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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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Ninth International Conference; Paris, France; 2017

Program by Workshops: Tuesday, November 14, 2017


 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Using a Reinforcement Based Treatment Package to Increase Food Acceptance
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Studio AB, Niveau 2
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica Weber, Ph.D.
JESSICA WEBER (Els for Autism Foundation), Anibal Gutierrez Jr. (University of Miami)
Description: Selective eating or "picky eating" is often described as a reluctance to try new foods based on some dimension of the food. Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder frequently exhibit these types of selective eating behaviors. Rigidity or adherence to sameness is a defining feature of autism that may extend to feeding and lead to habits that are difficult for parents to break. These feeding difficulties may cause significant parent stress and could potentially lead to more severe mealtime behaviors in the future. Interventions to address feeding challenges, often incorporate the use of escape extinction. Escape extinction is a highly effective procedure that has demonstrated significant success, however, for children who display less severe feeding behaviors, the use of escape extinction may not be necessary. Moreover, parents are often hesitant to implement escape extinction when their child displays more mild feeding related behaviors. The treatment package presented has demonstrated success in increasing food acceptance by individuals diagnosed with ASD, without the use of escape extinction. This workshop will teach participants to implement the treatment package and provide results of a study evaluating the effectiveness of the procedure.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the features of picky eating; (2) describe the steps in the Picky Eating manual; (3) administer the Picky Eating assessment tool; (4) implement the Picky Eating program steps to increase food acceptance; (5) train caregivers on the use of the steps in the Picky Eating program.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, video demonstrations, guided practice and role play.
Audience: The workshop is designed for providers, including BCBAs, BCaBAs and RBTs, who work with children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, food selectivity, picky eating
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Using Play-Based Discrete Trials to Teach Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers With Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Scene C, Niveau 0
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: E. Amanda Boutot, Ph.D.
E. AMANDA BOUTOT (Texas State University), SAMUEL DIGANGI (Arizona State University)
Description: Interventionists often find that more traditional formats of instruction associated with applied behavior analysis (ABA) (such as discrete trial training, DTT) may be challenging for very young learners (0-3 years). Practitioners report that physicians often recommend "FloorTime" as an alternative to ABA because of its focus on "play". The presenters have combined the concepts of play and the use of ABA principles, and specifically DTT, to teach very young learners functional skills within the context of play. This hands-on workshop will teach participants how to use play as a conduit for learning when teaching very young children with for autism or other developmental disabilities, even for children who are not yet proficient players. Based on 10 years broader practice and research supporting more naturalistic strategies, presenters will describe the rationale behind conducting discrete trials in a play-based format, as well as demonstrate and provide guided practice. Additionally, participants will learn the difference between "controlling reinforcers" and using play materials and activities as discrimintative stimuli in play-based DTT. We will discuss the concept of contriving the motivational operant, share tips on program development within the context of play as well as methods of data collection within a play-based environment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the rationale behind using play as a basis for DTT for very young leaners; (2) Explain the concept of contriving the motivational operant as it relate to play-based DTT; (3) Explain the difference between "maintaining reinforcer control" and using play materials as discriminative stimuli in play-based DTT; (4) Demonstrate DTT using play materials or activities appropriate for infants, toddlers, or preschoolers; (5) List and describe specific strategies (tips) for program development and data collection that may be unique to a play-based format.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, discussion, guided practice, small group breakout, and video observation.
Audience: Basic: appropriate for BCaBAs and BCBAs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): early intervention, naturalistic instruction, preschoolers, toddlers
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Video Modeling Techniques to Improve Social Behaviors of Preschoolers With Autism
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Scene DEF, Niveau 0
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ed.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Partners In Learning, Inc.), LAUREN DEGRAZIA (Partners in Learning, Inc.), NICOLE M. RZEMYK (Partners in Learning, Inc.), JENNIFER CORNELY (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LORI LORENZETTI (Partners in Learning, Inc,)
Description: Video modeling (VM), in which the subject is shown a video version of a behavior he/she is to imitate, is a well-researched method used to improve a variety of deficits for learners with autism, particularly in the area of social skills (Charlop, 2007). Some benefits of video modeling are:
  • Faster acquisition/better generalization than in vivo modeling
  • Accentuates certain stimulus features
  • Minimizes distracting/irrelevant features
  • Is an engaging medium for longer attending
  • Does not require social interaction during learning
Video modeling offers options for intervention, specifically: peer modeling, self-modeling, and video point of view. Peer modeling utilizes same age/sex peers proficient in performing the skill. Video self-modeling uses the learner and editing processes as the model. Video point of view shows the video version of the behavior from the subject's visual perspective. Combining VM with other evidence-based practices provides learners with a comprehension plan to improve a variety of social behaviors. Today's technology makes video programming user-friendly. This workshop demonstrates via case studies how preschoolers with autism benefit from VM to increase play, respond/initiate conversation, and improve participation in social activities within an inclusive preschool. Participants have the opportunity to learn to use current apps/devices via hands-on tutorials and sample VM options.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define the major types of video modeling options; (2) match video approach to address specific target skill deficits; (3) define and measure subject's progress with video modeling protocols; (4) implement video modeling intervention using current technology,including editing simple video clips.
Activities: The format combines lecture, video demonstration, hands-on tutorial instruction and discussion
Audience: BCBAs, junior BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing Individualized Treatment Programs for Adolescents and Adults Across the Autism Spectrum
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Forum Auditorium, Niveau 1
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training (IBT)), CECILIA KNIGHT (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: As the population of individuals with ASD continues to grow, treatment planning for teenagers and adults is becoming a top priority for many clients, caregivers and professionals. While the number of older adolescents and adults with ASD is rising, most treatment options are aimed at early intervention, or the treatment of young children. Support services for adolescents and adults with ASD are scarce, and often times do not reflect the vastly different needs of individuals on all levels of the spectrum. This workshop will discuss the importance of developing individualized ABA treatment of older individuals with ASD, through appropriate assessment and prioritization of needs. Additionally, several specific treatment models with goals and strategies will be discussed to address the varying needs for teenagers and adults on the autism spectrum. Specifically, programming options for teaching adults who are mildly, moderately and severely affected will be reviewed, including programming to teach higher order social skills and perspective taking, skills for independent living and vocational success, and skills for functional communication and self-care. This presentation will also address specific ethical considerations for treating older children and adults, specifically how to protect client dignity and facilitate clients into decision making and management of their own treatment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify specific factors to consider when assessing and prioritizing the needs of adolescents and adult clients with ASD; (2) Identify and review several programming options for older individuals with ASD according to varying levels of need, including advanced social skills instruction, independent living and vocational skills instruction, and functional communication and self-care; (3) Identify relevant treatment goals and intervention strategies for clients within several case study vignettes; (4) Identify specific ethical considerations regarding the treatment of adolescents and adults with ASD including the promotion of client dignity and self-advocacy.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, discussion, video demonstration, and small group breakout tasks.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for BCBAs, therapists, educators, administrators, caregivers, or other professionals involved in the treatment of adolescents and adults with ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism adolescents, autism adults, individualized treatment
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Cultivating Workplace Wellbeing With Behavioral Science
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Studio F, Niveau 2
Area: CSS/OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Julie M. Slowiak, Ph.D.
JULIE M. SLOWIAK (University of Minnesota Duluth; InJewel LLC)
Description: Workplace stress, driven by a variety of factors, can have a direct and negative impact on employee wellbeing and, consequently, an indirect and potentially negative impact on those with whom employees interact (e.g., coworkers, clients, family members, friends) (Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health, 2016). This workshop is designed to provide behavior analysts with knowledge, tools, and techniques that will allow them to make a noticeable, positive impact on their own wellbeing, on the wellbeing of their employees or clients, and ultimately, on society as a whole. An understanding of the dimensions of wellbeing that tie to both individual and organizational values will assist behavior analysts' efforts to design interventions that promote sustainable behavior change. The workshop instructor will provide an overview of the basic wellbeing concept, introduce attendees to dimensions of wellbeing, describe self-management tools and provide tips to promote healthy and productive lifestyle behaviors, and describe and share data from recent research aimed at promoting and supporting wellbeing in the workplace. The workshop instructor will guide participants through a series of exercises that will allow participants to both identify specific, values-based goals that they would like to work toward and to develop an action plan for change. This workshop is designed to be highly interactive; participants will receive feedback from the workshop instructor, be asked to engage in large and small group discussions, and be asked to share their goals and action plans with other workshop participants.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the basic wellbeing concept; (2) Describe at least six dimensions of wellbeing; (3) Describe at least five self-management tools and techniques to improve wellbeing; (4) Describe recent findings from research aimed at promoting and supporting wellbeing in the workplace; (5) State at least one specific, values-based goal for improving personal wellbeing; (6) Describe an action plan for pursuing their values-based wellbeing goal.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice/exercises, and small and large group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and demonstration of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials for identifying personal levels wellbeing, developing goals, and designing an action plan will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop is designed to provide those with a basic understanding of behavior analysis and those currently practicing as behavior analysts with knowledge, tools, and techniques that will allow them to make a noticeable, positive impact on their own wellbeing, on the wellbeing of their employees or clients, and ultimately, on society as a whole.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): organizational health, sustainable change, values, wellbeing
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Providing an Effective Curriculum for Children and Adults With Limited Skill Repertoires and Problem Behavior
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Forum ABC, Niveau 1
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A.), TROY FRY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A)
Description: Those working with children and adults with limited skill repertoires and problem behavior often find that selecting targets for skill acquisition is extremely challenging. They are often provided with developmental curricula (e.g., the VB-MAPP, ABLLS-R, or Denver Early Start Model) designed primarily for young children with autism or delays in language and social skills, who acquire intraverbal repertoires and experience stimulus generalization and novel responses. Skills that are part of these curricula are often not functional for children or adults with limited skill repertoires or problem behavior. This workshop will describe the difference between developmental and functional skills (for example, the difference between rote counting and counting objects) and why functional skills are important for these children and adults. This workshop will then provide a review of the available functional skills curricula and an analysis of these instruments with respect to the principles and procedures of our science. This workshop will also describe how teaching functional skills improves the teaching repertoires of behavior analysts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the difference between developmental and functional skills; (2) describe three developmental and three corresponding functional skills; (3) describe why children and adults with limited skill repertoires and problem behavior should be taught functional, rather than developmental, skills; (4) describe how teaching teaching functional skills improves their overall teaching repertoire.
Activities: This workshop will include lecture, demonstrations, and guided practice for participants.
Audience: The target audience is BCBAs and BCABAs with limited experience, who are being asked to provide intensive instruction for children and adults with limited skill repertoires and problem behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Developmental skills, Functional skills, Generalization, Language skills
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Reconsidering Our Approach to Supervision: What Every Behavior Analyst Needs to Know About Delivering Effective Supervision
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Loft GH, Niveau 3
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa N. Wilson, Ph.D.
ALYSSA N. WILSON (Saint Louis University), HEATHER LYNN LEWIS (Saint Louis University)
Description: Behavior analytic research on supervision has identified the effectiveness of using behavioral applications (e.g., behavioral skills training) to teach competent trainees. Supervisors may need additional assistance with identifying evidence-based practices when it comes to implementing effective and competency-based supervision, particularly when supervising large groups of trainees. Therefore, the current experiential workshop seeks to assist supervisors who a) work with multiple trainee's in a given period of time, and b) collaborate with outside corporations, including Universities, in order to provide attendee's an opportunity to refine their supervision skill sets. The workshop will highlight 5 domains of the supervision process: (1) supervisor-trainee relationship during and after supervisory period, (2) delivering competency-based supervision, (3) successful tips for managing independent and group supervision, (4) organization strategies (e.g., evaluation rubrics, mapping clinical projects, goal setting, etc.), and (5) shaping professional behavior. Attendees will be provided supplemental materials during the workshop, to practice the skills presented. The workshop will use in-vivo training paired with problem-based learning paradigms to assist attendee's with acquiring skills discussed during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) List important features and elements of supervision; (2) Determine best-practices for supervision; (3) List aspects of appropriate supervisor-trainee relationships throughout various phases of supervision; (4)Demonstrate competency-based supervision skills; (5)Demonstrate skills for conducting individual and group supervision; (6) Design and implement organization strategies.
Activities: The workshop will use lecture, discussion, video observation, in-vivo modeling, rehearsal, and feedback to assist trainees with achieving the learning objectives. Problem-based learning (e.g., small groups work through a supervision issue/problem) will be used to assist attendees with putting the discussed skills into practice. In-vivo and video demonstrations of strategies will be conducted with group discussions and role-play to ensure skill acquisition. Supplemental materials will be provided to support attendee learning during the workshop. Attendees will also be able to use the supplemental materials after the workshop, as an example/guide for the supervision process.
Audience: The nature of the workshop is geared towards behavior analysts who are new to supervision or whom have previous supervision experience. The content of the workshop will be focused on the foundation of all effective supervision strategies (i.e., reliance on basic concepts of behavior), and will be tailored to establishing best practices.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): behavior analysis, Supervision
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Root Cause Analysis and Behavior Analysis: Applying Root Cause Analysis to Incidents and Assessment of Problem Behavior
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Forum GHIJ, Niveau 1
Area: PRA/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Merrill Winston, Ph.D.
MERRILL WINSTON (Professional Crisis Management, Inc.), LARAINE WINSTON (Life Targets, LLC)
Description: Root cause analysis has been used for decades to analyze the causes of major disasters and is used by agencies such as the NTSB to determine the cause(s) of airline disasters but it is also used for any industry that requires a detailed analysis of the chain of events that led to a particular outcome. This workshop will apply this type of analysis to behavioral incidents as well to the analysis of problem behavior
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) conduct a root cause analysis; (2) apply a root cause analysis to a behavioral incident; (3) apply a root cause analysis to assist in the understanding of all the causes for a given behavior problem.
Activities: The workshop will be comprised of lecture and then the participants will be broken into groups and given sample incidents for which they will conduct their own root cause analysis. This will be followed up by more lecture. Participants will also be given sample behavior problems and the function(s) of the behavior and will attempt a root cause analysis to help explain why a particular function has taken dominance in the maintenance of the behavior
Audience: The target audience is practicing behavior analysts who wish to augment their ability to track down numerous variables that all contribute to behavior problems and/or behavioral incidents
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Functional Assessment, Root Cause
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Standard Celeration Charting
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Studio DE, Niveau 2
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Abigail B. Calkin, Ph.D.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center), Kristine F. Melroe (Morningside Academy)
Description: The workshop will review the uses of the standard celeration chart (SCC) across the past 50 years with emphasis on its scientific charting and analyses of human performance in education and in other areas such as inner behavior and areas that impact society. The behavior charts shown will be individual and systemic. Participants will review writing precise performance statements (pinpoint behaviors), standard charting conventions, the three important dimensions of behavior to monitor--frequency, celeration, and bounce, and how to analyze data on the chart to assist in decision making. Some of the research and articles shared will be analyses and publications in international journals of educational research and behavior analysis. The guidelines and standards followed are those set by universities, school districts and communities for improvement in performance and learning. Attendees bringing their computers will assist in individual learning.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) state and analyze the content of the data on an SCC in terms of its frequency, celeration, and bounce (variability) in 1 minute; (2) make data-based decisions off of a variety of charts in educational and social (including inner behavior) fields; (3) state his/her new area of expertise and will list what kinds of decisions s/he will assist others to make once back at work after ABAI-Paris; (4) write new workshop learnings to facilitate practicing them once home.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture with slides to impart knowledge, videos of people in learning situations for examples, and small group sharing of ideas about solutions. Activities to meet workshop objectives will include lecture, video observations, practice of chart interpretation, and written plans for implantation of workshop learning. Supplemental materials will be available online at the time of and after the workshop. The format will include lecture, guided practice, many frequency building exercises, and brief small group discussions.
Audience: This workshop assumes the participants have a basic knowledge of the standard celeration chart and that they have used it. This workshop will be given an intermediate level and is designed to provide information on chart-based decision-making to advance the skills of the participants.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): precision teaching
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
The Acquisition of Behavioral Cusps as the Basics to Develop Language
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
7:00 AM–9:00 AM
Forum EF, Niveau 1
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
GLADYS WILLIAMS (CIEL, SPAIN), RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Personalized Accelerated Learning Systems (PALS))
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to discuss the acquisition of behavioral cusps as basic elements to develop language. Research has shown that basic prerequisites greatly enhance an individual's ability to develop functional language. In this workshop we will provide an overview of the teaching procedures designed to develop these basic skills and tactics to strengthen observational learning in the individual. We will discuss several strategies developed to bring vocal emissions under stimulus control. This discussion will include some basic strategies for teaching tacts as well as a detailed outline of the Rapid Tacting protocol. Building on that knowledge we will introduce a structure that contains elements of Direct Instruction (DI), Precision Teaching (PT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT), designed to gradually increasing the sophistication and complexity of language with the goal of becoming a functional speaker.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: 1. Identify and describe pre-listener skill repertoires; 2. Identify and describe listener repertoires; 3. Identify and describe speaker verbal repertoires; 4. Practice use of strategies to teach basic speaker verbal repertoires; 5. Identify and describe repertoires that support language flexibility; 6. Identify what describe component skills of each verbal repertoire.
Activities: Combines- lecture, discussion, small break out-group, video observation, and targeted reading.
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, behavioral cusps, skill acquisition, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Forum Auditorium, Niveau 1
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Katharine M. Croce, Ed.D.
KATHARINE M. CROCE (Chicago School of Professional Psychology; Bucks C), JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education)
Description: This interactive and hands-on workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a match component will be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match System, a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically-supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. Additionally, participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. The Self & Match System has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional behavior disorders, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. The Self & Match System can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems or class-wide and school-wide management procedures as a part of school-wide PBIS. It has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings, including public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring; (2) effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system; (3) identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system; (4) identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention; (5) identify the basic components of the Self & Match System; (6) systematically individualize an intervention based on collaborative and critical thinking; (7) create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace; (8) systematically consider function in the development of self-monitoring interventions and reinforcement opportunities.
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring behavioral interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, and the components of an effective Self & Match system. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own Self & Match System. The format combines lecture, small group collaboration, small group discussion-oriented activities, whole group responding utilizing interactive digital polling software, and interactive dialogue. Core content will be taught through a combination of lecture, video examples, data analysis, and guided practice.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who primarily support individuals from pre-K to 21 in school, home, or clinic settings. This is a great workshop for individuals and/or teams.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Behavior Intervention, School, Self-monitoring
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Preference and Reinforcement: The Keys to Maximizing Productivity With Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Scene C, Niveau 0
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard B. Graff, Ph.D.
RICHARD B. GRAFF (The May Institute)
Description: Behavior analyst practitioners, teachers, and parents use reinforcement-based procedures with individuals with autism spectrum disorder and developmental and intellectual disabilities to increase desirable behavior and to reduce undesirable behavior. The ultimate success of these procedures depends on the clinician's ability to a) identify effective reinforcers and b) arrange their delivery in an effective fashion. Understanding how to identify reinforcers, which is critical to designing and implementing effective reinforcement-based interventions, requires a working knowledge of preference and reinforcer assessments. This workshop reviews different preference assessment methods that have been published in the behavior analytic literature, how to identify stimuli to include in assessments, and the prerequisite skills required for each assessment. Variables that influence preference assessment outcomes are then reviewed, including the effects of pre-assessment motivating operations and differential consequences following selection responses. A brief introduction to different methods commonly used to assess reinforcer efficacy is provided, and variables that influence the effectiveness of reinforcers are reviewed. Next, recently published peer-reviewed research on innovative methods to train staff and parents how to implement commonly used preference assessment procedures will be reviewed; protocols and data sheets for implementing these assessments will be provided to attendees.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe three different preference assessment methods; (2) describe the prerequisite skills required for each preference assessment; (3) describe three different reinforcer assessment methods; (4) name at least two factors that affect the efficacy of reinforcers; (5) describe potential solutions to changes in reinforcer value.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion, and live and/or video demonstrations. Supplemental materials will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analyst practitioners who work with individuals with autism spectrum disorder and developmental and intellectual disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Following a Safer and More Efficient Functional Analysis and Treatment Model
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Scene DEF, Niveau 0
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mahshid Ghaemmaghami, Ph.D.
MAHSHID GHAEMMAGHAMI (University of the Pacific), JESSICA SLATON (Nashoba Learning Group, Western New England University)
Description: Functional analysis is a powerful methodological tool that can provide an effective and humane treatment for problem behavior (Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Despite its growing empirical support, a recent survey (Oliver, Pratt, & Normand, 2015) suggests that the majority of practicing behavior analysts are not conducting functional analyses to inform treatment considerations. Practitioners may be avoiding the functional analysis because of concerns that it places the patient or clinician in a dangerous environment and requires too much time or resources. We will be teaching the audience how to conduct an interview-informed synthesized contingency analysis that takes an average of 25 min (e.g., Jessel, Hanley, & Ghaemmaghami, 2016; Ghaemmaghami, Hanley, & Jessel, 2016), and presenting a collection of replications from clinical practice. We will then discuss how to use the results of the functional analysis to design effective, function-based treatments that include the teaching of complex and developmentally appropriate functional communication skills, and skill-based delay tolerance procedures that increase other social behaviors such as compliance, task engagement, and social interaction, in order to affect more global changes in the functional repertoires needed to be successful in contextually complex environments with natural reinforcement contingencies. Both socially mediated problem behavior and automatically maintained non-injurious stereotypy will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) design and conduct an interview-formed synthesized functional analysis of problem behavior in approximately 25 minutes, (2) teach complex functional communication skills, (3) teach toleration for delays and denials to reinforcement, (4) program for generalization and maintenance of these skills.
Activities: The workshop format will include lecture and discussion of material, small group activities, and guided activities from a workbook on designing functional analysis and function-based treatment.
Audience: BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers interested in learning a fast and safe approach to assessing and treating problem behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): FCT, problem behavior, synthesized FA, tolerance training
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond Mand Training: Increasing Meaningful Social Behaviour in Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Studio AB, Niveau 2
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan E. Tirella, M.Ed.
SUSAN E. TIRELLA (Forest Bridge School), Sarah Walker (Forest Bridge School)
Description: While traditional applied behaviour analysis programs are often extremely effective in increasing communication skills and remediating repetitive, stereotyped behaviours in individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder; many fail to address social skills beyond initiating social interactions through mand training. This workshop will review the application of Teaching Interactions (Leaf, et al., 2009), and how to implement them while following a comprehensive social skills curriculum (Winner, 2005) for individuals with high-functioning Autism. Participants will learn how to increase appropriate social behaviours in structured teaching sessions through the use of discrimination training and role-play and how to program for generalization to natural contingencies by establishing a socially significant rationale for change and systematically shaping approximations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify socially significant social behaviours to increase; (2) identify the components of an effective teaching plan based on teaching interactions; (3) develop a lesson plan that increases the identified social behaviour and programs for generalization to natural contingencies.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, video observation and small group breakout.
Audience: BCaBAs, BCBAs, or other individuals with experience and training in ABA and a basic understanding of typical social skills development.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills and the Development of Comprehensive Treatment Programs
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Forum ABC, Niveau 1
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Marie Laure Joelle Nuchadee, Ph.D.
MARIE LAURE JOELLE NUCHADEE (French ABA)
Description: The Applied Behavior Analysis Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorder: Practice Guidelines for Healthcare Funders and Managers states that "A developmentally appropriate ABA assessment process must identify strengths and weaknesses across domains and potential barriers to progress. The information from this process is the basis for developing the individualized ABA treatment plan." There are numerous existing tools that aim at assessing learner's abilities and skills levels, however the assessment process required for the development of comprehensive treatment programs or focused treatments can be complex. This workshop will cover the different existing clinical tools used by professionals in behavior analysis working with developmentally impaired patients allowing a detailed analysis of the skills of the students, but focus more particularly on the use of the Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills (ABLLS-R) and its skills-tracking system and how it can be used to identify the skills to be targeted both in comprehensive as well as focused treatments.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) observe and document the skills present in the behavioral repertoire of a child; (2) target the learning needs of a student; (3) develop a focused treatment according to the results of the assessment; (4) develop a comprehensive treatment according to the results of the assessment.
Activities: Lecture, small group activities on case studies, discussion
Audience: Professionals with basic knowledge in ABA and looking forward to strengthen their knowledge in applied behavior analysis
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): behavioral assessment, comprehensive treatment
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Learn French! Applications of Fluency-Based Learning to Foreign Language Acquisition
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Studio GHIJ; Niveau 2
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Daniel B. Sundberg, Ph.D.
DANIEL B. SUNDBERG (The Tandem Traveler), LISA M SICKMAN (The Tandem Traveler)
Description: Behavioral approaches to teaching and education have had tremendous impact on learning and language acquisition. The application of Skinner's analysis of Verbal behavior has advanced the way we teach new learners to communicate (Sundberg & Michael, 2001). Approaches such as direct instruction and precision teaching have helped to produce tremendous educational gains in both delayed and typically developing learners (Binder & Watkins, 1990). Yet there are very few examples of the application of this science to teaching typically developing adults to learn a foreign language (Dounavi, 2011). A skill that is growing in importance as the world becomes increasingly global. This workshop will present participants with an overview of a behavior analytic approach to language, learning, and instruction. Participants will use this knowledge to practice creating their own instructional sequence to train 20 French words of their choice, with guidance and feedback from the instructors. Participants will refine the instructional content based on real-time learner feedback. By the end of the workshop participants will have learned 20 useful phrases for the visit to Paris, and will have learned the basics of behavior-based methods to design effective language learning instruction.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) describe the core principles of fluency-based learning and precision teaching; (2) construct an instructional sequence using behavioral principles to teach foreign language; (3) speak and recognize 20 new words of French by the end of the workshop.
Activities: The workshop objectives will be achieved through lecture, guided practice, small group activities, group discussions, and fluency building exercises.
Audience: Behavior analysts visiting France who have no familiarity with the French language and want to learn some, and learn about instructional design and precision teaching.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Fluency, Language Acquisition, Precision Teaching, Verbal Behavior
 
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Procedural Integrity of Clinical Programming in Applied Settings
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Loft GH, Niveau 3
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Helena L. Maguire, M.S.
HELENA L. MAGUIRE (Melmark New England; Endicott College), SILVA ORCHANIAN (Melmark New England), Jill Harper (Melmark New England; Endicott College)
Description: The clinical effectiveness of a behavior support plan relies not only on the technological sophistication of the written plan, but also on the ability of direct service staff to accurately and consistently implement the behavior support plan. This workshop will present the staff training, supervisory training, and performance-monitoring systems for clinical programming that have evolved over the past 17 years at Melmark New England: a private, not for profit, community-based organization serving children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders, acquired brain injury, neurological diseases and disorders, dual diagnosis, and severe challenging behaviors. Following a review of the OBM literature on effective systems development, workshop participants will review sample-training schedules, training protocols, performance monitoring tools, as well as procedures for training supervisors to implement these systems. The goal of workshop will be to provide participants with empirically based systems the research to ensure competent and accurate implementation of clinical programs.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) identify the components of an effective staff training program; (2) select training protocols for sample clients; (3) identify the components of training systems necessary for supervisory staff; (4) identify areas where performance-monitoring tools and systems should be developed.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, large- and small-group discussion, small-group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: The target audience includes individuals with the responsibility of training or overseeing the training of direct service staff and development of supervisory training programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Procedural Integrity, Staff Training, Supervision Training
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
From Supervision to Consultation: Development of Competent Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA)
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Forum GHIJ, Niveau 1
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dana Garner, Ph.D.
DANA GARNER (Garner Behavior Services LLC ; Penn State), CHERICE R. CARDWELL (Association Francaise Les Professionnels de l'Analyse du Comportement), NICOLE TURON-DIAZ (Learning By Design, LLC)
Description: This workshop will cover ethics and practices when providing supervision to BACB applicants. The BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts will be cited to support interaction between supervisor and supervisee. Research will be cited that supports a variety of successful and ethical options for supervision (i.e., Sellers, Valentine, & Leblanc, 2016). The first portion of the workshop will cover ethical delivery of supervised field experience to BACB applicants. The second portion of the workshop will discuss how the skills learned within supervision influence competent consultation and ethical behavior when guiding home ABA programming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify necessary components of a supervision contract; (2) identify qualifications of BCBA/BCBA-Ds that are ethically able to provide supervision to BACB applicants; (3) identify BACB applicants that are ethically qualified to begin receiving supervision from BCBA/BCBA-Ds; (4) identify the components of a supervisor/supervisee relationship, when the relationship begins and terminates; (5) describe ethical code of conduct from the BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts that relate to provision of supervised field experience; (6) list qualifications of a competent BCBA/BCBA-D for home programming.
Activities: Workshop Activities: 1. Lecture 2. Group discussion 3. Small group break out for activities
Audience: Target audience includes: BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs who are providing home programming, and individuals receiving supervised field experience.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Using Motivational Interviewing Techniques to Alter Motivating Operations and Increase Parent Engagement in ABA Therapy
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Studio DE, Niveau 2
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monica Gilbert, M.S.
MONICA GILBERT (Crystal Minds New Beginning )
Description: Behavior Analysts often find barriers when providing parent training. Although Behavior Analysts offer empirically validated strategies and successfully change behaviors, it can be difficult for parents to adhere to treatment. A reason for parents inability to engage in treatment may be due to their "resistance". Resistance is defined as a private event that is evoked by an antecedent stimuli (clinician's confrontational language), which is reinforced by escape of the aversive stimuli. Motivating Operations have a behavior/value altering effect in that they make "escaping" the stimuli (clinician) by engaging in resistant behaviors more or less reinforcing. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically proven intervention that has shown substantial success in the literature in changing addictive behaviors in substance abusers, medication adherence, and developmental disabilities. MI is the route by which private events can be altered by using "change talk" strategies to decrease resistant behaviors and increase cooperation between parents and clinicians. In this workshop, we will discuss private events as Skinner defined it and as they relate to MI strategies. We will also present the proven strategies of MI to decrease resistance and foster a collaborative working relationship between parent and clinicians. Transtheoretical model (stages of readiness) will also be presented. Attendees will build skills in assessing level of resistance and use change talk procedures to successfully decrease them.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Assess parent's motivation based on the trans-theoretical model and using different proven measures; (2) Provide examples of effective change talk strategies to develop and build collaborative relationships with parents; (3) Describe motivation using private events; (4) Identify traps that can harm clinician-parental relationships; (5) Describe key features of effective MI strategies; (6) Measure change talk vs. counter-change talk; (7) Identify key features necessary for cooperative relationships between caregivers and clinicians.
Activities: Workshop activities will include didactic instruction, small group breakout, guided practice and role-plays.
Audience: Certified behavior analysts (BCaBA, BCBA), licensed psychologists, and graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Speech Science for the Behavior Analyst: Behavioral Tricks to Remediate Speech Errors
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
9:15 AM–11:15 AM
Forum EF, Niveau 1
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Janine Shapiro, M.S.
JANINE SHAPIRO (Access Behavior Analysis)
Description: This workshop will detail aspects of speech science relevant for behavior analysts who treat clients with speech errors. Attendees will practice analyzing speech errors to determine the most useful prompting procedures to improve intelligibility. Examples of different prompting and prompt fading procedures that are behavior analytic in nature will be demonstrated and videos of implementation with clients will be shown for clarity. A framework for how to divide up therapeutic resources across verbal and non-verbal means of communication will be provided. Peer-reviewed journal articles that support unlikely positions such as the use of alternative augmentative communication as a means to promote verbal communication will be discussed. The last forty-five minutes will be dedicated to the discussion of specific cases from audience members. The previous content of the workshop will be referenced during this discussion.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) state the three aspects that define any speech sound in any language; (2) determine which aspect(s) of a speech sound is in error when provided with the target sound and the error sound produced by the client; (3) demonstrate at least three different prompting procedures to remediate speech errors; (4) list the six different speech-language profiles of clients; (5) list two different speech errors that if noted, would immediately warrant referral to a speech-language pathologist and/or a physician.
Activities: The workshop will be comprised of lecture, video observation, individual activities, and discussion. Materials that support the content as well as references for journal articles and books will be provided as handouts.
Audience: The target audience is behavior analysts that treat patients with speech errors that affect intelligibility.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Incorporating Mindfulness Strategies into Behavioral Parent Training for Caregivers of Children With Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Studio AB, Niveau 2
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Tracy Raulston, M.Ed.
TRACY RAULSTON (University of Oregon), WENDY A. MACHALICEK (University of Oregon), Meme Hieneman (Positive Behavior Support Applications), Nell Caraway (IRIS Educational Media)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to provide practitioners with methods to incorporate mindfulness strategies into behavioral parent training for parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental disabilities. Parents of children with ASD are at an increased risk for clinically significant stress and depression. Mindfulness has been found to be associated with decreased stress and depression in parents of children with ASD, even after accounting for child challenging behavior (Jones, Hastings, Totskia, Keane, & Rhule, 2014). Additionally, mindfulness training has been successfully applied to this population, resulting in decreased levels of stress and increased quality of life (Neece, 2014). Attendees of this workshop should have foundational skills in behavioral parent training/coaching. This workshop will focus on how to embed mindfulness strategies within behavioral support plans. Example strategies include training parents to: (a) observe stimuli within (e.g., breath, private events) and outside (e.g., sound, smell) themselves; (b) objectively attend to variables affecting their childs behavior without adding assumptions; (c) detach from unpleasant private events (e.g., negative thought patterns associated with parenting); and (d) implement interventions as designed and without reacting to stress. Instructional videos and guided audio meditations will be shared during the training.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe operationally defined behaviors of mindfulness; (2) describe how stress reduction strategies increase the potential social validity of behavioral parent training and coaching; (3) describe how to objective attend to and observe private events and sensory stimuli; (4) practice the behaviors required for a short mindfulness meditation, including appropriate sitting posture, breathing, and engagement in critical private events.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, video and audio sample, and group guided practice.
Audience: This workshop is intended for attendees with skills and experience training parents in the use of behavioral support plans. No knowledge or skills in mindfulness practices are required.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): mindfulness, parent training, stress reduction
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Use of Video Modeling for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder in School-Based Settings
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Forum Auditorium, Niveau 1
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christos Nikopoulos, Ph.D.
CHRISTOS NIKOPOULOS (Autism Consultancy Services Ltd, London)
Description: Over the last few decades, there has been a shift in emphasis from language-based instruction to more visual instructional supports as a catalyst for learning in individuals with multiple disabilities and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This is due to extensive reports that individuals with ASD demonstrate enhanced performance on simple visual search tasks that require detecting a target set among distracters. Given the visual superiority of people with ASD, it is perhaps not surprising that the majority of current educational programs for these individuals frequently employ visual supports. Picture prompts, photographic activity schedules, visual schedules, or videos appear to be appropriate and particularly motivating for these individuals. The range of target behaviors and different methods by which video modeling has been successfully implemented to teach individuals with ASD ages 3 to 20 years, attests to its robustness as an approach for supporting appropriate behaviors in this population. This approach, as it could be implemented in school-based settings, will be the focus of this workshop, wherein extensive and updated details and findings from the literature, as well as from the clinical and research practice of the instructor, will be provided to the audience.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) name the salient features of video-modeling procedures as guided by findings from the literature (e.g., with what ages video modeling can be effective, what intervention goals can be addressed by the implementation of video modeling, in which settings video modeling can be effectively used, etc.); (2) describe different types of video modeling and the advantages and disadvantages of each type when targeting different performance areas in children with ASD (e.g., social skills, daily living skills, communication/language, play skills, joint attention, challenging behaviors); and (3) demonstrate step-by-step different types of video modeling (e.g., video modeling, self-modeling, priming modeling, point-of-view modeling) that could be designed and implemented in school-based settings.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, guided practice, video demonstrations of practice strategies, real-life case scenarios and examples, small group activities as well as group discussion.
Audience: Graduate students and RBTs, Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA), and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBA), psychologists as well as respective therapists and special educators working in a variety of applied and experimental settings as well as educational and social science settings who are interested in teaching a number of different skills to children/adolescents with ASD and other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Recent Research on Teaching Children With a Diagnosis of Autism
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Scene C, Niveau 0
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John W. Esch, Ph.D.
JOHN W. ESCH (Esch Behavior Consultants, LLC)
Description: Referring to the verbal behavior of an individual, Skinner (1957) writes: Reinforcing consequences continue to be important after verbal behavior has been acquired. Their principal function is then to maintain the response in strength. How often the speaker will emit a response depends, other things being equal, upon the over-all frequency of reinforcement in a given verbal community (p. 30). This quote highlights the importance of a verbal community in the development and maintenance of language with typically developing individuals. Persons with a diagnosis of autism may have limited verbal communities. Within family and educational settings, a verbal community may consist of only a single main caregiver and one or two teachers. This environment may hinder the development of skills necessary for emergent behavior, e.g., observational learning. This workshop will discuss the importance of a verbal and social community in the education of children with ASD. We will identify and describe recent research of instructional practices that encourage untaught emergent behavior. We will then consider the design of fun group activities that provide motivational events to support emergent behavior in a social community. Lastly, we will look at common language and social concerns, e.g., conditional verbal discriminations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) describe why conditional verbal discriminations are difficult to learn and teach; (2) state the traditional instructional sequence for teaching children with ASD and the data supporting the recommended changes to that sequence; (3) explain potential benefits for using games in the instruction of ASD children.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through lecture, keynote presentation, and video demonstrations of main points.
Audience: This workshop is intended for BCBAs and advanced BaCBAs working with children or who are responsible for programming others who teach children with an ASD diagnosis. The workshop will address common instructional difficulties e.g., conditional verbal discriminations, instructional sequences, methods to encourage emergent behavior, reinforcement.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
I Get By With a Little Help From My Friends: Promoting Inclusion, Communication, and Social Skills Development
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Scene DEF, Niveau 0
Area: AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kimberly Maich, Ph.D.
KIMBERLY MAICH (Brock University; Memorial University of Newfoundland), TRICIA VAN RHIJN (University of Guelph), SHERI MALLABAR (Brock University)
Description: With continued transformation happening in Ontario, Canada Kindergarten classrooms and emphasis being placed on Inclusive Education, there is a growing need for more evidence-based interventions to promote development in a classroom of young children, each with unique needs. This early intervention strategy is designed to support the unique needs of students with social-communication difficulties (including Autism Spectrum Disorder). The purpose of this extensive research study is to identify and assess the effectiveness of a peer-mediated social skills program called Stay, Play, and Talk (Phase IV). The program has been designed to increase the engagement of kindergarten-aged children identified as having social-communication difficulties and their peers who are typically developing within an inclusive kindergarten classroom environment. This intervention is the fourth phase of a pilot project, following Phases I-III in various Ontario jurisdictions. Using a Single Case Research Design (Multiple Baseline Across Subjects) this project involved student participants with social-communication difficulties in inclusive classrooms (Intervention and Control). All students in the classroom were taught Stay, Play, and Talk, and the target children received intensive triad trainings with their peers. Preliminary findings for each phase of the study suggest a steady, high increase in the number of communications between the target children and their typically developing peers, after the intervention had taken place.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify the importance of peer-mediated social skills instruction within peer-mediated environments; (2) describe program structures involved in the Stay, Play, and Talk Intervention; (3) effectively deliver peer-mediated social skills training to young children.
Activities: The format combines lecture, small group hands-on activities, guided practice, and will conclude with research findings from four phases a research study that support the effectiveness of this peer-mediated intervention (Stay, Play, and Talk: A Peer-Mediated Social Skills Program for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other Social Communication Difficulties and their Peers Phases I-IV).
Audience: Teachers, Early Childhood Educators, Educational Assistants, Special Education Consultants, Speech-Language Pathologists, Board Certified Behavior Analysts
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Early Intervention, Inclusive Education, Kindergarten, Peer-Mediated Intervention
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Integration of Automatic and Social Reinforcement Interventions in Applied Settings: A Framework for Addressing Dual Diagnoses
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Loft A, Niveau 3
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Tina G. Patterson, M.Ed.
TINA G. PATTERSON (Operations and Clinical Consultant)
Description: The workshop will review the credible effects of component analysis on occurrences of high-intensity behaviors exhibited by students diagnosed with a developmental disability and psychiatric disorder in school settings. Automatic and Social Reinforcement have been analyzed using indirect, direct and experimental analysis procedures for decades with results indicating that when high-intensity behaviors are present for these contingencies, differential reinforcement interventions are effective in reducing harmful behaviors, (Thompson, et al, 1998; Miltenberger, 2005; Borero and Vollmer, 2006). The students had a history of physical aggression towards others, self-injurious behaviors, property destruction and elopement from the school grounds. We will review the components of interventions using differential reinforcement procedures combined with medical consultations. The results showed that each of the student's high intensity-behaviors was reduced and they were able to participate in large group settings with their same-age peers. BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance is addressed through the following codes: 2.09 � Treatment/Intervention Efficacy; 3.01 � Behavior Analytic Assessment; 3.02 � Medical Consultation; 4.09 � Least Restrictive Procedures; 7.0 � Behavior Analysts� Ethical Responsibility to Colleagues.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) explain positive and negative automatic reinforcement and positive and negative social reinforcement contingencies and their influence on high-intensity behaviors; (2) describe interventions using component analysis of assessment data; (3) identify differential reinforcement procedures to increase automatic and social functionally equivalent replacement behaviors.
Activities: Workshop activities will include a combination of lecture, small group activities, video demonstrations and guided practice. The instructor will be prepared to address any learning or language barriers by providing supplemental materials.
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): automatic reinforcement, intervention
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Empowering Behavior Analytic Perspective on Language: Implications of Relational Frame Theory for Children's Affective and Hyperactive Problems
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Forum ABC, Niveau 1
Area: DDA/CBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Carmen Luciano, Ph.D.
CARMEN LUCIANO (University Almeria)
Description: Relational Frame Theory (RFT; Hayes, Barnes-Holmes, & Roche, 2001) is a contextual approach to complex human behavior with increasing empirical evidence (Dymond & Roche, 2013) that conceives language and cognition as arbitrarily applicable relational responding. As such, RFT has the potential to generate practical applications in relatively new areas for behavior analysis. In fact, during the last few years, RFT is providing important applications in the clinical work with children in several areas including autism, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and emotional disorders (Rehfeldt & Barnes-Holmes; Dixon, 2015; Luciano, Valdivia-Salas, Cabello, & Hernndez, 2009; Ruiz & Perete, 2015). The aim of the current workshop is to present a sketch of these applications. Firstly, the basics of RFT will be summarized. Secondly, the implications of RFT for training verbal behavior will be presented. Thirdly, the connection between RFT and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes, Strosahl, & Wilson, 1999) will be presented for the treatment of psychological disorders in children competent in verbal behavior. Lastly, the complementarity and integration with traditional contingency management techniques will be highlighted.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) Identify the basics of RFT; (2) Understand the rational for developing self-regulation in hyperactive children; (3) Adapt ACT strategies based on RFT for the treatment of psychological disorders in children.
Activities: Lecture, Small group breakout, Guided practice, Video observation
Audience: Intermediate. Participants should have basic knowledge of relational frame theory and acceptance and commitment
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): children, emotional disorders, hyperactivity, RFT
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Effect Sizes for Single Case Experimental Designs: Demonstrating an Undesirable Baseline Trend
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Studio F, Niveau 2
Area: EAB/EDC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Kimberly Vannest, Ph.D.
KIMBERLY VANNEST (Texas A&M University)
Description: Overlap in Visual Analysis is well established and understood by the field, less widely accepted but gaining momentum is the addition of effect sizes to the interpretation of data. Effects size calculations can enhance analysis particularly when undesirable baseline trend or the variability characteristic of applied settings is present. Non-overlap effect sizes such as Tau U provide strong statistical power, control trend in a moderate way, data are directly interpretable, respect design features, and the calculations are easy, even by hand with short data series. This session will train behavior analysts to use effect sizes to enhance interpretation and allow behavior analyst remain in control of data analysis and interpretation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) successfully identify difference between desirable or undesireable trend and lack of experimental control; (2) use two methods to calculated and adjust for trend in experimental data; (3) discuss implications of trended data in individual studies and meta-analytic research.
Activities: This two hour work shop will include brief lecture, demonstration, practice opportunities and discussion.
Audience: Graduate students, Scholars, Researchers, Clinicians in need of defensibility in practice.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Date Interpretation, Effect Sizes, Visual Analysis
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Pragmatic Supervision: Evaluate, Analyze, Change, and Repeat
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Loft GH, Niveau 3
Area: OBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Pragmatic supervisors collect frequent, accurate, sensitive measures of client progress, and when clients are not meeting their progress goals, those supervisors make changes. A pragmatic supervision process includes the following steps: 1) Pinpoint performance problems worth solving. a. Collect frequent, accurate, sensitive measures of client progress. b. When clients are not meeting their progress goals, evaluate staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels. 2) Analyze causes of inadequate client progress and staff performance. 3) Recommend solutions, which may include changes in staff a. Resources b. Training c. Management. 4) Design and implement those solutions. 5) Evaluate Improvements in a. Client Progress b. Staff Performance. This 2-hour workshop includes a workbook with practice materials, practice cards, a tool for evaluating client progress and staff performance, andpractice and discussion of the pragmatic supervision process. I have taught longer versions of this workshop at ABAI conferences, Swiss ABA, Australia ABA, British Columbia ABA and at numerous agencies across the U.S., during the last several years. Participants should bring laptops and smartphones or tablets to the workshop to practice using a new application.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called celeration efficiency; (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; (3) measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (4) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (5) recommend solutions to staff performance problems with the best return on investment.
Activities: This 2-hour workshop includes a workbook with practice materials, practice cards, a tool for evaluating client progress and staff performance, practice and discussion of the pragmatic supervision process, and counts toward the Behavior Analysis Certification Board continuing education requirements for supervisors.
Audience: This workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, and directors of educational and clinical organizations who serve students or clients with learning difficulties.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): analysis, evaluation, pragmatism, supervision
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA — 
Ethics
The Application of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board's Ethics Code in Clinical and Academic Settings
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Forum GHIJ, Niveau 1
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara Metzger, Ph.D.
BARBARA METZGER (Troy University)
Description: In this workshop, participants will review key features of the Behavior Analysis Certification Board's ethics code and practice applying them with scenarios taken from clinical and academic settings. Participants will discuss their recommendations of ethical behavior based on the ethics code.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe key features of the behavior analysis certification board's ethics code; (2) practice applying the ethics code to real-life examples of ethical scenarios taken from clinical and academic settings; (3) provide recommendations for ethical behavior based on the ethics code.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met by brief presentation of the key features of the certification board's ethics code and presentation of ethical scenarios. Participants will break up into small groups to discuss the application of the ethics code by making recommendations for ethical behavior for resolving the dilemmas.
Audience: Practitioners working in applied settings and academics who teach ethics to students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Basic Statistics for Behavior Analysts
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Forum EF, Niveau 1
Area: PRA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Annette Griffith, Ph.D.
ANNETTE GRIFFITH (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Description: In fields such as psychology, education, and medicine, the majority of the research conducted involves group designs and statistical data analyses (Byiers, Reichle, & Symons, 2012). In fact, in many fields, statistical analysis is viewed as the gold standard for evaluation and interpretation of data (Sullivan, 2011). In contrast, a hallmark of the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) is the use of single subject research methods, that rely on visual inspection of the data (Kazdin, 2010). As a result, while knowledge and skill in single subject design methods is a key component in behavior analytic training programs and a necessary skill for certification (BACB, 2012), many behavior analysts may not have the skills necessary to accurately interpret and critically evaluate the literature outside the field of ABA (Shull, 1999). This may place behavior analysts at a disadvantage when assessing current knowledge, as many studies outside the field of ABA are very relevant for our clinical and experimental work. Therefore, this workshop will provide a basic overview of statistical analyses typically employed for group level designs. We will cover rationales for learning more about statistical analyses, review common statistical methods, and examine how these methods are presented in the scientific literature.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe reasons why it is beneficial for behavior analysts to be familiar with statistical analysis methods; (2) identify common statistical analysis methods used in related fields; (3) identify and interpret basic descriptive and inferential statistics in the context of research reports; (4) discuss methods for increasing statistical knowledge and familiarity in the future.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, and group breakout sessions. Guided practice and group breakout sessions will incorporate project-based methods to facilitate engagement and comprehension (Shambare, 2011).
Audience: Clinicians with BCaBA and BCBA certification.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): data analysis, statistics
 
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Making it Work: Ethical Considerations and Solutions for Behavior Analytic Supervision of Individuals Seeking Certification
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
11:30 AM–1:30 PM
Studio DE, Niveau 2
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training (IBT)), CECILIA KNIGHT (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: As more individuals enter the field of Behavior Analysis, defining parameters for appropriate supervision to those seeking BCBA, BCaBA and RBT certification is an important topic of discussion. Specifically, our ethical codes, which define our responsibilities to our supervisees, as well as the public they serve, give rise to certain considerations that must be addressed regarding appropriate and ethical supervisory practices. Supervising a paid employee, providing remote on-line supervision to a student, or contracting with an international student who is not your employee are several examples of situations faced by BCBA supervisors which often present practical and ethical challenges. Furthermore, as BCBAs start to assess and then mentor RBTs, there are many unexplored areas of concern that a BCBA must consider; how many RBTs should a practitioner supervise while maintaining other responsibilities, how can a BCBA remotely assess RBT candidates with confidence, and what should a BCBA do when the RBTs performance in the workplace is subpar? This presentation will review ethical concerns that may arise in various supervisory situations as well as present solutions for BCBAs who are trying to provide ethical and appropriate supervision to those pursuing certification as BCBAs and BCaBAs, as well as those currently certified as an RBT.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify several ethical issues which commonly arise within supervision of BCBA/BCaBA candidates and RBTs, including confidentiality, dual relationships and conflict of interest, scope of expertise and ensuring quality of service; (2) identify and discuss solutions to address common ethical dilemmas faced by BCBAs offering supervision to those seeking to gain and/or maintain certification; (3) identify specific factors that should be considered and addressed when deciding to commence supervision of a candidate; (4) identify and review components of effective behavior analytic supervision according to BACB guidelines.
Activities: The workshop format will combine lecture, large group discussion, and small group breakout activities.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for BCBAs providing behavior analytic supervision to students, educators, or other professionals seeking certification as a BCBA or BCaBA, as well as to individuals certified as RBTs. It would also be appropriate for those involved in the organization and arrangement of BCBA supervision for individuals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate

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