Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Program by : Monday, May 25, 2020


 

Panel #433
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Behavior Analysis in Service of Gender and Sexual Minorities: State of the Field
Monday, May 25, 2020
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen Kate Kellum, M.Ed.
Chair: Patrick Wade Richardson (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)
KAREN KATE KELLUM (University of Mississippi)
MARIA LOUDERMILK (LittleStar ABA Therapy)
JEFFREY BOLIN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

Gender and sexual minorities (GSM) are estimated to comprise between 4% and 10% of the population, but are twice as likely to experience mental health problems. Social stigma and a lack of laws to protect their rights are some of the major contributors of increased stress, anxiety, depression, substance abuse, and suicidal ideation for the LGBTQIA+ population. GSM can also be reluctant to seek treatment, as there is a mistrust of healthcare providers that has built up due to a history of discrimination, a lack of training, and shortage of understanding of the experiences of GSM. Behavior analytic and behaviorally-inspired interventions are amongst the most effective for treating depression, substance abuse, anxiety, and other psychological difficulties. Behavior analysis has only recently, however, begun to make a unique contribution to conceptualizing and addressing LGBTQIA+ issues. The purpose of this panel is to offer perspectives on the status of behavior analytic contributions to promoting GSM well-being, in terms of building a robust body of behavior analytic research and developing and making available behavior analytic services. Discussants will also address the contingencies that have slowed the progress of behavior analysis in this domain as well as ethical matters involving GSM.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

ABAI members interested in learning more about gender and sexual minorities' issues.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe perspectives on the status of behavior analytic contributions promoting GSM well-being; (2) Discuss the barriers that have slowed down progress of behavior analysis addressing GSM concerns; (3) Describe ethical issues involving GSM.
Keyword(s): diversity, gender minorities, LGBTQIA+, sexual minorities
 
 
Paper Session #434
Diversity submission Cultural Considerations in Service Delivery
Monday, May 25, 2020
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty N-P
Area: CSS
Instruction Level: Basic
Chair: Shariffah Azzaam (Florida Institute of Technology)
 
Diversity submission 

Guidelines for Providing Residential and In-Home Services for Muslim Clients

Domain: Service Delivery
SHARIFFAH AZZAAM (Qatar Foundation)
 
Abstract:

Why isn't my Muslim client eating? Should I continue to work with my client while their caregiver prays? Do I have to change the way I teach toileting for my Muslim clients? With Islam being the second largest religion in the world and the third largest religion in America, these are questions that many service providers may find themselves asking. Service providers who will provide home-based or residential treatment to Muslim clients should be aware of common daily living practices, social expectations, dietary, and hygienic requirements of their clients who are practicing Muslims. Practicing Muslims pray 5 times a day, fast during the month of Ramadhan, may dress differently from other clients, and adhere to specific hygiene routines after using the bathroom. In order to provide ethical and culturally appropriate treatment, service providers should be aware of the practices of the practicing Muslim. In this paper the author will review basic guidelines for working with Muslim clients as well as review specific intake questions that service providers should consider asking when working with Muslim clients.

 
Diversity submission 

Overlooked and Forgotten: Using an Intersectional Lens to Address Disparities for Black Girls With Autism

Domain: Theory
Temple S Lovelace (Duquesne University), JOVONNE TABB (Duquesne University), Olajumoke Oshokoya (Duquesne University), Mary Comis (Duquesne University), Angela Estrada (Duquesne University)
 
Abstract:

Intersectionality is defined as the complex, interconnected way that the cumulative effects of having multiple marginalized identities present an “overlapping discrimination” that is unique and cannot be accounted for as separate identities (Crenshaw, 1989). It is at this intersection that any singular analysis of what it means to be Black or a girl or a person with Autism Spectrum Disorder is insufficient. As autism disparity rates for diagnosis are reduced (Centers for Disease Control, 2018), it is increasingly clear that we must begin to examine the extent of the disparity seen in other areas, such as service delivery and research (National Center for Education Statistics, 2019; National Institutes of Health, 2019). The purpose of this study is to present a scoping review of the current literature on the intersectional examination of Black girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder (Figures 1, 2). The authors will present the current disparities in funding, service delivery, and educational placement (Figure 3). Lastly, the authors will present why there must be a call to action for how we consider intersectionality in order to improve the global behavior analytic support we must offer for Black, Indigenous, and People of Color with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

 
 
 
Panel #457
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Diversity submission Evaluating the Effects of Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity Within the BCBA/RBT Supervision Model
Monday, May 25, 2020
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS/TBA; Domain: Translational
CE Instructor: Mawule A. Sevon, Other
Chair: Shawn Capell (Covenant 15:16 LLC )
MAWULE A. SEVON (The Key Consulting Firm, LLC)
KIMBERLY EDWARDS (SIQS Educational Consulting, LLC)
SHANEERIA K PERSAUD (United Behavior Analysis Inc.)
Abstract:

The field of Applied Behavior Analysis has experienced tremendous growth since its inception. According to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board®, between the years 2016 and 2018, the total number of certified behavior analysts has increased by over 30%, and the total number of registered behavior technicians® has nearly doubled. An essential component for obtaining and maintaining these certifications include supervision hours. The Behavior Analyst Certification Board® has provided task lists regarding the items and topics required for adequate supervision; however, no components of cultural responsiveness and awareness are included. With the increase of behavior analysis within culturally diverse populations, it is imperative that our field develop new and innovative ways of including cultural competency into the Board Certified Behavior Analyst® and Registered Behavior Technician® supervision experience. Many behavior analysts have reported not receiving sufficient training within the areas of diversity and cultural responsiveness and feel unprepared to serve diverse clients and communities adequately. This workshop is designed to address the gap in formal training specific to the lack of diversity and cultural responsiveness across the supervision continuum.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Registered Behavior Technicians; Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts; Board Certified Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: 1. Define cultural responsive practice 2. Understand and apply the impact of cultural responsive practice on the supervision continuum 3. Apply cultural responsive practices to the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts and Task List
Keyword(s): Certification, Cultural Awareness, Cultural Sensitivity, Supervision
 
 
Panel #473
Diversity submission PDS: More Strategies for Empowering Women: Managing Professional and Personal Life
Monday, May 25, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty N-P
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Fernanda Suemi Oda (The University of Kansas)
SARAH A. LECHAGO (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
LAURA L. GROW (Garden Academy)
FLORENCE D. DIGENNARO REED (University of Kansas)
Abstract:

Women face gender-related problems worldwide and are still underrepresented in important areas. Although female representation has increased substantially over time, women continue to face serious challenges. At the 2019 ABAI conference, three leaders in our field discussed gender inequality and shared their experiences. The purpose of this second panel is to empower women and continue discussing the gender gap and what can be done to close it. Three prominent behavior analysts will share their experiences as successful women and leaders in academia, clinical, and organizational settings. Panelists will discuss strategies to achieve goals and manage professional and personal life.

Instruction Level: Basic
 
 
Invited Paper Session #491
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Cultural Responsiveness, Social Justice, and Behavior Analysis
Monday, May 25, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: DEI/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Shahla Ala'i, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SHAHLA ALA'I (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

The voice and inclusion of people of diverse cultural identities is expanding within the world and within our discipline. This expansion presents both tensions and possibilities. Ideally, applied behavior analysts should be developing increasingly more cultural responsiveness in all aspects of research and practice. That is not the case. Cultural responsiveness is closely yoked with lived experience, social justice, and the kyriarchy. The purpose of this presentation is to explore worldviews in the context of coloniality and to then relate this to our disciplinary and personal responses to power and efforts to contribute to a more socially just world. This includes consideration of global trends, the aims and history of our discipline, womanist and determinist worldviews, and ethics. The presentation will close with a discussion of pathways to cultural responsiveness and social justice.

Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience:

Behavior analysts interested in culture, social justice, applied research, practice

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the critical features of cultural responsiveness; (2) briefly identify the context for cultural responsiveness (global trends, coloniality, aims and history of our discipline, womanist and determinist worldviews, and ethics); (3) discuss pathways for advancement of cultural responsiveness in behavior analytic research and practice.
 
SHAHLA ALA'I (University of North Texas)
Shahla Ala’i received her B.S. from Southern Illinois University and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Behavior Analysis at the University of North Texas (UNT) and the director of the North Texas Autism Project (NTAP). NTAP is a service, training and research program working in cooperation with several global partners, with applied anthropologists, and with Easter Seals North Texas. Shahla is also a member of a social justice collective at UNT. This is an interdisciplinary effort designed to create a space for applied research and activism in social justice and includes faculty and students from Woman’s and Gender Studies, Applied Anthropology and Behavior Analysis. Shahla teaches classes on ethics, autism intervention, parent training, applied research methods, and behavior change techniques. Shahla served on the governing board of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) and as a subject matter expert on supervision and on ethics. Shahla currently serves on the ABAI Practice Board and the APBA Diversity Ad Hoc Task Force. She has published and presented research on ethics in early intervention, play and social skills, family harmony, change agent training, and evidence-based practice. Her research is applied and grounded in a commitment to love and science. She has trained hundreds of master’s level behavior analysts who have gone on to serve families and communities with honor. Shahla has over four decades of experience working with families, particularly those from non-dominant cultural backgrounds. She travels and presents her work nationally and internationally to both professional and lay audiences. She was awarded an Onassis Foundation Fellowship for her work with families, was the recipient of UNT’s prestigious student selected “Fessor Graham" teaching award, and received the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis Career Contributions Award in 2019.
 
 
Panel #495
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Examining Racial and Implicit Bias Within the Field of Applied Behavior Analysis
Monday, May 25, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty N-P
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Denisha Gingles, M.S.
Chair: Vanessa Bethea-Miller (Bethea-Miller Behavioral Consulting)
DENISHA GINGLES (Signature Behavior Analytic Services)
SHAWN CAPELL (Covenant 15:16 LLC)
KRISTEN CSIZMADIA (Bethea-Miller Behavioral Consulting)
Abstract:

Implicit bias refers to "actions or judgments that are under the control of automatically activated evaluation, without the performer's awareness of that causation" (Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998, p. 1464). Related professionals, such as education, mental health, and medical experts, are working to address the topic of racial and ethnic bias, as well as the impact on the communities in which they serve. Though this is the case in surrounding fields, this topic continues to be a less discussed area within behavior analysis. Mental health researchers have shown consequences of racial bias leads to various negative outcomes for diverse consumers. Implicit bias research has also been well studied in the educational field related to its overuse of punishment procedures. Lastly, medical field professionals have discovered the connection between implicit bias and medical intervention used for certain racial groups. Given the amount of pre-existing research, behavior analysts can take advantage of the existing knowledge base to better serve stakeholders of the field, our clients. This panel will discuss methods for behavior analysts to examine their own biases with the purpose of rendering culturally and socially valid services.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

BCBA, BCBA-D

Learning Objectives: Attendees will evaluate their own biases related to race and ethnicity. Attendees will identify the impact of biases on their work as a behavior analyst. Attendees will ascertain behavior analytic practices that can be implemented to address implicit bias. Attendees will determine how to address issues of implicit bias across multiple professional settings and identify solutions to these concerns.
Keyword(s): Bias, culture, diversity, race
 
 
Invited Paper Session #511
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
Diversity submission Management of Well-Being in Organizations and Beyond
Monday, May 25, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: DEI; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Ramona Houmanfar, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno)
Abstract: A growing body of scientific evidence suggests implicit biases influence ways our actions may affect others to the extent that may favor some and detract from others. Biases can be deleterious and throw decisions off course just enough to harm others (e.g., women and minorities) or unjustifiably protect special interests. Moreover, the numerous examples of ways diversity can promote organizational success and quality of healthcare have generated interests of organizational leadership in relation to bias and diversity across industries. In many ways, leaders’ communication and decision-making shape the interlocking behavioral contingencies, aggregate products (i.e. metacontingency), and the behavior topographies of consumers (i.e., cultural practices). Simply stated, leaders’ design and implementation of contingencies can bear positive or negative influences on the wellbeing of the organizational members plus the external environment (including the physical and social environment). This presentation provides an overview of ways behavior science can contribute to the design of healthy environments that promote well-being of workers and consumers in human service industry.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Leaders, managers, organizational members, and consumers in human service industry.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the foundation (concepts, principles, methodology) underlying contingency analysis at the cultural level of selection; (2) discuss the behavior analytic account of implicit bias as related to emerging socio-cultural issues; (3) list behaviors and associated outcomes that align with a behavior analytic discussion of wellbeing.
 
RAMONA HOUMANFAR (University of Nevada, Reno)
Dr. Ramona A. Houmanfar is Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Behavior Analysis Program at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). She currently serves as the trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, Chair of the Organizational Behavior Management Section of Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, and editorial board members of the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, and Behavior & Social Issues. Dr. Houmanfar recently completed her seven-year term as the editor of Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. She has served as the former senior co-chair of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, Director of the Organizational Behavior Management Network and President of the Nevada Association for Behavior Analysis.
Dr. Houmanfar has published over seventy peer reviewed articles and chapters, delivered more than 100 presentations at regional, national, and international conferences in the areas of behavioral systems analysis, cultural behavior analysis, leadership in organizations, rule governance, communication networks, instructional design, and bilingual repertoire analysis and learning. Her expertise in behavioral systems analysis and cultural behavior analysis have also guided her research associated with implicit bias, cooperation, situational awareness, decision making, and value based governance. Dr. Houmanfar has published three co-edited books titled “Organizational Change” (Context Press), "Understanding Complexity in Organizations", and “Leadership & Cultural Change (Taylor & Francis Group).
 
 
Paper Session #565
Diversity submission ABA in Community and Public Health Settings
Monday, May 25, 2020
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 1, Salon B
Area: CBM
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Gerald McKeegan (Friends Hospital)
 
Diversity submission ABA Practice in a Medically Oriented Rehabilitation Setting
Domain: Service Delivery
GERALD MCKEEGAN (Friends Hospital)
 
Abstract: Interventions based on the principles of Applied behavior analysis are used to treat a variety of disabilities and deficits in independent living and functioning stemming from many etiologies. Applied behavior analysts apply basic behavioral practices that improve language and social interaction. Practitioners of ABA support rehabilitation and independent living among age groups from childhood to older adults. The purpose of the present paper is to outline the behaviors and interventions that an analyst encounters in a rehabilitation setting that is medical in orientation and services. ABA can be utilized in such a setting regardless of the diagnoses of the individuals. Working with other disciplines such as physical, occupational, and speech therapies, neuropsychology, as well as nursing can advance the implementation of ABA in rehabilitative settings to achieve beneficial outcomes for the individuals receiving services. Finally, the challenges and opportunities to extend an ABA focused practice will be described. Recommendations for future practice in the field of rehabilitation will be given.
 
Diversity submission Green Spaces and Healthy Aging
Domain: Theory
PARSLA VINTERE (CHE Senior Psycholgical Services; Elaine Kaufman Cultural Center)
 
Abstract: In the past few decades there is an increased attention being paid to the effect of green spaces. Studies examining the relationship between time spent outdoors and seniors’ health status show a positive relationship. In terms of physical health, there is evidence that being outdoors is associated with an increase in Vitamin D levels, improved functioning of the immune system, better recovery from injury and illness and increased energy levels. Similarly, there is evidence of mental health benefits associated with time spent outdoors, such as decreased levels of stress, depression and anxiety and improved attention and well-being. Several studies suggest that health care providers need to pay more attention to how often their senior clients are outdoors. Many traditional nursing homes are attempting to improve care and quality of life for their residents by creating more home-like atmosphere. The purpose of this paper is to (a) examine the typical scheduling of the daily activities in the long-term care settings; (b) discuss the Green House nursing home model; and (c) present some anecdotal evidence of the effectiveness of the time spent outdoors using clinical behavior analytic approach to psychotherapy with aging population.
 
Diversity submission 

An Approach to Addiction Recovery and Reanimation Emphasizing Robust Antecedent State Development Through Neuroscience and Public Health Principles

Domain: Service Delivery
MATTHEW GROSS (Shippensburg University), Richard T Cook (Applied Behavioral Medicine Associates of Hershey, PA)
 
Abstract:

Patients undergoing recovery from addiction, especially following an acute inpatient rehabilitation experience, often experience a period of time during which they are "spared" from typical daily activities, responsibilities, and reinforcers. During this time, particularly if living "back at home," demands on them are initially reduced, or non existent, but ideally should gradually increase, commensurate with ongoing successful habit development, but too often, they don't do so. Unfortunately, for some patients, their families, their rehabilitation clinicians, their healthcare payers/insurers, the legal system, their friends, and other key stakeholders in their recovery, either in being well intentioned..or simply by not paying attention.., set up an environment sheltering them not only from responsibilities "too much for them to handle" at this time, but unfortunately also from the many natural consequences that would bring life back to them, shaping their behaviors, overt and private, to assist to return them to (ideally, improved versions of) their "normal" lives. While they might participate in some sort of outpatient "program," sadly the absence of a systematically implemented, reevaluated, revised, and increased set of responsibilities and actions expected of them within their family or other living situation, outside of their formal outpatient drug rehab program activities, can allow them, or arguably, cause them, to become "permanent teenagers," returning from their outpatient program activities to their home, where they can isolate themselves into their rooms, pajamas, snack foods, phone, computer, and up all night schedules of internet or video or game controller or tv reruns, often absent even much interaction with other family members in the house. Instead of focusing on "esteem building," behavioral activation robustly employed, with a goal of developing patterns of behavior useful to returning to a (more desirable) day to day life going forward, can get them showered dressed, out of their rooms, out of their houses, and into volunteer or part time job activities which will, if guided well, expose them to natural reinforces that will train them, rehabilitate them, reanimate them, redefine them, and reintegrate them into the (hopefully well chosen) worlds around them, and increase the likelihood they will be fortified against the stimuli, internal and external, that might lead them to emit behaviors of relapse.

 
Diversity submission Cultural Awareness and the Behavior Analyst: The Supervision Process
Domain: Service Delivery
BOBBY NEWMAN (Proud Moments ABA), Damali Alexander (Proud Moments ABA), Chanie Rubin (Proud Moments ABA)
 
Abstract: The basic ethics guidelines for the field of Applied Behavior Analysis require that behavior analysts be culturally competent in terms of service delivery. The same cultural competency concerns are no less important in the supervision of future BCBAs, but this has not received the same attention as client-based concerns. In this talk, we will explore issues related to cultural competence and the BCBA supervision process.
 
 
 
Panel #597
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Isms: Why We Hate and What To Do About It
Monday, May 25, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty M
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Natalie A. Parks, Ph.D.
Chair: Beverly Kirby (Team ABA LLC)
NATALIE A. PARKS (Behavior Leader)
MARK WILKERSON (Team ABA, LLC)
Abstract:

Webster’s Dictionary states the suffix “-ism” is a neutral term used to describe philosophies, theories, religions, social movements, and behaviors; however, it is used to identify that one is in opposition of such practices in the United States since the mid-nineteenth century. Currently words such as racism, sexism, classism, and heterosexism are used to describe the perceived negative ideologies and behaviors of one person(s) towards another. Hate crimes are crimes motivated by a negative bias towards another person(s) based on a general characteristic. Although hate crimes reached an all time low in 2014, they have been on a sharp rise, reaching a high in over 10 years in 2017 (FBI, 2018). Usually “-isms” are discussed individually; however, the behavioral underpinnings of how “-isms” develop and are maintained over time are similar. As behavior analysts, we have solutions to move this world towards a more accepting and inviting place for all. This panel will explore the theory behind and behavioral mechanism in place for “-isms” to develop and what we, as individuals and as behavior analysts, can do to change it.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

BCBAs, BCaBAs, BCBA-Ds

Learning Objectives: 1. State the behavioral mechanisms responsible for the development of -isms 2. Identify what behavior mechanisms are in place for at least two different -isms 3. Identify at least 2 environmental variables can be manipulated to change the development and maintenance of -isms
Keyword(s): diversity, inclusion, racism, sexism
 
 
Business Meeting #617
Diversity submission Culture and Diversity SIG Meeting
Monday, May 25, 2020
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M4, Liberty I-L
Chair: Elizabeth Hughes Fong (Saint Joseph's University)
Presenting Authors:

Annual meeting of the Culture and Diversity SIG.

Keyword(s): culture, diversity, multicultural
 

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