Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

46th Annual Convention; Online; 2020

Program by Workshops: Thursday, May 21, 2020


Manage My Personal Schedule

 

Workshop #W4
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Considerations: What Every Behavior Analyst Should Know About Augmentative and Alternative Communication Decision-Making
Thursday, May 21, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Catherine Horton, M.S.
CATHERINE HORTON (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc. )
Description: An overwhelming number of communication options exist for our learners with complex communication needs. Practitioners are not only faced with decisions related to the type of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) system, but are also tasked with choices related to the most effective teaching strategy. Behavior analysts must be familiar with the available options, critically review the current research and make informed recommendations; all while maintaining compliance with the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code and working collaboratively with other members of the educational team. This presentation will review several current and popular approaches in the field including aided language stimulation/modeling, prompting strategies, core vocabulary, presumed competence and the varying definitions of "robust" as related to AAC decision-making. Relevance to the Code will be explored and participants will be presented with related ethical dilemmas with proposed solutions. Participants will leave the training with a framework for analyzing new communicative approaches while maintaining positive, ethical team collaboration.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) State specific guidelines from the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code in relation to AAC decision-making (2) Describe current popular approaches in the field of AAC, specifically including aided language stimulation/modeling, core vocabulary, prompting strategies; presumed competence and the term "robust" as it applies to AAC decision-making (3) Describe strategies for working cooperatively with other educational team members
Activities: Workshop objectives will be targeted via a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion and analysis of videos demonstrating key concepts. Ethical scenarios will also be presented for small group discussion and problem-solving.
Audience: This workshop will be presented by a dually-certified Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) and Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). Content will be of particular relevance to behavior analysts and other team members working with learners who utilize AAC systems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
When Peek-a-Boo Fails: How to Teach Eye Gaze to Young Children With Autism
Thursday, May 21, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ivana Krstovska, Ph.D.
IVANA KRSTOVSKA (Lehman College, City University of New York)
Description: Impairment in eye gaze is one of the earliest symptoms identified in infants later diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Eye gaze impairment interferes with successful attention to environmental stimuli necessary for building the foundation of early social communication. As a result, the learning process of young learners with ASD is negatively affected. This workshop will first review the research on eye gaze interventions across both requesting and joint attention contexts. Prerequisite skills required for eye gaze will be identified next. Specific procedures to teach eye gaze across different social-communicative contexts, including requesting and joint attention will be described as well as planning for generalization. Video clips of typically developing toddlers and toddlers with ASD engaging in eye gaze will be viewed, followed by a guided practice of various prompting and prompt fading procedures to teach eye gaze. Strategies to decrease response effort during instruction will be discussed to help avoid the development of problem behavior during intervention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1. assess and, if necessary, teach prerequisite skills needed for eye gaze 2. teach eye gaze in different social-communication contexts 3. decrease response effort to engage in eye gaze 4. plan for skill generalization and maintenance
Activities: This workshop will include a lecture, video observation, discussion, and guided practice. Supplemental materials with written procedures for each targeted skill will be provided to participants at the beginning of the workshop.
Audience: This workshop is developed for practitioners who work with young children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders as direct service providers, supervisors, trainers or consultants in the early intervention program and preschool special education facilities as well as those who provide Applied Behavior Analytic home-based services.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: BACB
An Applied Behavioral Medicine Approach to Marital Behavior Change: Skip the Whining and Arguing and Focus Directly on Changing Behaviors
Thursday, May 21, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM EDT
Virtual
Area: CBM/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Cook, M.D.
RICHARD COOK (Applied Behavior Medicine Associates of Hershey, PA)
Description: this workshop will assist attendees already versed in the philosophies and methodologies of Applied Behavior Analysis in applying those fundamental concept to changing behaviors within a marriage. Changing the behaviors will arguably most effectively decrease the disagreements and arguing that serve to undermine and ultimately destroy the discordant marriage. Traditional cognitive behavioral and family therapy techniques attempt to talk and understand, processes doomed to fail when a basic problem is the inability to communicate within the marriage in the first place. no couple falls back in love at the suggestion of a counselor; couples fall in love, then out of love, as a function of behaviors, overt and private, and the consequences on each other and the marriage itself. the love within a marriage is restored most effectively and most efficiently as a function of behaviors the spouses experience with one another. the workshop presents guides for therapists to follow that focus directly on idenitfying and modifying problematic behaviors, deliberately seek out positive aspects of the marriage and each spouse, and markedly decrease the potential for the arguing often associated with (typically ineffective) marriage counseling.
Learning Objectives: 1 . Attendees will develop habits of identifying specific issues (from within the cacophony of intramarital discord) on which to focus and deconstructing them into chains of behaviors as well as the physical, physiologic, and behavioral infrastructure (antecedents) that can be adjusted in the couples behavioral equation to increase the likelihood of emission of behaviors which will address those identified issues. 2. Attendees will practice using and develop habits of practice that will assist the spouses in identifying core problems, and then they themselves deconstruct into factors they can manipulate to solve those problems and in the future become their own counselors 3.attendees will develop the habits of assisting spouses in recognizing responsibilities to other parties within the marriage besides themselves and their often cherished "resentments," and leveraging those responsibilities ( such as to their children, to the family itself as a party and entity) to help effect behavior changes needed to address issues.
Activities: Lecture with ongoing discussion Guided notes Small Group Practice implementing Skills and Concepts discussed
Audience: Conference attendees who professionally conduct marriage counseling/marital and family therapy Conference attendees who are married or might become married who seek to establish desirable, healthy habits within the marriage
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: BACB
The Good Behavior Game: A Simple, Best-Practice Procedure for Transforming Class-Wide Student Behavior
Thursday, May 21, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM EDT
Virtual
Area: EDC/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: P. Raymond Joslyn, Ph.D.
P. RAYMOND JOSLYN (Utah State University)
Description: The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a well-established classroom management procedure that has been studied in our field for over 50 years. Extensive empirical research supports its use in reducing problem behavior (e.g., disruption) and increasing appropriate behavior (e.g., staying on task) in classrooms. Research has also demonstrated that the GBG can promote prosocial student interaction, increase teacher praise relative to reprimands, and may have long-term effects for students (e.g., decreased prevalence of substance abuse disorders, mental health needs, delinquency, and incarceration). The GBG is effective across school settings (e.g., mainstream, special education, alternative schools) and student age groups (e.g., preschool through high school and college), flexible and customizable, and easy to implement. However, despite the strong evidence supporting its use, it is currently underutilized in education. This is at least partially due to inadequate dissemination and possible misperceptions about its effectiveness, required effort, and utility across populations and settings. The goal of this workshop is to disseminate this best-practice procedure and provide the necessary skills and tools for attendees to do so as well. Attendees will be able to implement the GBG and its variations, train school staff (e.g., teachers, paraprofessionals), and troubleshoot to overcome implementation barriers. The presenter will share tips from his research and clinical experience for getting teacher and student buy in and discuss his own peer-reviewed research on the GBG, which includes extending the GBG to schools for children with emotional and behavioral disorders and delinquency, adapting the GBG to individual classrooms, methods for quickly and efficiently training teachers, and variations that reduce implementation effort.
Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to: 1) Discuss the current and past research supporting the use of the Good Behavior Game 2) Describe the key components of the Good Behavior Game and be able to implement the procedure 3) Describe variations of the Good Behavior Game and contexts in which they are appropriate 4) Discuss methods for training teachers and overcoming barriers to implementing the Good Behavior Game
Activities: Workshop objectives will be taught through lecture, demonstration, group discussion, and small group breakout (group size permitting). Supplemental materials and resources summarizing core content and troubleshooting will be provided.
Audience: This workshop is primarily intended for school-based practitioners (e.g., BCBAs, school psychologists), behavior support staff, and teachers (e.g., elementary, middle, high school, special education) who want to learn about evidence-based classroom behavior management.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: BACB
Eyes, Ears, and Thoughts Up Front: Teaching Generative Attending Skills Across the Spectrum
Thursday, May 21, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM EDT
Virtual
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Personalized Accelerated Learning Systems (PALS)), GLADYS WILLIAMS (CIEL, SPAIN), SARA POLGAR (David Gregory School )
Description: One defining characteristic of individuals labeled as having Autism Spectrum Disorder (F84.0) is a tendency to attend to a limited subset of environmental events participating in simple and complex contingencies of reinforcement ((Lovaas, Schreibman, Koegel, & Rhem, 1971). Limited attending repertoires restrict the type, range and potential for jointly acting sensory modalities to control and influence responding (cf, Brown & Bebko, 2012). Seeking to understand and affect the acquisition of various constellations of compound stimulus control, ABA researchers (e.g., Holth, 2005; Pelaez, 2009) have focused on identifying and remediating deficits and delays in the acquisition of simple and complex attending, joint attending and social referencing competencies (DeQuinzio, Poulson, Townsend, & Taylor, 2016). Important to today’s workshop is that “attentional” deficits and weaknesses can be remediated (Gewirtz & Palaez-Nogueras, 1992b; Luke & Greer, 2008), they can be decomposed into component/composite relations (Alessi, 1989; Binder, 2010), and attentional capacities and competencies are critical to the subsequent learning of new and higher order operants (Greer & Speckman, 2009).
Learning Objectives: 1. Contingently analyze attending behaviors 2. Identify component/composite relations Design conditioning contingencies to affect attending as a valued response. 3. To describe how attentional competencies and capabilities establish a foundation for the development of basic and advanced listener repertoires. 4. To describe how listener and speaker repertoires can be joined and generalized to promote incidental learning.
Activities: Combined lecture, discussion, and small group break out
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Supervising Safely, Assessing Risks, and Expanding Our Functional Assessments in Trauma Related Environments With Teams
Thursday, May 21, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Teresa Camille Kolu, Ph.D.
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence)
Description: As demand for behavior analytic services grows, we are increasingly asked to provide services compatible with national and local “trauma-informed” emphases. While an ethical, appropriate and individualized analysis of behavior may already be “trauma-informed”, board certified behavior analysts often report being uncomfortable when tasked with providing behavior analysis in a trauma-informed environment or team. Such behavior analytic practice must be conceptually sound while interfacing supportively with an increasing number and type of community providers who identify as trauma-informed. Recent data suggest board certified behavior analysts lack tools to assess or document the trauma related histories and the related risks that an increasing number of clients bring to treatment. This workshop educates attendees in a set of tools to supervise others and treat behavior in rich trauma-informed interdisciplinary settings (the Supervision, Risk Assessment, Functional Assessment, Environmental Assessment, and Trauma Relationships package). Handouts of assessment, risk analysis, and checklist tools are provided to assist participants in practicing skills during the workshop’s intensive instruction, modeling, roleplay, and feedback coaching sessions. Feedback from previous workshops in this series is implemented by engineering small group exercises to facilitate fluency using the take-home tools in the workshop and applying them to participants’ practice settings.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify behavior analytic principles applicable to supervising trauma supporting teams 2. Practice identifying trauma related risks in trauma supporting teams 3. Roleplay assessing the functions of behavior in trauma supporting teams 4. Update behavior plan and assessment templates with behavior analytic features related to trauma-related risks and functions of behavior
Activities: Workshop activities are completed in small groups and large group formats, and include instruction through lecture and demonstration, roleplay using tools provided, feedback, and group discussion. Tools will be provided to use during the workshop and take home, while supplemental tools and resources will be available to download related to the workshop activities and content.
Audience: Advanced audience members, such as those who have been supervising board certified behavior analysts for at least two years, are appropriate.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Behavioral Leadership
Thursday, May 21, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Natalie A. Parks, Ph.D.
NATALIE A. PARKS (Behavior Leader)
Description: Leadership is a set of skills that effectively energizes followers to accomplish the mission of the company in an ethical manner. Unfortunately, many leaders are promoted due to their excellent technical skills without being provided any specific training in the skills of leadership. Behavior analysts have the specific skills necessary to motivate others, teach new skills, and maintain behavior over time; however, applying these skills organizationally can be difficult. Several questions emerge including: What is leadership in behavior analysis? Why is it important? Who can be a leader? and How do you shape the behavior of a behavior analysis leader? This workshop will discuss the Leadership in Behavior Analysis (LIBA) model and provide an outline for the ideal behavior analysis leadership formula so that you can achieve a high level of prominence within our field, establish a long-lasting positive legacy for everyone in your organization, and grow your organization.
Learning Objectives: 1. State the different components of the Leadership in Behavior Analysis model. 2. Complete the LIBA assessment and identify current leadership skills. 3. Conceptually analyze leadership in behavior analysis. 4. State how to write a vision, mission, and values that align with the BACB Code of Professional Conduct. 5. Pinpoint strategies and behavior that will lead to best performance in followers. 6. Identify how to create a performance management system. 7. State how to identify performance problems.
Activities: Instructional Strategies Include: lecture, discussion, and completion of practice activities and assessments. Workshop objectives will be met through completions of practice activities, completion of worksheets and assessments, role plays and practice, feedback from presenters, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior Analysts (BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Conducting and Supervising Functional Behavior Assessment and Functional Analysis Across Environments
Thursday, May 21, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joanne Sgambati, Ph.D.
ERIN SPARACIO-ARCHIBALD (Eden II/ Genesis Programs), JILLIAN BRACCOLINO (Eden ll/ Genesis Programs), JOANNE SGAMBATI (Eden II/Genesis Programs), JAMES CORRIGAN (Eden ll/Geneisi Programs), KATHLEEN ROTAN (Eden ll/ Genesis Programs)
Description: This workshop will address the supervision of the methodology of functional behavior assessments and the empirical approach to a functional analysis across various environments. The basic components of a functional analysis can be adapted across environments to facilitate the assessment of maladaptive behaviors. The components of a functional behavior assessment, such as parent and care caregiver interviews, direct and indirect observations, questionnaires, and anecdotal data collection will be reviewed. Staff, students, and teachers can be supervised to acquire the necessary skills to conduct the various components of a functional analysis through effective supervision with behavioral training strategies. Best practices in supervision of staff who would be conducting assessments will be reviewed. Case studies, examples, and problem resolution will be discussed across various environments such as school settings, home environments, Day Habilitation programs, residential settings, and applied behavior analysis clinics. Implications and limitations of conducting a functional analysis outside of a clinical setting will be openly discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned: The components of functional behavior assessment and the empirical approach to a functional analysis. Participants will learn ways to apply supervision strategies and skills training to staff across various environments, and learn to trouble shoot and adapt supervision strategies across different environments given various scenarios.
Activities: Specific activities will include: 1. Choosing appropriate assessment and data collection systems when conducting a functional behavior assessment and functional analysis. 2. Analyzing data through various visual displays. 3. Problem solve and create improved behavioral skills training strategies for supervised staff given various scenarios. 4. Open discussion of applied supervision issues will also be reviewed.
Audience: Psychologists, Special Educators, Social Workers, Speech Pathologists, and Behavior Analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Comprehensive Program Evaluation of Individualized Intensive Behavioral Intervention for Autism in the Lovaas Model
Thursday, May 21, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest; University of Minnesota)
Description: This workshop will present the four main purposes, methods, and outcomes of comprehensive program evaluation of a widely recognized EIBI program: the Lovaas model: 1) to ensure that each family is receiving the most appropriate level of individualized intervention; 2) to evaluate the organization’s programming in a manner that contributes to continuous quality improvement; 3) to convey the value of the treatment program to policy makers; and 4) to meet the obligation of the behavior analyst to the field by producing useful research. The evaluation is geared to efficiently identify and develop the most significant objectives for each different child in as short a time frame as possible. The most efficient objectives will entail genuine sustainable generalization in all natural environments. The performance of all team members, parents, and supervisors are managed on a daily, weekly, six-month, and overall basis. Key measures will be presented, including the dynamic program management system. The prescriptive assessment system is multi-modal. It includes criterion-referenced measures, norm-referenced measures, standardized measures, treatment integrity, resource utilization, reliability, social validity, and individualized behavior analyses. A substantial body of research on 246 children served over 15 years will be presented.
Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to describe: 1) the important context variables for giving parents the opportunity to give genuine informed consent to treatment. 2) a variety of assessments of child response to treatment. 3) a system for generating an individualized prescriptive prognosis for EIBI every six months. 4) measures that convey the value of the treatment program to policy makers. 5) the results of a comprehensive research program.
Activities: The format includes, lecture, video-taped models, models of evaluation materials, and question-and-answer discussions of challenges being faced by participants in their own program evaluation activities.
Audience: Advanced clinicians, administrators, and advocates.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Help for BCBAs With Challenging Ethical Dilemmas: Avoiding Multiple Relationships, Confidentiality, and Limits to Confidentiality
Thursday, May 21, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: CBM/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Similar to psychologists and other helping professionals, BCBAs have several ethical responsibilities including: avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others. Although BCBAs may be aware of what these ethical responsibilities are, they may not have had the training to deal with these complicated and sometimes threatening situations. The workshop presenter is a licensed psychologist in addition to a BCBA-D and has had much experience supervising professionals, including BCBAs, who are faced with these daunting situations. This workshop will provide BCBAs and other professionals knowledge of and practice with handling these situations. Workshop participants can bring real or hypothetical ethical dilemmas to process, as well as hear about case scenarios and participate in roleplay situations. Behavior Skills Training (BST), which is an evidence-based procedure recommended for use in supervision, will be used to aid participants in becoming more skilled and confident in handling these challenging ethical dilemmas. Participants will be provided with specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, fidelity checklists, safety assessment form) and given information on how to use these tools.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the reasons why ethical dilemmas of avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others are so challenging 2. Describe the problem-solving process for dealing with challenging ethical dilemmas and how it was used in specific case scenarios 3. Describe the use of Behavior Skills Training (BST), including instructions, modeling, rehearsal and feedback, to aid participants in becoming more skilled and confident in handling these challenging ethical dilemmas 4. Describe the use of specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, fidelity checklists, safety assessment form)
Activities: The participants will listen to lecture and case examples of ethical dilemmas. They will also have discussion, role play ethical dilemmas and receive feedback on how these were handled. They will also be exposed to current literature regarding ethical dilemmas.
Audience: BCBAs, psychologists, social workers, guidance counselors, teachers, administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: BACB
Efficient Literature Searches Using Online Databases Available to You
Thursday, May 21, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nicole L. Bank, M.S.
NICOLE L. BANK (The PartnerShip, LLC; University of North Texas)
Description: Behavior analysts have theoretical, professional, and ethical obligations to stay in touch with the scholarly literature. General strategies for staying in contact with the scholarly literature are available (Carr and Briggs, 2010; Dubuque, 2011; Gillis & Carr, 2014) but as the popularity of online research resources increase, behavior analysts (both professional and academic) need to know how research is organized in these online systems. Furthermore, behavior analysts should understand what challenges our discipline pose when searching within this organizational system. This workshop provides an overview of online research resources for behavior analysts, explains how these resources are organized, and provides multiple examples of discipline-specific search strategies for more effective and efficient literature searches. This workshop will include multiple demonstrations and search results within a variety of research resources. The group will work together to conduct common literature search scenarios and/or research questions provided by workshop participants. Workshop participants will leave with the presentation slides and a table of where to find free, full text articles from relevant scholarly journals.
Learning Objectives: 1) Name at least two online sources of behavior analytic research 2) Describe how online research resources are organized 3) Observe and demonstrate examples of efficient, discipline-specific search strategies
Activities: Workshop content will be provided through an interactive lecture, live literature search demonstrations, examples of lecture components within the demonstrations, and literature searches conducted by the group.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior analysts at all levels in their career.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: BACB
Using Assessments Systematic Programming to Increase Joint Attention Skills
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christina Barosky, M.A.
CHRISTINA BAROSKY (Bierman ABA; Simmons University ), CHRISTINA GALLAGHER (Bierman ABA )
Description: Research has shown that low joint attention scores at the infant and preschool ages are associated with language deficits, and that the presence of joint attention can be a predictor of language skills (Charman et al., 2003; Toth et al., 2006; Whalen et al., 2006). Therefore, it is imperative that practitioners have a method for assessing and programming for joint attention. One method of effective instructional design includes breaking larger skills down into pinpoints (Kubina, 2019). This allows practitioners to design precise programming to increase language and foundational learning skills. This workshop will target methods of assessing joint attention skills, breaking those skills down using component composite analysis, and designing programming that can be monitored for progress and systematically built up to increase skills.
Learning Objectives: 1. Cite one method of assessing joint attention skills 2. Define the critical steps in conducting a component/composite analysis 3. Compile programming objectives following analyzing assessment results and component/composite 4. List examples of joint attention pinpoints
Activities: Lecture to introduce the topic and review assessment methods. Video examples and group participation/discussion to learn how to identify components of joint attention. Small group assignments to come up with different programming goals.
Audience: Designed for practitioners who are looking to learn how to assess joint attention skills and use their assessment to start to design a variety of programs to teach joint attention. Introduction to breaking down the skill of joint attention into smaller pieces.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Strategies for Rapidly Assessing Skills and Developing Comprehensive, Prioritized Intervention Plans for Individuals With Autism Based on Developmental Patterns of Typically Developing Children
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed for consultants to learn how to quickly assess skills and design comprehensive intervention programs for children with autism. Many funding sources limit the time consultants have to conduct an assessment and design an intervention program. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct comprehensive, yet time-efficient assessments that lead to the development of effective educational programs. It is necessary to prioritize learning objectives are selected for those basic language and learner skills that allow students to learn from their everyday interactions with others. To facilitate a rapid acquisition of critical skills, it is important that specific learning objectives are based on the patterns of skill development of neurotypical children. Participants will compare the skill levels of young children with autism to the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children from a peer-reviewed journal publication. Participants will learn to analyze programs for nonverbal individuals and select learning objectives that identify the skills necessary to develop instructional control and to establish an initial verbal repertoire. Participants will also learn to analyze programs for an individual who has basic mand, tact, and intraverbal skills, and select learning objectives that will lead to development of more advanced language and social interaction skills.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to state strategies to rapidly assess the basic language and learning skills of young students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. 2. Participants will be able to state strategies for developing a prioritized set of learning objectives based upon a student’s current set of skills. 3. Participants will be able to compare the existing skill levels of a child with an autism spectrum disorder with the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children.
Activities: The workshop will begin with a pre-assessment of the workshop participants’ abilities in reviewing a brief description of a student’s skills and then identifying repertoires that should be the focus of an intervention plan. A presentation on how to rapidly assess a student’s basic language and learning skills will be provided, followed by a presentation of data from a peer-reviewed journal article regarding data of neurotypical children’s skills measured on the ABLLS-R from 6 months to 7 years of age. The patterns of skill development across multiple repertoires of typically developing children will then be reviewed and discussed with the participants. A review and discussion of both early learner and advanced learner profiles will be conducted to identify prioritized learning objectives for each type of student. Finally, a post-assessment of the participants’ abilities in assessing and identifying appropriate learning objectives will be conducted.
Audience: This workshop is designed at an intermediate level for Board Certified Behavior Analysts who have had some experience assessing skills and implementing teaching strategies who now wish to further develop their ability to quickly assess the skills and develop effective educational programs for children with a diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Toilet Training for Individuals With Autism and Developmental Disabilities: Assessment to Treatment - Day to Night
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University)
Description: Research indicates that behavioral toileting methods continue to be effective for individuals with and without disabilities. The current workshop will present the audience with empirically supported procedures for toilet training individuals on the autism spectrum using a variety of methods consistent with the principles of ABA. First, a brief review of the literature on toilet training will provide the audience with background information showing empirical support for behavioral principles and procedures. Seminal articles in the field of ABA will be discussed. Next, the presenter will discuss the importance of conducting an objective assessment of problem skill areas so that treatment procedures can be properly individualized and designed. Assessment procedures and functional hypotheses will be discussed targeting both urination and bowel movement accidents. Data will include narrative ABC data, frequency counts and scatter plots. The details of a reinforcement-based urination training procedure will be presented. The audience will be presented with a task analysis for how to run the procedure and analyze treatment results. The presenter will then outline the details of assessment, treatment, data analysis and evaluation for bowel training. An emphasis will be placed on functional assessment for bowel accidents so that treatment can be tailored to function.
Learning Objectives: 1. Through this workshop, audience members will be able to conduct a behavioral assessment of toilet training issues and needs. 2. The audience members will be able to design and implement an effective urination training intervention. 3. The audience members will be able to design and implement an effective bowel training intervention. 4. The audience members will learn how to collect data for a toileting intervention in order to make useful data-based treatment decisions
Activities: Workshop activities will include didactic instruction by the presenter guided by a power point (which will be distributed as a hand out), discussion of distributed materials including assessment protocols, data sheets, task analyses and sample treatment plans, role plays of treatment strategies, group discussion and the answering of audience questions. Discussion of case examples and case data will also be provided.
Audience: The workshop content will be at the intermediate level. Basic principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis will be described related to how they can be used in toilet training interventions, however the workshop is not designed to teach these basic principles and procedures for people who are unfamiliar with ABA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Ethics of Self-Care: A Workshop in Building Your Own Practice
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ashley N. Fiorilli, Ph.D.
ASHLEY N. FIORILLI (Animate Behavior)
Description: Over the last few years, an increase of panels and presentations have surrounded self-care, mindfulness and being present in the moment. Many times, the topic is presented without tangible take homes for participants. As practitioners are often presented with stressful human service interactions, it is not only crucial that we understand the theory of self-care, but the practice of it as well. Often, when practitioners are faced with stressful days, the antecedents to self-care are not salient enough to support self-care. Through this workshop, participants will explore the ethics of self-care and our Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (PECC), review varied topographies of self-care, explore and analyze both their covert and overt behaviors in relation to self-care, and develop an individual self-care plan (SCP). Each participant will receive a follow up meeting (teleconference call, phone call etc…) with the instructor as a support to the implementation of their SCP.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. State how self-care relates to our PECC. 2. List the benefits of a self-care routine. 3. Define present moment and mindful practices. 4. Demonstrate present moment activities. 5. Explain the impact of private events on overt behavior. 6. Describe the analysis of their own private events. 7. Create a SCP individualized to themselves 8. Create a committed action of how they will implement their SCP. 9. Create a corresponding datasheet to SCP.
Activities: The workshop will start with a lecture to introduce the topic. Interspersed within the lecture, participants will be given worksheets that relate to the topic and their lived experience. Worksheets will include: an ABC thought journal for analysis of private events, a list of self-care actions, an example and template for creating their own SCP, and an example data sheet. Participants will practice varied present moment activities.
Audience: This workshop is for all certified behavior analysts. A personal self-care routine or present moment practice is not required for attendance. This workshop is designed for behavior analysts who wish to increase a sense of work-life balance.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: BACB
Empirically Supported Behavioral Parent Training and Functional-Based Assessment and Treatment: Behavior Analysts Collaborating With Medical and Mental Health Professionals
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Andrew W. Gardner, Ph.D.
ANDREW W. GARDNER (University of Arizona - College of Medicine - Department of Psychiatry and Pediatrics), CHELSEA E. CARR (The University of Arizona - College of Education, Disability and Psychoeducational Studies )
Description: Parent and care provider training has been an integral part of Behavior Analysis for diverse reasons (e.g. training, maintenance, and generalization of skills). Many Behavior Analysts are not aware of the Parent Training Programs: Insight for Practitioners (2009) study published by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention identifying empirically supported training programs and effective components for parent training. These empirically supported training programs can go hand in hand with function-based assessment and treatment to address family accommodation to challenging behavior, as well as secondary gains (i.e. function of behavior). There are a number of empirically supported Behavioral Parent Training programs (e.g. PMT, PCIT, etc.) acknowledged by diverse medical and mental health professionals (e.g. psychiatry, pediatrics, etc.). Behavior Analysis has 30+ years of research on function-based assessment and treatment. The merging of these two areas to collaborate with other professionals and build bridges is the focus of the current workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify empirically supported Behavioral Parent Training programs, Learn specific skills related to Parent Management Training (PMT) and Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), Identify the differences between indirect and direct function-based assessment tools for challenging behavior (e.g. screening tools, functional analyses, etc.), and learn how these tools can be used in practice to collaborate with medical and mental health professionals
Activities: The workshop format will include lecture, video observation, modeling, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: Intermediate: Junior BCBAs, BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, Psychologists, School Psychologists, Social Workers, etc.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: BACB
Error Correction: What's Stimulus Control Got To Do With It?
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM EDT
Virtual
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jaime Wedel, CAGS
JAIME WEDEL (Pyramid Educational Consultants), ANNE OVERCASH (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.)
Description: The science of teaching has provided many effective tools. However, even the best-planned lesson may not be effective- there are no perfect lessons. Therefore, students will make errors. We should aim to minimize the error rate but we should also have systematic plans in place when errors occur. We will briefly review some of the current literature regarding error correction (EC), which points to the importance of stimulus control and differential reinforcement. We will then discuss four specific types of EC and related them to specific types of lessons. First, we will consider one strategy for errors within discrete trial types of lessons. Then we will review two types of EC within sequential lessons. Finally, we will review potential strategies when shaping is our primary teaching strategy. With these strategies associated with specific lesson types, we should never be surprised when the next error occurs and should always have a reactive plan. We will also review some "interesting" scenarios and develop potential alternative error correction strategies that conform to best practices.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop participants will be able to (1) define why stimulus control matters in error correction; (2) apply specific error correction strategies to virtually any type of lesson; (3) identify what strategy to use when shaping is your primary teaching tool and (4) analyze various error correction scenarios for efficacy related to stimulus control
Activities: This learning format combines short lectures, video clips, and discussion of key topics which will be followed by a discussion of scenarios and problem solving both in full group and small groups.
Audience: BCBAs, RBTs, teachers and those with a background understanding of stimulus control will benefit by sharpening their own teaching skills as well as assisting others in developing effective lessons.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE