Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

45th Annual Convention; Chicago, IL; 2019

Program by Special Events: Sunday, May 26, 2019


 

Special Event #211
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CHOICE: Session 1
Sunday, May 26, 2019
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom CD North
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University)
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
 

CHOICE: Look Again

Abstract:

Choice is at its core one of the most relevant topics that our field has, does, and must continue to address. The study of choice has been relevant since the beginning - of everything. The concept cuts across nearly every line of research in the field; from philosophical issues to schedule work, from maze work to self-management, from choosing what tie to wear to choosing what program to implement, from behavioral economics to the behavior of the scientist. There lies choice, at every turn. How you respond to the statement: “making a choice” might well define you as a behavior analyst – or a mentalist. The short discussion will cover a brief history of choice research and how it has changed, and not, current directions, and potential future work. I hope you choose to attend while I have a lecture on choice!

 
RYAN SAIN (Northwest Autism Center)

I have been a behavior analyst since my mother sat me down in a mall in the 80s and told me to “just watch people”. I formalized that education with undergrad work at Eastern Washington University and graduate study under Thomas Armon Brigham at Washington State University. I focused on experimental evaluations of applied self-management programs, and of course, behavior analysis in general. I later worked internationally doing university development work across Africa and Afghanistan. It is there that I developed an appreciation for open educational resources. I hung up my soft money hat and returned to teach at my alma mater (i.e., EWU). Several years ago, after leaving academia, I joined the team at Northwest Autism Center and am currently the Operations Support Analyst - functionally doing OBM type work in an ABA setting. In my spare time (and that of my friend and colleague, Mr. Brad Bishop) we focus on bringing ABA to the world via YouTube. PsychCore was formed as a vehicle to bring change to how ABA is taught and disseminated. We have thousands of subscribers and ~700 videos covering specific issues related to ABA, EAB, and Behavior Analysis in general. Our success in teaching is not our own - we are students of Behavior Analysis first - and we seek to apply those principles at every level of our delivery of content. I currently reside in Spokane, Washington with my wife and four children, 2 dogs, a cat, and a bunch of fish.

 

CHOICE: Helping Academic Avoiders Choose to Do More Work: Why Escape-Based Interventions Might Not Be the Answer

Abstract:

Students who avoid academic work often have long and complicated histories that have established school-based tasks as aversive. Although problem behavior in the presence of academic tasks might be maintained by escape, interventions based on escape (e.g., allowing breaks contingent on work completion, escape extinction) may be counterproductive, even for those who are capable of undertaking the work. This presentation will discuss how the ways we approach interventions for work avoidance may affect students’ choices to attempt academic tasks, as well as how much work they do. Data collected from high school students will demonstrate how interventions designed to match the functions of work avoidance may negatively impact students’ choices about undertaking work, as well as their perceptions about the aversiveness of academic tasks. The presentation also will address the potential importance of incorporating choice into various aspects of intervention delivery for work avoiders, as well as how consideration of more remote reinforcement (and punishment) histories may be helpful in promoting students’ choices to engage with learning opportunities at school.

 
JENNIFER AUSTIN (University of South Wales)

Jennifer L. Austin, Ph.D., BCBA-D has been applying the science of behavior analysis to improve outcomes for children and their teachers for over 20 years. Both her research and clinical work focus on how behavior analytic assessment and intervention strategies can be applied with typically developing children, as well as examining what adaptations may be necessary for making our science “work” in mainstream classrooms. She has worked with numerous schools in the US and the UK, focusing primarily on those in disadvantaged communities. Dr. Austin received her PhD from the Florida State University and currently serves as Professor of Psychology and Head of Behavior Analysis at the University of South Wales. Prior to moving to the United Kingdom, Dr. Austin served as faculty at the University of South Florida, California State University, Fresno and the University of Houston, Clear Lake. She is the President of the UK Society for Behaviour Analysis and a former Associate Editor of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice.

 
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) list the general areas of choice research; (2) discuss the scientific study of choice; (3) see the application of choice research to many fields related to behavior analysis; (4) identify contingencies that may result in work avoidance at school; (5) discuss how some function-based interventions for work avoidance may produce undesired effects on students’ choices to attempt work; (6) identify intervention components that may be helpful in supporting students’ choices to undertake work.
 
 
 
Special Event #227
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CHOICE: Session 2
Sunday, May 26, 2019
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom CD North
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Elizabeth Kyonka (University of New England)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Kyonka, Ph.D.
 

CHOICE: Influencing Preferences for Conditions With and Without Choice-Making Opportunities

Abstract:

When provided with the opportunity to select between conditions in which multiple responses may produce reinforcement or conditions in which one response produces reinforcement, human and non-human animals more often select (i.e., display preference for) the conditions associated with multiple response options (i.e., choice-making conditions). However, this finding is neither static within, nor universal across participants. This data-based presentation will discuss learning histories and variations in choice presentation methods which impact these preferences.

 
JEFFREY TIGER (Marquette University)

Dr. Tiger is an associate professor of psychology and the behavior analysis program director at Marquette University. He completed his Ph.D. in Behavioral Psychology at the University of Kansas under the guidance of Greg Hanley and a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Nebraska Medical Center with Wayne Fisher. Dr. Tiger is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and licensed behavior analyst in the state of Wisconsin. He has served on the board of editors of Behavior Analysis in Practice and the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) and is a current Associate Editor for JABA. He also received the B. F. Skinner New Researcher Award in 2012, awarded by Division 25 of the APA. Dr. Tiger’s research emphasizes the development of effective intervention practices for individuals with developmental disabilities, while extending our knowledge of the basic processes that result in behavior change. Some examples of his research include evaluating the value of choice-making opportunities, developing stimulus control over social behavior through multiple schedule arrangements, and teaching braille related skills to individuals with and without visual impairments.

 

CHOICE: Variability as a Determinant of Food and Cocaine Choice in Rhesus Monkeys

Abstract:

Relative to nondrug reinforcers, illicit drugs may be uncertain or variable in terms of their availability, quality, price, and time and effort to obtain. Thus, variability may be an important aspect that differs for illicit drugs relative to nondrug alternatives. Research has demonstrated that reinforcers available under variable schedules of reinforcement are generally chosen over reinforcers offered under fixed schedules. As such, illicit drugs may more effectively compete with more predictable, nondrug alternatives, perhaps due to an inherent variability of the conditions associated with the acquisition of illicit drugs. Conversely, drug choice could be reduced by making nondrug reinforcers available under variable schedules. To examine these issues, male and female rhesus monkeys are given choices between fixed and variable schedules of cocaine or food. In control conditions, both schedules are a fixed-ratio (FR) 50, 100, or 200. In test conditions, the schedule of cocaine or food delivery is changed to a mixed-ratio (MR) 50, 100 or 200 on one lever and an equal on average FR on the opposite lever. At sufficiently large MR values, choice of cocaine or food under an MR schedule tends to be greater than choice of the same reinforcer under an FR schedule. However, we see individual differences in the degree to which MR schedules are chosen across different cocaine doses and schedule values. Our findings suggest that variable availability could contribute to excessive allocation of behavior toward procuring illicit drugs at the expense of more predictable, nondrug alternatives, and this effect appears likely to persist during periods of scarce drug access.

 
SALLY HUSKINSON (University of Mississippi Medical Center)

Dr. Sally Huskinson is currently an Assistant Professor in the Division of Neurobiology and Behavior Research in the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. As an undergraduate, she worked with Dr. Erin Rasmussen at Idaho State University where she earned her bachelor’s degree (2007) in psychology. She went on to earn her master’s (2011) and doctoral (2012) degrees in psychology at West Virginia University with the mentorship of Dr. Karen Anderson. In 2012, Dr. Huskinson went to the University of Mississippi Medical Center to complete a postdoctoral fellowship in behavioral pharmacology with Dr. William Woolverton until his untimely death in 2013. Dr. Huskinson finished her postdoctoral training with Drs. Kevin Freeman and James Rowlett, also at the University of Mississippi Medical Center where she currently resides. Her research interests are in drug abuse with an emphasis on drug self-administration and choice procedures, including delay discounting and uncertain drug access.

 
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe features of providing choice-making opportunities which may contribute to preference for these conditions; (2) describe histories of differential reinforcement that may be arranged to enhance the reinforcing efficacy of choice-making opportunities; (3) explain how uncertain access to illicit drugs might influence behavioral allocation between drug and nondrug reinforcers; (4) describe how uncertain access to a drug can be evaluated using choice procedures in the laboratory; (5) describe how we might use our knowledge about variable schedules to inform treatments for substance use disorders.
 
 
 
Special Event #230A
Accreditation and Verified Course Sequences: Recognition of University Training in Behavior Analysis
Sunday, May 26, 2019
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Domain: Theory
Chair: Jenna Lynn Mrljak (Association for Behavior Analysis International)
Panelists: MICHAEL F. DORSEY (Amego Inc.), MICHAEL PERONE (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

The discipline of behavior analysis is experiencing rapid growth, which is especially noticeable in recent the increase of university programs offering training in behavior analysis. There are currently two mechanisms for university training programs to be recognized: accreditation of degree-granting programs and verification of course sequences. This panel will present these systems, including their procedures for obtaining and maintaining recognition along with their respective goals. This session is designed for current VCS coordinators, program directors of ABAI-accredited programs, and those interested in applying for either system of recognition.

Instruction Level: Basic
MICHAEL F. DORSEY (Amego Inc.)
MICHAEL PERONE (West Virginia University)
 
 
Special Event #243
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CHOICE: Session 3
Sunday, May 26, 2019
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom CD North
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
CE Instructor: R. Douglas Greer, Ph.D.
 

CHOICE: How Stimuli Come to Choose: Transformation, Valuation, and Durability of Learned Reinforcers

Abstract:

From a behavioral selectionist perspective, it is not the individual who chooses, but the consequent stimuli (e.g., reinforcers) that select out responding. New reinforcers are learned throughout the lifespan, just as new responses are learned. When new reinforcers are acquired, stimuli that do not function to reinforce are transformed such that new stimulus control is established. The question is: How do stimuli that did not have value come to be transformed into reinforcers, or, how are new reinforcers learned? This presentation will describe three ways in which new reinforcers are established with children: stimulus-stimulus pairings, operant procedures, and observational conditioning-by-denial procedures. These procedures have been successful in altering the value of stimuli leading to changes in a) musical preference and “appreciation,” b) food preferences, c) social reinforcers, d) educational reinforcers, e) foundational verbal developmental cusps, such as observing responses, and f) stimulus control for social learning.

 
JESSICA SINGER-DUDEK (Teachers College, Columbia University)

Dr. Jessica Singer-Dudek is the Director of Transdisciplinary Programs in ABA at Columbia University Teachers College. She also serves as a Senior Behavior Analyst Consultant to schools implementing the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) model, and serves as the CABAS® Professional Advisory Board Secretary/Treasurer. Dr. Dudek’s research interests include component analyses of successful behavior analytic models of education, teacher and supervisor training, verbally governed and verbally governing behaviors, establishment of early observing responses, verbal behavior development, conditioned reinforcement, and observational learning.

 

CHOICE: How Should/Do People Choose When Discrimination is Difficult?

Abstract:

Classic models of signal detection assume that subjects set a criterion on a similarity dimension, calling all events below that S1 and all above S2. The criterion should be set at the point that maximizes the expected (long run) payoffs. This tutorial describes that model and the effect of discriminability (d’) on the ability to accurately position the criterion. It is shown that the forces driving the criterion toward optimal are too weak and complicated to ever work when discriminability is poor. How do subjects do it? They don’t: They deviate systematically from optimality. Why? What do they actually do? Will any model successfully predict their behavior? How is Gerd Gigerenzer relevant? These questions will be answered, and those answers questioned.

 
PETER KILLEEN (Arizona State University)

Peter received his doctorate in 1969 under the perplexed gazes of Howie Rachlin, Dick Herrnstein, and Fred Skinner. His first (and only) position was at Arizona State University (in the department Previously-Known-As Fort Skinner in the Desert). He has studied choice behavior and schedule-induced responses like polydipsia, reinforcement schedules, timing, and delay discounting. His reinforcers include the Poetry in Science Award; the APA Div. 25 Med Outstanding Researcher Award; the Hilgard Award for the Best Theoretical Paper on Hypnosis (!); the F. J. McGuigan Lecture on Understanding the Human Mind (!!); Presidents of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, and the 3rd International Seminar on Behavior (SINCA). A year at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Oslo birthed a paper that received The Faculty of 1000’s “Must Read” for its behavioral energetics theory of ADHD. His statistic prep was an Emerging Research Front Feature on Thomson Reuters Sciencewatch. He has written oodles of screeds on Choice; his first, now receiving social security, showed that pigeons were indifferent between free food and schedules where they had to work for it https://goo.gl/E8gzSo; his last was a deep dive into the logistics of choice https://goo.gl/y9GjJG. What matters in his golden years is family and friends, the well-being of behavior analysis, and thinking deep thoughts. He is urging our field to turn some of their efforts to understanding the role of emotions in behavior, and bridging to the outer world through embodied cognition. About these you will hear more at the presidential address.

 
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss a behavioral selectionist point of view of choice; (2) discuss various methods of how stimuli are transformed into conditioned reinforcers; (3) discuss the effects of learned reinforcers on a wide variety of social and non-social behaviors; (4) draw the logo of SDT, and show how the criterion should move with changes in frequency of signal or payoff changes; (5) explain what today’s analysis demonstrates to be the strategy people probably use; (6) scratch your head over why optimality analysis persisted as a descriptive model many decades after it was invalidated; (7) argue whether it remains a good normative model; (8) explain what “to Gerd” means.
 
 
 
Special Event #271
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CHOICE: The Future of Choice in Behavior Analysis
Sunday, May 26, 2019
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom CD North
Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Elizabeth Kyonka (University of New England)
CE Instructor: Elizabeth Kyonka, Ph.D.
Panelists: AMY ODUM (Utah State University), ERIN B. RASMUSSEN (Idaho State University), TODD A. WARD (bSci21 Media, LLC)
Abstract:

Conceptually, “choice” can be theoretically fraught for radical behaviorists because of its incompatibility with strict determinism. Pragmatically though, choice has been an important and popular topic in behavior analysis research and practice. Broadly defined, choice is consistently among the most popular topics at this conference and in behavioral journals. It has yielded some of the most significant conceptual and empirical advances in behavior analysis. From substance abuse to consumer activities to problem behavior, few areas of behavior analysis have escaped the influence of choice. Choice is a critical variable in mathematical elaborations on the matching law that serve as the foundation for quantitative models of behavior and client preference assessments alike. This panel follows six individual presentations about key concepts, cutting edge research, and contemporary thinking about choice in behavior analysis education, research, and practice. In this panel, three distinguished behavior analysts will reflect on the value of choice for behavior analysts and offer their thoughts about where the field might go in the future. The panel is also an opportunity for an interactive discussion with the audience about the future of choice in behavior analysis.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

AMY ODUM (Utah State University)
ERIN B. RASMUSSEN (Idaho State University)
TODD A. WARD (bSci21 Media, LLC)
 
 
Special Event #298
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CREATIVITY: Session 1
Sunday, May 26, 2019
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom CD North
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Darlene E. Crone-Todd (Salem State University)
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
 

CREATIVITY: Using the Science of Behavior to Engineer Creativity and Innovation in the Workplace

Abstract:

Since the industrial revolution, we have witnessed a steady decline in the need for unskilled labor as the workplace has become progressively more automated. This continuing trend has led to a greater value for new types of workplace behaviors, particularly those that contribute to employee creativity and organizational innovation. As such, modern researchers and supervisors need to investigate strategies that promote such valued novelty at work. This talk will draw upon the lessons from the science of behavior to explore factors that managers can practically influence.

 
DOUGLAS JOHNSON (Western Michigan University)
Dr. Douglas A. Johnson works as an assistant professor at Western Michigan University. He is the Director of Undergraduate Training for the Department of Psychology and Co-Chair of the Industrial/Organizational Behavior Management graduate program at WMU. He completed his doctoral degree in applied behavior analysis in 2009 from Western Michigan University. His publications and research interests are related to topics such as organizational behavior management, behavior-based instructional design, behavioral approaches to adult learning, computer-assisted instruction, performance feedback, motivation, and creativity.
 

CREATIVITY: Behavioral Approaches to Creativity: Novel Behavior, Generativity, and Contingency Adduction in Education

Abstract:

Generativity is the study of the conditions that produce novel responding in new circumstances, without directly programing them. This conceptualization has driven our Generative Instruction model of teaching and learning in educational settings. The thrust of Generative Instruction is to engineer discovery learning by arranging instruction of key component skills, facts, concepts and principles in such a way that students will engage more frequently in novel complex academic behavior without direct teaching, a process we call contingency adduction. We have discovered that complex behavioral repertoires emerge without explicit instruction when well-selected component repertoires are appropriately sequenced, carefully instructed, and well-rehearsed. In this presentation I will report our discoveries and investigations of generative responding in academic skill development as well as thinking, reasoning, and problem-solving development. The data that we will share have come from many classrooms across the United States, as well as an associated instructional design company. Our descriptive data show such consistent patterns that we want to share them with the wider behavioral community, in the hopes that other practitioners will join us in our inductive explorations, and that researchers will join us by conducting controlled studies of the contingency adduction in a variety of settings.

 
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy)
Dr. Kent Johnson founded Morningside Academy, in Seattle, WA, in 1980, and currently serves as its executive director. Morningside is a laboratory school for elementary and middle school children and youth. Morningside investigates effective curriculum materials and teaching methods, and has provided training and consulting in instruction to more than 125 schools and agencies throughout the USA and Canada since 1991. Dr. Johnson has served in all the positions at Morningside, including classroom teacher for 10 years, financial manager, administrator, teacher trainer, school psychologist, and school consultant. He has published many seminal papers and books about research-based curriculum and teaching methods, including The Morningside Model of Generative Instruction: What It Means to Leave No Child Behind, with Dr. Elizabeth Street. Dr. Johnson also is a co-founder of Headsprout, Inc., now Mimio, a company that develops web-based, interactive, cartoon-driven instructional programs, including Mimio Sprout Early Reading and Mimio Reading Comprehension Suite. Dr. Johnson received the 2001 Award for Public Service in Behavior Analysis from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis. Before founding Morningside, Dr. Johnson was a professor at Central Washington University, director of staff training at the Fernald School in Massachusetts, and an instructional designer at Northeastern University in Boston. He received his M.S. (1974) and Ph.D. (1977) in psychology at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst. He received his B.S. in psychology and sociology from Georgetown University (1973).
 
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) explain the changing nature of work tasks and the challenges these present to Organizational Behavior Management; (2) explain how new workplace demands represent an opportunity to answer long-standing criticisms of the field of behavior analysis; (3) describe the implications of basic research on novelty and creativity and how it relates to potential best practices for organizational innovations; (4) describe 5 controlling variables that produce novel behavior; (5) define the 3 critical features of contingency adduction; (6) describe 5 variations of contingency adduction in education; (7) give examples of 5 variations of contingency adduction in education.
 
 
 
Special Event #323
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CREATIVITY: Session 2
Sunday, May 26, 2019
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom CD North
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Darlene E. Crone-Todd (Salem State University)
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
 

CREATIVITY: The Stitching and the Unstitching Revisited: The Creative Tripod

Abstract:

There are no undebated definitions of “creativity” and any definition will reflect how this rich topic is treated. Nearly 20 years ago I discussed how behavior analysis might contribute—or not—to an understanding of creativity. I revisit this topic, expanding on some issues and reconsidering others. As before, I focus on scientific and mathematical accomplishments which tie closely to Weisberg’s placement of creative achievements in the domains of problem-posing and problem-solving. From the massive empirical, theoretical, and historical literature at least three essential and interlocking dimensions of significant creative achievements emerge: talent, expertise, and motivation. I emphasize “interlocking” because the productive expression of each of these elements depends on the others. The role of behavior analysis in these elements is modest, at best. It has nothing to say about talent—and even in some cases might deny its role altogether. As for expertise, with some notable exceptions, behavior analysis has had little to say about the acquisition of truly complex performances; this has been left to other fields. As for motivation, one must go well beyond naïve “pleasure and pain” accounts to more elusive, yet more powerful and pervasive behavior-consequence relations.

 
M. JACKSON MARR (Georgia Tech)
M. Jackson (Jack) Marr received a BS degree in 1961 from Georgia Tech where he studied mathematics, physics, engineering, and psychology.  He received a Ph.D. in experimental psychology with a minor in physiology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1966. He is professor emeritus of psychology at Georgia Tech where he has taught courses in physiology and behavior, behavioral pharmacology, probability & statistics, and the experimental analysis of behavior. He is one of five founding Fellows of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, a Fellow of Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) and Division 3 (Experimental Psychology) of the American Psychological Association (APA), a Fellow of the Psychonomic Society, and a Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences honoree. He was elected twice to president of the Association for Behavior Analysis International and served twice as president of the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis. He was also president of Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) of APA and the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis. He was APA Council member representing Division 25.  He is the past editor of Behavior and Philosophy and continues to serve on its editorial board. He also serves as review editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He served as the co-editor of Revista Mexicana de Análisis de la Conducta and as an associate editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and The Behavior Analyst. He was experimental representative to the executive council of the Association for Behavior Analysis International, served on the Board of Directors of The Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, and currently serves on the Board of Trustees the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. He has been particularly active in the international support and development of behavior analysis in Great Britain, Europe, Mexico, Brazil, China, and the Middle East. He was a Research Fellow in Pharmacology at Harvard Medical School, a visiting professor at the Universidad National Autonoma de Mexico, and the first eminent scholar invited to Jacksonville State University. He was a Navy contractor for Project Sanguine in a study of possible behavioral effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields and an AIEE Senior Fellow at the Naval Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory, where he conducted research on the behavior effects of microwaves and of stimulant drugs on sustained military flight performance. For over 20 years he was involved through NSF grants and other support in the assessment and improvement of engineering education, including instructional design of systems to teach engineering physics. Current scholarly interests include dynamical systems theory, the quantitative analysis of behavior, comparative behavior analysis, and theoretical/conceptual issues in behavioral analysis.
 

CREATIVITY: All Creative Behavior is Operant, But Not All Operant Behavior is Creative

Abstract:

Creativity is goal-directed variation and selection. It is one tool in a problem-solving toolbox. If there are effective algorithms to solve problems, creativity is unnecessary and often counter-productive; few people want creative brain surgeons. The world however is unpredictable, and often algorithms, or learned habit patterns, or well-conditioned operant chains, fail. Then alternative routes to a goal must be found, and efficient production of and effective selection of alternative solution paths constitutes creativity. The pleasure in creative problem solving is so great for some individuals that they become artists, writing novels and composing music and painting scenes, where almost every move sets a problem, and ensuing ones solve it. Creativity itself can be created; there are both algorithms and heuristics that foster it. This talk will outline a number of those, embed them in a behavioral framework, and test your use of them with problems.

 
PETER KILLEEN (Arizona State University)
Dr. Peter Killeen is professor of psychology at Arizona State University, and has also been visiting scholar at the University of Texas, Cambridge University, and the Centre for Advanced Study, Oslo. He is a Fellow of the Society of Experimental Psychologists, has held a Senior Scientist Award from the National Institute of Mental Health, has been president of the Society for the Quantitative Analyses of Behavior (from which organization he appropriately received the Poetry in Science Award in 2002), held the American Psychological Association F. J. McGuigan Lectureship on Understanding the Human Mind, and received the Ernest and Josephine Hilgard Award for the Best Theoretical Paper (Killeen & Nash, 2003). Dr. Killeen has made many highly innovative and fundamental contributions to the experimental and quantitative analysis of behavior. His major work includes the development of incentive theory, culminating in the mathematical principles of reinforcement (Behavioural and Brain Sciences, 1994), and the behavioral theory of timing (Psychological Review, 1988). He is the author of 80 peer-reviewed papers, many of which have been heavily cited. He has served on the boards of editors of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Behavioural Processes, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, Psychological Review, Brain & Behavioral Functions, and Comparative Cognition & Behavior Reviews. Dr. Killeen's quantitative and conceptual developments have enriched behavior analysis and the world beyond.
 
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe some of the richness and complexity of creative accomplishments; (2) describe the interlocking roles of talent, expertise, and motivation in creative accomplishments; (3) describe the quite modest role behavior analysis has played, or can play, in addressing creative accomplishments; (4) create a bug list; (5) distinguish lateral and convergent thinking; (6) get the creator and the critic in you under proper stimulus control; (7) outline a more general problem-solving framework, and identify where creativity resides in it; (8) foster play and unfoster rectitude.
 
 
 
Special Event #342
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CREATIVITY: Session 3
Sunday, May 26, 2019
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom CD North
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Chair: Douglas A. Johnson (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Douglas A. Johnson, Ph.D.
 

CREATIVITY: PORTL: A Lab for Teaching Students to Design Creative Behavioral Solutions

Abstract:

In addition to being able to follow existing protocols, students of behavior analysis should also be able to design solutions based on the needs of their learner. However, this requires students to both understand basic principles and to have a particular set of skills and tools. This presentation will introduce you to a tabletop teaching game called PORTL (the Portable Operant Research and Teaching Lab). PORTL provides a versatile environment where students can learn how to engineer creative solutions in the context of both designing teaching programs and designing research experiments. Students are taught a series of component skills which later can be built on and recombined when designing novel solutions to problems. This presentation will describe the curriculum that we use to teach these skills. As well, it will feature video examples of student products illustrating both teaching programs and research experiments.

 
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas)

Jesús Rosales-Ruiz is an associate professor at the University of North Texas in the Department of Behavior Analysis. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas in 1995, under the mentorship of two pioneers in the field of behavior analysis, Donald M. Baer and Ogden R. Lindsley. Jesús is one of the few scientists in the world studying animal training from both the theoretical and applied perspectives. He, along with his students, has greatly contributed to the understanding of the science and practice of animal training. Jesús also studies the antecedent control of behavior, generalization, behavioral cusps, fluency-based teaching, treatment of autism, teaching of academic behavior, rule-governed behavior and contingency-shaped behavior. He has served on several editorial boards, including the Journal of Precision Teaching, the European Journal of Behavior Analysis, and the International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy. He has also served as a reviewer for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, the Journal of Neuroscience Methods, Behavioral Processes, and PLOS ONE. Jesús is a fellow of the Eastern Psychological Association, a trustee of the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies and a member of the Association for Behavior Analysis International.

 

CREATIVITY: A Behavior Analytic Account of "Creativity"

Abstract:

Creativity can be defined in many ways, including the extent to which behavior occurs under certain circumstances, results in desirable outcomes, and perhaps varies along one or more dimension of behavior. In this talk, a brief overview of the operant and respondent components of creativity will be discussed, including antecedent conditions, variations and coordination of behavior, and temporal aspects of consequences. Examples will be provided from art, literature, and other realms to provide a context for the audience to make contact with the analyses from a behavioral lens.

 
DARLENE CRONE-TODD (Salem State University)
Darlene E. Crone-Todd is a Full Professor in Psychology at Salem State University. She designed and coordinates the graduate program in Behavior Analysis, and has presented in over 50 symposia at conferences worldwide, including time spent researching and presenting in Brazil. She has published research in peer-reviewed journals including, The Behavior Analyst Today, The Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, and Substance Use and Misuse. She is currently on the board of directors for the B. F. Skinner Foundation, and serves as the editor in chief for their publication, Operants. Dr. Crone-Todd earned her doctorate at the University of Manitoba, completed a post-doc at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Behavior Pharmacology. Her current research interests include human choice behavior, computer-mediated learning environments, higher-order thinking, and shaping behavior. Ongoing projects involve behavioral interventions related to wellness, and to facilitating student success.
 
Target Audience:

Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the important variables of a Skinner box and how these relate to both PORTL and applied settings; (2) describe the PORTL reinforcement system; (3) describe component skills of shaping that can be practiced during PORTL; (4) describe how PORTL can be used to design teaching programs and conduct research; (5) define “creativity” in behavior analytic terms; (6) discuss how motivating operations are involved in creative behavior; (7) discuss how creative behavior is selected for by consequences; (8) discuss how creative behavior involves successively more complex behavioral repertoires.
 
 
 
Special Event #367
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CREATIVITY: Panel
Sunday, May 26, 2019
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Ballroom Level, Grand Ballroom CD North
Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Darlene E. Crone-Todd (Salem State University)
CE Instructor: Darlene E. Crone-Todd, Ph.D.
Panelists: DARLENE E. CRONE-TODD (Salem State University), KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), DOUGLAS A. JOHNSON (Western Michigan University), PETER R. KILLEEN (Arizona State University), MARCUS JACKSON MARR (Georgia Tech), JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas)
Abstract:

This panel features the six speakers from the "creativity" thematic sessions and will include a question and answer period with the audience.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
DARLENE E. CRONE-TODD (Salem State University)
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy)
DOUGLAS A. JOHNSON (Western Michigan University)
PETER R. KILLEEN (Arizona State University)
MARCUS JACKSON MARR (Georgia Tech)
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas)
 
 
Special Event #378
ABAI Program Board Meeting
Sunday, May 26, 2019
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Hyatt Regency East, Concourse Level, Michigan 1 A-C
Domain: Theory
Chair: Federico Sanabria (Arizona State University)
Abstract:

A meeting of board members to discuss the annual convention program.

 

AAB Applied Animal Behavior

Susan D. Kapla (Northern Michigan University), VALERI FARMER-DOUGAN (Illinois State University)
 

AUT Autism

NICOLE HEAL (Melmark New England), Thomas S. Higbee (Utah State University), Tiffany Kodak (University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee)
 

BPN Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroscience

CARLA LAGORIO (University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire), Sally L. Huskinson (University of Mississippi Medical Center)
 

CBM Clinical, Family, Behavioral Medicine

Jeannie A. Golden (East Carolina University), Amy Murrell (University of North Texas)
 

CSS Community, Social, and Sustainability Issues

TODD A. WARD (bSci21 Media, LLC), Thomas G. Szabo (Florida Institute of Technology)
 

DDA Developmental Disabilities

ERIC BOELTER (Seattle Children's Autism Center), Kelly M. Schieltz (The University of Missouri)
 

DEV Human Development

R. DOUGLAS GREER (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)
 

EAB Experimental Analysis of Behavior

ELIZABETH KYONKA (University of New England, Australia), Erik Arntzen (Oslo and Akershus University College)
 

EDC Education

Scott P. Ardoin (University of Georgia), Robin Codding (University of Massachusetts Boston)
 

OBM Organizational Behavior Management

DOUG JOHNSON (Western Michigan University), Byron J. Wine (The Faison Center)
 

PCH Philosophical, Conceptual, and HistoricalIssues

DARLENE E. CRONE-TODD (Salem State University), David C. Palmer (Smith College)
 

PRA Practice

Robert Ross (Beacon ABA Services), MARK D. SHRIVER (Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center)
 

SCI Science

DEREK D. REED (The University of Kansas)
 

TBA Teaching Behavior Analysis

GABRIELLE LEE (Chongqing Normal University), Lin Du (Teachers College, Columbia University)
 

VRB Verbal Behavior

EINAR INGVARSSON (Virginia Institute of Autism), Sarah A. Lechago (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
 
 
Special Event #395
Friends of SABA Reunion
Sunday, May 26, 2019
8:00 PM–10:00 PM
Swissôtel, Concourse Level, Zurich D
Chair: Michael J. Dougher (University of New Mexico)

ABAI members who donated to the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis (SABA) in 2017 and 2018 are invited to a reception in honor of their contributions and commitment to the field. We are grateful for the generosity of those who support the activities of ABAI and SABA.

 

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Modifed by Eddie Soh
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