Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Program by Day for Friday, May 22, 2020


 

Noteworthy Activity #1
Welcome to ABAI Yoga Session with the Health, Sport and Fitness SIG
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 AM–7:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, South Pre-Function
Chair: Kate Elizabeth Harrison (Brett DiNovi & Associates, BCBA)

Mute the anticipations of the weekend (and your cell notifications!), and join us for a 50-minute flow aimed to support your contact with "the now." This balanced class begins with a gentle warm-up, transitions into active movement with your breath, and closes with a short savasana. All levels are welcome!

 
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: BACB
Clinical Decision Making for Skill-Acquisition Programs
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Erica Jowett Hirst, Ph.D.
ERICA JOWETT HIRST (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Dallas)
Description: This workshop covers essential skills for behavior analysts and special education teachers who are working with individuals in a one-on-one context. The content of this workshop includes selecting appropriate skills, making data-based decisions, maximizing learner performance, and making program changes. Content encompasses findings of peer-reviewed research as well as over 15 years of clinical experience.
Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to select skills that are most appropriate for the learner. Attendees will be able to make decisions based on the learner's data. Attendees will be able to maximize correct responding and minimize errors. Attendees will be able to make appropriate changes to their learner's skill-acquisition programs.
Activities: The format combines lecture and discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts and special education teachers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): DTT, skill acquisition, skill selection
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: BACB
An Applied Behavioral Medicine Approach to Addiction Recovery and Reanimation: Techniques from Public Health and Behavior Analysis Emphasizing Antecedent State as well as Consequence Management
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/BPN; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard T Cook, M.D.
RICHARD T COOK (Applied Behavioral Medicine Associates of Hershey,Pa; Ruth Pauline Cook Foundation), MATTHEW GROSS (Shippensburg University)
Description: the workshop will integrate principles of medicine, addiction neuroscience, public health problem solving, and applied behavior analysis behavior modification to develop treatment plans robust in antecedent state as well as scripted behavior and contingency management Heavily emphasize, and practice, use of fundamental behavior analysis techniques, with particular attention to the antecedent state, often neglected even in behaviorally based approaches. Scripting of and differential reinforcement of other, alternative incompatible behaviors in order to develop habits. Workshop to honor work, spirit, and legacy of behavior analysis and addiction recovery pioneer Dr. Sherman Yen.
Learning Objectives: 1)Attendees will develop habits related to deconstruction of aspects of varied domains within the recovering addicts life into factors of the addicts behavioral equation that can be modified such that the likelihood of emission of toxic, drug use/relapse behaviors is decreased, replaced with increased likelihood of emission of alternative and incompatible behaviors that are deemed healthier and more likely to enhance the addict's reanimation and recovery. 2) attendees will apply public health principles and techniques, such as haddon's matrix and strategies for injury control modified for addiction recovery, to circumstances and events of specific patients 3) while discussing and better understanding currently popular behaviorally based approaches focused on contingency management, attendees will practice development and implementation of approaches focused on decreasing the likelihood of emission of drug use and relapse behaviors by robust adjustment of the factors of the antecedent state
Activities: Neurophysiology of Addiction Behavioral Physiology Individualized Resource and Needs Assessment Integration of Family into active particpation in recovery, including learning approaches to focus directly on changing behaviors of family members, as well as behaviors of interactions between family members and the recovering addict
Audience: Workshop Will be useful for Behavior Analysts who are: Professional addiction clinicians Treat addiction in their practice Family member addiction Behavior Analysts in General Practice Involved in community or police making
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Addiction, Addiction Recovery
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: BACB
The Good Behavior Game: A Simple, Best-Practice Procedure for Transforming Class-Wide Student Behavior
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: P. Raymond Joslyn, Ph.D.
P. RAYMOND JOSLYN (Utah State University)
Description: The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a well-established classroom management procedure that has been studied in our field for over 50 years. Extensive empirical research supports its use in reducing problem behavior (e.g., disruption) and increasing appropriate behavior (e.g., staying on task) in classrooms. Research has also demonstrated that the GBG can promote prosocial student interaction, increase teacher praise relative to reprimands, and may have long-term effects for students (e.g., decreased prevalence of substance abuse disorders, mental health needs, delinquency, and incarceration). The GBG is effective across school settings (e.g., mainstream, special education, alternative schools) and student age groups (e.g., preschool through high school and college), flexible and customizable, and easy to implement. However, despite the strong evidence supporting its use, it is currently underutilized in education. This is at least partially due to inadequate dissemination and possible misperceptions about its effectiveness, required effort, and utility across populations and settings. The goal of this workshop is to disseminate this best-practice procedure and provide the necessary skills and tools for attendees to do so as well. Attendees will be able to implement the GBG and its variations, train school staff (e.g., teachers, paraprofessionals), and troubleshoot to overcome implementation barriers. The presenter will share tips from his research and clinical experience for getting teacher and student buy in and discuss his own peer-reviewed research on the GBG, which includes extending the GBG to schools for children with emotional and behavioral disorders and delinquency, adapting the GBG to individual classrooms, methods for quickly and efficiently training teachers, and variations that reduce implementation effort.
Learning Objectives: Attendees will be able to: 1) Discuss the current and past research supporting the use of the Good Behavior Game 2) Describe the key components of the Good Behavior Game and be able to implement the procedure 3) Describe variations of the Good Behavior Game and contexts in which they are appropriate 4) Discuss methods for training teachers and overcoming barriers to implementing the Good Behavior Game
Activities: Workshop objectives will be taught through lecture, demonstration, group discussion, and small group breakout (group size permitting). Supplemental materials and resources summarizing core content and troubleshooting will be provided.
Audience: This workshop is primarily intended for school-based practitioners (e.g., BCBAs, school psychologists), behavior support staff, and teachers (e.g., elementary, middle, high school, special education) who want to learn about evidence-based classroom behavior management.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): challenging behavior, classroom management, group contingency, teacher training
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Improving Classroom Behavior Support Through Applied Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert F. Putnam, Ph.D.
ROBERT F. PUTNAM (May Institute), ERIK MAKI (May Institute), SACHA KG SHAW (Endicott College )
Description: This workshop will provide behavior analysts a review of the research on evidence-based practices in classwide behavior support (Simonsen & Fairbanks, Briesch, Myers, & Sugai, 2008; Simonsen et al., 2015; Reinke, Herman & Sprick, 2011). These practices include: 1) antecedent practices (physical layout, classroom expectations, behavioral routines, teaching expectations and routines, precorrections, active supervision); 2) instructional management (opportunities to respond), 3) reinforcement practices (contingent behavioral-specific praise, group contingencies, and token economies, behavioral contracts) and consequence (planning ignoring, explicit reprimands, differential reinforcement, response cost, and timeout). The workshop will go over the use of classwide functional assessment as a method to systematically evaluate the classroom environment to design and implement effective classroom-wide behavioral support practices. Once the environment is assessed, the model incorporates both indirect (i.e., lecture, written training materials) and direct (i.e., modeling, performance feedback) instruction. Finally, participants will learn how teachers participate in a data-based decision-making process to establish more effective practices, procedures, and interactions with students. Data (Swain-Bradway et al., 2017) will be presented supporting the need for a comprehensive training method that includes both direct instruction and performance feedback for teachers to implement classroom-wide behavior support practices with integrity.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) apply functional assessment strategies to the selection and implementation of effective classroom-wide practices; 2) use evidence-based methods used to train teachers in evidenced based classroom-wide behavior support practices; 3) use a data-based decision process used with teachers to modify classroom behavior support practices, and; 4) use instructional and behavior support practices that establish more effective interactions between teachers and students and increase on task behavior.
Activities: Participants will learn how to: 1) apply functional assessment strategies to the selection and implementation of effective classroom-wide practices; 2) use evidence-based methods used to train teachers in evidenced-based classroom-wide behavior support practices; 3) a data-based decision process used with teachers to modify classroom behavior support practices, and; 4) instructional and behavior support practices that establish more effective interactions between teachers and students and increase on-task behavior.
Audience: Behavior analysts who consult to classrooms both in public school districts and/or private schools who desire to develop their consultation skills to improve both instructional practices and/or on-task behavior of students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: BACB
Behaving Behavior Analytic When Working in Public Schools to Support Students With Severe Disabilities
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert C. Pennington, Ph.D.
ROBERT C. PENNINGTON (University of North Carolina-Charlotte)
Description: Serving educational professionals and their students in school contexts is a challenging but meaningful endeavor. In this session, Dr. Pennington will draw on his over 25 years working in schools to discuss functional contingencies related to teacher behavior change and provide an approach for assessing and then supporting teachers in the improvement of classroom programming.
Learning Objectives: Serving educational professionals and their students in school contexts is a challenging but meaningful endeavor. In this session, the presenter will draw on the extant research literature and his over 25 years working in schools to discuss functional contingencies related to teacher behavior change and provide an approach for assessing and then supporting teachers in the improvement of classroom programming. Participants will be provided strategies for interacting with school personnel, methods for identifying targets for teacher behavior change, and strategies for training educators. Specifically, participants will discuss school environments, putative reinforcers within those environments, and ways to modify the environmental to shift teacher practice. The presenter also will provide attendees the opportunity to use commercially available tools to score classroom videos and identify areas for improvement within classrooms, and subsequently develop behavioral objectives for teacher behavior change. Finally, the presenter will provide strategies for implementing coaching (e.g., behavior skills training, dynamic fading, self-management strategies). Through out the presentation, the presenter will discuss common issues related to special education service delivery to provide context for behavior analysts new to this area of practice.
Activities: The format includes lecture, small group activities, guided practice of the use of classroom observation tools and objective development, and discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts new to working in public school settings
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): coaching strategy, Program assessment, school consultation, teacher support
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Acting Out: Learning BACB Ethics and Problem-Solving Strategies Through Interactive Team-Based Learning
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Wayne Fuqua, Ph.D.
RICHARD WAYNE FUQUA (Western Michigan University)
Description: This workshop is designed primarily for practitioners who have some familiarity with the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysis from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) and wish to improve their skills to (a) identify and analyze ethical challenges, (b) practice and refine strategies to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, (c) develop organizational level strategies to prevent ethical lapses and (d) obtain CEUs in the ethics domain as required for BACB recertification. Others, including licensed psychologists, who are interested in applying BACB ethical guidelines to real-world ethical challenges in practice and research are also encouraged to attend. Participants should be prepared to describe and discuss real world ethics cases in a manner that protects the identity of those individuals involved in the ethics cases.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and analyze ethical challenges; (2) identify and troubleshoot strategies to resolve ethical challenges; (3) refine their skills to tactfully and effectively resolve ethical challenges, (4) implement team-based learning strategies that can be used to promote BACB ethics in work and educational settings.
Activities: This workshop will include very limited lecture content. Emphasis will be placed on small group activities and discussion, role plays, guided practice and fluency building exercises.
Audience: This workshop is most appropriate for BCBAs, practitioners (including those without BCBA credentials) and graduate students with some level of familiarity with the BACB's Professional and Ethical Compliance Code. It will help to have some experience with the delivery or management of ABA services, but that is not necessary.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: BACB
Eyes, Ears, and Thoughts Up Front: Teaching Generative Attending Skills Across the Spectrum
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
To Be Determined
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Personalized Accelerated Learning Systems (PALS)), GLADYS WILLIAMS (CIEL, SPAIN), SARA POLGAR (David Gregory School )
Description: One defining characteristic of individuals labeled as having Autism Spectrum Disorder (F84.0) is a tendency to attend to a limited subset of environmental events participating in simple and complex contingencies of reinforcement ((Lovaas, Schreibman, Koegel, & Rhem, 1971). Limited attending repertoires restrict the type, range and potential for jointly acting sensory modalities to control and influence responding (cf, Brown & Bebko, 2012). Seeking to understand and affect the acquisition of various constellations of compound stimulus control, ABA researchers (e.g., Holth, 2005; Pelaez, 2009) have focused on identifying and remediating deficits and delays in the acquisition of simple and complex attending, joint attending and social referencing competencies (DeQuinzio, Poulson, Townsend, & Taylor, 2016). Important to today’s workshop is that “attentional” deficits and weaknesses can be remediated (Gewirtz & Palaez-Nogueras, 1992b; Luke & Greer, 2008), they can be decomposed into component/composite relations (Alessi, 1989; Binder, 2010), and attentional capacities and competencies are critical to the subsequent learning of new and higher order operants (Greer & Speckman, 2009).
Learning Objectives: 1. Contingently analyze attending behaviors 2. Identify component/composite relations Design conditioning contingencies to affect attending as a valued response. 3. To describe how attentional competencies and capabilities establish a foundation for the development of basic and advanced listener repertoires. 4. To describe how listener and speaker repertoires can be joined and generalized to promote incidental learning.
Activities: Combined lecture, discussion, and small group break out
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Generative Instruction, Joint Attention, Visual Regard, Visual Tracking
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Training Caregivers in Schools and Human Services: From Research to Practice
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Peter Sturmey, Ph.D.
PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York)
Description: 1. Behavioral Skills Training (BST) has been widely adopted in educational and residential services as a method to train socially significant, evidence-based skills that result in improvements in the skills of typical children and adults and with children and adults with developmental disabilities. 2. There are hundreds and small N experiments and tens of randomized controlled trials demonstrating the effectiveness, efficiency and acceptability of BST. 3. These studies have been published in peer-reviewed journals, such as JABA. 4. The content relates to ethical, legal, statutory and regulatory guidelines and standards such as: (1) ABAI's and BCBA ethical guidelines that practitioners should be competent and use effective evidence-based practices; (2) legal requirements to do no harm or minimize harm by having trained caregivers; and (3) strategies used by services to mitigate risks and liabilities by having competent staff and use evidence-based practices.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1)describe how to conduct a training needs assessment for their organization; (2)describe the components of behavioral skills training (BST); (3) conduct an adequate task analysis of a teaching skill; (4) describe a training procedure that incorporates role play scripts using strategies to promote generalization of skill; (5) describe strategies to develop pyramidal training; describe strategies to develop and evaluate system-wide caregiver training programs.
Activities: The workshop will include (1) didactic / lecture presentations on research that forms the basis for skills training; (2) written exercises to write tasks analyses, training procedures, general case and multiple case training analyses of caregiver performances; (3) varied videomodels of BST; and (4) group discussions of applications and development of plans.
Audience: This intermediate workshop will be appropriate for advances graduate students, Masters and Doctoral level practitioners, program administrators and faculty teaching classes in ABA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): parent training, pyramidal training, staff training
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
The Private Practice Model: Including Leveraging Time With RBTs
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terence G. Blackwell, M.Ed.
TERENCE G. BLACKWELL (Chimes International Limited)
Description: As ABA services are now reimbursed through commercial major medical insurance plans in 49 of 50 states; practitioners wrestle with business operations questions. There are also concerns and questions about "risk exposure" for fraud allegations and investigations. This session details how to position yourself as a small business, including the required oversight for supervising staff (e.g., RBTs) and reducing risk by setting up basic internal compliance controls. This content is proven by the author's operational experience in running both small and very large human services and educational agencies.
Learning Objectives: 1) The learner will demonstrate creation of a basic operational budget for a small business. 2) The learner will discriminate and demonstrate knowledge of the basic elements of committing billing fraud. 3) The learner will write their own "USP", unique services proposition, to support their service model. {marketing} 4) The learner will be able to demonstrate in a written quiz, the required criteria for supervision of an RBT.
Activities: lecture format including worksheets for budgeting Quiz: on the basics of the element of fraud and on the supervision requirements of RBTs. Small group discussion on the creation of marketing Copy of BACB ethical standards for discussion as applicable to small business entities (and sole practitioners)
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs and BCBA-D, who are experienced in the field for at least 3 years and who are considering entering the business of delivery of ABA services will find value in attending.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: BACB
Facilitating Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Squiccimara, M.S.
LAURA SQUICCIMARA (Advances Learning Center; LEARN Behavioral), JESSICA WENIG (Advances Learning Center; LEARN Behavioral)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: assessment of appropriate social skills, grouping students into effective learning clusters, training and supervising staff to run groups, and creating and implementing individualized prompting and reinforcement schedules while facilitating group activities that provide ample opportunity for social responding. This workshop will review assessments that can be used to determine potential social skills objectives and teach participants to group students into effective learning clusters based on assessment data. Participants will also learn how to facilitate group activities designed to create opportunities for social responding, while ensuring that prompting and reinforcement schedules are individualized for each student. Finally, this workshop will prepare participants to collect data on multiple students simultaneously, graph that data in such a way that progress can be easily monitored and assess staff’s procedural integrity and reliability of program implementation for a group of students.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify assessment tools from which social skills objectives can be derived. 2. Identify common or complimentary objectives to group students into effective learning clusters. 3. Facilitate group activities that teach a variety of basic, intermediate and advanced social skills. 4. Implement individualized prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students. 5. Collect data on multiple students simultaneously and graph student data in a standardized, yet flexible way. 6. Take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders.
Activities: This workshop will alternate between lecture and hands-on activities. Participants will work in groups and individually to complete guided activities related to leaning outcomes. They will view video models and participate in role-plays where they will have the opportunity to ask questions and receive feedback on their performance.
Audience: --BCBAs who run or train staff to run social skills groups --Public school ABA professionals whose students participate in group social skills support --Teachers, SLPs, behavioral therapists or other direct care staff who run social skills groups --ABA professionals currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): assessment, group instruction, pragmatics, social skills
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: BACB
Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Katharine M. Croce, Ed.D.
KATHARINE M. CROCE (Self & Match), JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education)
Description: This INTERACTIVE and HANDS-ON workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for individuals of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match System, a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically-supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials, and access to Self & Match Maker, an online Self & Match form creator. Participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. The Self & Match System has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional behavior disorders, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. Self & Match can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems, class-wide, and school-wide management procedures as a part of SWPBIS and has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings; including (but not limited to): public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings.
Learning Objectives: *Identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring *Effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system *Identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system *Identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention *Identify the basic components of the Self & Match System *Systematically individualize an intervention based on collaborative and critical thinking *Create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace *Systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own Self & Match System. The format combines lecture, small group collaboration, whole group responding utilizing interactive responding, and discussion. Core content will be taught through a combination of lecture, video examples, data analysis, and guided practice.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, and/or others who support individuals from pre-K to 21 in school, home, or clinic settings as well as adults that are interested in increasing appropriate behaviors. Great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavior-interventions, self-management, Self-Match, self-monitoring
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Anxiety and Trauma for Those on the Autism Spectrum
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Bobbie J Gallagher, Ph.D.
BOBBIE J GALLAGHER (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; Autism Center for Educational Services)
Description: Research has shown that people with autism have a higher risk of adverse and potentially traumatic childhood experiences and confirms high rates of anxiety present in individuals with autism, but many times, little is done outside of the search for medication. Children, youth, and adults with ASD may express anxiety very differently from neurotypical individuals, and as a result those around them may inadvertently increase rather than decrease stressors. This workshop will address why anxiety and trauma may manifest differently in individuals with autism. The audience will review tools, such as the Behavior Avoidance Test, to measure behaviors and identify triggers as well as review the use of technology (heart rate monitors) to measure stressful events in those with limited language. Various assessments, such as the Groden Stress Survey, will be discussed as these may be used during a functional behavior assessment in order to design effective behavior intervention plans and skill acquisition programs. Additionally, how training of staff in neuroscience based strategies, ex. David Rock's S.C.A.R.F., and other person-centered approaches can decrease adverse responses to triggers.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1)Describe causes of anxiety and trauma in individuals with ASD (2) Identify various assessment tools for use in developing treatment for those with ASD who have anxiety or experienced trauma (3) Describe interventions that may decrease responses to triggers in those with ASD.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture and audience participation through review of assessment tools, and small group practice of person-centered strategies.
Audience: The target audience is BCBAs working with individuals with ASD who experience anxiety that evokes challenging behaviors and resistance to treatment.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Providing Sexual Education for Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder and Developmental Disabilities Through the Use of Behavior Analytic Assessment and Instruction
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University), SORAH STEIN (Partnership for Behavior Change)
Description: Sexual behavior is a topic that will be an issue for many individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities at some point in their lives. Although specific issues vary, many issues are related to deficits in social skills. ABA treatments can be effective in promoting appropriate behaviors of a sexual topography though targeting related social behaviors. This workshop will focus on ABA strategies useful for individuals with developmental disabilities including individuals on the autism spectrum. The workshop will begin with an overview of general issues regarding sexuality development. Consistent with ethical standards, a brief overview of the physiology of human sexual behavior will be provided so that behavior analysts can identify situations where medical issues may be present. We will then address problem sexual behavior through functional assessment and discuss replacement treatments based on function. We will then move into more specific topics which could be included within an ABA sexual education curriculum. Treatment strategies will include reinforcement-based shaping, differential reinforcement, discrimination training, video modeling, task analyses, picture activity schedules, scripts and script fading, and social stories. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available. Topics related to ethics and consent will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: 1. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to state common issues experienced by people with developmental disabilities and ASD as related to appropriate and problem behaviors of a sexual topography, 2. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to develop 2-3 teaching programs for skill acquisition of sexual behaviors using techniques and theories consistent with applied behavior analysis, 3. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to conduct a functional assessment of problem behavior as it relates to sexual behavior and develop a behavior intervention plan based on the function, 4. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to list considerations associated with consent.
Activities: Workshop content will be taught through the following activities: 1. Didactic instruction by the presenters, 2. Group discussion, 3. Presentation and review of teaching materials, 4. Role play and practice of presented teaching procedures where applicable, 5. Sharing and discussion of research data
Audience: The current workshop content is geared towards the following audience: 1. Intermediate and advanced behavior analysts who have a desire to learn how to apply behavioral principles and teaching methods to the topographies of sexual behavior. 2. Educators and related service professionals who have an advanced behavioral background and work with individuals with developmental issues that have needs in the area of sexual behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, sex, sex education, sexual behavior
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Supervising Safely, Assessing Risks, and Expanding Our Functional Assessments in Trauma Related Environments With Teams
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Teresa Camille Kolu, Ph.D.
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence)
Description: As demand for behavior analytic services grows, we are increasingly asked to provide services compatible with national and local “trauma-informed” emphases. While an ethical, appropriate and individualized analysis of behavior may already be “trauma-informed”, board certified behavior analysts often report being uncomfortable when tasked with providing behavior analysis in a trauma-informed environment or team. Such behavior analytic practice must be conceptually sound while interfacing supportively with an increasing number and type of community providers who identify as trauma-informed. Recent data suggest board certified behavior analysts lack tools to assess or document the trauma related histories and the related risks that an increasing number of clients bring to treatment. This workshop educates attendees in a set of tools to supervise others and treat behavior in rich trauma-informed interdisciplinary settings (the Supervision, Risk Assessment, Functional Assessment, Environmental Assessment, and Trauma Relationships package). Handouts of assessment, risk analysis, and checklist tools are provided to assist participants in practicing skills during the workshop’s intensive instruction, modeling, roleplay, and feedback coaching sessions. Feedback from previous workshops in this series is implemented by engineering small group exercises to facilitate fluency using the take-home tools in the workshop and applying them to participants’ practice settings.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify behavior analytic principles applicable to supervising trauma supporting teams 2. Practice identifying trauma related risks in trauma supporting teams 3. Roleplay assessing the functions of behavior in trauma supporting teams 4. Update behavior plan and assessment templates with behavior analytic features related to trauma-related risks and functions of behavior
Activities: Workshop activities are completed in small groups and large group formats, and include instruction through lecture and demonstration, roleplay using tools provided, feedback, and group discussion. Tools will be provided to use during the workshop and take home, while supplemental tools and resources will be available to download related to the workshop activities and content.
Audience: Advanced audience members, such as those who have been supervising board certified behavior analysts for at least two years, are appropriate.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): ethics, supervision, trauma, trauma-informed
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP — 
Ethics
Using Adaptive Assessments Ethically in Behavior Analytic Practice
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda Keating, Psy.D.
AMANDA KEATING (University of South Florida)
Description: Over the past several years, behavior analysts have been tasked by funders to provide a variety of outcome measures and assessments. However, most behavior analytic programs do not provide training in many of these assessments. In this workshop, the ethical use of two specific adaptive measures will be provided, the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales, Third Edition (Vineland-3) and the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Third Edition (ABAS-3). Each of these instruments will be discussed along with guidance on administration. Case studies will be provided, and participants will practice providing semi-structured interviews with the goal of equipping behavior analysts to utilize the instruments to not only satisfy funders, but to gain valuable information about their behavior programming.
Learning Objectives: 1. List the different options the Vineland-3 and ABAS-3 can be administered and scored. 2. List several advantages of the semi-structured interview format for adaptive skills assessment. 3. Compare and contrast the utility of the Vineland-3 and ABAS-3 for use in behavioral programming.
Activities: This workshop will include lecture, demonstration, discussion, hands-on practice in utilizing the semi-structured interview format, practice with scoring, and case studies for practice with interpretation. Participants will be provided sample protocols.
Audience: Intermediate. The target audience would be practitioners who are seeking training to evaluate the outcomes of such assessments when provided by others or to ethically administer the ABAS-3 or Vineland-3 to consumers following the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABAS-3, adaptive assessment, insurance requirements, Vineland-3
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Delivering the PAX Good Behavior Game for Clinical and Population-Level Prevention Effects
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dennis D. Embry, Ph.D.
DENNIS D. EMBRY (PAXIS Institute), JASON FRUTH (Ohio Research Solutions)
Description: A sophisticated version of the good behavior game [1-5], used in multiple randomized trials [6-11], significantly reduces in immediate, proximal problematic behaviors [2] and has long-term prevention, intervention and treatment effects on mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders measurable 1, 5, 10-15 years later [12-19]. A Canadian randomized trial reduced DSM disorders at a population level [9], specifically benefitting children with historic disparities. The PAX Good Behavior Game, the official version of the GBG used in randomized comparative effectiveness trials, is more sophisticated than the original ABA studies [2, 4, 10, 11]—yet not well known among ABAI professionals [2, 20]. All randomized trials of the PAX GBG are by independent scientists, with no economic ties to the program. Independent studies of bare bones versions of GBG, without the relational frame, Premack reinforcers, and others evidence-based kernels have either no effect or iatrogenic effects on behavioral health indicators [21, 22]. PAX GBG is explicitly designed to create generalization across people, activities, behaviors, and settings—including to home, after school settings, etc. This workshop details how PAX GBG can be supported by ABA specialists [23, 24] in the context of educational laws, health-care services, and population-level implementations in eight states already to reduce psychiatric and behavioral disorders at population-level.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) facilitate schools and communities in the adoption and delivery of the PAX Good Behavior Game in classroom settings for children with appropriate DSM diagnoses and/or supporting social justice for children, families, and communities with historic disparities; (2) reinforce PAX GBG implementation for effective outcomes that reduce challenging behavior, improve in social and academic skills, and address special education issues; (3) assist measurement, monitoring and reinforcement of teacher implementation, child behavior change, and generalization across people, places, and time.
Activities: Lecture, small group activities, large group activities
Audience: Applied behavior analysts working in schools, after-school centers, autism centers, and congregate care settings
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: BACB
Behavior Analysis, Relational Frame Theory, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EAB/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Carmen Luciano Soriano, Ph.D.
CARMEN LUCIANO SORIANO (University Almeria, Spain)
Description: Behavior Analysis (BA) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT) are integrated in a continuum dimension that is rooted to the functional and contextual perspective of behavior. The applied implications are huge. In this workshop, I will travel back to those times where BA began to provide formulas about how contingencies organized behavior. These effective experiences accounted for part of the enormous variability shown in behavior and then B.F. Skinner realized the impact of rules on contingencies. Even more, the relevance of generative self-rules and self-knowledge as well as how we respond to the one`s own behavior were on the table. This door was identified to further scientific inquiry, however it took some time for an insightful behavior to occur in the middle of practical experiences, an insight pointing to the emergent or derived responding. It was when the door was clearly opened to the analysis of further and more sophisticated forms of variability as generativity or derived responding as well as the experimental analysis of meaning of a particular case of high-order reinforcers that alter the function of other contingencies. Relational Frame Theory was a step forward into the analysis of such behavioral phenomena. Consequently, an extension of the functional dimension was in place to account for relevant behaviors as those pointing to human suffering or, conversely, responding to living in peace with oneself. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, ACT, is nowadays the contextual Therapy more compromised with the functional analysis of the interactions involved in moving from suffering to living. In this workshop we will go through this trajectory to stop for a while in ACT and to finish with the eyes focused in the emergence of insightful/creative behavior to connect points that still seem as isolated points in the behavioral universe.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify BA and RFT as part of the functional contextual dimension 2. Understand the emergence of insight in behavioral science 3. Identify the basic principles of reinforcement and relational responding 4. Understand ACT strategies based on Functional Analysis and RFT 5. Practice some of the relevant strategies in ACT
Activities: Lecture, small group activities, guided practice, building exercises, video observation
Audience: Basic and intermediate level should be appropriate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Two-for-One Teaching: A Relational Frame Theory Approach to Integrating Social-Emotional Learning Into Academic Instruction
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jonathan Weinstein, Ph.D.
JONATHAN WEINSTEIN (VA Hudson Valley HCS), LAUREN POROSOFF (Empowerforwards.com)
Description: In this highly experiential, make-and-take workshop, we’ll learn protocols that incorporate values work into academic units. Informed by evidence-based psychological science, the workshop will involve writing, drawing, food metaphors, Relational Frame Theory, making stuff you can use, and empowering students to become the people they want to be. As a set of Tier 1 interventions that teachers can incorporate flexibly into their classrooms, students learn to do meaningful academic work while also learning how they want to approach their education, their work, their surroundings, and each other. After learning each protocol by doing it ourselves, we’ll reflect on the process and see an example of what it looks like in a classroom. Then, based on what we’ve just learned, we’ll create materials so we can use the protocols with our students. Along the way, we’ll discover how some of the psychological science of empowering students discover and do what matters to them, and we’ll learn how to structure units to incorporate SEL into every stage.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Lead six protocols that augment the functions of academic tasks to also include perspective-taking, values exploration, and committed action. 2. Name the three elements of deictic framing and describe its benefits in the classroom. 3. Describe the difference between conditional and hierarchical framing and their relative benefits in the classroom. 4. Explain how deictic and hierarchical framing function in six protocols. 5. Identify six stages of an academic unit. 6. Design academic units to include social-emotional learning at every stage.
Activities: Instructional strategies include the following work: 1. Experiential: Learn a protocol you can use with students by trying it yourself. 2. Reflective: Debrief the experience and examine how it can apply to your practice. 3. Generative: Based on what you’ve just learned, make something to use in your own work. 4. Iterative: Repeat this cycle so that you’re building a unit throughout the day. Audience members will mostly work in small groups. There will be several short didactic presentations.
Audience: This is a workshop for classroom teachers across the age span from middle school to post-secondary educational settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Tier-1 Intervention
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: BACB
Functional Assessment Consultation Support in Schools
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Edward J. Daly, Ph.D.
EDWARD J. DALY (University of Nebraska-Lincoln)
Description: This workshop will present a model for conducting school-based consultation which embeds functional assessment into the process. The consultation model incorporates innovations not commonly used in functional assessment (direct academic assessment, observations of active responding, reinforcer validation, performance-deficit analysis, brief experimental analysis). The model follows a sequence of problem validation, treatment validation, and treatment evaluation. Protocols for the consultative interviews and the assessments will be shared with participants. The assessments involve curriculum-based measures, classroom observations of active responding, preference assessment, reinforcer validation, and brief experimental analysis. Guidance will be given in terms of how to conceptualize, structure, and interpret the results to present the consultee with evidence-based treatment options for classroom application. Research and case examples will be presented to illustrate each step of the process.
Learning Objectives: This session will help participants (1) integrate interview, observational data, basic skill assessment data, work samples, preference assessments, performance-deficit analyses, and brief functional analyses into the consultation process; (2) guide consultees in a strategic and structured decision-making process that prioritizes improving academic performance; (3) support teacher implementation of empirically derived treatments through antecedent control strategies and performance feedback; and (4) evaluate the results within cases to produce recommendations for future programming and across cases to examine the effectiveness of their own consultative services.
Activities: The format combines lecture, guided practice with skill objectives, and group discussion.
Audience: This workshop is intended for an intermediate-level audience; that is, individuals who have skills in identifying principles of behavior, functional assessment (including descriptive assessment, preference assessment, and functional analysis), and who wish to learn how to apply them efficiently in the schools in a way that meets the typical concerns and priorities of school-based professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Academic intervention, Behavioral intervention, Consultation, Functional assessment
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: BACB
Tools for Assessing Baseline Classroom Conditions: Determining When Functional Behavior Assessment is Needed
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D.
KATHRYN M. KESTNER (West Virginia University), STEPHANIE M. PETERSON (Western Michigan University), REBECCA RENEE ELDRIDGE (Western Michigan University), NICOLE HOLLINS (Western Michigan University), LLOYD D. PETERSON (Compass: A positive Direction in Behavior Intervention)
Description: Empirical evidence has demonstrated that environmental classroom variables (e.g., teaching and classroom management practices) significantly impact students’ academic performance and social behavior (Moore Partin, Robertson, Maggin, Oliver, & Wehby, 2010). Behavior analysts consulting in elementary education settings should assess baseline classroom conditions as part of functional behavior assessments; at times, treatment of individual student behavior can be resolved by helping teachers establish effective class-wide practices (Anderson & St. Peter, 2013; Sutherland & Wehby, 2001). Where there is room for improvement in classroom ecology, class-wide interventions have the added benefit of improving social and academic behavior for an entire group of students, rather than isolated benefits for particular target students who are referred for services. In this workshop, we will provide participants with behavioral skills training to teach them to use the baseline classroom assessment tools provided in Kestner, Peterson, Eldridge, and Peterson (2017). These tools allow behavior analysts to measure these four variables as part of and assessment to evaluate the baseline conditions of the target classroom: (a) rates of active student responding (ASR), (b) appropriateness of the curriculum, (c) feedback and reinforcement, and (d) effective instructions and transitions. In this workshop, attendees will gain hands-on experience using the data-collection form designed to aid in the assessment of baseline classroom ecology (Kestner, Peterson, Eldridge, Peterson, 2017). We will also provide resources that practitioners can use to select antecedent- and consequence-based interventions to decrease challenging classroom behavior that are matched to the findings of a baseline classroom assessment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe four classroom variables that impact academic and social behavior; (2) Use a specialized data-collection form as part of a baseline classroom assessment ; and (3) Discuss how practitioners can select classroom-based interventions to decrease challenging behavior based on the results of a baseline classroom assessment.
Activities: These objectives will be met through lecture and guided practice. Participants will view videos of classroom instruction and code data from the video. The instructors will work with participants to obtain interobserver agreement measures to gauge learner mastery of content. Opportunities for discussion and active participation opportunities will be provided.
Audience: Practitioners, such as BCBAs, who work or consult in in elementary school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): classroom management, data collection, FBA, functional assessment
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: BACB/NASP — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This day long workshop will focus on the U.S. Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the many ethical issues that practicing behavior analyst should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal legal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments, writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term positive behavior supports as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations including FBAs. Participants will learn how state law applies at the local level. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify the major components of US special education law, IDEIA, which protects the majority of clients served by a behavior analyst. 2. Identify the procedural areas of IDEIA that could result in ethical dilemmas for the practicing behavior analyst. 3. Identify the legal and ethical requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation completed by a behavior analyst. 4. Identify when a behavior analyst must complete an FBA vs when they should complete one under the IDEIA. 5. Identify when a BIP must be developed by a behavior analysts under the IDEIA 6. Identify what type of data must be collected under the IDEIA 7. Describe the difference between a procedural and substantive error and how ethical blunders could create these types of errors.
Activities: The format combines: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study Analysis, Online Responding, & Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts School Administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): School Ethics, SPED Law
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Latency Based Functional Analysis: Application in the General Education Public School Setting
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Chardae Rigdon, M.S.
CHARDAE RIGDON (Rockwood School District)
Description: This workshop is designed to provide attendees with a replicable process on how to determine, train, and implement a latency based functional analysis within a general education setting (one teacher to 18 – 20 students) to obtain clear and reliable data that then becomes the foundation for a behavior intervention plan with staff buy in. The workshop will highlight the related components of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts to the entire process of implementing a functional analysis so that it is ethical and efficient with all stakeholders on board and well informed (i.e. 2.0 and 3.0). Attendees will learn skills that are needed within the school system specifically how to establish a hierarchy of the client in this circumstance (i.e. parent, administrators, teacher, student), effective methods for consulting with team members of different professions, and how to evaluate all ethical considerations in determining when a latency functional analysis may and may NOT be considered. Each participant will have hands on learning on how to provide training utilizing research based methods (behavior skills training) to allow familiar staff of the target student to implement the written conditions and to make data based decisions during and post the analysis so that the results are clear and explainable to all involved parties.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1) describe all factors related to implementing a functional analysis with a student who is socially aware and potentially responsive to observers and/or additional people in the classroom; 2) explain related factors in selecting the type of functional analysis to conduct: considerations specifically for latency; 3) state the critical elements of implementing a latency functional analysis in the school setting with the general education staff (developing conditions, staff training, collaboration with buy in); 4) explain how to effectively present data results to an educational team
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a systematic approach of lecture of which the purpose and outline of the process will be provided. Guided practice will be utilized to teach each step of the process along with a small group practice to provide a realistic 'team meeting' with feedback and coaching from the instructor. Each exercise will build on the next.
Audience: BCBA, BCaBA, educators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): education, functional analysis
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: BACB
Beyond Just Business: Developing Scorecard Systems to Increase Value-Driven Behaviors in Human Services
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Becca Tagg, Psy.D.
BECCA TAGG (Del Mar Center for Behavioral Health), SHANNON BIAGI (Chief Motivating Officers), KAITLIN SHAFFER (Del Mar Center for Behavioral Health)
Description: Performance scorecard systems have been demonstrated to be an effective method by which to increase the performance of staff members through clarifying expectations, providing a means of objective feedback, and encouraging data-based reinforcement. In this hands-on workshop, a case study of a novel application of performance scorecards will be shared, which focuses on broader organizational values rather than solely on traditional business results. Benefits of these types of systems, including their role in reducing bias and increasing value-driven behavior, will be discussed. During the workshop, participants will take steps towards developing their own scorecard systems, individually or in teams, as the presenters walk through how the case study was developed.
Learning Objectives: During this workshop, participants will: Identify how bonus/scorecards can impact organizational behavior Recognize the process followed during the case study presented for developing the bonus/scorecard system Associate common value terms with the behaviors that represent those values Determine the best fit of different strategies of measurement for value-based behaviors based on organizational factors and culture Identify potential benefits of bonus/scorecard systems Match limitations encountered during the case study to their proposed resolutions Define the organizational performance category or value-driven behavior they are seeking to impact Select and operationalize the behaviors and results that contribute to those performance categories Determine the strategy for measuring the behaviors and results, including how they will be measured, how often, and who is responsible for collecting and reporting the data Calculate the range of measurement for each behavior/result, including the lowest acceptable value, the median value, the targeted value, and the stretch goal Assign priority weights based upon several factors, including strategic importance, relative control, company goals, etc. Assemble the scorecard with the information they’ve gathered Identify best practices for historical data testing, piloting, and incentive program development Plan for launching full scale, including how to monitor social validity and data trends
Activities: The format will consist of guided activities that culminate into the development of a potential value-based scorecard system. This will be facilitated through multiple worksheets, small group discussions, active student responding questions, and large group activities.
Audience: Intermediate BCBA business leaders and their core team members.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): OBM, Performance Management, Scorecards, Values
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Behavioral Leadership
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Natalie A. Parks, Ph.D.
NATALIE A. PARKS (Behavior Leader)
Description: Leadership is a set of skills that effectively energizes followers to accomplish the mission of the company in an ethical manner. Unfortunately, many leaders are promoted due to their excellent technical skills without being provided any specific training in the skills of leadership. Behavior analysts have the specific skills necessary to motivate others, teach new skills, and maintain behavior over time; however, applying these skills organizationally can be difficult. Several questions emerge including: What is leadership in behavior analysis? Why is it important? Who can be a leader? and How do you shape the behavior of a behavior analysis leader? This workshop will discuss the Leadership in Behavior Analysis (LIBA) model and provide an outline for the ideal behavior analysis leadership formula so that you can achieve a high level of prominence within our field, establish a long-lasting positive legacy for everyone in your organization, and grow your organization.
Learning Objectives: 1. State the different components of the Leadership in Behavior Analysis model. 2. Complete the LIBA assessment and identify current leadership skills. 3. Conceptually analyze leadership in behavior analysis. 4. State how to write a vision, mission, and values that align with the BACB Code of Professional Conduct. 5. Pinpoint strategies and behavior that will lead to best performance in followers. 6. Identify how to create a performance management system. 7. State how to identify performance problems.
Activities: Instructional Strategies Include: lecture, discussion, and completion of practice activities and assessments. Workshop objectives will be met through completions of practice activities, completion of worksheets and assessments, role plays and practice, feedback from presenters, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior Analysts (BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Cultures, leadership, performance management, Vision Mission
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
The Evolution of a Science: A Brief History of Behavior Analysis in the Twentieth Century
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: PCH/TBA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: A. Charles Catania, Ph.D.
A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland, Baltimore County)
Description: This history of our science reviews its origins and the co-evolution of basic and applied research in the context of major world events. Precursors through 1900 include Darwin and Thorndike. 1900s: Behavior emerges as a subject matter; 1910s: Watson's Behaviorist Manifesto; 1920s: Learning theorists; 1930s: Skinner joins Keller at Harvard, later writes Behavior of Organisms; 1940s: World War II leads to shaping, Walden Two, other innovations; 1950s: The Cold War provides context for Science and Human Behavior, Verbal Behavior; SEAB and JEAB founded; 1960s: The science grows despite cognitive-behavioral culture wars; JABA founded; our own organizations develop; applications and basic work grow side by side (e.g., "psychotic children"; time out); 1970s: Applications foster founding of programs; international extensions grow; the field, with roots in psychology, sees a viable future outside it; 1980s: Treatments of autism, self-injury, etc., establish conditions for credentialing and professional extensions; 1990s: Behavior analysis thrives mainly in cultural niches, but an explosion of applications brings increasing recognition; The 21st Century: Where do we go from here? (This workshop is based on a book in progress with Nancy Neef and Victor Laties as co-authors. It will probably be Catania's last ABAI workshop.)
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants should be able to describe how basic concepts (reinforcement, the operant, the 3-term contingency) evolved and played a role in the expanding influence of behavior analysis. 2. Participants should be able to outline how basic and applied dimensions of behavior analysis evolved in combination in the early history of the field, then separated mainly for practical editorial reasons, and eventually came back together to provide reciprocal benefits in translational studies and in the basic questions raised by applications. 3. Participants should be able to identify the innovations of major founders of behavior analysis, especially including Keller, Skinner, Schoenfeld, Ferster and Sidman. 4. Participants should be able to describe how the work of the major founders contributed to education in general and the education of those on the autism spectrum in particular. 5. Participants should be able to identify the 20th century contexts within which the major features of behavior analysis were created and evolved. 6. Participants should be able to identify factors that led to negative views of behavior analysis within the general culture: from aircribs and timeout and use of punishment to issues of verbal behavior and human freedom.
Activities: This workshop will consist of lecture organized by decades of the twentieth century, with breaks (usually between decades) for discussion and for exercises in historical fact-checking.
Audience: The content should be of interest to all behavior analysts, and especially to those relatively new to the field. It should also be useful for those who teach either basic or applied courses or practica and who wish to enrich the discussion of our history and the origins of our behavioral tools and methods. The workshop will demonstrate the cumulative nature of central concepts and will also emphasize how basic and applied research developed side by side from the very beginning. Early behavior analysts didn't even make the distinction, which came relatively late as a consequence of managing the practicalities of journal editing. To the extent that the two approaches have moved apart, translational research is drawing them back together.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): application milestones, behavior-analysis founders, experimental milestones, theoretical milestones
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: BACB
Introduction to Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for Behavior Analysts: A Hands-On Workshop
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: PCH; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Marc J. Lanovaz, Ph.D.
MARC J. LANOVAZ (Université de Montréal)
Description: Artificial intelligence holds promise in revolutionizing how we work and interact. However, the adoption of artificial intelligence in behavior analytic practice and research has been lagging in comparison to other professions (e.g., medicine, psychology). Behavior analysts are not traditionally trained to program and work with automated algorithms, which may explain why we are falling behind. The purpose of the workshop is to provide a gentle introduction to artificial intelligence and some its applications for behavior analysts with no prior training in programming or computer science. First, the presenter will review the terminology and logic underlying artificial intelligence and its application to socially significant problems. Second, the participants will apply machine learning algorithms to solve two behavior analytic problems: 1) the automated detection of vocal stereotypy in children with autism spectrum disorders and 2) the analysis of single-case designs. In summary, the workshop will provide step-by-step written and oral instructions as to how to apply the algorithms to behavior analytic problems, the presenter will model how to train machine learning models, and the participants will practice their newly learned skills by coding their own models (using helper functions) and receive feedback on their implementation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1) Describe what artificial intelligence and machine learning are 2) Explain the benefits and drawbacks of using machine learning models to solve socially significant problems 3) Describe behavior analytic applications of machine learning 4) Train simple machine learning models to analyze behavior analytic data using Python
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lectures, small group activities, and guided practice. Supplemental materials will be available online and include a) a description of artificial intelligence and machine learning terms, b) all code and data files to run the analyses presented during the workshop, and c) step-by-step written tutorials on applying machine learning algorithms to behavior analytic data. It is required that attendees bring a laptop computer to the workshop in order to participate in the guided practice.
Audience: Advanced graduate students BCBAs BCBA-Ds
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Artificial intelligence, Data analysis, Machine learning
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: BACB
Teaching With PORTL
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Ph.D.
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas), MARY ELIZABETH HUNTER (Behavior Explorer), CRYSTAL FERNANDEZ (University of North Texas)
Description: PORTL, the Portable Operant Research and Teaching Lab, offers a convenient and fun way to practice and experience the principles of behavior. This tabletop game is essentially a portable Skinner box for humans. It is ideal as a companion for college instruction and for staff training. Through PORTL exercises, students can learn about reinforcement, extinction, discrimination, stimulus control, shaping, chaining, and other behavioral phenomena. Students also learn how to design reinforcement systems, write teaching plans, collect data, and assess the learner’s progress during teaching. One advantage of PORTL is that students get to experience what it is like to be both the teacher and the learner. In this workshop, you will learn the fundamentals of PORTL, the parallels between PORTL and the Skinner box, and the basics of using PORTL in the classroom or as a teaching tool for therapists. You will also get to play several PORTL exercises as both the teacher and learner, which will further illustrate the power of PORTL as a teaching tool.
Learning Objectives: (1) Describe the basic components of the game PORTL and the relationship between PORTL and the Skinner box. (2) Describe how to use PORTL to teach basic behavioral principles to students or practitioners. (3) Teach simple and complex behaviors using PORTL.
Activities: This workshop will consist of lectures and hands-on activities. Lectures and videos will be used to describe the basics of PORTL and teach participants how to use PORTL to teach others about basic behavioral principles. Participants will have a chance to experience PORTL through a series of hands-on exercises. During the exercises, participants will play the roles of both teacher and student. Group discussions will be used to summarize and reflect on the experience gained by playing the exercises and to further discuss how to use PORTL as a teaching tool.
Audience: This workshop is designed for anyone who is interested in teaching others about basic behavioral principles and who is interested in teaching others about how to design and implement teaching programs. University professors will find the material useful for their undergraduate and graduate behavior classes. BCBAs and licensed psychologists will find the material useful for training practitioners and therapists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): basic principles, laboratory experience, shaping skills, staff training
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Writing and Reviewing Ethical Intensive Behavior Programs
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc and TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: This workshop is intended to advance skills relating to writing and reviewing Individual Behavior Plans for recipients with challenging behavior. Starting with provider self-evaluation regarding accepting a recipient, moving through authoring plans, and then reviewing those written by others, this is an active-participant workshop. Among topics to be covered; The "rules" in various areas for addressing dangerous and challenging behaviors, researching relevant legislation and policy obligations, determining agency policy for the use of restraint and/or restrictive procedures, and reviewing journals for efficacious interventions will be covered. We will also review the ethical obligations of providing services to these difficult recipients, including the need for crisis management training when restraint "isn't used" in regular programming. Evaluating, training and supervising staff will be reviewed at length. Additionally, we will review obligations to the recipient, the family, the agency, and families who private pay. A peer-review system will be presented and evaluated by participants, as well as the need for experienced clinicians to have mentors of their own. Using a format for "old school" (non-computer generated) IBPs, and case studies, we will examine recommended components, organization, wordsmithing, effective data collection, and the importance of explicit, detailed, instructions.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to identify behaviors that meet criterion for dangerous and challenging, intensive behaviors. Participants will be able to systematically format IBPs to allow consistency for all implementers, without software. Participants will be able to differentiate legal and ethical requirements when addressing intensive behaviors. Participants will be able to efficiently and effectively review IBPs for individuals with dangerous and challenging behavior. Participants will be able to give appropriate feedback to clinicians who are incorrectly authoring IBPs for intensive behaviors.
Activities: Workshop activities will include; lecture, participant self-evaluation, identification of policies and rules regarding restrictive procedures in various (participant) areas, using sample programs and videos to review, evaluate, and revise interventions.
Audience: This workshop is for experienced clinicians who are struggling with service provision for recipients with dangerous and challenging behavior, those BCBAs who are looking to refresh/expand their own behavioral repertoires, and those who find themselves supervising pre-certificants and established staff who are writing behavior plans for this challenging population.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Challenging Behavior, Ethics Ethical, Intensive Behavior, Supervision Review
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: BACB
Using Relational Frame Theory to Promote Generative Language
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Siri Ming, Ph.D.
SIRI MING (VB3; Private Practice), IAN T. STEWART (National University of Ireland, Galway), JOHN D. MCELWEE (Private Practice; VB3)
Description: Relational Frame Theory (RFT) sees generalized derived relational responding—relational framing—as the core skill involved in human language, essential for flexible, fluent conversational skills and academic progress. Relational responding repertoires have been highly correlated with language and IQ measures, relational training programs have shown powerful effects on both academic skills and IQ, and a key domain for the application of RFT has recently been in teaching children with language and academic deficits. Our approach integrates theory and research on the assessment and training of derived relational responding skills with strategies developed by programs which follow a Skinnerian analysis of verbal behavior, including an emphasis on analyzing motivational variables, training mands, and conducting training in the natural environment. In this highly interactive workshop, we identify relational responding repertoires along with other critical behavioral cusps to teach towards an ultimate aim of establishing generative language, and present a powerful framework for approaching early intervention, based on RFT and informed by decades of research and practice. For participants who are using curricula based on an RFT approach already, we invite a deeper exploration of the underlying theory, and introduce a framework for problem-solving when lesson plans are not producing desired outcomes.
Learning Objectives: 1. Using an assessment and programming flowchart and case review template, describe the priorities for assessment and intervention for learners at early and more advanced skill levels with an emphasis on behavioral cusps for generative language. 2. Describe the defining features of relational frames, distinguishing between derived, generalized, and taught responses and between arbitrary and nonarbitrary relational responding. 3. Demonstrate how to assess and teach early derived relational responding skills in relations of coordination and how to use equivalence-based teaching to efficiently teach new content.  4. Demonstrate how to assess and teach nonarbitrary and arbitrary relational responding skills in relations of distinction. 5. Describe how to assess and teach early relational responding skills in a variety of patterns including opposition, comparison, spatial and temporal relations. 6. Distinguish between teaching categorization from an equivalence perspective and teaching hierarchical categorization; describe how to assess and teach class inclusion. 7. Describe the early foundational repertoires for developing a sense of “self” and perspective-taking.
Activities: The workshop combines lecture, video demonstration, small and large group discussion, and role play.
Audience: Behavior analysts charged with assessing and designing programming for teaching language in early intervention and early elementary level programs for children with autism.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Executive Functioning and Autism: Applications Within Applied Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sarah B. Woldoff, Ph.D.
SARAH B. WOLDOFF (Arcadia University)
Description: The goal of a neuropsychological evaluation is to comprehensively assess and identify strengths and weaknesses across multiple areas. The evaluation measures such areas as attention, problem solving, memory, language, I.Q., visual-spatial skills, academic skills, and social-emotional functioning. Some children referred for an evaluation may already have a known learning disorder or other diagnoses such as Autism. Recommendations for particular therapies and methods as they relate to specific diagnoses stemming from the neuropsychological assessment can also be made and can be combined with other evaluations such as Functional Behavior Assessment. Executive functioning skills are critical for academic success both within the classroom and in the real world. Deficits in executive functioning are often seen in students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These behaviors include long-term planning, time management, using feedback effectively, controlling impulses, and utilizing organization skills. These deficits also contribute to poor social interactions, cognitive functioning, emotional and behavioral development, as well as learning and academic achievement and should be considered when establishing.
Learning Objectives: Describe how executive functions impact individuals with autism spectrum disorder Become familiar with interventions that support executive functioning difficulties Identify practical recommendations to create supports to create and use at home, in school, or in the community.
Activities: The format will combine lecture and small group activities and discussion. Attendees will receive guided notes, a resource packet, and glossary of terms to take home.
Audience: The workshop would be beneficial to PreK through high school teachers, RBTs, BCABA's, BCBA's, and other community service providers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Executive Functioning, Goal Setting
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Addressing Multicultural and Diversity Issues in Applied Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Brian Conners, M.Ed.
SHAWN CAPELL (Covenant 15:16 LLC ), BRIAN CONNERS (Seton Hall University)
Description: Over the past several years the topic of diversity and cultural competency has become a popular topic within the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). This workshop will assist participants in the identification of current areas of concern regarding diversity and cultural competency across all aspects of service delivery (e.g., supervision, implementation, evaluation, etc.). Participants will exit this workshop with a clear road map of tangible solutions to increasing diversity and cultural competency within the ABA service-delivery model in their organizations.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1. Define culture and cultural competency 2. Understand how culture impacts the ABA service-delivery model 3. Infuse cultural practices in training and supervision 4. Apply cultural practices to the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts
Activities: Participants will participate in a variety of activities including group discussions, case studies/scenarios, video simulations, etc. to apply the concepts taught in the workshop. Participants will be presented with models and worksheets to apply to their clinical practice.
Audience: Registered Behavior Technicians; Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts; Board Certified Behavior Analysts
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Cultural Competency, Diversity, Multicultural, Service Delivery
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: BACB
How Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Helped Create an ABA Benefit and Support Clinicians in Wisconsin
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Tabitha Ramminger, M.S.
TABITHA RAMMINGER (Wisconsin Medicaid)
Description: Federal law requires state Medicaid programs to provide Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) services for Medicaid members under 21 years of age. The purpose of EPSDT is to prevent, diagnose, and treat health problems as early as possible, before they can grow into bigger problems. In Wisconsin, Medicaid has utilized EPSDT authority to create a comprehensive Behavioral Treatment benefit which allows coverage of ABA services for individuals of all ages and diagnoses. This workshop will inform practitioners on EPSDT and how it was utilized to create a the benefit in Wisconsin. The presenters will provide a detailed overview of the prior authorization process, how medical necessity is determined, and common documentation challenges providers experience. Additionally, the presenters will review how prior authorization has been utilized as a tool to improve ABA services in the state of Wisconsin through a customer service approach of high provider engagement, written feedback, and service authorization foreshadowing with the overall intent to support individuals receiving ABA in Wisconsin.
Learning Objectives: Understand EPSDT Federal Law for Insurance Coverage Understand Medical Necessity and how it is applied to service determinations Identify common service authorization errors, and how to submit more efficient authorization requests.
Activities: Lecture of background and core material Supplemental materials of core material will be handed out along with resource links. Active group discussions. Small breakout groups with activities to develop treatment goals.
Audience: Practicing clinicians who bill insurance - preferably those who serve Medicaid recipients in any state
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): EPSDT, Insurance, Medicaid, Prior Authorization
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: BACB
Introduction to Administration, Scoring, and Intervention Planning Using the Essential for Living
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sarah Weddle, Ph.D.
SARAH WEDDLE (May Institute ), CHRISTINA DELAPP (May Institute )
Description: The purpose of the workshop is to introduce attendees to the Essential for Living (EFL; McGreevy, Fry, & Cornwall, 2012, 2014) assessment and curriculum guide. The EFL program organizes and prioritizes crucial language, health and safety, and daily living skills to promote the independence of children and adults with moderate to severe disabilities. The trainers will cover the scope and sequence, Quick Assessment (administering, scoring), Alternative Method of Speaking (AMS) Assessment, probing and scoring items of interest, writing goals and objectives derived from the assessment, and locating corresponding teaching protocols. This workshop will utilize a behavioral skills training approach and includes components of didactic instruction, modeling, and role-playing with feedback (Parsons, Rollyson, & Reid, 2012). We have embedded practice opportunities and role plays within the training using sample data and vignettes. Trainers will guide the attendees through practice opportunities using scripts, providing exemplar models, and checking performance. In addition, to practice opportunities and role-plays, attendees will actively participate by writing the didactic content into workbooks. The EFL is a comprehensive program so attendees will be encouraged to use the system under supervision or seek consultation if necessary.
Learning Objectives: • Attendees will identify the purpose and domains assessed using the Essential for Living communication, behavior, and functional skills curriculum by completing their workbooks. • Attendees will practice administering and scoring the EFL Quick Assessment and Alternative Method of Speaking Assessment using exemplar scripts. • Attendees will practice writing objectives derived from the results of the EFL for an exemplar learner by completing this section in their workbooks. • Attendees will locate and review the teaching protocols within the EFL Handbook that correspond to related goals & objectives. • Attendees will identify how to collect the first trial of the day data and update the EFL manual for an exemplar student.
Activities: Participants will complete guided notes in their workbooks that correspond to lecture content. Participants will be introduced to a topic, the trainer will model, and then participants will have opportunities to practice the skill with the trainer. Participants will have many opportunities to practice in small groups.
Audience: behavior analysts, educators, speech and language pathologists, and psychologists working with individuals with moderate to severe disabilities in schools, homes, residential programs, and adult day programs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Curriculum Guide, Functional Skills, Moderate/Severe Disabilities, Progress Monitoring
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Dotting the I's and Crossing the T's: Documentation Compliance
Friday, May 22, 2020
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thea H. Davis, M.S.
THEA H. DAVIS (Autism Bridges; MassCAP), EILEEN MENDES (MassCAP), BARBARA HUNT (Autism Bridges), CATHY J. BOOTH (Autism Bridges)
Description: Providing insurance funded services to individuals with autism requires more than just assessing the individual, developing the treatment plan, and providing direct instruction. Understanding state and federal laws related to service delivery, documentation, and billing; as well as understanding contract terms and distinctions in medical necessity criteria across payers can be challenging to navigate. Missing one small but critical regulation, policy, or sentence in a contract can make or break a business. This workshop will offer guidelines on ethical documentation practices, retention schedules for medical records, conformance to documentation expectations with respect to medical necessity criteria, preparing for an external audit, conducting internal audits, and how to navigate the back of the house needs.
Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to understand essential elements of a medical record The participant will be able to access relevant regulatory and payer policy information The participant will be able to design documentation forms that cover insurance regulated session notes and treatment plans developed from primary resources. (DSM5, CPT Manual, CPT Assistant, Insurance Contracts, and Federal guidelines)
Activities: Core content and examples will be taught through lecture. Their will be guided practice and group discussion
Audience: Level: Intermediate Target audience: Owners of ABA Companies, and BCBA's and clinicians providing Adaptive Behavior Services as defined int the CPT Manual
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Compliance, documentation, medical billing
 
Special Event #2
Closed Meeting: Affiliated Chapter Leadership Training
Friday, May 22, 2020
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 1/2
Chair: Michael F. Dorsey (Amego Inc.)
Presenting Authors: PER HOLTH (OsloMet -- Oslo Metropolitan University), FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University)

ABAI is pleased to offer a Leadership Training Session for officers of ABAI affiliated chapters for the purpose of providing strategies for guiding the growth of chapters and providing services to members and constituents. Although this training is free for up to three officers per chapter, advanced registration is required and attendance is by invitation only.

Presentations include:

  • The Basics of Strategic Planning, by Byron Wine and Adam Warman (OBM Network)
  • ABA Billing Code Update and Commission Introduction, by Julie Kornack (ABAI Billing Code Commission and Center for Autism and Related Disorders)
  • Verified Course Sequences (VCS) for Non-US Programs, by Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
  • Moving Your Program from VCS to Accreditation: The Whys and Hows, by Linda Hayes (University of Nebraska, Reno) and Jenna Mrljak (Association for Behavior Analysis International)
 
 
Special Event #3
Closed Meeting: Special Interest Group Leadership Training
Friday, May 22, 2020
3:00 PM–6:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 3
Chair: Peter R. Killeen (Arizona State University)
Presenting Authors:

ABAI is pleased to offer a Leadership Training Session for officers of ABAI Special Interest Groups (SIGs) for the purpose of providing strategies for guiding the growth of SIGs and providing services to members and constituents. This training is for SIG leaders only. Although the SIG training is free for up to three officers per SIG, registration is required. This event is closed; attendance is by invitation only.

 
 
Workshop #W67A
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Working With Adults With Severe Problem Behavior: Ethical Considerations and Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adrienne Hursh, M.A.
ADRIENNE HURSH (Pyles and Associates), DENNIS PALIWODA (Pyles and Associates), SHAI MAOR (Pyles and Associates)
Description: Severe problem behaviors can manifest into a variety of topographical behaviors but typically consists of aggression, self-injury, and/or property destruction. Unfortunately, this also means a decrease in opportunities for individuals who engage in this type of severe problem behavior because of the damage that these individuals can inflict. As legislature continues to push for community placements and the imminent closure of non-community-based placement opportunities for adults who display the aforementioned behaviors, the need for community supports that can safely, ethically, and successfully manage these individuals has significantly increased. Due to biological factors (e.g. height and weight) of these individuals, intervention strategies that are/were effective with children are not typically effective with these types of adults. Being an adult comes with an increase in freedom of choice (depending on conservatorship) that can make navigating support for these types of individuals extremely complex. Furthermore, at times an increased number of support services can provide a challenge in collaborating how to best support the individual. These support services include, but are not limited to psychiatrists, medical doctor’s, mental health therapy services, behavioral services, day programs and regional centers.
Learning Objectives: After attending this workshop, attendees will be able to (1) describe programmatic, ethical, and collaborative considerations for working with adults with severe problem behavior, (2) identify clinical situations that necessitate different approaches and (3) demonstrate understanding of information provided by creating a preliminary plan for an individual they serve.
Activities: This workshop includes presentation of information through lecture, presentation of evidenced based interventions, and guided group activities.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is anyone working with adults.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): adults, dual diagnoses, severe behavior
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
If You Are a BCBA, Are You/Can You Become a Dog Trainer? Some Ethics and Some Steps in That Direction
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terri M. Bright, Ph.D.
TERRI M. BRIGHT (MSPCA Angell)
Description: When you have studied behavior analysis, you find yourself being asked about the behavior of non-human species, usually dogs. Do you pause before stepping into the breach and making suggestions? Until you have the tools to implement the assessments and interventions you have used with humans, you will likely not be able to generalize your skills to another species. Safety is also a reason: 4 million people are bitten by dogs each year. To a trained professional, the precursors of aggression are like a blinking neon sign; to a novice, they are unnoticed. Whether in your neighborhood, your home, or your workplace, dogs pose a bite risk to humans. Dog bite prevention involves teaching others to recognize precursors of a possible bite. This workshop will first remind BCBA’s and others what the ethics are of teaching outside of their scope of training and experience. It will also teach attendees to identify precursors of canid aggression as well as what to do when they see them. Finally, if you are interested in dog training, this workshop will demonstrate generalization of such skills as preference assessments and functional assessment/analysis of dog behavior, and give some simple tools for training dogs, as well as instructions on how to refer to the right dog trainer.
Learning Objectives: Upon completion if the workshop, attendees will be able to: - via videos and textual prompts, identify the precursors of dog aggression and how to stay safe in the presence of an aggressive dog; - identify how your behavioral skills are skewed towards humans and how your dog-training skills may be skewed away from science - identify when and if you should intervene with a dog’s problem behavior; - identify an ethical dog trainer in their geographical area should they need a referral - learn to perform preference assessments and use the Functional Assessment of Behavior of Dogs (FABD), an assessment created by the workshop presenter
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, surveys, choral responding, small group breakout, still photos of dogs, dog behavior videos and textual prompts. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and video demonstrations of dog behavior. Supplemental materials will be provided such as participants will be able to review all photos, videos and surveys after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This basic workshop is meant for those who find themselves in the company of dogs and who are tempted to train them and otherwise interact with them. Though participant's individual dogs' behaviors are not the target of the workshop, enough information will be disseminated so that participants can, perhaps, begin their dog-training at home, using the tenets of ABA and within the scope of the BACB Task List; they will be able to recognize the limits of their behavioral skills across species. Those who come into contact with dogs in the community or workplace and who are fearful or uncertain will be better equipped to act appropriately, be it to gain safety or to find referrals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Supervision
Navigate Challenging Behavior Better: How to Supervise and Train Individuals to Comprehensively Address Challenging Behavior
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Miller, Ph.D.
MEGAN MILLER (#dobetter Pod)
Description: This workshop focuses on going beyond the typical training provided on functions of behavior and behavioral assessment to provide attendees with a more comprehensive understanding of how to supervise and train others to navigate challenging behavior. This workshop provides an overview of how to truly conduct functional assessment and analysis and reviews research in support of advancements in functional analysis technology (e.g., Hanley, 2015). It then provides a deeper dive into considerations relating to ethical and flexible application of extinction and maintaining analysis when designing behavior intervention plans.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to describe how to provide supervision relating to the primary purpose of functional assessment Participants will be able to identify at least 1 benefit to including advancements in functional analysis technologies during supervision Participants will be able to explain at least 1 ethical consideration regarding extinction to incorporate during supervision Participants will be able to describe at least 1 general guideline to follow when addressing challenging behavior during supervision Participants will be able to describe the importance of maintaining analysis in developing behavior intervention plans when supervising others on the development of such plans
Activities: This workshop combines interactive exercises designed to provide opportunities to reflect upon the experiences of trainees and clients when addressing challenging behavior with a behavioral skills training packet designed to demonstrate how to provide supervision to trainees on comprehensively addressing challenging behavior.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BCBAs with at least 2 years of experience and who are responsible for providing BACB fieldwork supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): alternatives extinction, challenging behavior, comprehensive assessment, effective supervision
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Using Mentorship to Improve Retention and Decrease Burnout
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen Nohelty, M.Ed.
KAREN NOHELTY (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), BEVERLY DOWNING (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), VERONICA HINOJOSA (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), JULIE LEMON (Center for Autism and Related Disorders)
Description: Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA) provide supervision to a range of individuals, including Registered Behavior Technicians (RBT), Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts BCaBAs, BCBA candidates, and junior BCBAs. Different from supervision, mentorship can contribute to reduced burnout and increased retention through a supportive relationship. Practical strategies based on research, including research from the broader medical field, as well as case studies from the presenters, will be discussed. This workshop will prepare participants to use a variety of methods to assess mentees existing skills, use behavioral skills training (BST) in supporting mentees in learning new skills (including interpersonal skills such as problem solving, communication, conflict resolution), and assess the impact of changes in mentorship. Additionally, strategies for using feedback to support mentees will be reviewed. Opportunities will be provided for attendees to practice these skills and develop self-management goals to enable tracking of their own progress.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will identify evidence based practices for mentoring staff. 2. Participants will identify how BST can be used to support the skill development of mentees. 3. Participants will identify how they can examine the effects of changes in their mentorship strategies.
Activities: The format combines lecture, group discussion, and breakout groups. After information is shared with participants, opportunities will be provided to practice skills discussed.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes BCBAs who are supervising others, including those who have recently received their credential, are new to supervising others, and/or want to improve this skillset.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BST, feedback, mentoring, supervision
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: BACB
Efficient Literature Searches Using Online Databases Available to You
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nicole L. Bank, M.S.
NICOLE L. BANK (The PartnerShip, LLC; University of North Texas)
Description: Behavior analysts have theoretical, professional, and ethical obligations to stay in touch with the scholarly literature. General strategies for staying in contact with the scholarly literature are available (Carr and Briggs, 2010; Dubuque, 2011; Gillis & Carr, 2014) but as the popularity of online research resources increase, behavior analysts (both professional and academic) need to know how research is organized in these online systems. Furthermore, behavior analysts should understand what challenges our discipline pose when searching within this organizational system. This workshop provides an overview of online research resources for behavior analysts, explains how these resources are organized, and provides multiple examples of discipline-specific search strategies for more effective and efficient literature searches. This workshop will include multiple demonstrations and search results within a variety of research resources. The group will work together to conduct common literature search scenarios and/or research questions provided by workshop participants. Workshop participants will leave with the presentation slides and a table of where to find free, full text articles from relevant scholarly journals.
Learning Objectives: 1) Name at least two online sources of behavior analytic research 2) Describe how online research resources are organized 3) Observe and demonstrate examples of efficient, discipline-specific search strategies
Activities: Workshop content will be provided through an interactive lecture, live literature search demonstrations, examples of lecture components within the demonstrations, and literature searches conducted by the group.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for behavior analysts at all levels in their career.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): literature reviews, literature searches, scholarly literature
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Teaching the Foundational Components of Pretend Play
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nancy J. Champlin, M.A.
NANCY J. CHAMPLIN (ACI Learning Centers), MELISSA SCHISSLER (ACI Learning Centers)
Description: Play is imperative to a child's development and is identified as one of the core deficits in children diagnosed with autism, often described as lacking in symbolic qualities and flexibility (Jarr & Eldevik, 2007). Evidence-based play interventions can positively impact future communication and language skills, cognitive functioning, as well as social interactions for individuals with autism and other developmental delays. Play should be an integral part of a child’s programming because of its importance to the child’s overall development (Wilburn, 2011). The purpose of this workshop is to train participants on how to teach the foundational components of pretend play utilizing the Pretend Play and Language Assessment and Curriculum (PPLAC). The PPLAC is a behaviorally-based curriculum formulated from the typical developmental sequence of play and language and utilized to establish and expand a child's pretend play repertoire. The five elements of play including agent, object, category of play, advanced play, and the essential skills to sociodramatic play are identified and separated into teachable components.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to identify and examine the five elements of pretend play 2. Participants will be able to demonstrate implementation of targets from Stage 1: Single Agent in the Pretend Play and Language Assessment and Curriculum 3. Participants will be able to demonstrate collecting and analyzing data for targets in Stage 1 in the Pretend Play and Language Assessment and Curriculum 4. Participants will be able to demonstrate initiating play, positioning appropriately, effective prompting, and providing feedback following a play opportunity 5. Participants will be able to identify effective components of short-term and long-term pretend play goals
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met by alternating between didactic instruction, discussion, video modeling, and small group activities such as role play and practicing data collection. Participants will be provided with workbooks including presentation notes and sample data sheets.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts, Speech Language Pathologists, Special Educators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Assessment, Curriculum, Pretend Play, Social
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Efficient and Effective Supervision for Registered Behavior Technicians in Non-Clinical Settings: Challenges and Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: BCBAs who supervise and train RBTs are time-challenged to assist the RBT to acquire and maintain the essential skills to be successful implementing data-based practices. RBTs working in non-clinical settings require additional support and training as current ABA terminology and technology may not be supported in those environments. This workshop is designed for BCBAs who require additional strategies to support and supervise RBT’s in non-clinical settings utilizing time efficient and effective strategies to accelerate the RBT’s learning and skill acquisition. The workshop will present numerous evidence-based practices to add to the supervisors’ tool belt in order for the RBT to acquire the necessary skills. These individualized training protocols feature supervision documentation, vocabulary acquisition, skill demonstration, and feedback. All of these activities will aid the RBT to satisfactorily demonstrate competency to implement the task acquisition strategies and master the BACB task list to ensure delivery of current standards of care.
Learning Objectives: The participants will be able to use shaping. The participants will be able to use modeling. The participants will be able to use prompting and fading procedures. The participants will be able to provide naturalistic teaching strategies to provide instruction to the RBT. The participants will be able to individualize additional instruction for the RBTs. The participants will be able to collect data and evaluate success using data-based strategies. The participants will be able to monitor the client’s progress and treatment integrity. The participants will be able to use self-management strategies. The participants will be able to use data-based decisions to determine the need for additional training and support.
Activities: The format combines lecture, video examples, small group hands on activities and guided practice.
Audience: BCBAs, Special Education Teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysis of Seizures
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: BPN/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. Individuals with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be better controlled, and important new skills could be acquired, if the behavior analyst understands epilepsy. A brief review of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be provided. The etiology, genetics and classification of common seizure disorders will be briefly reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be covered. Developmentally disabled clients are often improperly monitored and over-medicated for seizures. These issues can be avoided with EEG (electroencephalography), which is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy. Workshop participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with the EEG, without sedation or anesthesia. Participants will learn how epileptic seizures change an individual's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about how to describe, measure and control these relationships in an ethical manner.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, each participant will be able to: 1. Define an epileptic seizure. 2. Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures. 3. Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior. 4. Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions. 5. Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress. 6. Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures. 7. Know how to prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia. 8. Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures. 8. Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy. 9. Explain some recent research on epilepsy and behavior analysis. 10. Explain how the environment can decrease abnormal brain activity and seizures.
Activities: The workshop activities will include lecture, group discussion, video observation, and interactive activities to test knowledge (using Kahoot). Students will have access to videos, peer reviewed articles and chapters on Research Gate before the conference. Research Gate link: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/John_Neill
Audience: Clinical behavior analysts and experimental analysts with an interest in learning effective methods for analyzing seizures and their immediate and long term effects on intellectual functioning, everyday behavior and behavior disorders.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): animal models, electroencephalography, epileptic seizures, pseudoepileptic seizures
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Children With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Broadening the Lens
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Traditional counselors view aberrant behaviors as symptoms of underlying constructs that are the reason for these behaviors, while behaviorists view these behaviors as serving an environmental function. FBA identifies the function of aberrant behaviors and acceptable replacement behaviors that serve the same function. Components that are often missing in the analysis of aberrant behaviors include: 1) motivating operations in the form of private events (thoughts and feelings); and 2) learning history with specific Sds for reinforcement or punishment. This workshop will deal with the following: disturbed attachment, callousness and lack of emotionality, oppositional and defiant behaviors, and anxiety and depression.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the symptoms of emotional/behavioral disorders as behaviors serving an environmental function 2. Describe the process of conducting FBAs with children with emotional/behavioral disorders 3. Describe the role of learning history in treating with children with emotional/behavioral disorders 4. Describe the role of motivating operations and discriminative stimuli in treating children with emotional/behavioral disorders 5. Describe how to develop and implement function-based treatments for children with emotional/behavioral disorders
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using lecture, role-play, case presentations, discussion and small-group interaction
Audience: Participants can include BCBAs, teachers, psychologists, psychiatrists, administrators, nurses, counselors, and social workers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral disorders, emotional disorders, function-based treatment, functional assessment
 
Workshop #W77
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Help Me Help You: Key Strategies for Developing Effective Parent Training Systems
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laurie Tarter, Psy.D.
LAURIE TARTER (EnCompass Behavioral Health ), JANET VASQUEZ (Precision Chi), KARELIX ALICEA (Lotus Behavioral Interventions), PIYAPORN MOUA (EnCompass Behavioral Health)
Description: Parent training is a vital part of an ABA program. Utilizing best practices and evidence-based treatment plays a critical role in the efficacy of parent training. This workshop will equip practitioners with essential information to enable them to develop a quality parent training system that will promote efficacious ABA services. Presenters will provide a review of the current research and evidence-based protocols pertaining to parent training. With a focus on ethical considerations when working with parents and their families, participants will learn how to identify common ethical issues that may occur related to parent training and solutions for those issues. The workshop will also review methods for providing parent training via different modalities, including Telehealth, as well as how to take a family systems approach. Additionally, presenters will review the role on an organization in the development of parent training systems. Lastly, participants will learn methods to create their own parent training goals, methods of implementation, and data collection.
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify evidence-based parent training protocols 2. Identify best practice methods for creating a parent training protocol, including the identification of goals, implementation procedures and data collection methods with a family-systems focus. 3. Identifying similarities and differences in parent trainings methods across modalities (i.e., in person, in-clinic, Telehealth). 4. Identify the role of an organization in parent training policies and procedures. 5. Identify ethical guidelines pertaining to parent training and identify ethical dilemmas related to parent training and its resolution. 6. Identify who should provide the parent training, supervision practices and consultation, and when to refer out to other providers.
Activities: The workshop will include: lecture, guided practice, and discussion. There will be opportunities for questions and answers.
Audience: The workshop level is for an intermediate audience.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, Evidence-based, Parent Training
 
Workshop #W78
CE Offered: BACB
Systematically Evaluating the Comprehensiveness of a Child's (an Adult's) Treatment Plan for Addressing Problems and Building Upon the Gifts of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Cook, M.D.
RICHARD COOK (Applied Behavior Medicine Associates of Hershey, PA)
Description: Appropriate "treatment" for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), by standards of multiple organizations representing those having or treating it, typically include "medication" and "behavior therapy," defined in various ways, yet studies of various populations often conclude that those within the cohort get cursory medication check visits (if medication is used at all) and "behavior" therapy, the topography of which varies greatly, often with little resemblance to approaches which an applied behavior analyst would recognize, again, if any behavior therapy at all. This workshop uses a combination of a medical and public health problem solving model to teach attendees how to evaluate the adequacy of an individuals treatment plan within a customizable, practical group of domains, and apply behaviorally sound principles to effect changes that will both address the problems and build upon the "gifts" associated with ADHD.
Learning Objectives: Workshop Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify domains of behavior relevant to each individual; (2) practice a systematic approach to applying the systematic approach taught to both problem and "gift" behaviors associated with ADHD; (3) develop their own customized guide for systematically evaluating the comprehensiveness of an ADHD treatment plan for a child or an adult.
Activities: Workshop Activities: Lecture, discussion guided notes use of pre-scripted algorithms for which attendees will practice and learn the approach to modifying for each individual's ADHD treatment plan for whom evaluation is performed
Audience: attendees who treat/address/have ADHD, or have a spouse, child, or patient who does
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ADD, ADD/ADHD, ADHD
 
Workshop #W79
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Balanced Behavior Analyst: The Personal and Professional Balancing Act
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kate Elizabeth Harrison, M.Ed.
KATE ELIZABETH HARRISON (Brett DiNovi & Associates, BCBA), REBECCA CORRELL (The Language and Behavior Center)
Description: Balance, as a practitioner, and in managing personal and professional life, is essential to expanding the field of applied behavior analysis. If behavior analysts engage in actions that seclude the field from differing perspectives, they may inadvertently cause damage to the lives of those served by the field as well as the growth of the field itself. Behavior analysts must actively choose to conduct themselves in a manner that encourages humility, respect, and inquiry as it relates to supervision and collaboration. In conjunction with this position, behavior analysts must learn to, and actively practice, set and model professional boundaries, to avoid burnout risk, poor supervision, and diminished quality of service.
Learning Objectives: 1) State two actions that can be taken within 24 hours that will move participants towards balance as a behavior analyst; 2) Describe three characteristics of a Balanced BCBA; 3) Describe and demonstrate how to provide feedback in a constructive manner to those outside of the ABA field; 4) Identify one way in which to evaluate their effectiveness as a supervisor; 5) Identify one method in which to seek mentorship from a positive role model in the field of ABA; and 6) State two benefits of collaborating with professionals in other fields.
Activities: The format will combine lecture and discussion, a values exercise, small group breakout, and large group discussion
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, BCBA-Ds
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Collaboration, Self-Care, Supervision, Values-based Supervision
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Compassionate Collaboration Workshop
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Colleen Suzio, M.S.
JESSICA ROHRER (Center for Children with Special Needs; Endicott College), KIMBERLY MARSHALL (CCSN: Center for Independence; Endicott College), COLLEEN SUZIO (Center for Children with Special Needs; Endicott College)
Description: Behavior analysts are not well known for engaging in compassionate collaborative skills. Taylor et al., (2018) surveyed caregivers of individuals with autism to gain insight as to how they perceived behavior analysts’ compassionate, collaborative, and interpersonal skills. Many of the scores suggested deficits in collaborative repertoires of the clinicians. For example, when presented with a statement about whether their behavior analyst compromises when there is a disagreement, only 58.9% of respondents said that they agreed. When caregivers were asked if their behavior analyst asked them how they were doing regularly, the percentage of agreement was 53.68%. It is this type of data that has exacerbated the need for additional assessment and training in this area. The Compassionate Collaboration Tool was developed as a means to support in these areas of deficit. It is a guide to help with the assessment and training of compassionate collaborative skills of clinicians. In this workshop, attendees will participate in dynamic learning opportunities focused on the skills within the Compassionate Collaboration Tool. Attendees will have the opportunity to reflect on their clinical skills in this area and to improve their compassionate and collaborative interactions through evidence-based training methods.
Learning Objectives: • Attendees will identify skills related to compassionate, collaborative, and interpersonal interactions. • Attendees will participate in Behavioral Skills Training (BST) to implement the skills from the Compassionate Collaboration Tool. • Attendees will provide feedback to each other regarding implementation of compassionate, collaborative, and interpersonal skills.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, discussion, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: The target audience should include clinicians who are looking to further their knowledge and skill sets with compassionate collaborative care.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Risk-Benefit Analysis of Treatments for Severe Problem Behaviors
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nathan Blenkush, Ph.D.
NATHAN BLENKUSH (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center), JASON CODERRE (Judge Rotenberg Center), DYLAN PALMER (Judge Rotenberg Educational Center and Simmons University), JOSEPH TACOSIK (Judge Rotenberg Education Center)
Description: Behavior analysts are often part of multidisciplinary teams that treat patients with severe problem behaviors that are refractory to typical interventions. Professionals within and between disciplines do not always agree on the most appropriate treatment approach for a given person. However, there is general agreement that those providing treatment should provide the most effective and least restrictive interventions available. Unfortunately, risk perception and bias sometimes influence decision making to the detriment of the person receiving treatment. Here, we review decision analysis tools that may help inform decisions made by behavior analysts and interdisciplinary teams when treating severe problem behaviors. We review ethical, legal, and regulatory policies that must be considered in relation to treating people with severe problem behaviors.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to describe the elements of at least two decision analysis tools associated with treatment selection. 2. Participants will identify at least three potential fallacies or biases associated with risk and clinical decision making. 3. Participants will evaluate at least two treatments using a risk benefit approach.
Activities: The format combines lecture, application of decision analysis, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts, psychologists, and other professionals who are often confronted with people who emit severe problem behaviors refractory to typical interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Decision analysis, Risk Perception, Treatment evaluation
 
Workshop #W83
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Treating Compassionately With Sound Clinical Judgement
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jill E. McGrale Maher, M.A.
JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Massachusetts Preparatory Academy for Children), IAN MELTON (Endicott College, Journeys Behavior Learning Center), BRITANY MELTON (Endicott College, Logan Center), COURTNEY MAHER (Michigan State University )
Description: Over the past several years, many Behavior Analysts have acquired reputations of being uncaring and cold in their approach to care, interventions, and in interactions with stakeholders. Fortunately, many leaders in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis have recently begun to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of compassion and empathy in our work and its importance in improving clinical outcomes (Taylor, LeBlanc & Nosik 2018; ). Several companies are beginning to include positive interactions, empathy, compassion, cultural competence and collaboration skills in staff training programs. Additionally, companies are starting to measure how improving relationships with caregivers, parent’s perception of compassionate care, how compassionate care of our clients and ourselves can enhance our work as behavior analysts, and potentially improve clinical outcomes. What has not been formally discussed on a wide-spread basis are implementation strategies for this concept while using sound clinical judgement. In other words, when and how to “draw the line” and assert oneself as the expert. This workshop will discuss and provide participants with strategies to master compassionate care while ensuring high quality, clinically sound programming. Participants will discuss and practice guidelines and strategies to ensure timely decision making to guarantee state-of-the art and best quality programming.
Learning Objectives: Participants will: 1. Identify and practice essential communication skills 2. Identify and practice essential listening skills 3. Identify and practice essential active listening skills 4. Identify and practice essential communication skills 5. Identify and practice how to identify stakeholder’s goals and how to incorporate them into treatment plans 6. Identify and practice how to identify and honor diverse cultural practices into treatment plans 7. Identify and practice assessing situations and relationships 8. Identify and practice repairing damaged conversations and relationships 9. Discuss guidelines for ensure utilization of evidence-based interventions and procedures while being empathic to all situations 10. Discuss how the BACB Ethical Code applies to the current topic 11. Role-play situations utilizing skills in objectives 1-10
Activities: Instructional strategies include: Lecture, small group activities, role-play, video observation, small and large group discussions Workshop Objectives wil be met through: small group activities, role-play, video observation, small and large group discussions
Audience: Target audience is intermediate-advanced and will be best suited for staff working directly with staff, families, and clients with ASD or DDA. Professionals responsible for designing staff training programs will benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W85
CE Offered: BACB
Enhancing Organizational Training: A Review of Melmark’s Training Program
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: OBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Shawn P. Quigley, Ph.D.
SHAWN P. QUIGLEY (Melmark), JENNIFER RUANE (Melmark), JILL HARPER (Melmark New England)
Description: Behavior analytic care models often rely upon a tiered model of credentialed practitioners (see BACB, 2014 as an example). Training requirements and practices vary, but organizations often play a large role in ensuring training needs are met. The science of behavior analysis has provided guidance on how to effectively train and support employees (e.g., Parsons, Rollyson, & Reid, 2012). The purpose of this workshop is to review how a mid-size human-service provider has structured training supports for its employees. Aspects of orientation training (sometimes referred to as onboarding training), on-the-job training (i.e., post-orientation training), and continued professional development (i.e., training to enhance skills and promote professional growth) will be discussed. The discussed training practices will be discussed in relation to organizational behavior management literature specific to training.
Learning Objectives: Attendees will describe application of performance-based instruction strategies Attendees will describe application of active student responding to employee training Attendees will describe metrics for evaluating training supports
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, discussion, and small group practice. All lecture activities include components of active student responding (e.g., guided notes, choral responding). Handouts that exemplify training supports (e.g., crosswalk of training requirements, fidelity checklists) will be provided to attendees.
Audience: Attendees should have a basic understanding of organizational behavior management (e.g., contingencies are selected at multiple levels) and training philosophies (e.g., performance-based training). Practitioners responsible for organizational training practices may benefit from this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Performance Management, Training
 
Workshop #W86
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Cultural Concerns in the Development of Professional Ethics for Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: PCH/AUT; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: William L. Holcomb, Ph.D.
WILLIAM L. HOLCOMB (The New England Center for Children)
Description: As the number of Board Certified Behavior Analysts® (BCBA)worldwide increases, the probability that an individual BCBA would be practicing in a novel or different culture continues to increase. This is particularly likely in the use of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in the treatment of individuals with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities (given the proportion of BCBAs who practice in these areas and the world-wide demand for services). The presentation will review the general development of ethical standards and the differences between moral, ethical, and legal codes, especially as they apply to practicing ABA. Next, a behavior analytic concept of culture as defined by Skinner will be introduced and contrasted with non-behavior analytic models of the effects of culture on ethics (e.g., Hofstede’s cultural dimensions model, guidelines for cultural ethics in business, etc.). Throughout the presentation, examining how these variables affect and are addressed by the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts will be stressed. Scenarios encountered in applied settings will be presented illustrating potential ethical dilemmas across cultures. Participants will identify section(s) of the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts relevant to determining if an ethical conflict has occurred and what action should be taken.
Learning Objectives: The attendee will: 1. State the difference between moral, ethical, and legal dilemmas and identify an appropriate plan to resolve the dilemma. 2. State a behavior analytic-based definition of culture, and give at least one example of how cultural differences may affect practice. 3. Identify at least one personal value connected to the participant’s cultural history. 4. Recognize ethical conflicts and identify means of resolving these conflicts according to the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts. 5. Identify potential conflicts in two scenarios and cite the applicable sections and elements of the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that address the conflicts.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, review of brief written material, and small group breakouts. Scenarios illustrating potential ethical dilemmas across cultures will be provided for participant practice in using the BACB® Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts as a starting point for determining solutions.
Audience: Intermediate to advanced professionals involved with evaluation, treatment and monitoring of individuals diagnosed with autism and other developmental disabilities (Provides additional training for individuals with experience and training on the topic) at the post graduate training level. No one needs to be excluded.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W87
CE Offered: BACB
Implementing Effective Competency-Based Parent and Caregiver Training
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frances Nieves Serret, M.S.
FRANCES NIEVES SERRET (Advances Learning Center), CASEY KANE (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center)
Description: The importance of generalizing effective behavioral support strategies and techniques to parents and caregivers of clients with challenging behaviors is critical. As is providing an effective and successful training model for teaching parents and caregivers to implement strategies with competence and fluency. This workshop will present a competency-based Parent/Caregiver Training model, components of which include a social validity rating scale, pre-test and post-test measures, lectures, role-plays, modeling, procedural integrity data collection, prompting guidelines, and performance feedback. Hands-on activities for each component will be included, along with strategies for individualization of both content and pacing, and for utilizing data-based programming decisions to ensure optimal success and effectiveness.
Learning Objectives: 1. Develop individualized, competency-based parent training models based on specific client profiles. 2. Effectively utilize teaching strategies, including lecture, modelling, role-play, and performance feedback when educating parents/caregivers of clients with ASD and developmental disabilities. 3. Devise data collection systems to accurately record procedural integrity of parent/caregiver implementation of programming. 4. Design user-friendly teaching strategies for parents/caregivers. 5. Implement data-based decision-making strategies relative ongoing content and pace of instruction.
Activities: The workshop alternates between lecture, discussion and hands-on activities.
Audience: BCBA
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavioral Interventions, Caregiver Training, Competency-Based Training, Social Validity
 
Workshop #W88
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Putting the SUPER in Supervision: Evidence Based Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeremy H. Greenberg, Ph.D.
JEREMY H. GREENBERG (The Children's Institute of Hong Kong)
Description: This three-hour intensive workshop will include evidence-based teaching, learning, and supervision strategies ad tactics from the Applied Behavior Analysis research literature. The content is aimed at behavior analysts and supervisors who are charged with the supervision of RBTs, Board Certified Assisitant Behavior Analysis, and BCBAs working with students having various special education needs.
Learning Objectives: Introduction to Supervision [Strategies & Tactics for Supervisors] The Learn Unit Data-Based Decision Making The TPRA (Ingham & Greer, 1992)
Activities: Participants will become literate in the The Learn Unit and supporting literature through Active Student Responding (ASR). Participants will learn the rules included in the Data Decision Protocol (Keohane, 1997; Greer, 2002; Greenberg, 2007) through hands-on presentation and exercises Participants will learn about the TPRA procedure, supporting research, and practice data collection and IOA using video models.
Audience: Supervisors of RBT, Board Certified Assisitant Behavior Analysts, and Board Certified Behavior Analysts, or other practitioners or therapists working with students with special education needs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): data decisions, learn units, supervision, tpra
 
Workshop #W89
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
OASIS-S: A Tool to Help Supervisors Meet the Ethical Obligations of Effective Supervision
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Linda S. Heitzman-Powell, Ph.D.
KATRINA OSTMEYER-KOUNTZMAN (Behavioral Technologies Consulting Organization; Beyond the Individual, LLC), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center)
Description: Effective behavior analytic supervision practices are of concern. In 2011 the BACB® developed a Supervision Task Force (BACB newsletter, 2011). This task force is focused on establishing “(a) more clearly defined approved experience activities, (b) supervisor qualification, and (c) guidelines for the format of supervision” (BACB® newsletter, Sept. 2011, p.1). The behavior analytic field acknowledges areas of deficiencies and the need for more tools and research in the practice of supervision and training of behavior analyst students (LeBlanc & Luiselli, 2016). The Online and Applied System for Intervention Skills – Supervision (OASIS-S) was developed to provide a modular curriculum specifically for distance-based supervision. Initial data show positive outcomes with trainee increases in knowledge, skill application, and higher passing rates on certification examinations (Heitzman-Powell et al., 2013). OASIS-S incorporates the current supervision requirements outlined by the BACB while making the program easy to use via integration into a comprehensive learning management system that includes modular curriculum, video integration, and paperwork management. This workshop will outline the ethical considerations for providing an effective, evidence-based supervision experience, barriers and solutions, and provide an overview of OASIS-S to provide an effective, evidence-based supervision experience using didactic instruction, guided practice, and group discussion.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1). Accurately answer questions about supervision ethical and practice guidelines set forth by the BACB as evidenced delivered via a post-workshop post-test, 2). List at least three barriers and solutions to providing effective, evidence-based supervision for BCBA candidates, and 3). Define and describe the components of OASIS-S and how they address barriers to effective, evidence-based supervision, 4). Show the ability to navigate the OASIS-S system with provided support prompts.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture integrated with active student responding and discussion to outline BACB supervision practices, identify barriers and solutions to effective supervision, and describe the research conducted to develop and support the use of OASIS-S. Guided practice will be utilized to teach participants to navigate OASIS-S including the use of supervisee and supervisor views of the system. Finally, a pre and post-test assessment will be utilized to support success of learning objectives.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is behavior analysts providing supervision to individuals pursuing the BCaBA, BCBA, or BCBA-D credentials.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Competency-Based Training, Programmed Instruction, Supervision Ethics
 
Workshop #W90
CE Offered: BACB
Improving Public Speaking and Presentation Skills for Professional Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jessica Foster Juanico, Ph.D.
JESSICA FOSTER JUANICO (University of Kansas), MEGAN R. HEINICKE (California State University, Sacramento), TYRA PAIGE SELLERS (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Description: Professional behavior analyst frequently engage in a variety of public speaking activities, no matter their role (e.g., academic, administrator, practitioner). Proficient public speaking and presentation are important skills for communicating powerful messages to a variety of professional audiences (Friman, 2014). For example, Friman urges behavior analysts to use “front of the room” opportunities to help achieve Skinner’s vision of disseminating our science to mainstream audiences. Public speaking is one of the most commonly reported human fears; therefore, individuals frequently avoid “front of the room” opportunities and changes to disseminate the science. This workshop focuses on increasing public speaking and presentation skills by 1) identifying barriers to fluent public speaking, 2) offering recommendations from interviews of 10 expert public speakers in our field, and 3) practicing behavior-analytic strategies to improve speech fluency. The content of this workshop does not reflect an official position of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will: (1) list and describe common barriers to effective public speaking and presenting, (2) list and describe a variety of recommended practices to help increase effective public speaking and presentation, and (3) learn, via modeling and practice, to implement specific strategies to increase speech fluency.
Activities: Workshop instructional strategies will include lecture, discussion, and breakout groups. Workshop objectives will be met through a balance of lecture, guided practice (i.e., modeling and practice), and group discussion. Supplemental materials (e.g., copy of presentation slides) will be provided to support participant learning.
Audience: The target audience is BCBAs and BCBA-Ds who are interested in increasing their knowledge of public speaking practices and proficiency of their public speaking skills. The format will combine lecture, small group activities, and guided practice.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): effective dissemination, expert interviews, public speaking, recommendations
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Owning Your Competency: Parent and Caregiver Training and the Future of International Dissemination
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jacob Sadavoy, Ph.D.
JACOB SADAVOY (Global Autism Project), KAREN CHUNG (Special Learning, Inc. )
Description: Generalization of behavioural support strategies and techniques is critical for functional learning of skills across environments that are socially significant for the client. In order for this to happen, parents and caregivers need to be able to replicate outcomes of the clients skill acquisition and behaviour change programs with their loved one. In order for this to happen, the therapist must be cognizant of the needs, culture, and environment of both the client and the guardian. This becomes a challenge when working with families in cultures and communities that differ from that of the practitioner. Over 90% of BCBAs and BCaBAs practice within North America which accounts for less than 10% of the world’s population. As of 2023, the BACB will no longer be a licensing board for Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) practitioners outside of North America. The need for ABA clinicians is paramount internationally however literature and resource availability, non-existent credentialing agencies, and cost of programs and supervision are all barriers for prospective practitioners. Without adequate services prospective international clients often believe their family member with ASD are uneducable which leads to a life in isolation and, in some places, builds a reliance on available pseudoscientific therapies some of which are harmful or even deadly. This workshop will focus on ensuring practitioners have the skills to provide thoughtful intervention for clients that will promote parent and caregiver engagement and generalization of goals across the clinical teaching environment to the home environment.
Learning Objectives: (1) Identify repertoires that should be fostered in quality behavior analysts (2) Assess needs of supervisee and develop observable goals to support acquisition, mastery, and maintenance of goal; (3) Develop methodologies to assess the effectiveness of supervision; (4) Understand how to implement supervisory practices beyond “teaching-to-the-test” and develop supervisees’ problem solving fluency, verbal behavior of ABA methodology, communication skills with invested client stakeholders, ethical decision making, critical thinking and reasoning, sustainability, and cultural competency
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and role play.
Audience: Target audience includes those who currently or plan to supervisee RBTs, BCaBAs, and those hoping to sit for the BCBA exam, including practicum supervisors and Clinical Directors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): curriculum, hierarchical development, supervision, sustainability
 
Workshop #W92
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Simplivise: Training the Trainer to Simplify Training and Supervision Through the Use of Evidence-Based Strategies
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Yendri Diaz, M.A.
YENDRI DIAZ (Skillometry Inc.), MARIA BROWN (Skillometry Inc. ), ZUHE C ARNESEN (Skillometry Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed to develop effective trainers and supervisors within ABA organizations. This workshop will demonstrate how to incorporate Behavioral Skills Training, Precision Teaching, and digital technology into a simplified training and supervision program that develops and maintains critical skills for effective ABA services in online and in-person environments. Phase 1: Instructional design segment where attendees will learn how to create an evidenced-based training program. Phase 2: Teach attendees how to train and supervise staff utilizing a unique blend of BST, PT, and digital tech. Phase 3: Prepare attendees to maintain skill repertoires through simplified supervision and digital technology.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Identify and define evidence-based training and supervision strategies. 2. Develop an outline for training and supervision content using evidence-based strategies and digital technology. 3. Identify and set goals for trainers, supervisors, and their learners. 4. Identify how to measure quality and effectiveness of their training and supervision. 5. Plan for maintenance of skills through supervision.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using behavioral skills training through the following activities: 1. Instructor led presentation and group discussion. 2. Instructor will model target skills. 3. Individual and small group guided practice. 4. Individual and small group competency building exercises. 5. Instructor will provide individual feedback to each attendee based on performance of target skills. 6. Visual aids and worksheets will be provided as supplementary materials.
Audience: Workshop target audience is ABA Clinical and Training Managers, Supervisors, and BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BST, Digital Technology, Staff Training, Supervision
 
Workshop #W93
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Multiply Controlled Verbal Behavior: Theory and Application
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Olga Meleshkevich, Ph.D.
OLGA MELESHKEVICH (ABA Consulting; Simmons University), JUDAH B. AXE (Simmons University)
Description: With early learners, behavior analysts often teach the basic verbal behavior operants, such as mands, tacts, echoics, and simple intraverbals. Once these repertoires are developed, programming should incorporate multiply controlled verbal behavior where more than one antecedent evokes a response. In this workshop, we will define concepts related to multiply controlled verbal behavior, including “verbal conditional discrimination,” joint control, and autoclitic frames. We will describe and illustrate research-based strategies to overcome restricted stimulus control when teaching three types of multiply controlled verbal behavior: (1) listener responding in which a selection response is evoked by a verbal stimulus and a nonverbal stimulus, (2) “intraverbal-tacts” in which a verbal response is evoked by a question about a picture, and (3) multiply controlled intraverbals in which a verbal response is evoked by a multi-part question (e.g., “What do you eat that is yellow?”). Throughout the workshop, we will discuss the roles of echoic behavior and autoclitic frames on shaping generalized verbal behavior repertoires.
Learning Objectives: • Define multiple control in verbal behavior and “verbal conditional discrimination.” • Explain the concepts of “restricted stimulus control” and “overselectivity.” • Describe research-based strategies for teaching verbal conditional discriminations. • Explain how procedures based on analysis of multiple control facilitate generalization within verbal operants.
Activities: lecture, video demonstrations, small-group activities
Audience: behavior analysts, speech-language pathologists, researchers, graduate students, special education teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autoclitic frames, intraverbal, joint control, multiple control
 
Workshop #W94
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
The Verbal Behavior SCoRE: Stimulus Control Ratio Equation
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: VRB/AAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lee L Mason, Ph.D.
LEE L MASON (Cook Children's Health Care System), ALONZO ALFREDO ANDREWS (The University of Texas at San Antonio)
Description: Skinner (1957) writes, "It is my belief that something like the present analysis reduces the total vocabulary needed for a scientific account." In many ways, then, this seems to me to be a better way of talking about verbal behavior" (p. 456). Language is a much sought after, yet elusive subject matter for scientific investigation. Skinner (1957) proposed that language fell within the scope of a science of behavior, and was therefore open to functional analysis and interpretation. Over the past 60 years, much has been done to further the scientific explanation, prediction, and control of verbal behavior as a function of environmental variables. This workshop provides a hands-on approach to conducting the Verbal Behavior Stimulus Control Ratio Equation (SCoRE), and analyzing the results of this assessment for developing individualized treatment plans for individuals with autism and other language disorders. Specifically, we describe language as a continuous variable, and explain procedures for assessing verbal behavior deficits. The procedures described in this workshop are empirically supported (Lerman et al., 2005; Mason & Andrews, 2014), and conceptually systematic with a behavior-analytic approach to language assessment and intervention (Mason & Andrews, 2018).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the strength of verbal operants in relation to one another; (2) conduct a verbal operant analysis; and (3) identify treatment objectives based upon the results of the SCoRE.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video modeling, role-playing, and workbook demonstrations. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Guided notes will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop is geared towards Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts, Registered Behavior Technicians, special education teachers, school psychologists, speech language pathologists, and other professionals who provide direct services to strengthen the language of children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional analysis, language assessment, stimulus control, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W95
CE Offered: BACB
Mand Training Across Motivating Operations and Generalization
Friday, May 22, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: VRB/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan Pyles, M.A.
MEGAN PYLES (Pyles and Associates)
Description: In early behavioral intensive intervention, functional communication in the form of mands is often the initial skill targeted as it provides a replacement for problem behavior and allows children to control their environment (Carr & Durand, 1985; Sundberg & Michael, 2001). Mands occur across a variety of motivating operations and stimulus conditions. For example, a child may mand to gain access to a preferred item or activity, to end a non-preferred activity, or to obtain information. For these mands to be part of a functional verbal repertoire, generalization of mands to novel stimuli, environments, motivating operations, and people should be observed. Because each type of mand occurs in unique motivational conditions, clinicians must implement different procedures to evoke these verbal responses. This workshop will review various types of mands (e.g., for tangibles, actions, information, and removal of aversive stimuli) and train on teaching procedures for each. Further, the differences between generalization across stimuli and generalization across motivating operations will be discussed, as well as the clinical implications of these differences (Miguel, 2017).
Learning Objectives: After participation in this workshop, attendees will be able to (1) define and outline the functional relations (i.e., antecedent, behavior, and consequence) for each type of mand, (2) generate novel examples of each type of mand, outline teaching procedures, and plan for generalization across motivating operations and stimuli, and (3) implement teaching procedures for each type of mand, and train another individual on implementation, data collection, and mastery criterion.
Activities: This workshop includes presentation of information, guided group activities, and discussion.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is anyone working in the field of ABA using a verbal behavior approach to functional communication. Both direct line staff and supervisors can benefit from the information and activities.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): generalization, mand training, MOs, verbal behavior
 
Business Meeting #4
A Meeting of the Canadian ABAI Chapters: Updates From Across the Country
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I
Chair: Myra-Jade Lui (QcABA)
Presenting Authors:

There are currently 6 affiliate ABAI chapters operating out of Canada, representing a total of 9 provinces. In May of 2019, members from these chapters held a video-conference with the purpose of sharing information about each province's service delivery and funding options, as well as general information about the state of the field. This business meeting will be a continuation of that gathering, with the focus on updating all of the Canadian chapters on any local initiatives regarding funding and service delivery.

Keyword(s): Canadian Chapters
 
 
Business Meeting #5
JEAB Business Meeting
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, University of D.C.
Chair: Mark Galizio (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Presenting Authors:
Meeting for editorial board members, authors and other interested ABAI members
 
 
Business Meeting #6
Behavioral Development Special Interest Group Business Meeting
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 8
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Presenting Authors:
The Behavioral Development SIG promotes behavior analytic empirical and conceptual analyses of issues related to behavioral development, and it encourages examination of how methodological and theoretical positions outside behavior analysis approach these issues empirically and conceptually. These kinds of analyses have often dealt with complex kinds of behavior such as verbal behavior development, stimulus equivalence, relational frames, and problem solving, as well as normal and problematic behaviors in social interactions, as well as the historical bases of behaviorism and behavior analysis as basic science and applied practice. The business meeting will review activities during the past year and discuss plans for the next. All are welcome to attend.
Keyword(s): behavioral development, complex behavior
 
 
Business Meeting #7
Louisiana Behavior Analysis Association
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, Georgetown
Chair: Janice L. Huber (LaBAA)
Presenting Authors:
The Louisiana Behavior Analysis Association is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice, and to promote access to responsible behavior analytic services by professionals sufficiently trained in the discipline of behavior analysis. All members and guests are invited to attend the business meeting for updates on chapter initiatives, membership, the annual conference, and other chapter business.
 
 
Business Meeting #8
Acceptance and Commitment Training and Psychological Flexibility Special Interest Group
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty L
Chair: Evelyn Rachael Gould (McLean Hospital | Harvard Medical School; New England Center for OCD and Anxiety; FirstSteps for Kids, Inc. )
Presenting Authors:
The purpose of this meeting is to introduce the new Special Interest Group board members, and say goodbye to outgoing board members. Group and committee initiatives will be discussed and goals for the upcoming year reviewed. We welcome input from all current members of the SIG. Those who are interested in the SIG but are not yet members are also encouraged to attend.
Keyword(s): ACT, psychological flexibility
 
 
Business Meeting #9
Business Meeting of the New York State Association for Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence D
Chair: Nicole M. DeRosa (SUNY Upstate Medical University)
Presenting Authors:

NYSABA is a state affiliate chapter of ABAI and an affiliate chapter of APBA. NYSABA’s mission is to promote and protect the integrity of the science and professional practice of behavior analysis within the State of New York. During this business meeting, representatives of the NYSABA Board will update attendees on NYSABA’s activities over the last year, as well as future goals. Some of the topics to be discussed will be committee reports, NYSABA activities in New York State, ongoing CEU and networking opportunities, and legislative issues related to the restriction on the scope of practice of behavior analysts in New York State. This meeting is open to all members of NYSABA and anyone interested in learning more about ABA in New York State.

 
 
Business Meeting #10
Addiction Special Interest Group
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Chair: August F. Holtyn (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)
Presenting Authors:
This will be the business meeting of the Addiction Special Interest Group (SIG). The mission of the SIG is to provide a forum for students, practitioners, and researchers who have an interest in studying and applying behavior analysis to understand, prevent, and treat addiction. The Addiction SIG is an organization for behavior analysts and others who are interested in understanding, preventing, and treating misuse of licit and illicit drugs and other commodities (e.g., alcohol, nicotine, stimulants, opioids, internet, smartphones, food) and associated psychosocial problems (e.g., psychiatric comorbidities, unemployment, poverty). The purpose of this inaugural meeting will be to: (1) provide an overview of the SIG’s mission, (2) discuss ongoing and future activities of the SIG, (3) develop plans to increase membership within the SIG, and (4) encourage feedback on SIG activities and future directions. All interested conference attendees are welcome to attend this meeting.
Keyword(s): Addiction, Behavioral Pharmacology, Substance Use
 
 
Business Meeting #11
Behavior Analysis and the Arts
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Salon 12
Chair: Abigail B. Calkin (Calkin Consulting Center)
Presenting Authors:

This meeting will gather as many member of the BAARTs group as can attend. After introductions, the main topic of the meeting will be planning the projected Evening of the Arts for the 2021 ABAI Convention.

 
 
Business Meeting #12
Sexual Behavior: Research and Practice Special Interest Group
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 7
Chair: Barbara Gross (Empowered: A Center for Sexuality; Special School District of St. Louis County)
Presenting Authors:
All individuals attending the ABAI convention who have an interest in sex research, sex education, and/or procedures used to change sex-related behaviors are invited to attend the Sexual Behavior: Research and Practice Special Interest Group's annual meeting. Items of business will include a discussion of current SIG activities occurring both at and outside the ABAI convention, the sharing of relevant research findings, and plans for the next year of SIG activities.
Keyword(s): sex education, sex research, sexual behavior, sexuality
 
 
Business Meeting #13
Illinois Association for Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M1, Catholic University
Chair: Scott Herbst (SixFlex Training & Consulting)
Presenting Authors:
We will provide updates and host discussion regarding the Association's finances, legislative efforts, member engagement initiatives, and other issues affecting Behavior Analysts in Illinois.
Keyword(s): Illinois, Licensure
 
 
Business Meeting #14
Behavioral Gerontology Special Interest Group
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 9
Chair: Claudia Drossel (Eastern Michigan University)
Presenting Authors:

The Behavioral Gerontology SIG (https://bgsig.wordpress.com/) provides an open forum for students, practitioners, and researchers who have an interest in applying the science, practice, and philosophy of behavior analysis to problems encountered by adults in later life, typically referring to ages 65 and older. The goal is to promote the development, implementation, and evaluation of behavior analytic approaches to a wide variety of topics of high public health significance in this population, such as self-management for health promotion and disease prevention, and functional assessments of and interventions for behavioral changes commonly associated with neurocognitive disorders (e.g., due to Alzheimer's disease). The meeting will explore attendees' interests and needs and foster collaborations and the sharing of information, to encourage education, training, practice, and research. Further business items consist of determining policies and procedures and structuring SIG activities throughout the year.

Keyword(s): aging, cognitive loss, dementia, health promotion
 
 
Business Meeting #15
Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Salon 13
Chair: Alicia N. MacAleese (Advanced Child Behavior Solutions, LLC)
Presenting Authors:
We welcome new and current members to attend the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis business meeting. Business items will be reviewed along with updates on our Chapter's events. This meeting is open to all current members of the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis and those who are interested in joining.
 
 
Business Meeting #16
The Foundation for the Advancement of a Strategic Science of Teaching (FASST)
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence B
Chair: Grant Gautreaux (FASST)
Presenting Authors:
We are seeking those interested in committee work for FASST. Some of the committees include: social media; higher ed & university accreditation professional credentialing; model accreditation for sites; research initiatives; collaboration and partnering; archival and historical preservation; conference; AIL initiative; resource management- research; autism resources, general and special education resources.
 
 
Business Meeting #17
Teaching Behavior Analysis Special Interest Group Business Meeting
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence A
Chair: Dacia McCoy (University of Cincinnati)
Presenting Authors:
Teaching Behavior Analysis (TBA) purpose is to improve the teaching and learning of the principles and applications of behavior analysis in any setting in which those activities occur. The purpose of this meeting is to update members and potential members on the activities of the TBA SIG. We will set goals for the upcoming year and allow time for individuals to network. All are invited to attend. You do not have to be a member of the TBA SIG. Anyone interested in the teaching of behavior analysis in all environments is welcome.
Keyword(s): Academia, K-12, Teaching
 
 
Business Meeting #17A
Self & Match
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Independence C
Chair: Jamie Siden Salter (San Diego County Office of Education)
Presenting Authors:

This business meeting will bring together professionals that have attended the “Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System” workshop and are currently implementing Self & Match System(s). The goal of this session is to help behavior analysts identify ways to optimize current Self & Match interventions. This session will include a round table discussion and review of current Self & Match systems. A systematic Self & Match: Considerations During Implementation Guide will be shared with all participants in order to help implementers as they critically evaluate their systems. We would also love to hear from you if you have conducted (or are considering conducting) research regarding the Self & Match System. Please email if you are considering attending: selfandmatch@gmail.com.

 
 
Special Event #18
Student Welcome Event
Friday, May 22, 2020
7:00 PM–8:30 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Chair: Jovonnie L. Esquierdo-Leal (University of Nevada, Reno)

The ABAI Student Committee will be hosting a Special Welcome Event for current and future student members. During this session, Student Committee Members will review useful information and distribute materials to help you make the make the best of your convention experience. From tips on how to put your best foot forward to an overview of important events, your Student Committee has you covered. ABAI 2020 Student Survival Kits will be available to attendees on a first come, first served basis—so don’t be late!

 
 
Special Event #19
Student Trivia Night
Friday, May 22, 2020
8:30 PM–10:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Chair: Allyson R Salzer (University of Kansas)

Grab your friends and join the Student Committee for a fun night of trivia! Drop in at any time and join one or all rounds of trivia, hosted by leading researchers and academics in the field of behavior analysis. Test your knowledge about the ABAI organization, the field of behavior analysis, and our nation’s capital, Washington D.C. Questions will range from easy to difficult and prizes will be delivered for winners of each team. Come mingle with other students and faculty and kick off the conference with a friendly game of trivia!

 
 
Special Event #20
International Reception
Friday, May 22, 2020
9:00 PM–10:30 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 1-5
Chair: Per Holth (OsloMet -- Oslo Metropolitan University)

All registrants are welcome to join us in celebrating the diversity of our membership and the world-wide dissemination of the science and practice of behavior analysis. A short presentation about international development in the field and ABAI global efforts will be followed by ample time to socialize with friends and colleagues from around the world.

 

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