Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search

46th Annual Convention; Washington DC; 2020

Program by B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Events: Sunday, May 24, 2020


 

B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #238
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Keys to School Success: Bridging the Outcomes of the Boehm Test of Basic Concepts-3 (BTBC-3) to Language Development
Sunday, May 24, 2020
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: TBA; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Lin Du (Teachers College, Columbia University)
CE Instructor: Lin Du, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ANN BOEHM (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Abstract:

The session will cover the long history of how the outcomes of the BTBC-3 inform intervention and instruction for young children’s language development and success in school. The issues covered are of particular relevance for children on the ASD spectrum. Recent research using the Boehm Test of Basic Concepts-3: Preschool in a behaviorally-based preschool program has identified bi-directional naming as a key factor in the progression of learning, an issue to be explored in the session. The importance of relational concepts as measured by the BTBC for learning across all areas of learning, following directions and more complex problem solving will be presented along with strategies for intervention.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) highlight the history of the BTBC and its role in language development; (2) provide a guide for developing instructional activities at increasing levels of difficulty; (3) review recent research with students with special needs (ASD, visually impaired, deaf and hard of hearing, and individuals with cognitive impairment).
 
ANN BOEHM (Teachers College, Columbia University)

Ann E. Boehm, Ph.D. is professor emerita of psychology and education at Teachers College, Columbia University where she continues to teach a course on early childhood assessment. She is the author of the Boehm Test of Basic Concepts (BTBC) which was the outcome of her dissertation and was seminal in identifying basic relational concepts as an important aspect of language development and essential for success across all areas of school learning. The test, now in in its third edition, consists of a preschool level (ages 3-5) and a school age level (ages 5-7). Outcomes of the test are helpful for identifying learning objectives and monitoring progress, The BTBC-3 is one of the few instruments available at these age levels in raised form and big picture versions for the blind and visually impaired (through the American Printing House for the Blind). She is the author of numerous books and articles. Her current research interests focus on the next version of the BTBC, direction following, intervention activities, and work with students on the ASD spectrum.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #251
CE Offered: PSY
Why Do Captive Animals Perform Abnormal Repetitive Behaviours?
Sunday, May 24, 2020
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Nathaniel Hall (Texas Tech University)
CE Instructor: Nathaniel Hall, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: GEORGIA MASON (University of Guelph)
Abstract: Unusual repetitive behaviours in confined animals (including those sometimes called stereotypies) have long been used as welfare indicators because they are disturbing and fairly easy to assess. Because it is not yet certain which behaviours should be included (for example, is wheel-running normal or abnormal?), how much the heterogeneity of different forms matters, and which are most analogous with stereotypies versus OCDs versus other clinical abnormal behaviours, I will group all as “abnormal repetitive behaviour” (ARB). Despite these unknowns, enough is now understood to use ARBs in welfare assessment (where welfare means affective state: moods, and quality of life). I will review the aetiology of ARBs, and discuss their underlying mechanisms (including unintended reinforcement by owners), to help illustrate why it is that they emerge. To evaluate their validity as indicators of welfare, I will review whether they are increased by exposing animals to aversive stimuli and stimuli that are ancestrally bad for fitness. I will show that the prevalence and/or frequency of ARBs typically reflects suboptimal husbandry and uncomfortable health problems, and that they are quite specific to negative states (though perhaps as experienced over the lifetime, rather than just present state alone). Overall, ARBs are thus reliable signs of poor welfare. However, general activity can be a confound. Indeed, some negative states never promote ARBs; and in some species, strains and individuals show little ARBs, even in extremis, becoming inactive instead (such that all else being equal, we should not assume that high ARB individuals have worse welfare than low ARB individuals).
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation participants will be able to: (1) explain how animal welfare is assessed by scientists (despite this relying on unobservable affective states); (2) select the appropriate control data and comparator groups when using abnormal repetitive behaviour (ARB) in animal welfare assessment; (3) recommend or select options for reducing ARB, from a range of techniques that include environmental enrichment and pharmaceutical approaches, and identify when these have successfully not only reduced ARB but also improved welfare.
 
GEORGIA MASON (University of Guelph)
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #287
CE Offered: BACB
Onward and Upward: Behavioral Science Principles and Practice in Human Space Exploration
Sunday, May 24, 2020
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Level M2, Marquis Ballroom 6
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Derek D. Reed (University of Kansas)
CE Instructor: Derek D. Reed, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: PETER ROMA (NASA Johnson Space Center)
Abstract:

Complex mission-oriented operational environments such as space exploration seem incompatible with the rigor and control that define the behavior analytic approach. Yet, the inherent risks, strategic value, and public investment in these missions require applying the best science available to enable success. This presentation will describe the parallels between behavior analytic principles and spaceflight operations, review selected historical and recent applications of behavioral science in astronauts and other teams in isolated, confined, and extreme environments, and describe opportunities for applied behavior analysis as part of integrated multidisciplinary efforts to enable future mission success and support those who work, live, serve, and explore on the final frontier.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Scientists, lab/department/program directors, agency program administrators

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) define “ICE” environment(s); (2) identify three key shared features between classical laboratory behavior analysis and spaceflight operations; (3) identify three factors that affect cooperative behavior and team performance in long-duration missions.
 
PETER ROMA (NASA Johnson Space Center)

Dr. Pete Roma is Senior Scientist and Director of the Behavioral Health & Performance Laboratory at NASA Johnson Space Center. He also holds adjunct appointments at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, the University of Kansas, the University of California—Irvine, the University of Texas at Austin, and Rice University. Prior to joining NASA, he trained and worked with space research pioneer Dr. Joseph V. Brady and behavioral economics pioneer Dr. Steven R. Hursh studying individual and environmental influences on cooperative behavior in high-performing teams. At NASA, the BHP Laboratory specializes in multidisciplinary longitudinal research and countermeasure development to support individual and team behavioral health, performance, and adaptation in isolated, confined, and extreme operational environments. Through support from NASA’s Human Research Program, Space Biology Program, and Systems Maturation Team as well as the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (MRMC) and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), recent and ongoing efforts include integrated investigations of human physical and behavioral health, performance, and biopsychosocial adaptation over time in NASA’s Human Exploration Research Analog (HERA) and 20-ft Chamber facilities, the Hawai’i Space Exploration Simulation and Analog (HI-SEAS) habitat, the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems’ SIRIUS/NEK chamber, Concordia and Neumayer Stations in Antarctica, and the International Space Station.

 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #324
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
How Children Learn Early Communicative Gestures
Sunday, May 24, 2020
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207A
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Einar T. Ingvarsson (Virginia Institute of Autism)
CE Instructor: Einar T. Ingvarsson, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: ELENA NICOLADIS (University of Alberta)
Abstract:

Children can communicate through gestures (like pick-me-up or pointing) even before they begin to speak. Some gestures likely develop through social learning (like waving hello). Researchers have argued that other early gestures, like the pick-me-up gesture, cannot be learned through social learning (since adults do not gesture to be picked up). They have therefore proposed that these gestures are learned through ontogenetic ritualization, a kind of learning that critically involves role and dyad specificity. Ontogenetic ritualization is thought to differ from operant conditioning. In this presentation, on the basis of videotaped interactions between parents and children between six and twelve months of age, I argue that these early communicative gestures are likely learned through operant conditioning. I also discuss the possible developmental origins of pointing, ranging from operant conditioning to species-typical behavior. It is important to entertain the possibility that simple and well-established learning mechanisms account for children’s early gestures.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Anyone interested in the early communication of typically developing infants and toddlers as well as practitioners interested in designing interventions with clinical communication-disordered populations.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) review the different developmental origins of communicative gestures most commonly considered among researchers; (2) articulate the differences between ontogenetic ritualization and operant conditioning; (3) explain why particular communicative gestures might have particular developmental origins.
 
ELENA NICOLADIS (University of Alberta)
Elena Nicoladis is a professor of psychology at the University of Alberta. Her research interests include first language acquisition (both among bilinguals and monolinguals), language and thought, and gestures in communication.
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #343
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Bullying Among Youth in the Digital Era
Sunday, May 24, 2020
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 2, Room 207A
Area: DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Kelly M. Schieltz (University of Iowa)
CE Instructor: Kelly M. Schieltz, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: REBECCA ANG (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)
Abstract:

The advancement of technology has inevitably shaped social interactions for a large majority of adolescents in urbanized cities. This digital age is a time of positive growth, but also a time of considerable challenge. Bullying has extended its reach from the physical to the cyberspace. Most of what we now know about traditional bullying and cyberbullying comes from research conducted in Western societies. There have been a number of studies from Asian Pacific Rim societies, though it is acknowledged that there is a comparative lack of studies from South-East Asian countries. This talk will review key issues in this field such as the similarities, differences, and relationship between cyberbullying and traditional bullying, measurement issues in cyberbullying research as it relates to prevalence rates, and crucial cross-cultural considerations. This talk will also examine the risk and protective factors, and outcomes including mental health outcomes of traditional/cyberbullying victims and perpetrators. Finally, this talk will also include a review of prevention and intervention strategies targeting multiple levels and contexts/systems (individual, relationships such as parent-adolescent, teacher-student, peer-peer, school, community) which will be needed to more effectively address traditional and cyberbullying in an integrated manner.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the similarities, differences, and relationship between cyberbullying and traditional bullying; (2) discuss measurement issues in cyberbullying research and how these issues influence prevalence rates; (3) review the risk and protective factors, and outcomes of cyberbullying/traditional victims and perpetrators; (4) promote prevention and intervention strategies targeting multiple levels and contexts/systems in order to more effectively address cyberbullying and traditional bullying in an integrated manner.
 
REBECCA ANG (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)
Rebecca P. Ang is a Professor with the Psychological Studies Academic Group, National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NIE NTU Singapore). She obtained her Ph.D. in School Psychology from Texas A&M University. She is a Nationally Certified School Psychologist in the USA, and a Registered Psychologist in Singapore. Dr. Ang’s research and professional interests include developmental child psychopathology, and in particular antisocial, aggressive behavior, and related prevention and intervention work. She is also interested in children’s relationships with their parents and teachers, and the impact these relationships have on children’s adjustment and functioning. Dr. Ang is a well-cited researcher whose scholarly work has been published in international peer reviewed journals. She serves on various advisory boards within NTU, government ministries, as well as voluntary welfare organizations. Some of her previous awards include the International Council of Psychologists Seisoh Sukemune/Bruce Bain Early Career Research Award, Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry Singapore Foundation Education Award, the NTU Nanyang Education Award (College), and the Singapore National Day Award - The Public Administration Medal (Bronze).
 
 
B. F. Skinner Lecture Series Paper Session #366
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Leveraging Technology for Health Behavior Change
Sunday, May 24, 2020
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, Level 3, Ballroom AB
Area: SCI; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Stephanie M. Peterson (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: SHERRY PAGOTO (University of Massachusetts Medical School)
Abstract:

The digital health industry, estimated to be worth $206 billion by 2020, has produced countless mobile apps, wearable devices, and other technologies to help users develop healthy lifestyles to manage and prevent physical and mental illness. An open question is whether behavioral science is being applied to these innovations which reach millions of users each day. In this talk, Dr. Pagoto will first discuss her work examining the degree to which the work of behavioral scientists is represented in popular commercial health technologies, and then she will present her research applying behavioral principles via mobile technology and social media. Finally, she will discuss ways that technology can provide novel sources of data to enhance our understanding of behavior as well as the efficacy and reach of behavioral interventions.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) understand the important role that behavioral science can and should play in informing digital health innovations; (2) understand ways that behavioral strategies, including stimulus control, self-monitoring, and others, can be applied using mobile technology; (3) understand ways that social media can be leveraged to reduce the burden of behavioral interventions while enhancing the impact of behavioral strategies.
 
SHERRY PAGOTO (University of Massachusetts Medical School)
Dr. Pagoto earned her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Western Michigan University in 2000. She is now a Professor in the Department of Allied Health Sciences at the University of Connecticut and Director of the UConn Center for mHealth and Social Media. Her research, funded by the National Institutes of Health, focuses on leveraging technology in the development and delivery of behavioral interventions designed to reduce risk for the top two causes of death in the US: cardiovascular disease and cancer. She has published nearly 200 papers on these topics. Devoted to communicating behavioral science to the public, she has >25K followers on Twitter and has written for the Washington Post, Boston Globe, Salon, US News and World Report, Chronicle of Higher Education, and Psychology Today. Her work has been featured in major news outlets including CNN, NPR, NBC News, ABC News, and Good Morning America. As a lifelong devoted behavior analyst, she keeps a first edition signed copy of B. F. Skinner’s autobiography displayed in her office.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
DONATE