Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Program by Day for Thursday, May 21, 2020


 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: BACB
Incorporating Apps into Effective Behavioral Programming in Applied Settings
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Catherine Russo, M.S.
CATHERINE RUSSO (Advances Learning Center and LEARN Behavioral), MELISSA CLARK (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center)
Description: “There’s an app for that” ™. As of August 6, 2019, there are 2.2 million apps available through Apple’s App store, and 2.7 million available through Google Play Store. With the number of approved apps increasing exponentially, there is nearly unlimited potential for these apps to provide opportunities for staff training and maintenance of skills, skill acquisition programs, graphing and remote monitoring of data from any location, and other invaluable extensions of behavior analytic programming needs. This workshop will present a model of using applications for data collection and the process for making modifications to achieve your teaching goals using specific software. It will also provide demonstrations and comparisons of applications for instructor tools and teaching. Instructor tool applications include apps designed to facilitate data collection, graphing, and assessment. Applications for teaching include apps that are either designed specifically or used incidentally to promote skill acquisition. This workshop will incorporate learning activities to demonstrate the use of these apps in behavior analytic programming and review the tricks of the trade to find the most useful apps for programming.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Identify evidence-based apps appropriate for programming and practice using apps from the following capacities: 1. Instructor tools apps: data collection, discrete trial implementation, graphing, preference assessments, assessment of target behavior, self-monitoring, social stories, video modeling and data conversion; based on cost, description, pre-requisite exemplars and reputable sources. 2. Apps for Teaching: including activity schedules; apps to promote independence in vocational settings and fine motor skills; discrete trial apps to teach expressive and receptive language and pre-academic and academic skills across multiple subject areas. 3. Apps for Fun: using preference assessment apps to determine potential reinforcers, new hot games on the market, lesser known activities and apps designed to teach functional skills hidden in “kid friendly” activities. Implement creative strategies, using applications, to replace stigmatizing methods commonly used to monitor behavior in community settings. Reference ethical considerations in selecting applications including determining reputable sources, evidence-based apps, pre-requisites, informed consent, privacy, treatment efficacy and noting which considerations directly reference sections of the BACB guidelines. Use the same resources as professionals in the assistive technology field to find even more applications and find deals on more costly applications.
Activities: Throughout the workshop we alternate between lecture, small group breakouts, and group discussion.
Audience: The intended audience includes Board Certified Behavior Analysts currently providing behavior analytic services in the home, school and/or community setting; teachers; speech and language pathologists; physical therapists; behavioral instructors or therapists who facilitate behavior analytic services; school staff intending to utilize apps to access portions of the curriculum or anyone currently using applications in the field or wishing to use them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Apps, Data collection, Effective Programming
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: BACB
Creating Professional Graphs in Microsoft Excel
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Erick M. Dubuque, Ph.D.
ERICK M. DUBUQUE (University of Louisville)
Description: Behavior analysts rely on visual displays of graphic data to make treatment decisions. It is therefore critical that behavior analysts know how to create graphical displays that are flexible and easy to interpret. During this workshop, attendees will learn how to generate multiple types of professional graphs using the latest versions of Microsoft Excel for PC and Mac. This will be accomplished by reviewing graphing conventions that produce sharp looking graphs fit for publication, professional reports, and presentations. To get the most out of this training, attendees are strongly encouraged to bring their own laptops loaded with the most recent version of Microsoft Excel for PC or Mac. At the conclusion of the workshop, attendees should be able to do the following:
Learning Objectives: 1. Generate multiple professional-looking visual displays, including; withdrawal, alternative treatment, changing criterion, and multiple-baseline design graphs. 2. Incorporate phase change lines and labels directly into graphic displays. 3. Create graphing templates to support consistency and efficiency when generating visual displays. 4. Transfer visual displays into other applications for reports or professional presentations.
Activities: The workshop presenter will use behavioral skills training by (a) instructing the attendees on the conventions used to generate professional looking graphical displays in the Microsoft Excel, (b) modeling those conventions by demonstrating the steps involved in creating various graphical displays, (c) asking attendees to practice the skills being modeled on their own laptops, and (d) providing feedback on attendee performance by checking their work during rehearsal.
Audience: This intermediate workshop is appropriate for pre-professionals, students, or behavior analysts who are unfamiliar or uncomfortable with generating their own graphical displays in Microsoft Excel for PC or Mac. The content is especially useful for any attendee interested in generating graphical displays for publication, professional reports, or presentations.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): graphing, Microsoft Excel, visual analysis, visual display
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: PSY
Parent-Child Interaction Therapy for Children on the Autism Spectrum
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Cheryl B. McNeil, Ph.D.
CHERYL B. MCNEIL (West Virginia University), CHRISTOPHER OWEN (West Virginia University), COREY LIENEMAN (West Virginia University), ROBIN HAN (West Virginia University)
Description: Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is an evidence-based intervention shown to decrease severe disruptive behaviors in children ages two to seven years. The course of treatment is divided into two phases: child-directed interaction (CDI) and parent-directed interaction (PDI). CDI strengthens the caregiver-child bond, whereas PDI teaches the caregiver to discipline effectively. In CDI, the caregiver practices PRIDE skills (i.e., praise, reflect, imitate, describe, and enjoy) shown to improve the caregiver-child relationship and increase child compliance even at long-term follow-up (Eyberg et al., 2001). Mastery of the PRIDE skills is beneficial for parents and caregivers as well as any individual who has contact with children. The presentation will connect the current ABA treatments PCIT. Clinical presentations of young children with ASD who present with comorbid behavioral difficulties will also be discussed. Specialized issues with this population, including social/communication difficulties and restricted interests, will be addressed. Skills will be described and practiced with regard to individualizing CDI and PDI to fit the unique concerns of children with ASD. Additionally, the workshop will propose a novel third component of PCIT, entitled “Social Directed Interaction” (SDI), in which the caregiver coaches the child to engage in pro-social behaviors while interacting with other children and adults.
Learning Objectives: 1) Model child-directed interaction skills 2) Explain the theoretical rationale and empirical evidence for providing PCIT to children on the autism spectrum (PCIT-ASD) 3) Discuss specialized issues and comorbid difficulties using PCIT-ASD 4) Critique new techniques related to social skills training.
Activities: Attendees will obtain learning objectives through lecture, demonstration, video modeling, interactive role-play, and small group breakouts. Core content will be taught through lecture, demonstrations, and video modeling. Interactive role-play and small group breakouts will be used to supplement and support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop is targeted for junior BCBAs, BCBAs, and BCBA-Ds.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Disruptive Behavior, Evidence-based Treatment, Parent-Child Interaction
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Considerations: What Every Behavior Analyst Should Know About Augmentative and Alternative Communication Decision-Making
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Catherine Horton, M.S.
CATHERINE HORTON (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc. )
Description: An overwhelming number of communication options exist for our learners with complex communication needs. Practitioners are not only faced with decisions related to the type of Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) system, but are also tasked with choices related to the most effective teaching strategy. Behavior analysts must be familiar with the available options, critically review the current research and make informed recommendations; all while maintaining compliance with the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code and working collaboratively with other members of the educational team. This presentation will review several current and popular approaches in the field including aided language stimulation/modeling, prompting strategies, core vocabulary, presumed competence and the varying definitions of "robust" as related to AAC decision-making. Relevance to the Code will be explored and participants will be presented with related ethical dilemmas with proposed solutions. Participants will leave the training with a framework for analyzing new communicative approaches while maintaining positive, ethical team collaboration.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) State specific guidelines from the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code in relation to AAC decision-making (2) Describe current popular approaches in the field of AAC, specifically including aided language stimulation/modeling, core vocabulary, prompting strategies; presumed competence and the term "robust" as it applies to AAC decision-making (3) Describe strategies for working cooperatively with other educational team members
Activities: Workshop objectives will be targeted via a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion and analysis of videos demonstrating key concepts. Ethical scenarios will also be presented for small group discussion and problem-solving.
Audience: This workshop will be presented by a dually-certified Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) and Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). Content will be of particular relevance to behavior analysts and other team members working with learners who utilize AAC systems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): AAC, Communication, Ethics, Pyramid
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Standing up for Science: Ethical Challenges and Opportunities for Behavior Analysts Working in the Autism Community
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: David A. Celiberti, Ph.D.
DAVID A. CELIBERTI (Association for Science in Autism Treatment), ERIN S. LEIF (Monash University )
Description: There are literally hundreds of interventions for autism, although the vast majority of these lack any scientific support. Unfortunately, approaches that are not grounded in science prevail in many schools and centers, fringe treatments are afforded widespread media coverage distracting consumers and separating individuals with autism from science-based intervention such as ABA, and the internet is filled with misinformation and unsubstantiated claims. This presents ethical challenges and opportunities for behavior analysts. Science and scientific methods are not only relevant to discussions surrounding autism treatment selection but should serve as the foundation upon which treatments should be chosen, implemented, and evaluated. This workshop will highlight the role that behavior analysts can play in helping consumers, consultees, supervisees and other colleagues choose interventions, implement those interventions with high degrees of fidelity and transparent, as well as in objectively evaluating outcomes. Strategies for promoting science and the scientific method in both practice and in communication will be discussed throughout the workshop as they interface with our ethical responsibilities and what is known about evidence-based practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, workshop participants will be able to: 1. identify and describe red flags in autism treatment, recurring media misrepresentations, and diverse perspectives on treatment selection and explain the ethical concerns that result; 2. demonstrate a broader conceptualization of how the tenets of applied behavior analysis can be both a model and a framework for delivering science-based education and treatment regardless of discipline and highlight the implications conceptually and procedurally; 3. describe challenges for behavior analysts related to interdisciplinary collaboration, consumer education, and interacting with members of the media community and describe strategies for avoiding or reducing the impact of these challenges; and 4. identify specific and sustainable contributions that can be made to promote science in the treatment of autism across disciplines, as well as within interactions with the media community and consumers
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, small group exercises, and follow up feedback and discussion. Original source material from the media will be incorporated in the workshop and discussion. Very brief role plays will be included as warranted.
Audience: The workshop level is intermediate but would be suitable for behavior analytic teaching faculty, BCBAs involved in supervision and consultation, as well as BCBAs working with multi-disciplinary teams.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Right to Effective Treatment: Understanding and Incorporating the Scientific Literature in Your Practice
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Benjamin N. Witts, Ph.D.
BENJAMIN N. WITTS (St. Cloud State University)
Description: Clients have the right to effective treatment. The effectiveness of treatment is typically relegated to the academic side of the science where standards and safeguards are put in place to help identify what is and is not "effective." However, the publication system at large is rife with bias and error, and consumers of that science are often not prepared to judge where bias lies. This workshop will educate attendees on various sources of bias in research and provide tools to help determine if and how the literature should inform practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, attendees will be able to: (1) identify common biases and errors in research; (2) describe how these biases and errors can influence research and publication; (3) describe ways in which the behavior-analytic literature can be incorporated into practice given these biases and errors
Activities: The format combines lectures, targeted reading, discussion, and small group activities
Audience: Intermediate; clinic directors, employees, graduate students
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, research, service delivery
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: BACB
Using Assessments Systematic Programming to Increase Joint Attention Skills
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christina Barosky, M.A.
CHRISTINA BAROSKY (Bierman ABA; Simmons University ), CHRISTINA GALLAGHER (Bierman ABA )
Description: Research has shown that low joint attention scores at the infant and preschool ages are associated with language deficits, and that the presence of joint attention can be a predictor of language skills (Charman et al., 2003; Toth et al., 2006; Whalen et al., 2006). Therefore, it is imperative that practitioners have a method for assessing and programming for joint attention. One method of effective instructional design includes breaking larger skills down into pinpoints (Kubina, 2019). This allows practitioners to design precise programming to increase language and foundational learning skills. This workshop will target methods of assessing joint attention skills, breaking those skills down using component composite analysis, and designing programming that can be monitored for progress and systematically built up to increase skills.
Learning Objectives: 1. Cite one method of assessing joint attention skills 2. Define the critical steps in conducting a component/composite analysis 3. Compile programming objectives following analyzing assessment results and component/composite 4. List examples of joint attention pinpoints
Activities: Lecture to introduce the topic and review assessment methods. Video examples and group participation/discussion to learn how to identify components of joint attention. Small group assignments to come up with different programming goals.
Audience: Designed for practitioners who are looking to learn how to assess joint attention skills and use their assessment to start to design a variety of programs to teach joint attention. Introduction to breaking down the skill of joint attention into smaller pieces.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Joint Attention
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
ABA Billing Codes Commission Presents: Is That Billable? Understanding How to Bill Ethically and Effectively
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sara Gershfeld Litvak, M.A.
JULIE KORNACK (Center for Autism and Related Disorders), BRYCE MILER (Trumpet Behavioral Health), SARA GERSHFELD LITVAK (Behavioral Health Center of Excellence)
Description: Led by members of the ABA Billing Codes Commission, this workshop will provide specific guidance for each of the CPT I billing codes for adaptive behavior. Elements of the workshop will include: • Review of billing code descriptors in the context of an ABA treatment plan • Best practices in clinical documentation for each billing code • Distinguishing the difference between supervision and direction of the technician • Billing for assessments • Medically Unlikely Edits – proper use and current status • Modifiers for complexity, telehealth • Potential changes to the codes • Minimizing claims denials • Additional codes to request in a contract negotiation • Valuing the codes • Ethical guidelines Participants will gain a deeper understanding of the intent of the billing codes and Medically Unlikely Edits; common billing obstacles; sustainable and ethical billing practices; the process and potential of valuing the codes; and changes to anticipate in the future.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Understand current ABA CPT coding requirements to minimize claims denials; (2) Understand issues with current ABA CPT coding in order to advocate for and participate in making necessary changes; (3) Identify critical elements in a contract regarding the billing codes; (4) Be aware of ethical requirements; and (5) Understand new resources available through the Commission to correct Insurance Carrier payment errors on a global level.
Activities: This workshop will involve lecture, discussion, and small group breakouts. Participants will learn general concepts and then have the opportunity to apply them to specific circumstances. To ensure that the workshop addresses all relevant billing code issues, participants will also have the opportunity to ask questions related to their personal experience with the billing codes, which may differ widely based on geographic regions, payor contracts, and state laws. Participants will receive a toolkit to apply what they learn to their own practices.
Audience: The target audience is behavior analysts and others who use the adaptive behavior codes to bill for ABA-based programs and those professionals who bill ABA on behalf of behavior analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA codes, billing codes, CPT, insurance
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Referent-Based Verbal Behavior Instruction
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alonzo Alfredo Andrews, M.A.
ALONZO ALFREDO ANDREWS (The University of Texas at San Antonio), LEE L MASON (Cook Children's Health Care System; Texas Christian University)
Description: Skinner’s (1957) analysis of verbal behavior deconstructed language according to stimulus control. Although the functional independence of these verbal operants has been empirically demonstrated, more commonly, speaker’s verbal behavior is induced by a convergence of controlling stimuli. However, circumscribed stimulus control may inhibit the development of complex verbal repertoires for some individuals, including those with autism spectrum disorders. For this reason, in this workshop, we describe a behavior analytic intervention with the overarching goal of establishing multiple control over verbal behavior through the conditioning of referent stimuli.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the strength of verbal operants in relation to one another; (2) demonstrate prompting and fading of verbal operants; and (3) demonstrate the process for transferring stimulus control across verbal operants
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video modeling, role-playing, and workbook demonstrations. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Guided notes will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop is geared towards Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts, Registered Behavior Technicians, special education teachers, school psychologists, speech language pathologists, and other professionals who provide direct services to strengthen the language of children with autism. (Ideally, this workshop will follow our other workshop submission on the Verbal Behavior Stimulus Control Ratio Equation)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): control transfer, generative instruction, high-p sequence, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Strategies for Rapidly Assessing Skills and Developing Comprehensive, Prioritized Intervention Plans for Individuals With Autism Based on Developmental Patterns of Typically Developing Children
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Partington, Ph.D.
JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: This workshop is designed for consultants to learn how to quickly assess skills and design comprehensive intervention programs for children with autism. Many funding sources limit the time consultants have to conduct an assessment and design an intervention program. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct comprehensive, yet time-efficient assessments that lead to the development of effective educational programs. It is necessary to prioritize learning objectives are selected for those basic language and learner skills that allow students to learn from their everyday interactions with others. To facilitate a rapid acquisition of critical skills, it is important that specific learning objectives are based on the patterns of skill development of neurotypical children. Participants will compare the skill levels of young children with autism to the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children from a peer-reviewed journal publication. Participants will learn to analyze programs for nonverbal individuals and select learning objectives that identify the skills necessary to develop instructional control and to establish an initial verbal repertoire. Participants will also learn to analyze programs for an individual who has basic mand, tact, and intraverbal skills, and select learning objectives that will lead to development of more advanced language and social interaction skills.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will be able to state strategies to rapidly assess the basic language and learning skills of young students with an Autism Spectrum Disorder. 2. Participants will be able to state strategies for developing a prioritized set of learning objectives based upon a student’s current set of skills. 3. Participants will be able to compare the existing skill levels of a child with an autism spectrum disorder with the age-equivalent skills of typically developing children.
Activities: The workshop will begin with a pre-assessment of the workshop participants’ abilities in reviewing a brief description of a student’s skills and then identifying repertoires that should be the focus of an intervention plan. A presentation on how to rapidly assess a student’s basic language and learning skills will be provided, followed by a presentation of data from a peer-reviewed journal article regarding data of neurotypical children’s skills measured on the ABLLS-R from 6 months to 7 years of age. The patterns of skill development across multiple repertoires of typically developing children will then be reviewed and discussed with the participants. A review and discussion of both early learner and advanced learner profiles will be conducted to identify prioritized learning objectives for each type of student. Finally, a post-assessment of the participants’ abilities in assessing and identifying appropriate learning objectives will be conducted.
Audience: This workshop is designed at an intermediate level for Board Certified Behavior Analysts who have had some experience assessing skills and implementing teaching strategies who now wish to further develop their ability to quickly assess the skills and develop effective educational programs for children with a diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorder.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism treatment, program development, rapid assessment, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Toilet Training for Individuals With Autism and Developmental Disabilities: Assessment to Treatment - Day to Night
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frank R. Cicero, Ph.D.
FRANK R. CICERO (Seton Hall University)
Description: Research indicates that behavioral toileting methods continue to be effective for individuals with and without disabilities. The current workshop will present the audience with empirically supported procedures for toilet training individuals on the autism spectrum using a variety of methods consistent with the principles of ABA. First, a brief review of the literature on toilet training will provide the audience with background information showing empirical support for behavioral principles and procedures. Seminal articles in the field of ABA will be discussed. Next, the presenter will discuss the importance of conducting an objective assessment of problem skill areas so that treatment procedures can be properly individualized and designed. Assessment procedures and functional hypotheses will be discussed targeting both urination and bowel movement accidents. Data will include narrative ABC data, frequency counts and scatter plots. The details of a reinforcement-based urination training procedure will be presented. The audience will be presented with a task analysis for how to run the procedure and analyze treatment results. The presenter will then outline the details of assessment, treatment, data analysis and evaluation for bowel training. An emphasis will be placed on functional assessment for bowel accidents so that treatment can be tailored to function.
Learning Objectives: 1. Through this workshop, audience members will be able to conduct a behavioral assessment of toilet training issues and needs. 2. The audience members will be able to design and implement an effective urination training intervention. 3. The audience members will be able to design and implement an effective bowel training intervention. 4. The audience members will learn how to collect data for a toileting intervention in order to make useful data-based treatment decisions
Activities: Workshop activities will include didactic instruction by the presenter guided by a power point (which will be distributed as a hand out), discussion of distributed materials including assessment protocols, data sheets, task analyses and sample treatment plans, role plays of treatment strategies, group discussion and the answering of audience questions. Discussion of case examples and case data will also be provided.
Audience: The workshop content will be at the intermediate level. Basic principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis will be described related to how they can be used in toilet training interventions, however the workshop is not designed to teach these basic principles and procedures for people who are unfamiliar with ABA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): bowel training, enuresis, toilet training, urination
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Working Together Effectively Through Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adrienne Hursh, M.A.
FUMI HORNER (Behavioral Perspective Applied Behavior Analysis; The Chicago School, Chicago), ADRIENNE HURSH (Pyles and Associates )
Description: Teamwork or collaboration is essential to produce the most effective outcomes when treating clients. This collaboration becomes more difficult when it involves other professionals from other disciplines (e.g., speech, OT, psychiatrist, etc.) and not all team members have the same philosophical perspective when addressing client challenges. Collaboration is not simply talking to other team members, it includes other variables that the field of ABA has yet to clarify. Despite the usefulness and importance of interdisciplinary collaboration, empirical research on interdisciplinary collaboration is almost non-existent. Research on interlocking behavior contingencies and behavior systems analysis helps to highlight the necessity of connecting treatment components across individuals of a group and analyzing their outcomes based on treatment goals. This workshop analyzes the common philosophical conflicts between BCBAs and other professionals, identifies where the gaps are, and proposes some solutions. Solutions proposed in this workshop are based on what is currently in the literature and information collected from treatment evaluations of current collaborations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants should be able to: 1. Identify roles and responsibilities of various members of interdisciplinary teams, 2. Identify components and outcomes of effective collaboration, and 3. Create a plan to establish an effective collaboration model
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through presentation of information, group activities with guided practice, and group discussion.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop are any professionals that work with clients including graduate students, BCBAs and other professionals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): BSA, interdisciplinary collaboration, Interlocking contingencies
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Conducting and Supervising Functional Behavior Assessment and Functional Analysis Across Environments
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joanne Sgambati, Ph.D.
ERIN SPARACIO-ARCHIBALD (Eden II/ Genesis Programs), JILLIAN BRACCOLINO (Eden ll/ Genesis Programs), JOANNE SGAMBATI (Eden II/Genesis Programs), JAMES CORRIGAN (Eden ll/Geneisi Programs), KATHLEEN ROTAN (Eden ll/ Genesis Programs)
Description: This workshop will address the supervision of the methodology of functional behavior assessments and the empirical approach to a functional analysis across various environments. The basic components of a functional analysis can be adapted across environments to facilitate the assessment of maladaptive behaviors. The components of a functional behavior assessment, such as parent and care caregiver interviews, direct and indirect observations, questionnaires, and anecdotal data collection will be reviewed. Staff, students, and teachers can be supervised to acquire the necessary skills to conduct the various components of a functional analysis through effective supervision with behavioral training strategies. Best practices in supervision of staff who would be conducting assessments will be reviewed. Case studies, examples, and problem resolution will be discussed across various environments such as school settings, home environments, Day Habilitation programs, residential settings, and applied behavior analysis clinics. Implications and limitations of conducting a functional analysis outside of a clinical setting will be openly discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will have learned: The components of functional behavior assessment and the empirical approach to a functional analysis. Participants will learn ways to apply supervision strategies and skills training to staff across various environments, and learn to trouble shoot and adapt supervision strategies across different environments given various scenarios.
Activities: Specific activities will include: 1. Choosing appropriate assessment and data collection systems when conducting a functional behavior assessment and functional analysis. 2. Analyzing data through various visual displays. 3. Problem solve and create improved behavioral skills training strategies for supervised staff given various scenarios. 4. Open discussion of applied supervision issues will also be reviewed.
Audience: Psychologists, Special Educators, Social Workers, Speech Pathologists, and Behavior Analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Functional Analysis, Functional Assessment, Supervision
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
When Peek-a-Boo Fails: How to Teach Eye Gaze to Young Children With Autism
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Ivana Krstovska, Ph.D.
IVANA KRSTOVSKA (Lehman College, City University of New York)
Description: Impairment in eye gaze is one of the earliest symptoms identified in infants later diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Eye gaze impairment interferes with successful attention to environmental stimuli necessary for building the foundation of early social communication. As a result, the learning process of young learners with ASD is negatively affected. This workshop will first review the research on eye gaze interventions across both requesting and joint attention contexts. Prerequisite skills required for eye gaze will be identified next. Specific procedures to teach eye gaze across different social-communicative contexts, including requesting and joint attention will be described as well as planning for generalization. Video clips of typically developing toddlers and toddlers with ASD engaging in eye gaze will be viewed, followed by a guided practice of various prompting and prompt fading procedures to teach eye gaze. Strategies to decrease response effort during instruction will be discussed to help avoid the development of problem behavior during intervention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: 1. assess and, if necessary, teach prerequisite skills needed for eye gaze 2. teach eye gaze in different social-communication contexts 3. decrease response effort to engage in eye gaze 4. plan for skill generalization and maintenance
Activities: This workshop will include a lecture, video observation, discussion, and guided practice. Supplemental materials with written procedures for each targeted skill will be provided to participants at the beginning of the workshop.
Audience: This workshop is developed for practitioners who work with young children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders as direct service providers, supervisors, trainers or consultants in the early intervention program and preschool special education facilities as well as those who provide Applied Behavior Analytic home-based services.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Comprehensive Program Evaluation of Individualized Intensive Behavioral Intervention for Autism in the Lovaas Model
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest; University of Minnesota)
Description: This workshop will present the four main purposes, methods, and outcomes of comprehensive program evaluation of a widely recognized EIBI program: the Lovaas model: 1) to ensure that each family is receiving the most appropriate level of individualized intervention; 2) to evaluate the organization’s programming in a manner that contributes to continuous quality improvement; 3) to convey the value of the treatment program to policy makers; and 4) to meet the obligation of the behavior analyst to the field by producing useful research. The evaluation is geared to efficiently identify and develop the most significant objectives for each different child in as short a time frame as possible. The most efficient objectives will entail genuine sustainable generalization in all natural environments. The performance of all team members, parents, and supervisors are managed on a daily, weekly, six-month, and overall basis. Key measures will be presented, including the dynamic program management system. The prescriptive assessment system is multi-modal. It includes criterion-referenced measures, norm-referenced measures, standardized measures, treatment integrity, resource utilization, reliability, social validity, and individualized behavior analyses. A substantial body of research on 246 children served over 15 years will be presented.
Learning Objectives: The participant will be able to describe: 1) the important context variables for giving parents the opportunity to give genuine informed consent to treatment. 2) a variety of assessments of child response to treatment. 3) a system for generating an individualized prescriptive prognosis for EIBI every six months. 4) measures that convey the value of the treatment program to policy makers. 5) the results of a comprehensive research program.
Activities: The format includes, lecture, video-taped models, models of evaluation materials, and question-and-answer discussions of challenges being faced by participants in their own program evaluation activities.
Audience: Advanced clinicians, administrators, and advocates.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): EIBI, Informed Consent, Outcomes, Program Evaluation
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: BACB
An Applied Behavioral Medicine Approach to Marital Behavior Change: Skip the Whining and Arguing and Focus Directly on Changing Behaviors
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Cook, M.D.
RICHARD COOK (Applied Behavior Medicine Associates of Hershey, PA)
Description: this workshop will assist attendees already versed in the philosophies and methodologies of Applied Behavior Analysis in applying those fundamental concept to changing behaviors within a marriage. Changing the behaviors will arguably most effectively decrease the disagreements and arguing that serve to undermine and ultimately destroy the discordant marriage. Traditional cognitive behavioral and family therapy techniques attempt to talk and understand, processes doomed to fail when a basic problem is the inability to communicate within the marriage in the first place. no couple falls back in love at the suggestion of a counselor; couples fall in love, then out of love, as a function of behaviors, overt and private, and the consequences on each other and the marriage itself. the love within a marriage is restored most effectively and most efficiently as a function of behaviors the spouses experience with one another. the workshop presents guides for therapists to follow that focus directly on idenitfying and modifying problematic behaviors, deliberately seek out positive aspects of the marriage and each spouse, and markedly decrease the potential for the arguing often associated with (typically ineffective) marriage counseling.
Learning Objectives: 1 . Attendees will develop habits of identifying specific issues (from within the cacophony of intramarital discord) on which to focus and deconstructing them into chains of behaviors as well as the physical, physiologic, and behavioral infrastructure (antecedents) that can be adjusted in the couples behavioral equation to increase the likelihood of emission of behaviors which will address those identified issues. 2. Attendees will practice using and develop habits of practice that will assist the spouses in identifying core problems, and then they themselves deconstruct into factors they can manipulate to solve those problems and in the future become their own counselors 3.attendees will develop the habits of assisting spouses in recognizing responsibilities to other parties within the marriage besides themselves and their often cherished "resentments," and leveraging those responsibilities ( such as to their children, to the family itself as a party and entity) to help effect behavior changes needed to address issues.
Activities: Lecture with ongoing discussion Guided notes Small Group Practice implementing Skills and Concepts discussed
Audience: Conference attendees who professionally conduct marriage counseling/marital and family therapy Conference attendees who are married or might become married who seek to establish desirable, healthy habits within the marriage
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): family therapy, marital therapy, marriage counseling
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
The Ethics of Self-Care: A Workshop in Building Your Own Practice
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ashley N. Fiorilli, Ph.D.
ASHLEY N. FIORILLI (Animate Behavior)
Description: Over the last few years, an increase of panels and presentations have surrounded self-care, mindfulness and being present in the moment. Many times, the topic is presented without tangible take homes for participants. As practitioners are often presented with stressful human service interactions, it is not only crucial that we understand the theory of self-care, but the practice of it as well. Often, when practitioners are faced with stressful days, the antecedents to self-care are not salient enough to support self-care. Through this workshop, participants will explore the ethics of self-care and our Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (PECC), review varied topographies of self-care, explore and analyze both their covert and overt behaviors in relation to self-care, and develop an individual self-care plan (SCP). Each participant will receive a follow up meeting (teleconference call, phone call etc…) with the instructor as a support to the implementation of their SCP.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to do the following: 1. State how self-care relates to our PECC. 2. List the benefits of a self-care routine. 3. Define present moment and mindful practices. 4. Demonstrate present moment activities. 5. Explain the impact of private events on overt behavior. 6. Describe the analysis of their own private events. 7. Create a SCP individualized to themselves 8. Create a committed action of how they will implement their SCP. 9. Create a corresponding datasheet to SCP.
Activities: The workshop will start with a lecture to introduce the topic. Interspersed within the lecture, participants will be given worksheets that relate to the topic and their lived experience. Worksheets will include: an ABC thought journal for analysis of private events, a list of self-care actions, an example and template for creating their own SCP, and an example data sheet. Participants will practice varied present moment activities.
Audience: This workshop is for all certified behavior analysts. A personal self-care routine or present moment practice is not required for attendance. This workshop is designed for behavior analysts who wish to increase a sense of work-life balance.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, mindfulness, present moment, self-care
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Help for BCBAs With Challenging Ethical Dilemmas: Avoiding Multiple Relationships, Confidentiality, and Limits to Confidentiality
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Similar to psychologists and other helping professionals, BCBAs have several ethical responsibilities including: avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others. Although BCBAs may be aware of what these ethical responsibilities are, they may not have had the training to deal with these complicated and sometimes threatening situations. The workshop presenter is a licensed psychologist in addition to a BCBA-D and has had much experience supervising professionals, including BCBAs, who are faced with these daunting situations. This workshop will provide BCBAs and other professionals knowledge of and practice with handling these situations. Workshop participants can bring real or hypothetical ethical dilemmas to process, as well as hear about case scenarios and participate in roleplay situations. Behavior Skills Training (BST), which is an evidence-based procedure recommended for use in supervision, will be used to aid participants in becoming more skilled and confident in handling these challenging ethical dilemmas. Participants will be provided with specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, fidelity checklists, safety assessment form) and given information on how to use these tools.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Describe the reasons why ethical dilemmas of avoiding multiple relationships, confidentiality and limits to confidentiality when someone is at-risk for hurting themselves or others or being hurt by others are so challenging 2. Describe the problem-solving process for dealing with challenging ethical dilemmas and how it was used in specific case scenarios 3. Describe the use of Behavior Skills Training (BST), including instructions, modeling, rehearsal and feedback, to aid participants in becoming more skilled and confident in handling these challenging ethical dilemmas 4. Describe the use of specific tools that might be helpful in solving challenging ethical dilemmas (problem solving model, fidelity checklists, safety assessment form)
Activities: The participants will listen to lecture and case examples of ethical dilemmas. They will also have discussion, role play ethical dilemmas and receive feedback on how these were handled. They will also be exposed to current literature regarding ethical dilemmas.
Audience: BCBAs, psychologists, social workers, guidance counselors, teachers, administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): confidentiality limits, ethical dilemmas, multiple relationships, suicide ideation
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: BACB
Empirically Supported Behavioral Parent Training and Functional-Based Assessment and Treatment: Behavior Analysts Collaborating With Medical and Mental Health Professionals
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Andrew W. Gardner, Ph.D.
ANDREW W. GARDNER (University of Arizona - College of Medicine - Department of Psychiatry and Pediatrics), CHELSEA E. CARR (The University of Arizona - College of Education, Disability and Psychoeducational Studies )
Description: Parent and care provider training has been an integral part of Behavior Analysis for diverse reasons (e.g. training, maintenance, and generalization of skills). Many Behavior Analysts are not aware of the Parent Training Programs: Insight for Practitioners (2009) study published by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention identifying empirically supported training programs and effective components for parent training. These empirically supported training programs can go hand in hand with function-based assessment and treatment to address family accommodation to challenging behavior, as well as secondary gains (i.e. function of behavior). There are a number of empirically supported Behavioral Parent Training programs (e.g. PMT, PCIT, etc.) acknowledged by diverse medical and mental health professionals (e.g. psychiatry, pediatrics, etc.). Behavior Analysis has 30+ years of research on function-based assessment and treatment. The merging of these two areas to collaborate with other professionals and build bridges is the focus of the current workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify empirically supported Behavioral Parent Training programs, Learn specific skills related to Parent Management Training (PMT) and Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), Identify the differences between indirect and direct function-based assessment tools for challenging behavior (e.g. screening tools, functional analyses, etc.), and learn how these tools can be used in practice to collaborate with medical and mental health professionals
Activities: The workshop format will include lecture, video observation, modeling, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: Intermediate: Junior BCBAs, BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, Psychologists, School Psychologists, Social Workers, etc.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Challenging Behavior, Collaboration, Functional Assessment, Parent training
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: BACB
Behavior Science and Sports: An Interactive Workshop on Applying Behavior Principles to the Behavior of Athletes and Coaches
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Andrew John Houvouras, M.A.
ANDREW JOHN HOUVOURAS (Florida Institute of Technology School of Behavior Analysis), JAIME RUS ALBA (Florida Institute of Technology School of Behavior Analysis), Kea Windsor (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; TeamABA)
Description: In an interactive workshop, participants will learn how to begin assessing and analyzing the behavior of coaches and athletes. Sports occupy a significant part of how many people occupy their time and, while there is a good body of research on applications of behavior analysis to sports, the behavior of coaches and elite athletes are underrepresented. Participants will be given the rationales, means and methods on how behavior analysts can continue extending behavior science to sports, the behavior of the coach and elite athletes by discussing current research, learning how to use computer based technology and apps, observing and collecting data on recorded and live demonstrations of athletic motions and skills, and creating materials task analyses and athlete performance scorecards to assist in the analyses. Participants will leave with ideas, permanent products, new skills and an appreciation for how the behavior of the coach and athlete merits more attention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe 2 functions of computer and web-based apps in the assessment of sports performance (2) Task analyze athletic movements demonstrated on video/live in-person (3) Create an athlete scorecard for a particular athletic movement (4) Identify 3 ways coaches can provide more effective feedback to athletes
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a proportioned presentation of lecture, active participant responding and discussion, video observation, in vivo practice on computers/tablets/smartphones, and live demonstrations of athletic movements and analyses. Participants will have opportunities to "make and take" athlete performance scorecards, data collection sheets and spreadsheets/graphic displays. Participants are encouraged to have charged computers, tablets and smartphones with camera capabilities.
Audience: Graduate students, teachers, researchers and practitioners of behavior analysis are encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Beyond the Black and White: Ethics in Human Services
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: CSS/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ann B Beirne, M.A.
ANN B BEIRNE (Proud Moments)
Description: The field of behavior analysis continues to grow in response to the need for high-quality services, as does the need for training in responsible practice. In a world that grows increasingly morally complex, how can behavior analysts maintain a high standard of ethics and what does “ethical responsibility” mean? In this live, in person workshop, we describe the expectations of ethical practice in behavior analysis and address the challenges of maintaining high standards for ethical behavior in a world where the “right” answers to our ethical questions may be elusive. Drawing upon over 20 years of clinical experience around the world, this workshop will encourage you to ask better questions rather than looking for simple answers. We’ll discuss: “Levels of goodness”: what does “goodness” really mean? Relative and absolute ethics, and when the use of each is appropriate Professionalism as an objectively defined response class: how to engage in it and how to recognize it in others How to engage in ethical practice with colleagues and families.
Learning Objectives: Identify “levels of goodness” Define relative and absolute ethics The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code® as task analysis Describe the case for absolutism Describe the case for relativism Identify challenges of ethical practice with clients and families Identify ways to meet and overcome these challenges Identify challenges of ethical practices as individuals and with colleagues
Activities: Lecture Discussion Active student responding
Audience: BCBAs and BCaBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Behavioral Treatment of Sexual Offending
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Duncan Pritchard, Ph.D.
DUNCAN PRITCHARD (Aran Hall School), HEATHER PENNEY (Aran Hall School)
Description: Sexual offending behavior presented by people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (IDD) is a significant challenge for behavior analysts who provide assessment, treatment, prevention, and ongoing support for this vulnerable population. Psychological interventions have recently been shown to increase sexual offending in incarcerated adults in the UK (Mews, Di Bella, & Purver, 2017). Most programs used to treat sexual offending presented by people with IDD are based on these interventions, so behavior analysts need to be mindful of using these unsupported interventions, especially so given the seriousness of any episodes of treatment relapse. This workshop will provide a review of ABA-based behavioral treatments and an introduction to behavioral treatment programming, including risk assessment and safety planning, independent living and vocational skill training, sex and relationship education and behavior contingency contracting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify the risks presented by sexual offenders with IDD; (2) design individualized safety plans; (3) use data to improve decision-making when planning to increase community participation (e.g., school, college, work experience, employment, public transport, leisure activities, etc.); and, (4) ethically manage sexual offending behavior across all contexts.
Activities: Lectures, large and small group discussions, review of case histories and critical incidents, developing risk assessments and safety plans, activity schedules, behavior support plans, behavior contingency contracts, risk-benefit analyses, and collecting and presenting data.
Audience: Behavior analysts who (a) work directly with sexual offender with IDD and (b) behavior analysts who train and/or manage and supervise direct care staff supporting sexual offenders with IDD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavioral Treatment, Developmental Disabilities, Sex Education, Sexual Offending
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
The Quality Behavior Analyst: A Systematic Approach to the Evaluation of Supervision
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: DDA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Yendri Diaz, M.A.
YENDRI DIAZ (Skillometry Inc.), JANET VASQUEZ (Precision Chi)
Description: The BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code requires behavior analysts that assume a supervisory position to take full responsibility for all dimensions of this undertaking (BACB, 2016). Although the BACB provides a professional and ethical compliance code, a system for evaluating the quality of supervision is at the discretion of the individual supervisor or by the ABA company the supervisor is employed with, if such protocols exist. The presenters of this workshop will provide a systematic method for evaluating the quality of supervision, which includes assessment protocols with content areas that are aligned with the BACB’s code, as well as a mastery criteria for each area. Collectively, these protocols are called The Quality Behavior Analyst (QBA). QBA is a set of criterion-referenced proficiency standards, assessments, and a scorecard tracking system for practitioners in the field of applied behavior analysis. QBA provides practitioners with detailed instructions, measurement protocol for tracking progress towards skill development, and mastery criteria for obtaining accuracy, fluency, generalization, and maintenance of the listed skills, which are critical to all of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) credential levels. This workshop will discuss the technical and professional skills behavior analysts should assess and train across credentials. Behavioral Skills Training will be conducted to train practitioners on how to utilize the QBA protocol, including how to assess the Registered Behavior Technicians’ current professional and technical skill repertoire and track information for the further development of those skills throughout the practitioners’ career. The Quality Behavior Analyst protocol includes the following materials: 1. List of skills (based on a corresponding instructional manual and on credential level) 2. Scorecard system used to measure and track the behavior analyst’s proficiency level in various professional and technical skills 3. Behavioral objective for each skill 4. Instructions for training and mastering each skill
Learning Objectives: 1. Assess, score, and track the Registered Behavior Technician’s technical skills while working in the field of applied behavior analysis through the implementation of the QBA protocol with 100% accuracy. 2. Assess, score, and track the Registered Behavior Technician’s professional skills while working in the field of applied behavior analysis through the implementation of the QBA protocol with 100% accuracy. 3. Discuss value systems when creating scorecards for RBT performance on technical skills. 4. Discuss value systems when creating scorecards for RBT performance on professional skills. 5. Provide reinforcing and corrective feedback to RBT’s based on performance and score on the QBA technical skills. 6. Provide reinforcing and corrective feedback to RBT’s based on performance and score on the QBA professional skills.
Activities: 1. Instructional strategies include: Behavioral Skills Training in which the authors will provide instructions on how to conduct the protocol to assess staff performance, model how to implement the protocol, roleplays will be conducted during which workshop attendees will rehearse implementing the protocol, and the authors will provide feedback to the attendees on their performance during implementation. 2. Author and attendees will hold discussion on value systems for scorecards. 3. Workshop objectives will be met through instruction, modeling, practice, feedback and ongoing rehearsal opportunities. 4. Supplemental materials will be provided and active student responding will be implemented to support participant learning and ensure mastery criterion is met. 5. The format of the presentations includes lecture, BST, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: The target audience are BCBAs providing supervision in the field of applied behavior analysis and clinical directors or ABA company owners seeking a curriculum for assessing RBT staff performance.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Assessment, Quality Leadership, Staff Training, Supervision
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Employee of the Month, the Compliment Sandwich, and Mandatory Fun: What Works When Supervising Direct Service Staff
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jacquelyn M. MacDonald, Ph.D.
DIANA PARRY-CRUWYS (Regis College), JACQUELYN M. MACDONALD (Regis College), CATIA CIVIDINI-MOTTA CIVIDINI (University of South Florida)
Description: Challenges in supervising human services staff can include high turnover and emotional burnout. Recent research has helped to clarify how best to use performance management to provide training and feedback for direct service providers; however, logistical and environmental arrangements may continue to produce challenges in the proper implementation of these techniques. Those supervising direct service staff may also be considering how to incorporate reinforcement programs into their efforts toward staff retention. In this workshop, participants will review and practice strategies for training direct care staff and providing meaningful feedback. Additionally, recommendations on the use of reinforcement (both group and individual contingencies) will be reviewed and participants will have opportunities to devise potential reinforcement plans for their organizations based on current research.
Learning Objectives: Participants will summarize evidence-based training practices for direct service staff. Participants will practice providing effective feedback to direct service staff. Participants will identify recommended reinforcement practices for effecting change and retaining staff in a human services setting.
Activities: The format of this workshop will include a review of the current research through lecture and video examples. Participants will also complete small group activities such as brainstorming, scenario review, and problem solving. Behavioral skills training will be used to teach participants to provide feedback according to best practice.
Audience: The level of the workshop is intermediate and it for supervisors of direct care staff.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Direct Care, Staff Burnout, Supervision
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: BACB
Getting Fluent With the Standard Celeration Chart: An Introduction to Precision Teaching
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amy Lynn Evans, M.Ed.
AMY LYNN EVANS (CentralReach), SHELBY GUNDLING (CentralReach)
Description: As precision teaching (PT) gains momentum in ABA, many questions arise about what it is, how to implement it, and whether conquering the funky blue chart is worth the effort. Participants in this workshop will tackle these questions and related topics through explicit instruction, guided practice, discussion, and a bit of frequency building. Participants will learn the basics of the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC) and the visual and quantitative analyses it provides. This opens up a world of understanding of the value of PT -- decision making efficiency. Once the core of the system is established, a deeper dive into the essential elements of PT (e.g., pinpointing and dimensional measurement) will reveal the role each plays in strengthening the system. Finally, an overview of fluency, frequency building, and component-composite analyses will help participants better execute PT-adjacent practices. The presenters of this workshop have spent a majority of their time in recent years training autism service providers to implement PT, and synthesizing literature and other resources to better support practitioners. Through this process, the content of this workshop has been refined to efficiently build skills and concept knowledge that serve as prerequisites to successful implementation of PT in behavior analytic services.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the process of Precision Teaching, (2) orient to an SCC, labeling features and describing charted frequency data, (3) describe frequency building, (4) describe fluency and its related outcome measures, and (5) make decisions using the metrics of the SCC.
Activities: The workshop format combines explicit instruction, video examples, group discussion, guided practice, and frequency building exercises.
Audience: This workshop is designed for professionals looking to gain or review the basics of precision teaching. Anyone interested in foundational skills and concepts related to precision teaching, for the purpose of effective dissemination, engagement with the literature, or implementation of precision teaching into behavior analytic practice are welcome.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Celeration, Data Analysis, Decision Making, Precision Teaching
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: BACB
Training Supervisors as Researchers: The Scientist-Practitioner Model Meets Organizational Behavior Management
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jill Harper, Ph.D.
JILL HARPER (Melmark New England), HELENA L. MAGUIRE (Melmark New England), SILVA ORCHANIAN (Melmark New England)
Description: Organization Behavior Management (OBM) involves the systematic application of the science of behavior at the organizational level, including individual behavior within the organizational structure (Sundberg, 2016). Supervision is an essential component to the maintenance of the integrity with which organizational systems are implemented. Supervising the implementation of any given system by others is not synonymous with one’s own implementation of that same system. In other words, doing is not the same as overseeing. Thus, effective supervision requires specific training in the component skills of supervision itself. This workshop will outline a supervisory training system developed to ensure effective, efficient, and acceptable training and ongoing supervision of staff within a human service organization. A description of the general structure and content areas of this training system will be reviewed and examples will be provided. Specific component skills such as conducing integrity checks and providing feedback will be described in detail to highlight training methods incorporated into the supervisory training system that result in the targeted outcome measures. Advanced training material such case conceptualization (Wilder, Austin, and Casella, 2009) and single-subject research design will be demonstrated with selected exemplars of performance management competencies of supervisors who completed this supervisory training series over the past several years.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will identify components of effective training systems necessary for supervisory staff. 2. Participants will provide examples of areas where performance monitoring tools and systems should be developed. 3. Participants will explain how to integrate case conceptualization and research methodology into supervisory training practices.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of didactic lecture, guided practice, group discussion. Core content will be delivered through dynamic lecture and group activities. Guided practice will provide participants with multiple modalities of learning.
Audience: Material presented during this workshop is would be appropriate for advanced masters students and those training in ABA and OBM programs, professionals within the field of ABA/OBM, middle management, as well as school leadership.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): OBM, Supervision, Training
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: BACB
An Exploration of Organizational Culture in ABA Service Delivery Settings
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robbie Fattal, M.S.
ROBBIE FATTAL (Maraca Learning), Bryant Silbaugh (The University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Interdisciplinary Learning and Teaching ), KATHRYN FATTAL (Maraca Learning)
Description: Mission, vision, values, and strategy are variables that influence organizational culture in ABA service delivery settings. By understanding the relationship between these variables and the behavior of members of an organization, leaders with control over contingencies within and beyond the organization can leverage these variables to strengthen and improve its culture. Service delivery in ABA is expanding rapidly, therefore it is necessary to equip the leaders within the industry with information that can help translate words in a mission statement into actionable plans and behavior that produce business results. As a result of completing this workshop, participants will increase their understanding of organizational culture and identify ways to positively impact their own organization by modifying their behavior to support the organization’s mission, vision, values, and strategies.
Learning Objectives: (1) Participants will identify and define terms associated with organizational culture such as mission, vision, values, and strategies, and discriminate between examples and nonexamples the terms. (2) Participants will identify their organizations’ mission, vision, values, and strategies or lack thereof. (3) Participants will identify and describe how mission, vision, values, and strategy are related and impact organizational culture. (4) Participants will discuss how they might apply these concepts within the context of cultural selection to positively impact their organizations.
Activities: The workshop activities combine lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and "Mix Pair Share" activities where participants will move around the room and discuss concepts and questions with other participants.
Audience: Leaders and business owners within autism service delivery settings. Both BCBA and non-BCBA leaders and owners are encouraged to participate.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA services, culture, organization, quality
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Missing Pieces: Creating Successful Practitioners Through Comprehensive Supervision Practices
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Calandra E. Plattner, M.S.
CALANDRA E. PLATTNER (Endicott College), SHANE T. SPIKER (Positive Behavior Supports, Corp.)
Description: Given the exponential growth within the field of behavior analysis, the need for improved training curriculum for early career BCBAs is critical. Graduate training programs establish baseline conceptual and scientific skills but often do not offer an opportunity for individuals to learn a sufficient level of professional skills outside of technical abilities. Many early-career BCBAs are working within the service delivery model, which requires they frequently and effectively interact with clients, families, and staff. Establishing a sufficient professional skill set that allows a practitioner to successfully supervise, collaborate, facilitate meetings, handle challenging conversations with parents and staff, and maintain sufficient work-life balance often take years to ascertain. This workshop will discuss these critical professional skills including how to self-assess current abilities, operationally define the behaviors that make up each skill and offer opportunities to practice. The purpose of the workshop is to provide instruction on the most essential skills that a practicing BCBA needs to be a strong clinician, collaborator, supervisor, and leader.
Learning Objectives: 1. Provide an operational definition for 8 critical professional skills. 2. Understand the importance of these professional skills and how they can improve quality of service delivery to clients. 3. Explain the potential contingencies maintaining as well as the barriers for practicing professional skills. 4. Identify how to critically evaluation your own professional skill set through ongoing self-assessment.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a variety of components including lecture with supporting materials (i.e., task analyses, self-assessments, videos), role-play opportunities and small and whole group discussions.
Audience: The intended audience includes students as well as early and middle career BCBAs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): "Professionalism", "Staff Development", "Supervision", "Training"
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Practice What You Preach: Using Behavioral Principles to Design an Effective Supervisor-Supervisee Relationship
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michele R. Traub, Ph.D.
ASHLEY WARLING-SPIEGEL (Behavioral Health Division - MN Dept of Human Services), MICHELE R. TRAUB (St. Cloud State University)
Description: This workshop will apply techniques common to the assessment and treatment of clients to the supervision relationship. Participants will work collaboratively to identify processes that are effective for all skill acquisition, whether by a client or a behavior analyst in training. Specifically, we will address common issues and concerns, including how best to assess and quantify supervisee skills, how to deliver effective feedback, how to shape critical thinking and other "intangibles," how to set reasonable expectations for supervisees at different points in their training, and considerations for supervisors using telemedicine and other remote strategies. Attendees will leave with sample tools and templates, including a comprehensive Supervisee Skill Assessment.
Learning Objectives: 1. Attendees will describe strategies for assessing supervisee skills. 2. Attendees will develop plans for supervision logistics. 3. Attendees will describe methods of planning for and addressing ethical concerns within the supervision relationship. 4. Attendees will demonstrate methods of delivering supervision feedback.
Activities: The workshop will incorporate several small-group discussions around prompted themes and questions, followed by a large-group guided discussion of strategies and solutions. Minimal lecture will introduce topics, and participants may be asked to role-play supervisory interactions to demonstrate specific skills.
Audience: BCBAs who supervise or want to supervise student-trainees, BCaBAs, and RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): assessment, ethics, supervision, telemedicine
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: BACB
Error Correction: What's Stimulus Control Got To Do With It?
Thursday, May 21, 2020
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
To Be Determined
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jaime Wedel, CAGS
JAIME WEDEL (Pyramid Educational Consultants), ANNE OVERCASH (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.)
Description: The science of teaching has provided many effective tools. However, even the best-planned lesson may not be effective- there are no perfect lessons. Therefore, students will make errors. We should aim to minimize the error rate but we should also have systematic plans in place when errors occur. We will briefly review some of the current literature regarding error correction (EC), which points to the importance of stimulus control and differential reinforcement. We will then discuss four specific types of EC and related them to specific types of lessons. First, we will consider one strategy for errors within discrete trial types of lessons. Then we will review two types of EC within sequential lessons. Finally, we will review potential strategies when shaping is our primary teaching strategy. With these strategies associated with specific lesson types, we should never be surprised when the next error occurs and should always have a reactive plan. We will also review some "interesting" scenarios and develop potential alternative error correction strategies that conform to best practices.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop participants will be able to (1) define why stimulus control matters in error correction; (2) apply specific error correction strategies to virtually any type of lesson; (3) identify what strategy to use when shaping is your primary teaching tool and (4) analyze various error correction scenarios for efficacy related to stimulus control
Activities: This learning format combines short lectures, video clips, and discussion of key topics which will be followed by a discussion of scenarios and problem solving both in full group and small groups.
Audience: BCBAs, RBTs, teachers and those with a background understanding of stimulus control will benefit by sharpening their own teaching skills as well as assisting others in developing effective lessons.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Effective Teaching, Error Correction, Stimulus Control

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