnam, Ph.D.
ROBERT F. PUTNAM (May Institute), ERIK MAKI (May Institute), SACHA KG SHAW (Endicott College )
Description: This workshop will provide behavior analysts a review of the research on evidence-based practices in classwide behavior support (Simonsen & Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, & Sugai, 2008; Simonsen et al., 2015; Reinke, Herman & Sprick, 2011). These practices include: 1) antecedent practices (physical layout, classroom expectations, behavioral routines, teaching expectations and routines, precorrections, active supervision); 2) instructional management (opportunities to respond), 3) reinforcement practices (contingent behavioral-specific praise, group contingencies, and token economies, behavioral contracts) and consequence (planning ignoring, explicit reprimands, differential reinforcement, response cost, and timeout). The workshop will go over the use of classwide functional assessment as a method to systematically evaluate the classroom environment to design and implement effective classroom-wide behavioral support practices. Once the environment is assessed, the model incorporates both indirect (i.e., lecture, written training materials) and direct (i.e., modeling, performance feedback) instruction. Finally, participants will learn how teachers participate in a data-based decision-making process to establish more effective practices, procedures, and interactions with students. Data (Swain-Bradway et al., 2017) will be presented supporting the need for a comprehensive training method that includes both direct instruction and performance feedback for teachers to implement classroom-wide behavior support practices with integrity.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) apply functional assessment strategies to the selection and implementation of effective classroom-wide practices; 2) use evidence-based methods used to train teachers in evidenced based classroom-wide behavior support practices; 3) use a data-based decision process used with teachers to modify classroom behavior support practices, and; 4) use instructional and behavior support practices that establish more effective interactions between teachers and students and increase on task behavior.
Activities: Participants will learn how to: 1) apply functional assessment strategies to the selection and implementation of effective classroom-wide practices; 2) use evidence-based methods used to train teachers in evidenced-based classroom-wide behavior support practices; 3) a data-based decision process used with teachers to modify classroom behavior support practices, and; 4) instructional and behavior support practices that establish more effective interactions between teachers and students and increase on-task behavior.
Audience: Behavior analysts who consult to classrooms both in public school districts and/or private schools who desire to develop their consultation skills to improve both instructional practices and/or on-task behavior of students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: BACB
Behaving Behavior Analytic When Working in Public Schools to Support Students With Severe Disabilities
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM EDT
Virtual
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert C. Pennington, Ph.D.
ROBERT C. PENNINGTON (University of North Carolina-Charlotte)
Description: Serving educational professionals and their students in school contexts is a challenging but meaningful endeavor. In this session, Dr. Pennington will draw on his over 25 years working in schools to discuss functional contingencies related to teacher behavior change and provide an approach for assessing and then supporting teachers in the improvement of classroom programming.
Learning Objectives: Serving educational professionals and their students in school contexts is a challenging but meaningful endeavor. In this session, the presenter will draw on the extant research literature and his over 25 years working in schools to discuss functional contingencies related to teacher behavior change and provide an approach for assessing and then supporting teachers in the improvement of classroom programming. Participants will be provided strategies for interacting with school personnel, methods for identifying targets for teacher behavior change, and strategies for training educators. Specifically, participants will discuss school environments, putative reinforcers within those environments, and ways to modify the environmental to shift teacher practice. The presenter also will provide attendees the opportunity to use commercially available tools to score classroom videos and identify areas for improvement within classrooms, and subsequently develop behavioral objectives for teacher behavior change. Finally, the presenter will provide strategies for implementing coaching (e.g., behavior skills training, dynamic fading, self-management strategies). Through out the presentation, the presenter will discuss common issues related to special education service delivery to provide context for behavior analysts new to this area of practice.
Activities: The format includes lecture, small group activities, guided practice of the use of classroom observation tools and objective development, and discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts new to working in public school settings
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Training Caregivers in Schools and Human Services: From Research to Practice
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Peter Sturmey, Ph.D.
PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: 1. Behavioral Skills Training (BST) has been widely adopted in educational and residential services as a method to train socially significant, evidence-based skills that result in improvements in the skills of typical children and adults and with children and adults with developmental disabilities. 2. There are hundreds and small N experiments and tens of randomized controlled trials demonstrating the effectiveness, efficiency and acceptability of BST. 3. These studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals, such as JABA. 4. The content relates to ethical, legal, statutory and regulatory guidelines and standards such as: (1) ABAI's and BCBA ethical guidelines that practitioners should be competent and use effective evidence-based practices; (2) legal requirements to do no harm or minimize harm by having trained caregivers; and (3) strategies used by services to mitigate risks and liabilities by having competent staff and use evidence-based practices.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1)describe how to conduct a training needs assessment for their organization; (2)describe the components of behavioral skills training (BST); (3) conduct an adequate task analysis of a teaching skill; (4) describe a training procedure that incorporates role play scripts using strategies to promote generalization of skill; (5) describe strategies to develop pyramidal training; describe strategies to develop and evaluate system-wide caregiver training programs.
Activities: The workshop will include (1) didactic / lecture presentations on research that forms the basis for skills training; (2) written exercises to write tasks analyses, training procedures, general case and multiple case training analyses of caregiver performances; (3) varied videomodels of BST; and (4) group discussions of applications and development of plans.
Audience: This intermediate workshop will be appropriate for advances graduate students, Masters and Doctoral level practitioners, program administrators and faculty teaching classes in ABA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Anxiety and Trauma for Those on the Autism Spectrum
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Bobbie J Gallagher, Ph.D.
BOBBIE J GALLAGHER (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; Autism Center for Educational Services)
Description: Research has shown that people with autism have a higher risk of adverse and potentially traumatic childhood experiences and confirms high rates of anxiety present in individuals with autism, but many times, little is done outside of the search for medication. Children, youth, and adults with ASD may express anxiety very differently from neurotypical individuals, and as a result those around them may inadvertently increase rather than decrease stressors. This workshop will address why anxiety and trauma may manifest differently in individuals with autism. The audience will review tools, such as the Behavior Avoidance Test, to measure behaviors and identify triggers as well as review the use of technology (heart rate monitors) to measure stressful events in those with limited language. Various assessments, such as the Groden Stress Survey, will be discussed as these may be used during a functional behavior assessment in order to design effective behavior intervention plans and skill acquisition programs. Additionally, how training of staff in neuroscience based strategies, ex. David Rock's S.C.A.R.F., and other person-centered approaches can decrease adverse responses to triggers.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1)Describe causes of anxiety and trauma in individuals with ASD (2) Identify various assessment tools for use in developing treatment for those with ASD who have anxiety or experienced trauma (3) Describe interventions that may decrease responses to triggers in those with ASD.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture and audience participation through review of assessment tools, and small group practice of person-centered strategies.
Audience: The target audience is BCBAs working with individuals with ASD who experience anxiety that evokes challenging behaviors and resistance to treatment.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Providing Sexual Education for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Disabilities Through the Use of Behavior Analytic Assessment and Instruction
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University), SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
Description: Sexual behavior is a topic that will be an issue for many individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities at some point in their lives. Although specific issues vary, many issues are related to deficits in social skills. ABA treatments can be effective in promoting appropriate behaviors of a sexual topography though targeting related social behaviors. This workshop will focus on ABA strategies useful for individuals with developmental disabilities including individuals on the autism spectrum. The workshop will begin with an overview of general issues regarding sexuality development. Consistent with ethical standards, a brief overview of the physiology of human sexual behavior will be provided so that behavior analysts can identify situations where medical issues may be present. We will then address problem sexual behavior through functional assessment and discuss replacement treatments based on function. We will then move into more specific topics which could be included within an ABA sexual education curriculum. Treatment strategies will include reinforcement-based shaping, differential reinforcement, discrimination training, video modeling, task analyses, picture activity schedules, scripts and script fading, and social stories. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available. Topics related to ethics and consent will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: 1. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to state common issues experienced by people with developmental disabilities and ASD as related to appropriate and problem behaviors of a sexual topography, 2. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to develop 2-3 teaching programs for skill acquisition of sexual behaviors using techniques and theories consistent with applied behavior analysis, 3. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to conduct a functional assessment of problem behavior as it relates to sexual behavior and develop a behavior intervention plan based on the function, 4. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to list considerations associated with consent.
Activities: Workshop content will be taught through the following activities: 1. Didactic instruction by the presenters, 2. Group discussion, 3. Presentation and review of teaching materials, 4. Role play and practice of presented teaching procedures where applicable, 5. Sharing and discussion of research data
Audience: The current workshop content is geared towards the following audience: 1. Intermediate and advanced behavior analysts who have a desire to learn how to apply behavioral principles and teaching methods to the topographies of sexual behavior. 2. Educators and related service professionals who have an advanced behavioral background and work with individuals with developmental issues that have needs in the area of sexual behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Delivering the PAX Good Behavior Game for Clinical and Population-Level Prevention Effects
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: CSS/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dennis D. Embry, Ph.D.
DENNIS D. EMBRY (PAXIS Institute), JASON FRUTH (Ohio Research Solutions)
Description: A sophisticated version of the good behavior game [1-5], used in multiple randomized trials [6-11], significantly reduces in immediate, proximal problematic behaviors [2] and has long-term prevention, intervention and treatment effects on mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders measurable 1, 5, 10-15 years later [12-19]. A Canadian randomized trial reduced DSM disorders at a population level [9], specifically benefitting children with historic disparities. The PAX Good Behavior Game, the official version of the GBG used in randomized comparative effectiveness trials, is more sophisticated than the original ABA studies [2, 4, 10, 11]—yet not well known among ABAI professionals [2, 20]. All randomized trials of the PAX GBG are by independent scientists, with no economic ties to the program. Independent studies of bare bones versions of GBG, without the relational frame, Premack reinforcers, and others evidence-based kernels have either no effect or iatrogenic effects on behavioral health indicators [21, 22]. PAX GBG is explicitly designed to create generalization across people, activities, behaviors, and settings—including to home, after school settings, etc. This workshop details how PAX GBG can be supported by ABA specialists [23, 24] in the context of educational laws, health-care services, and population-level implementations in eight states already to reduce psychiatric and behavioral disorders at population-level.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) facilitate schools and communities in the adoption and delivery of the PAX Good Behavior Game in classroom settings for children with appropriate DSM diagnoses and/or supporting social justice for children, families, and communities with historic disparities; (2) reinforce PAX GBG implementation for effective outcomes that reduce challenging behavior, improve in social and academic skills, and address special education issues; (3) assist measurement, monitoring and reinforcement of teacher implementation, child behavior change, and generalization across people, places, and time.
Activities: Lecture, small group activities, large group activities
Audience: Applied behavior analysts working in schools, after-school centers, autism centers, and congregate care settings
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Writing and Reviewing Ethical Intensive Behavior Programs
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: TBA/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc and TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: This workshop is intended to advance skills relating to writing and reviewing Individual Behavior Plans for recipients with challenging behavior. Starting with provider self-evaluation regarding accepting a recipient, moving through authoring plans, and then reviewing those written by others, this is an active-participant workshop. Among topics to be covered; The "rules" in various areas for addressing dangerous and challenging behaviors, researching relevant legislation and policy obligations, determining agency policy for the use of restraint and/or restrictive procedures, and reviewing journals for efficacious interventions will be covered. We will also review the ethical obligations of providing services to these difficult recipients, including the need for crisis management training when restraint "isn't used" in regular programming. Evaluating, training and supervising staff will be reviewed at length. Additionally, we will review obligations to the recipient, the family, the agency, and families who private pay. A peer-review system will be presented and evaluated by participants, as well as the need for experienced clinicians to have mentors of their own. Using a format for "old school" (non-computer generated) IBPs, and case studies, we will examine recommended components, organization, wordsmithing, effective data collection, and the importance of explicit, detailed, instructions.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to identify behaviors that meet criterion for dangerous and challenging, intensive behaviors. Participants will be able to systematically format IBPs to allow consistency for all implementers, without software. Participants will be able to differentiate legal and ethical requirements when addressing intensive behaviors. Participants will be able to efficiently and effectively review IBPs for individuals with dangerous and challenging behavior. Participants will be able to give appropriate feedback to clinicians who are incorrectly authoring IBPs for intensive behaviors.
Activities: Workshop activities will include; lecture, participant self-evaluation, identification of policies and rules regarding restrictive procedures in various (participant) areas, using sample programs and videos to review, evaluate, and revise interventions.
Audience: This workshop is for experienced clinicians who are struggling with service provision for recipients with dangerous and challenging behavior, those BCBAs who are looking to refresh/expand their own behavioral repertoires, and those who find themselves supervising pre-certificants and established staff who are writing behavior plans for this challenging population.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: BACB
Using Relational Frame Theory to Promote Generative Language
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Siri Ming, Ph.D.
SIRI MING (VB3; Private Practice), IAN T. STEWART (National University of Ireland, Galway), JOHN D. MCELWEE (Private Practice; VB3)
Description: Relational Frame Theory (RFT) sees generalized derived relational responding—relational framing—as the core skill involved in human language, essential for flexible, fluent conversational skills and academic progress. Relational responding repertoires have been highly correlated with language and IQ measures, relational training programs have shown powerful effects on both academic skills and IQ, and a key domain for the application of RFT has recently been in teaching children with language and academic deficits. Our approach integrates theory and research on the assessment and training of derived relational responding skills with strategies developed by programs which follow a Skinnerian analysis of verbal behavior, including an emphasis on analyzing motivational variables, training mands, and conducting training in the natural environment. In this highly interactive workshop, we identify relational responding repertoires along with other critical behavioral cusps to teach towards an ultimate aim of establishing generative language, and present a powerful framework for approaching early intervention, based on RFT and informed by decades of research and practice. For participants who are using curricula based on an RFT approach already, we invite a deeper exploration of the underlying theory, and introduce a framework for problem-solving when lesson plans are not producing desired outcomes.
Learning Objectives: 1. Using an assessment and programming flowchart and case review template, describe the priorities for assessment and intervention for learners at early and more advanced skill levels with an emphasis on behavioral cusps for generative language. 2. Describe the defining features of relational frames, distinguishing between derived, generalized, and taught responses and between arbitrary and nonarbitrary relational responding. 3. Demonstrate how to assess and teach early derived relational responding skills in relations of coordination and how to use equivalence-based teaching to efficiently teach new content.  4. Demonstrate how to assess and teach nonarbitrary and arbitrary relational responding skills in relations of distinction. 5. Describe how to assess and teach early relational responding skills in a variety of patterns including opposition, comparison, spatial and temporal relations. 6. Distinguish between teaching categorization from an equivalence perspective and teaching hierarchical categorization; describe how to assess and teach class inclusion. 7. Describe the early foundational repertoires for developing a sense of “self” and perspective-taking.
Activities: The workshop combines lecture, video demonstration, small and large group discussion, and role play.
Audience: Behavior analysts charged with assessing and designing programming for teaching language in early intervention and early elementary level programs for children with autism.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: BACB
Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Katharine M. Croce, Ed.D.
KATHARINE M. CROCE (Self & Match), JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education)
Description: This INTERACTIVE and HANDS-ON workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for individuals of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match System, a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically-supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials, and access to Self & Match Maker, an online Self & Match form creator. Participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. The Self & Match System has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional behavior disorders, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. Self & Match can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems, class-wide, and school-wide management procedures as a part of SWPBIS and has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings; including (but not limited to): public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings.
Learning Objectives: *Identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring *Effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system *Identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system *Identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention *Identify the basic components of the Self & Match System *Systematically individualize an intervention based on collaborative and critical thinking *Create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace *Systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own Self & Match System. The format combines lecture, small group collaboration, whole group responding utilizing interactive responding, and discussion. Core content will be taught through a combination of lecture, video examples, data analysis, and guided practice.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, and/or others who support individuals from pre-K to 21 in school, home, or clinic settings as well as adults that are interested in increasing appropriate behaviors. Great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Executive Functioning and Autism: Applications Within Applied Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sarah B. Woldoff, Ph.D.
SARAH B. WOLDOFF (Arcadia University)
Description: The goal of a neuropsychological evaluation is to comprehensively assess and identify strengths and weaknesses across multiple areas. The evaluation measures such areas as attention, problem solving, memory, language, I.Q., visual-spatial skills, academic skills, and social-emotional functioning. Some children referred for an evaluation may already have a known learning disorder or other diagnoses such as Autism. Recommendations for particular therapies and methods as they relate to specific diagnoses stemming from the neuropsychological assessment can also be made and can be combined with other evaluations such as Functional Behavior Assessment. Executive functioning skills are critical for academic success both within the classroom and in the real world. Deficits in executive functioning are often seen in students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These behaviors include long-term planning, time management, using feedback effectively, controlling impulses, and utilizing organization skills. These deficits also contribute to poor social interactions, cognitive functioning, emotional and behavioral development, as well as learning and academic achievement and should be considered when establishing.
Learning Objectives: Describe how executive functions impact individuals with autism spectrum disorder Become familiar with interventions that support executive functioning difficulties Identify practical recommendations to create supports to create and use at home, in school, or in the community.
Activities: The format will combine lecture and small group activities and discussion. Attendees will receive guided notes, a resource packet, and glossary of terms to take home.
Audience: The workshop would be beneficial to PreK through high school teachers, RBTs, BCABA's, BCBA's, and other community service providers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Dotting the I's and Crossing the T's: Documentation Compliance
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thea H. Davis, M.S.
THEA H. DAVIS (Autism Bridges; MassCAP), EILEEN MENDES (MassCAP), Barbara Hunt (Autism Bridges), CATHY J. BOOTH (Autism Bridges)
Description: Providing insurance funded services to individuals with autism requires more than just assessing the individual, developing the treatment plan, and providing direct instruction. Understanding state and federal laws related to service delivery, documentation, and billing; as well as understanding contract terms and distinctions in medical necessity criteria across payers can be challenging to navigate. Missing one small but critical regulation, policy, or sentence in a contract can make or break a business. This workshop will offer guidelines on ethical documentation practices, retention schedules for medical records, conformance to documentation expectations with respect to medical necessity criteria, preparing for an external audit, conducting internal audits, and how to navigate the back of the house needs.
Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to understand essential elements of a medical record The participant will be able to access relevant regulatory and payer policy information The participant will be able to design documentation forms that cover insurance regulated session notes and treatment plans developed from primary resources. (DSM5, CPT Manual, CPT Assistant, Insurance Contracts, and Federal guidelines)
Activities: Core content and examples will be taught through lecture. Their will be guided practice and group discussion
Audience: Level: Intermediate Target audience: Owners of ABA Companies, and BCBA's and clinicians providing Adaptive Behavior Services as defined int the CPT Manual
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
If You Are a BCBA, Are You/Can You Become a Dog Trainer? Some Ethics and Some Steps in That Direction
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terri M. Bright, Ph.D.
TERRI M. BRIGHT (MSPCA Angell)
Description: When you have studied behavior analysis, you find yourself being asked about the behavior of non-human species, usually dogs. Do you pause before stepping into the breach and making suggestions? Until you have the tools to implement the assessments and interventions you have used with humans, you will likely not be able to generalize your skills to another species. Safety is also a reason: 4 million people are bitten by dogs each year. To a trained professional, the precursors of aggression are like a blinking neon sign; to a novice, they are unnoticed. Whether in your neighborhood, your home, or your workplace, dogs pose a bite risk to humans. Dog bite prevention involves teaching others to recognize precursors of a possible bite. This workshop will first remind BCBA’s and others what the ethics are of teaching outside of their scope of training and experience. It will also teach attendees to identify precursors of canid aggression as well as what to do when they see them. Finally, if you are interested in dog training, this workshop will demonstrate generalization of such skills as preference assessments and functional assessment/analysis of dog behavior, and give some simple tools for training dogs, as well as instructions on how to refer to the right dog trainer.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion if the workshop, attendees will be able to: - via videos and textual prompts, identify the precursors of dog aggression and how to stay safe in the presence of an aggressive dog; - identify how your behavioral skills are skewed towards humans and how your dog-training skills may be skewed away from science - identify when and if you should intervene with a dog’s problem behavior; - identify an ethical dog trainer in their geographical area should they need a referral - learn to perform preference assessments and use the Functional Assessment of Behavior of Dogs (FABD), an assessment created by the workshop presenter
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, surveys, choral responding, small group breakout, still photos of dogs, dog behavior videos and textual prompts. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and video demonstrations of dog behavior. Supplemental materials will be provided such as participants will be able to review all photos, videos and surveys after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This basic workshop is meant for those who find themselves in the company of dogs and who are tempted to train them and otherwise interact with them. Though participant's individual dogs' behaviors are not the target of the workshop, enough information will be disseminated so that participants can, perhaps, begin their dog-training at home, using the tenets of ABA and within the scope of the BACB Task List; they will be able to recognize the limits of their behavioral skills across species. Those who come into contact with dogs in the community or workplace and who are fearful or uncertain will be better equipped to act appropriately, be it to gain safety or to find referrals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Navigate Challenging Behavior Better: How to Supervise and Train Individuals to Comprehensively Address Challenging Behavior
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, Ph.D.
MEGAN MILLER (#dobetter Pod)
Description: This workshop focuses on going beyond the typical training provided on functions of behavior and behavioral assessment to provide attendees with a more comprehensive understanding of how to supervise and train others to navigate challenging behavior. This workshop provides an overview of how to truly conduct functional assessment and analysis and reviews research in support of advancements in functional analysis technology (e.g., Hanley, 2015). It then provides a deeper dive into considerations relating to ethical and flexible application of extinction and maintaining analysis when designing behavior intervention plans.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to describe how to provide supervision relating to the primary purpose of functional assessment Participants will be able to identify at least 1 benefit to including advancements in functional analysis technologies during supervision Participants will be able to explain at least 1 ethical consideration regarding extinction to incorporate during supervision Participants will be able to describe at least 1 general guideline to follow when addressing challenging behavior during supervision Participants will be able to describe the importance of maintaining analysis in developing behavior intervention plans when supervising others on the development of such plans
Activities: This workshop combines interactive exercises designed to provide opportunities to reflect upon the experiences of trainees and clients when addressing challenging behavior with a behavioral skills training packet designed to demonstrate how to provide supervision to trainees on comprehensively addressing challenging behavior.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BCBAs with at least 2 years of experience and who are responsible for providing BACB fieldwork supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Teaching the Foundational Components of Pretend Play
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nancy J. Champlin, M.A.
NANCY J. CHAMPLIN (ACI Learning Centers), MELISSA SCHISSLER (ACI Learning Centers)
Description: Play is imperative to a child's development and is identified as one of the core deficits in children diagnosed with autism, often described as lacking in symbolic qualities and flexibility (Jarr & Eldevik, 2007). Evidence-based play interventions can positively impact future communication and language skills, cognitive functioning, as well as social interactions for individuals with autism and other developmental delays. Play should be an integral part of a child’s programming because of its importance to the child’s overall development (Wilburn, 2011). The purpose of this workshop is to train participants on how to teach the foundational components of pretend play utilizing the Pretend Play and Language Assessment and Curriculum (PPLAC). The PPLAC is a behaviorally-based curriculum formulated from the typical developmental sequence of play and language and utilized to establish and expand a child's pretend play repertoire. The five elements of play including agent, object, category of play, advanced play, and the essential skills to sociodramatic play are identified and separated into teachable components.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to identify and examine the five elements of pretend play 2. Participants will be able to demonstrate implementation of targets from Stage 1: Single Agent in the Pretend Play and Language Assessment and Curriculum 3. Participants will be able to demonstrate collecting and analyzing data for targets in Stage 1 in the Pretend Play and Language Assessment and Curriculum 4. Participants will be able to demonstrate initiating play, positioning appropriately, effective prompting, and providing feedback following a play opportunity 5. Participants will be able to identify effective components of short-term and long-term pretend play goals
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met by alternating between didactic instruction, discussion, video modeling, and small group activities such as role play and practicing data collection. Participants will be provided with workbooks including presentation notes and sample data sheets.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts, Speech Language Pathologists, Special Educators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Efficient and Effective Supervision for Registered Behavior Technicians in Non-Clinical Settings: Challenges and Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: BCBAs who supervise and train RBTs are time-challenged to assist the RBT to acquire and maintain the essential skills to be successful implementing data-based practices. RBTs working in non-clinical settings require additional support and training as current ABA terminology and technology may not be supported in those environments. This workshop is designed for BCBAs who require additional strategies to support and supervise RBT’s in non-clinical settings utilizing time efficient and effective strategies to accelerate the RBT’s learning and skill acquisition. The workshop will present numerous evidence-based practices to add to the supervisors’ tool belt in order for the RBT to acquire the necessary skills. These individualized training protocols feature supervision documentation, vocabulary acquisition, skill demonstration, and feedback. All of these activities will aid the RBT to satisfactorily demonstrate competency to implement the task acquisition strategies and master the BACB task list to ensure delivery of current standards of care.
Learning Objectives: The participants will be able to use shaping. The participants will be able to use modeling. The participants will be able to use prompting and fading procedures. The participants will be able to provide naturalistic teaching strategies to provide instruction to the RBT. The participants will be able to individualize additional instruction for the RBTs. The participants will be able to collect data and evaluate success using data-based strategies. The participants will be able to monitor the client’s progress and treatment integrity. The participants will be able to use self-management strategies. The participants will be able to use data-based decisions to determine the need for additional training and support.
Activities: The format combines lecture, video examples, small group hands on activities and guided practice.
Audience: BCBAs, Special Education Teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysis of Seizures
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: BPN/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. Individuals with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be better controlled, and important new skills could be acquired, if the behavior analyst understands epilepsy. A brief review of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be provided. The etiology, genetics and classification of common seizure disorders will be briefly reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be covered. Developmentally disabled clients are often improperly monitored and over-medicated for seizures. These issues can be avoided with EEG (electroencephalography), which is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy. Workshop participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with the EEG, without sedation or anesthesia. Participants will learn how epileptic seizures change an individual's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about how to describe, measure and control these relationships in an ethical manner.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, each participant will be able to: 1. Define an epileptic seizure. 2. Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures. 3. Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior. 4. Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions. 5. Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress. 6. Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures. 7. Know how to prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia. 8. Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures. 8. Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy. 9. Explain some recent research on epilepsy and behavior analysis. 10. Explain how the environment can decrease abnormal brain activity and seizures.
Activities: The workshop activities will include lecture, group discussion, video observation, and interactive activities to test knowledge (using Kahoot). Students will have access to videos, peer reviewed articles and chapters on Research Gate before the conference. Research Gate link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Neill
Audience: Clinical behavior analysts and experimental analysts with an interest in learning effective methods for analyzing seizures and their immediate and long term effects on intellectual functioning, everyday behavior and behavior disorders.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Children With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Broadening the Lens
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Traditional counselors view aberrant behaviors as symptoms of underlying constructs that are the reason for these behaviors, while behaviorists view these behaviors as serving an environmental function. FBA identifies the function of aberrant behaviors and acceptable replacement behaviors that serve the same function. Components that are often missing in the analysis of aberrant behaviors include: 1) motivating operations in the form of private events (thoughts and feelings); and 2) learning history with specific Sds for reinforcement or punishment. This workshop will deal with the following: disturbed attachment, callousness and lack of emotionality, oppositional and defiant behaviors, and anxiety and depression.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the symptoms of emotional/behavioral disorders as behaviors serving an environmental function 2. Describe the process of conducting FBAs with children with emotional/behavioral disorders 3. Describe the role of learning history in treating with children with emotional/behavioral disorders 4. Describe the role of motivating operations and discriminative stimuli in treating children with emotional/behavioral disorders 5. Describe how to develop and implement function-based treatments for children with emotional/behavioral disorders
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using lecture, role-play, case presentations, discussion and small-group interaction
Audience: Participants can include BCBAs, teachers, psychologists, psychiatrists, administrators, nurses, counselors, and social workers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Risk-Benefit Analysis of Treatments for Severe Problem Behaviors
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nathan Blenkush, Ph.D.
NATHAN BLENKUSH (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center), JASON CODERRE (Judge Rotenberg Center), DYLAN PALMER (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center and Simmons University), JOSEPH TACOSIK (Judge Rotenberg Education Center)
Description: Behavior analysts are often part of multidisciplinary teams that treat patients with severe problem behaviors that are refractory to typical interventions. Professionals within and between disciplines do not always agree on the most appropriate treatment approach for a given person. However, there is general agreement that those providing treatment should provide the most effective and least restrictive interventions available. Unfortunately, risk perception and bias sometimes influence decision making to the detriment of the person receiving treatment. Here, we review decision analysis tools that may help inform decisions made by behavior analysts and interdisciplinary teams when treating severe problem behaviors. We review ethical, legal, and regulatory policies that must be considered in relation to treating people with severe problem behaviors.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to describe the elements of at least two decision analysis tools associated with treatment selection. 2. Participants will identify at least three potential fallacies or biases associated with risk and clinical decision making. 3. Participants will evaluate at least two treatments using a risk benefit approach.
Activities: The format combines lecture, application of decision analysis, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts, psychologists, and other professionals who are often confronted with people who emit severe problem behaviors refractory to typical interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W86
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Cultural Concerns in the Development of Professional Ethics for Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: PCH/AUT; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: William L. Holcomb, Ph.D.
WILLIAM L. HOLCOMB (The New England Center for Children)
Description: As the number of Board Certified Behavior Analysts® (BCBA)worldwide increases, the probability that an individual BCBA would be practicing in a novel or different culture continues to increase. This is particularly likely in the use of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities (given the proportion of BCBAs who practice in these areas and the world-wide demand for services). The presentation will review the general development of ethical standards and the differences between moral, ethical, and legal codes, especially as they apply to practicing ABA. Next, a behavior analytic concept of culture as defined by Skinner will be introduced and contrasted with non-behavior analytic models of the effects of culture on ethics (e.g., Hofstede’s cultural dimensions model, guidelines for cultural ethics in business, etc.). Throughout the presentation, examining how these variables affect and are addressed by the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts will be stressed. Scenarios encountered in applied settings will be presented illustrating potential ethical dilemmas across cultures. Participants will identify section(s) of the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts relevant to determining if an ethical conflict has occurred and what action should be taken.
Learning Objectives: The attendee will: 1. State the difference between moral, ethical, and legal dilemmas and identify an appropriate plan to resolve the dilemma. 2. State a behavior analytic-based definition of culture, and give at least one example of how cultural differences may affect practice. 3. Identify at least one personal value connected to the participant’s cultural history. 4. Recognize ethical conflicts and identify means of resolving these conflicts according to the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. 5. Identify potential conflicts in two scenarios and cite the applicable sections and elements of the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that address the conflicts.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, review of brief written material, and small group breakouts. Scenarios illustrating potential ethical dilemmas across cultures will be provided for participant practice in using the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts as a starting point for determining solutions.
Audience: Intermediate to advanced professionals involved with evaluation, treatment and monitoring of individuals diagnosed with autism and other developmental disabilities (Provides additional training for individuals with experience and training on the topic) at the post graduate training level. No one needs to be excluded.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W92
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Simplivise: Training the Trainer to Simplify Training and Supervision Through the Use of Evidence-Based Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Yendri Diaz, M.A.
YENDRI DIAZ (Skillometry Inc.), MARIA BROWN (Skillometry Inc. ), ZUHE C ARNESEN (Skillometry Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed to develop effective trainers and supervisors within ABA organizations. This workshop will demonstrate how to incorporate Behavioral Skills Training, Precision Teaching, and digital technology into a simplified training and supervision program that develops and maintains critical skills for effective ABA services in online and in-person environments. Phase 1: Instructional design segment where attendees will learn how to create an evidenced-based training program. Phase 2: Teach attendees how to train and supervise staff utilizing a unique blend of BST, PT, and digital tech. Phase 3: Prepare attendees to maintain skill repertoires through simplified supervision and digital technology.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Identify and define evidence-based training and supervision strategies. 2. Develop an outline for training and supervision content using evidence-based strategies and digital technology. 3. Identify and set goals for trainers, supervisors, and their learners. 4. Identify how to measure quality and effectiveness of their training and supervision. 5. Plan for maintenance of skills through supervision.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using behavioral skills training through the following activities: 1. Instructor led presentation and group discussion. 2. Instructor will model target skills. 3. Individual and small group guided practice. 4. Individual and small group competency building exercises. 5. Instructor will provide individual feedback to each attendee based on performance of target skills. 6. Visual aids and worksheets will be provided as supplementary materials.
Audience: Workshop target audience is ABA Clinical and Training Managers, Supervisors, and BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W95
CE Offered: BACB
Mand Training Across Motivating Operations and Generalization
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: VRB/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Pyles, M.A.
MEGAN PYLES (Pyles and Associates)
Description: In early behavioral intensive intervention, functional communication in the form of mands is often the initial skill targeted as it provides a replacement for problem behavior and allows children to control their environment (Carr & Durand, 1985; Sundberg & Michael, 2001). Mands occur across a variety of motivating operations and stimulus conditions. For example, a child may mand to gain access to a preferred item or activity, to end a non-preferred activity, or to obtain information. For these mands to be part of a functional verbal repertoire, generalization of mands to novel stimuli, environments, motivating operations, and people should be observed. Because each type of mand occurs in unique motivational conditions, clinicians must implement different procedures to evoke these verbal responses. This workshop will review various types of mands (e.g., for tangibles, actions, information, and removal of aversive stimuli) and train on teaching procedures for each. Further, the differences between generalization across stimuli and generalization across motivating operations will be discussed, as well as the clinical implications of these differences (Miguel, 2017).
Learning Objectives: After participation in this workshop, attendees will be able to (1) define and outline the functional relations (i.e., antecedent, behavior, and consequence) for each type of mand, (2) generate novel examples of each type of mand, outline teaching procedures, and plan for generalization across motivating operations and stimuli, and (3) implement teaching procedures for each type of mand, and train another individual on implementation, data collection, and mastery criterion.
Activities: This workshop includes presentation of information, guided group activities, and discussion.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is anyone working in the field of ABA using a verbal behavior approach to functional communication. Both direct line staff and supervisors can benefit from the information and activities.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic

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