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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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42nd Annual Convention; Downtown Chicago, IL; 2016

Program by Workshops: Friday, May 27, 2016


 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behaviorally Based Social Skills Groups for Individuals With Autism: Lessons From Research and Clinical Practice
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich D, Swissotel
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joseph H. Cihon, M.S.
JEREMY ANDREW LEAF (Autism Partnership), MITCHELL T. TAUBMAN (Autism Partnership), CHRISTINE MILNE (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOSEPH H. CIHON (University of North Texas), RONALD LEAF (Autism Partnership Foundation), JOHN JAMES MCEACHIN (Autism Partnership)
Description: Researchers have demonstrated that social skills groups may be beneficial for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For the past 20 years the instructors have been implementing social skills groups for individuals diagnosed with ASD. Recently, they have completed a randomized control trial which evaluated a 16-week behaviorally based social skills group for individuals diagnosed with ASD. Based upon the instructors’ clinical experience and research experience they will present how behavior analysts can effectively implement behaviorally based social skills group. Research data, clinical data, and video examples of how to implement social skills group will be presented and the various teaching and reinforcement procedures that can be used within social skills group will be discussed. The instructors will also discuss ways to evaluate students’ progress within a social skills group. Finally, future directions for both clinicians and researchers will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify 3 different teaching procedures that can be used in social skills groups and identify what skills can be taught with these procedures; (2) identify 3 different formal assessments and identify what these formal assessments asses; (3) describe various data collection systems that can be used during social skill groups.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts who have previous experience working with individuals diagnosed with autism or developmental disability and who have implemented behaviorally based procedures to teach social behavior
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): group instruction, social behavior, social skills
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Establishing Creative Play: A Behavior Analytic Perspective
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 2, Swissotel
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: The purpose of this intermediate workshop is to train participants in the use of various strategies to teach creative play, through the use of visual supports. Creativity will be defined using behavioral definitions with an emphasis placed on planning for generalization. A variety of systematic strategies for teaching creative play using visuals will be reviewed with participants. Some of these strategies will include: matrix training, video modeling, visual checklists, and picture activity schedules. Video modeling has been shown to be a successful teaching strategy in increasing pretend play skills in children diagnosed with autism (MacDonald, Sacramone, Mansfield, Wiltz & Ahearn, 2009), while matrix training has demonstrated successful results in teaching generalized language responses without direct teaching (Goldstein & Mousetis, 1989). Picture activity schedules have also been used to foster independent play in children with autism spectrum disorders (MacDuff, G. S., Krantz, P. J., & McClannahan, L. E., 1993). This workshop will describe the expanded use of visual supports to facilitate generalization of materials, settings and play skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe and understand creativity; (2) describe the deficits in children with ASD to rationalize a need for teaching creativity; (3) identify the need to plan for generalization; (4) identify types of play to teach and who to teach it to; (5) describe matrix training and create a matrix for a pretend play activity; (6) describe video modeling and one scenario in which to implement it; (7) identify settings and occasions to use them and learners to use them with; (8) describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individuals’ learning styles.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a variety of approaches including: lecture, guided practice, video observations and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies provided. Hands on activities will follow: matrix , video models and visual schedules will be developed in small groups.
Audience: BCBAs, SLPs,graduate students
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Activity Schedules, Creativity, Play skills
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: BACB
Motivating Learner Participation: An Alternative to Traditional Escape Extinction Methods
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Lucerne I, Swissotel
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Robert Schramm, M.A.
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Knospe-ABA)
Description: The goal of the workshop is to teach participants an approach to earning instructional control with unmotivated or otherwise challenging learners that does not employ traditional escape extinction procedures such as forced physical prompting or physically holding the learner in the teaching setting. Through the Seven Steps to Earning Instructional Control, participants will be given an easy-to-teach and therefore reproducible path to earning learner motivation while avoiding some of the potentially behavior escalating procedures common in behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the importance of learner assent in home, clinic, and education settings; (2) employ creative and practical methods for controlling access to reinforcement in all environments; (3) describe the value and process of being meticulously contingent with words and actions and the value and process of pairing oneself with reinforcement; (4) describe the differences between positive and negative reinforcement and why one is valuable in earning instructional control with an unwilling learner; (5) describe the concept of a teaching arc and how one can prolong the value of teaching over several different reinforcing teaching settings for the length of teaching interactions.
Activities: Lecture, video, discussion, question and answer
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, parents, teachers, behavior therapists
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): 7 steps, escape extinction, instructional control, Schramm
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder a Variety of Skills Through the Use of Video Modeling
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich C, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christos Nikopoulos, Ph.D.
CHRISTOS NIKOPOULOS (Autism Consultancy Services, London)
Description: Over the last few decades, there has been a shift in emphasis from language-based instruction to more visual instructional supports as a catalyst for learning in individuals with multiple disabilities and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This is due to extensive reports that individuals with ASD demonstrate enhanced performance on simple visual search tasks that require detecting a target set among distracters. Given the visual superiority of people with ASD, it is perhaps not surprising that the majority of current educational programs for these individuals frequently employ visual supports. Picture prompts, photographic activity schedules, visual schedules, or videos appear to be appropriate and particularly motivating for these individuals. The range of target behaviors and different methods by which video modeling has been successfully implemented to teach individuals with ASD ages 3 to 20 years, attests to its robustness as an approach for supporting appropriate behaviors in this population. This approach, which has been so favorable to researchers and therapists for a number of reasons, will be the focus of this workshop, wherein extensive and updated details and findings from the literature, as well as from the clinical and research practice of the instructor, will be provided to the audience.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify the essential conceptual underpinnings of observational learning, which are critical for the formation of video modeling procedures; (2) name the salient features of video-modeling procedures as guided by findings from the literature (e.g., with what ages video modeling can be effective, what intervention goals can be addressed by the implementation of video modeling, in which settings video modeling can be effectively used, etc.); (3) describe different types of video modeling and the advantages and disadvantages of each type when targeting different performance areas in children with ASD (e.g., social skills, daily living skills, communication/language, play skills, joint attention, challenging behaviors); (4) demonstrate step-by-step different types of video modeling (e.g., video modeling, self-modeling, priming modeling, point-of-view modeling) could be designed and implemented; (5) design and analyze a video modeling intervention using selected case scenarios.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, guided practice, video demonstrations of practice strategies, real-life case scenarios and examples, small group activities and exercises as well as group discussion.
Audience: Graduate students and RBTs, Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA), and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analysts (BCaBA), psychologists as well as respective therapists and special educators working in a variety of applied and experimental settings as well as educational and social science settings who are interested in teaching a number of different skills to children/adolescents with ASD and other developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Communication skills, Social skills, Video modeling
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Generative Instruction for Individuals With Learning Challenges
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Skyway 272, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Eduational and Developmental Therapies, Inc), GLADYS WILLIAMS (CIEL, SPAIN)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to introduce clinicians to generative instruction technology. Both the conceptual and research base of generative instruction promises to significantly improve the efficacy and efficiency of ABA-based educational technologies for both neurotypical and atypical learners, and to resolve many of the learning challenges presented by children with autism and related disorders. The presentation is divided into three components: part 1 identifies and reviews the knowledge base that supports generative instruction design and delivery; part 2 reviews and demonstrates varius generative instructional design and delivery options; part 3 includes activities to acquire and practice each instructional design and delivery option.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify several types of generative instruction designs and procedures within hear/say, read/say, read/write, and hear-think/write learning channels, and describe the potential for each to establish generative learner performance; (2) identify the key studies and projects that have lead to contemporary, applied generative instructional design within hear/say, read/say, read/write, and hear-think/write learning channels; (3) demonstrate application of three major generative instruction procedures to individual, self-choose cases within hear/say, read/say, read/write, and hear-think/write learning channels and discuss/review with other workshop participants.
Activities: Activities will include didactic presentation of the conceptual and research history of generative instruction. The presentation will include video examples of various generative instructional design and delivery procedures (e.g., general case programming through direct instruction delivery). Presentation will include built in Active Student Response opportunities throughout. Active discussion will be encouraged throughout. After presentation of each major generative contingency (e.g., contingency adduction), small break out groups will be formed to produce a clinical example of the use of that contingency. Several procedures will require participants to complete pre-structured instructional design templates.
Audience: Intermediate level clinicians and clinical supervisors of instructional programming to address the learning, comprehension, and performance challenges of individuals with learning deficits and difficulties.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Contingency adduction, Generalcase programming, Generative instruction, Recombinative generalization
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Differential Reinforcement Schedules: What's the Difference and How to Implement in Classroom and Community Settings?
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich A, Swissotel
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ed.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LAUREN DEGRAZIA (Partners in Learning, Inc.), JENNIFER CORNELY (Partners in Learning, Inc.), NICOLE M. RZEMYK (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LORI LORENZETTI (Partners in Learning, Inc,)
Description: Differential schedules of reinforcement have long been scientifically validated as successful methods to improve human behavior (Vollmer et.al., 1999). When properly implemented, clinicians have demonstrated reduced levels of inappropriate targets (Call et.al., 2011; Rozenblat et.al, 2009), as well as increased rates of desired responses (Napolitano et.al., 2010). Children with autism can engage in both high rates of challenging behavior and profound deficits in social interactions. These deficits may impede successful inclusion within normalized classrooms. Rates of social responding, initiating, and reduced outbursts should be targeted at an early age to increase successful community integration. This workshop will demonstrate via case studies how to implement a variety of differential reinforcement (DR) schedules to: increase social initiations and responding in students with autism spectrum disorders towards peers in class by using a peer-led differential reinforcement of high rates of behavior schedule (DRH); reduce rates of challenging behaviors by using differential reinforcement of low rates of behavior schedule (DRL) fixed interval schedules in class and community settings; run multiple DR schedules as part of a treatment package; implement DR schedules using high and low tech options; design intervention plans via DR schedules that may best fit learner challenges and setting considerations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe each differential schedule of reinforcement treatment option; (2) state the relevant clinical information needed to apply appropriate DR schedule to fit the needs of the learner, (3) describe both high and low technology options to run DR schedules in a variety of settings
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video case study examples, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials for identifying appropriate guidelines for DR schedule applications to match learner needs will be provided in order to support participant learning. Both high and low technology options will be shared with participants.
Audience: Junior BCBAs, school consultants, child study teams, behavior specialists, BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): differential reinforcement
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Keep Calm and Carry On: Teaching Toleration of Non-Preferred Activities/Items to Individuals With Autism
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Nicole Pearson, Psy.D.
NICOLE PEARSON (NYC Autism Charter School), JENNIFER JAYE (NYC Autism Charter School), REBECCA WELLS (New York Center for Autism Charter School), LEIGH COOPER (NYC Autism Charter School)
Description: Many individuals with autism exhibit challenging behavior when confronted with non-preferred items or activities. While behavior intervention plans are often put in place to decrease maladaptive behavior, much more can be done through targeted programming to offset the likelihood of challenging behavior occurring in these instances. Specifically, programming to increase the toleration of non-preferred activities and items will increase appropriate responses and potentially establish a generalized repertoire of appropriate alternative responses and self-regulation skills that can be used in other non-preferred scenarios. This workshop will enable participants to develop, plan, and implement effective, evidence-based skill acquisition programming to increase the toleration of non-preferred activities and items in individuals with autism. Through an analysis of toleration programming components and case studies, participants will learn how to identify and break down goals into successive steps and how to shape toleration. This workshop will review the types of skills that can be targeted (e.g., eating a variety of foods, tolerating medical exams, tolerating wearing an ID bracelet), and allow participants to apply what they’ve learned through interactive, small group activities. Because programming can occur in school, home, and/or community settings, participants will also learn best practices and implementation procedures for working collaboratively with families/caregivers.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe how the principles of shaping apply to instruction to teach students with autism how to maintain appropriate behavior in the presence of nonpreferred activities and/or stimuli; (2) list components of effective teaching strategies to teach individuals with autism to maintain appropriate behavior around specific activities (e.g., birthday parties) and/or stimuli (e.g., automatic toilet flushing signals); (3) design a program that includes teaching procedures, plans for systematic fading of teaching procedures and/or reinforcement, data collection options and generalization to a novel setting for at least one activity or stimulus (e.g., getting a haircut); (4) use information about programming for effective home/school collaboration and parent training best practices to apply teaching strategies to home/community environments.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video demonstrations, and small group activities which will then be discussed with the larger group. Specific small group activities to include: each group will select a target skill from a list of potential targets (e.g., getting a shot, tolerating an ID bracelet, eating a new food) and create a de-sensitization procedure from start to finish; discuss data collection options and include strategies for generalization, fading, and parent training; problem solving a case study scenario; identifying alternatives/modifications that can be used if teaching to toleration is not an option.
Audience: The intended audience includes BCBAs and related providers currently providing behavior analytic services in home, school, and/or community settings; teachers/administrators; parents of individuals with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism education, desensitization, parent training, toleration programming
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: Unique Considerations for Staff Training in Community-Based Settings: Advanced Uses of Technology to Teach
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 3, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica Zawacki, Ph.D.
GLORIA M. SATRIALE (Preparing Adolescents and Adults for Life (PAAL)), JESSICA ZAWACKI (PAAL), ERIC SCHINDELDECKER (Preparing Adolescents and Adults for Life (PAAL)), RICKIESHA MARCH (PAAL), KAITLIN ROSS (PAAL)
Description: Staff competencies are critical to successful outcomes in service delivery for individuals with developmental disabilities. The literature is robust regarding the most efficient ways to train staff to perform their duties utilizing traditional methodology and in traditional educational settings. However, with the increasing implementation of training programs across community settings, and the decreasing focus on centralized service delivery, a retooling of traditional approaches to staff training and mechanisms for supervision is needed. Further, the influx of individuals into adult service systems has exhausted available resources requiring service providers to do more with less. Advances in technology (e.g., Internet, wireless systems, smart phones, Bluetooth, live-stream video) have transformed our ability to efficiently train, maintain, and develop staff competencies. The purpose of this workshop is to describe and demonstrate the use of various technologies to facilitate and accelerate competencies necessary for staff to work with adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) or other intellectual disabilities in various community settings (e.g., grocery store, library). Participants will learn about considerations in staff training that are unique to staff performance in community-based settings. Participants will learn the advantages and disadvantages of the use of technology when training staff, specific types of technology for specific uses. Additionally, more global issues about staff training, such as staff retention will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify unique considerations for staff training in community based settings; (2) identify advanced uses of readily available technologies to improve, facilitate and accelerate staff training in vivo and remotely; (3) create web-based portals to contain training and BST protocols for easy access by staff; (4) identify ways in which to accomplish more training with dedication of less resources; (5) discuss issues related to staff retention.
Activities: Objectives will be met through didactic instruction, video, and group discussion.
Audience: Staff trainers; human resource personnel; agency directors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, community instruction, staff training, technology
 
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
First Three Months of Behavioral Intervention for Children With Autism: A Developmental Perspective
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Montreux 2, Swissotel
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monika M. Suchowierska-Stephany, Ph.D.
Monika M. Suchowierska-Stephany (SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center), KATRINA OSTMEYER (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.), MIKAYLA M. MCHENRY-POWELL (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.)
Description: The first three months of early intensive behavioral intervention are a crucial period for a young learner with autism. It has been recommended that the behavioral intervention take into account a developmental perspective, especially as it relates to behavioral cusps leading to autistic development. In this workshop, we will examine several related skills that may be present or absent in young children with autism: stimulus overselectivity, facial recognition, mutually responsive orientation, joint attention, and social referencing. Based on this information, we will propose major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention, together with teaching strategies to accomplish those goals. Major challenges of the first three months will also be discussed. The workshop will conclude with some suggestions for the next months of therapy.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) list developmental concepts that relate to early behavioral intervention; (2) characterize skills that are present or absent in young children with autism and that are behavioral cusps for autistic development; (3) list major therapeutic goals for the first three months of intervention as they relate to the precursors of autism; (4) plan the following months of therapy.
Activities: During the course of the workshop, participants will have an opportunity to analyze videos of typically developing children and autistic children to search for the behavioral cusps discussed in the workshop as well as to plan–based on videos of autistic children–goals for the beginnings of their therapy. Small group activities will be organized.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts who work with families of young children with autism and are responsible for programming therapeutic goals for their pupils.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, behavioral cusps, child development
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Diagnosis and Treatment of Children With Psychiatric Disorders: Functional Assessments and Motivating Operations
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall AB, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: CBM/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University), JESSICA MINAHAN (Consultant)
Description: Typically, functional behavioral assessment (FBA) has been used with individuals with developmental disabilities, including autism spectrum disorders. The goal of FBA is to identify the function of aberrant behavior and to teach the individual to exhibit an acceptable replacement behavior that can serve the same function. Traditional counselors view aberrant behaviors in individuals with psychiatric disorders as symptoms of underlying constructs and use the diagnosis as a reason for these behaviors, proposing more global treatments such as evidence-based therapies or medications. On the other hand, behaviorists view those behaviors as serving an environmental function. Once the environmental function of a psychiatric symptom is identified, it can be treated effectively by replacing it with a more acceptable behavior serving the same function. However, there are several components that are often missing in the analysis of behavior that is related to psychiatric diagnoses. These include: the analysis/understanding of establishing/abolishing operations in the form of private events (e.g., physical sensations, covert tacts/mands) and learning history with SDs for reinforcement/punishment. Workshop presenters will discuss the process of conducting FBAs and developing function-based treatments for several different symptoms of psychiatric diagnoses including anxiety, disturbed attachment, and oppositional/defiant behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the symptoms of psychiatric disorders as behaviors serving an environmental function; (2) describe the process of conducting FBAs with children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (3) describe the role of learning history in treating with children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (4) describe the role of motivating operations in the form of private events in treating children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders; (5) describe how to develop and implement function-based treatments for children diagnosed with psychiatric disorders.
Activities: Participants will listen to didactic information and real-life case histories in homes, schools and community settings, take notes, ask questions, view a PowerPoint presentation, present their own cases for feedback, and participate in role-play situations.
Audience: Participants would include board certified behavior analysts, psychologists, counselors, health care providers, social workers and/or teachers who serve children with developmental disabilities or children who typically-developing who have emotional difficulties and/or have been given psychiatric diagnoses.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: BACB
Behavioral Relaxation: Training and Scale
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Montreux 1, Swissotel
Area: CBM/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Victoria Stout Kubal, M.S.
VICTORIA STOUT KUBAL (California Consulting and Research Institute)
Description: Relaxation techniques are an integral part of the successful treatment of those exhibiting anxiety-related, pain-related, and/or anger-related behaviors. The sooner a client learns relaxation and other types of self-control techniques, the safer his/her internal and external environments may become. In addition, due to limitations in funding, providers must often demonstrate that extensive treatment progress has been made within a relatively short period of time. Poppen’s (1998) Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) is an assessment tool for measuring the progress of an individual demonstrating the 10 overt relaxed behaviors taught to criterion with Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT). BRT can be an effective part of treatment for individuals with emotional/mental disorders, hyperactivity, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, physical limitations, and/or restricted cognitive/intellectual capabilities. This workshop will provide an opportunity to experience Poppen’s (1998) Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT) by means of labeling, modeling, imitation, practice, and corrective feedback. Once workshop participants are proficient in demonstrating URT and can verbally describe these 10 relaxed behaviors and corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors, they will be taught how to assess URT using the BRS.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) position his/her own body in alignment with the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from URT; (2) write a description of each of the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from URT in his/her own words and provide corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors; (3) give another individual appropriate feedback so that the other individual can correct himself/herself according to the 10 URT postures; (4) observe, record, and assess another individual’s performance of the 10 relaxed behaviors from URT by accurately using the BRS.
Activities: Verbal Behavior: Listen to a presentation regarding the physiological effects of relaxation, the history of using relaxation training to treat psychological and physical disorders, and Poppen’s (1998) development of BRT and BRS. Labeling and Modeling: View a live demonstration of the 10 postures included in URT. Each relaxed posture will be labeled, described topographically, and demonstrated physically. Modeling and Imitation: Learn how to breathe diaphragmatically, then imitate the other 9 relaxed behaviors of URT while viewing an instructor as model. After each participant has proficiently demonstrated each posture separately, he/she will practice relaxing all 10 areas at the same time. Feedback: Practice silently while the instructors are giving each participant individual corrective feedback. Later, workshop participants will form pairs and alternate practicing URT and giving each other corrective feedback. Criterion Tests: Take URT Written Criterion Test; score one another’s criterion test. Take BRS Written Criterion Test; score one another’s criterion test. Assessment: BRS scoring methodology will be explained and demonstrated. All observers, including the instructor, will simultaneously score the BRS for the model.
Audience: BCBA-Ds, BCBAs, BCaBAs who work with the following populations: clients with anxiety disorders, pain-related difficulties, or anger management problems; individuals with traumatic brain injury or developmental disabilities; persons exhibiting hyperactive or repetitive behaviors; clients exhibiting schizophrenic behaviors; and persons who experience an extreme amount of “stress.” Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, clinical behavior analysis, family and child therapy, and/or health and fitness training will also benefit from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Mindfulness, Relaxation, Self-control, Stress Management
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavior Analytic Training for Health, Life, Fitness, and Peak Personal Performance
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Alpine, Swissotel
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stephen Ray Flora, Ph.D.
STEPHEN RAY FLORA (Youngstown State University)
Description: As obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other health problems are at epidemic proportions for many populations, including populations served by Behavior Analysts, it is vital Behavior Analysts learn to apply behavior analysis to ameliorate these problems and to promote healthy lifestyles effectively. Medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of exercise, athletic participation, physical fitness and healthy living are covered. The workshop will teach participants to use applied behavior analysis principles to objectively access, analyze, and optimally improve their own, or their clients’ physical fitness, health related lifestyles, and, if desired, athletic performances. Emphasis will be placed on Behavior Analytic ‘gradual change techniques;’ optimal goal setting parameters; objective, data based analysis and decision making; and how Behavioral Analytic Experimental Designs, such as Multiple Baselines Across Situations and Bounded Changing Criterion Designs, may not just be used to measure change, but actually facilitate effective behavioral change. A new focus, from a behavior analytic perspective, will be on the uses and misuses of web based, social media fitness tools (e.g. Strava, fitbit, etc). Finally, participants will learn how improved health allows individuals to live a valued life and aid in chosen life directions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) state many of the behavioral, psychological, and medical benefits of physical fitness, athletic participation, and living a healthy lifestyle; (2) perform functional assessment of current health and fitness related behaviors; (3) perform task analyses of healthy eating behaviors; safe, effective exercise; and skilled athletic performances; (4) identify personalized reinforcers, motivations, incentives, and values for healthy lifestyles, physical fitness and athleticism; (5) understand the importance of, and how to effectively use goal setting, task analysis, pinpointing; how to identify skill gaps; how to set realistically achievable goals; and how to effectively use publicly posted goals to achieve fitness and optimal athletic performance; (6) use behavior analytic experimental designs to not only measure and access behavioral change but to facilitate health, fitness and athletic behavioral changes; (7) use the concepts of optimal physiological arousal, periodization, and super compensation in designing a personalized training program; (8) analyze and use web-based, social media tools as health and fitness aids; (9) use data collection, charting, and graphing to optimize fitness and improve eating related behaviors.
Activities: Participants will be guided though presented information with PowerPoint slides, worksheets and lecture handouts that will provide participants with the information necessary learn the medical, behavioral, and psychological benefits of fitness and develop effective programs for improving health, physical fitness, diet behaviors, and healthy lifestyles; develop effective programs to optimize athletic performance; and to use Behavior Analytic Experimental Designs to access and facilitate desired behavioral change. Participants will be shown, from a behavior analytic perspective; how to access, use and evaluate information and data collected from fitness based social media. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture utilizing PowerPoint, presenter provided practice materials, video observation, and group discussion.
Audience: The target audience is board certified behavior analysts, BCaBAs, psychologists, personal trainers, and others interested in learning to use behavior analytic procedures to promote healthy lifestyles, fitness, or to optimize elite performance. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, or health and fitness will also benefit.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): diet, health, physical fitness, sport psychology
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Functional Skills and Curriculum-Based Assessments for Learners With Moderate-to-Severe Disabilities: It's as Much About What We Teach as How We Teach It
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall KL, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates), TROY FRY (Patrick McGreevy and Associates)
Description: In recent years, many teachers, curriculum coordinators, and behavior analysts have struggled with “what to teach children” with moderate-to-severe disabilities or limited skill repertoires, including many children with autism, especially as they grow older. In public schools, teachers are often instructed to adhere to the Common Core State Standards, while in ABA centers they are often offered only developmental curricula designed to help young children “catch up” to their typically developing peers. When they look for alternative sources of more functional skills, they often find few options. If they look to the BACB Fourth Edition Task List, they find no items that assist in resolving this or any other curricular issue. The presenters will describe functional skills and curriculum-based assessments, their value for specific children and adults, and the scientific literature that supports their use.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe four criteria that can be used to determine if a skill is functional for a learner with moderate-to-severe disabilities; (2) describe four examples of speaker, listener, daily living, academic, and tolerating skills that are functional for learners with moderate-to-severe disabilities; (3) describe examples of available curriculum-based assessment instruments and the advantages and disadvantages of each; (4) describe four barriers to an effective method of speaking.
Activities: The presenters will present some of the material in a lecture format, followed by directed discussions and participant interactions. Participants will also be provided with opportunities for guided practice in the selection of functional skills, including the most important functional skill of all -- functioning effectively as a speaker.
Audience: BCBAs and BCaBAs who function as teachers, residential care providers, curriculum coordinators and supervisors, clinical directors, and university professors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: HELP! I Can't WAIT to Take a BREAK ... and Other Critical Communication Skills
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall EF, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Catherine Horton, M.S.
CATHERINE HORTON (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), ANNE OVERCASH (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), ANTHONY CASTROGIOVANNI (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), DONNA MARIE BANZHOF (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), JAIME WEDEL (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.), JESSECA COLLINS (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.)
Description: The primary purpose of this workshop is to review best practice considerations for identifying the function of challenging behaviors and discuss corresponding strategies to teach replacement communication skills. Learners commonly demonstrate contextually inappropriate behaviors (CIBs) within their educational environments in the home, school, and community settings. Often, these behaviors are a function of the student's inability to appropriately request assistance, request a break, and/or wait for a desired item/activity. This workshop will include discussion and demonstration of practical ways to teach these critical communication skills to students. The strategies are effective regardless of communicative modality (e.g., sign language, speech, Picture Exchange Communication System, speech generating devices [SGDs]) and should be implemented using similar teaching strategies to be discussed. Both high tech (SGDs) and low tech (pictures and other visuals) options for teaching will be explored.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify and evaluate critical communication skills; (2) design effective teaching strategies to promote these skills independent of modality; (3) incorporate these skills into functional activities and routines.
Activities: Instructional activities will include a combination of lecture, video review, and small group activities to practice skill implementation.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for any team member working with learners with communication challenges. This may include behavior analysts, speech/language pathologists, teachers or others involved with communication training with children and adults with disabilities including autism spectrum disorders.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Pica: From Research to Practice
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich B, Swissotel
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Deborah L. Grossett, Ph.D.
DON E. WILLIAMS (Don E. Williams, Ph.D., BCBA-D), PETER STURMEY (The Graduate Center and Queens College, City University of New York), DEBORAH L. GROSSETT (The Shape of Behavior)
Description: Pica is the consumption of non-nutritive items. Although observed in other populations and contexts, pica is common among individuals with profound intellectual disabilities and is sometimes dangerous and even lethal. Functional analyses have almost always identified the function of pica as automatic positive reinforcement, hence, it is difficult to treat and manage pica without resorting to positive punishment. This workshop will describe methods for conducting functional assessment and analysis of pica, describe non-punishment interventions and the ethical role of positive punishment, describe other treatments and environmental management strategies, describe the evidence for effective treatment of pica,and finally, describe issues related to staff training, management, supervision and organizational behavior management.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state the definition of pica and describe its associated risks; (2) describe methods for conducting functional assessments and analyses of pica; (3) describe strategies to prevent pica; (4) describe strategies to teach alternate behaviors; (5) describe the situations in which positive punishment may be ethically justified; (6) name evidence-based practices for pica; (7) describe issues related to staff training, management, supervision and organizational behavior.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lectures, reading case studies, small group break out, and discussion and feedback.
Audience: BCBAs in training; BCBAs; other professional staff and administrators working with clients with pica; applied researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, evidence-based practice, functional assessment, pica
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessing and Teaching Students With Significant Needs: The Impact of Essential for Living in a School Setting
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Michigan ABC, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lisa N. Britton, Ph.D.
LISA N. BRITTON (Spectrum Center), DIANINHA SEAL (Spectrum Schools), AMANDA BECK (Spectrum Schools and Programs)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to train people on the Essential for Living (EFL) assessment and curriculum. EFL is a skills-based assessment designed specifically for individuals with severe to profound disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviors and struggle with basic communication skills. The focus of this workshop is to describe EFL with a significant emphasis on how to conduct the assessment and develop targets for instruction. During the workshop the instructors will also describe and demonstrate the data collection process followed by opportunities to practice data collection. Outcome data and case studies will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) articulate what EFL is and the population that would benefit from it; (2) implement a quick assessment and apply the assessment procedures for a student/client on their case load; (3) identify appropriate targets based on the assessment results; (4) collect data with the EFL data collection tools.
Activities: The format of this workshop will include lecture, guided practice, and small group discussion.
Audience: Graduate students and professionals working with individuals with developmental disabilities in either an educational, group home, or day program setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Individualized Program Development: A Cohesive Model for a Student's Program Book That Expands Far Beyond Direct Teaching Settings
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Zurich E, Swissotel
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mark J. Palmieri, Psy.D.
MARK J. PALMIERI (The Center for Children with Speical Needs), SHAUNESSY M. EGAN (The Center for Children with Special Needs)
Description: The use of individualized program books is a well-known practice within educational settings. These procedures are considered essential for tracking student progress with those skills targeted for instruction using ABA-based methods. Increasingly, entire educational programs for students are expected to apply ABA-based methods of instruction. This work, however, rarely includes high-quality methods for implementing precise programming across the student's entire instructional day. That is, the quality of skill-focused program planning, data collection, intervention consistency, and empirical evaluation of progress are rarely equal across direct, or 1:1, teaching settings and the integrated environment. This workshop will present a program book model that offers a framework for the application integrated and precise lesson planning to address every component of a student's education program. This includes not only direct academic skill instruction but, importantly, integrated academic, social, and adaptive skill instruction as well as related service (e.g., psychology, speech and language, motor) targets. Throughout the workshop participants will study and be provided with models for such programs. Further, staff training methods and strategies for establishing system-wide buy-in for this model of program planning will be addressed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify models of individualized lesson plan development that address related service (e.g., psychology, speech and language) skill sets; (2) understand the essential features of individualized lesson plans address skills to be taught in integrated settings; (3) understand the critical elements of diverse direct teaching models including cold-probe, interspersed, and quick transfer models; (4) construct a model of a comprehensive program book which addresses all skills addressed within the student's educational program; (5) understand critical elements of staff training and methods for building system-wide support for the application of evidence-based lessons day-long.
Activities: This workshop will include direct lecture as well as applied practice opportunities for participants to develop individualized program books for use across all environments. Participants will have opportunities to review samples and work with templates to ensure appropriate familiarity with the workshop content.
Audience: This workshop is targeted toward practitioners with an intermediate familiarity with individualized program planning. It is designed to address contemporary issues with program planning that ABA-based program faced when attempting to support full and effective integration practices within educational settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): individualized instruction, natural environment, program planning, staff training
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Designing Classroom Environments to Produce Generative Behavior
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 1, Swissotel
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kent Johnson, Ph.D.
KENT JOHNSON (Morningside Academy), VICCI TUCCI (Tucci Learning Solutions, Inc.)
Description: Educators cannot possibly teach everything that needs to be learned with explicit instruction and practice to fluency. Effective, independent adults must learn how to learn without teachers and instruction. They must demonstrate generativity, the emergence of complex behavioral repertoires without explicit instruction. Many studies have been published demonstrating the process of generativity (e.g., Johnson & Layng, 1992; Andronis, 1999; Layng, Twyman & Stikeleather, 2004; Epstein, 1999). People must engage in behaviors they've learned in instruction in a wider variety of contexts than the classroom. We call this kind of generativity, application. They also engage in novel, untaught blends and re-combinations of behavior that they learned in school, in the context of new stimuli not encountered in classrooms. We call this kind of generativity, adduction, or contingency adduction. In this workshop participants will examine two instructional models that promote generativity, the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction (MMGI) for typical and near-typical learners (e.g., Johnson & Street, 2004, 2012, 2013), and the Competent Learner Model (CLM) for learners with autism and developmental disabilities (e.g., Tucci & Hursh, 1991; Tucci, Hursh & Laitinen, 2004). Participants will also design MMGI and CLM-based classroom environments to produce application and contingency adduction.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) break down a selected curriculum into its key tool skills, component skills, and composite repertoires; (2) design a generative application environment for one or more instructional objectives that they currently teach, using either MMGI or CLM procedures, including key motivational operations; (3) design a generative environment that is likely to produce contingency adduction of one or more instructional objectives that they currently teach, using either MMGI or CLM procedures, including key motivational operations.
Activities: Workshop presenters will teach each objective through lecture, study guides, and discussion. Participants will work in pairs or trios to analyze a selected curriculum area into its key tool skills, component skills and composite skills. Participants who work with children with autism will work in pairs or trios to design a CLM non-directed classroom environment to produce generative application of selected instructional objectives. Participants who work with typical or near-typical learners will work in pairs or trios to design an MMGI application classroom environment for selected instructional objectives. Each participant will be able to compare and contrast MMGI and CLM procedures employed to guarantee application. Participants who work with children with autism will work in pairs or trios to design a CLM non-directed classroom environment to produce generative contingency adduction of selected instructional objectives. Participants who work with typical or near-typical learners will work in pairs or trios to design an MMGI classroom environment to produce generative contingency adduction of selected instructional objectives. Each participant will be able to compare and contrast MMGI and CLM procedures employed to guarantee contingency adduction.
Audience: Those who deliver instructional services to typically developing children and youth, near-typical children such as those with ADHD and learning disabilities, and children with autism and developmental disabilities. This includes BCBAs, teachers, professionals of all types, and anyone interested in teaching higher-level skills.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Create Your Own Computer Applications for Research and Application: Easy to Learn LiveCode Programming Environment
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 2, Swissotel
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William F. Potter, Ph.D.
WILLIAM F. POTTER (California State University, Stanislaus), RYAN N. REDNER (University of Vermont), KENNETH J. KILLINGSWORTH (Killingsworth Consulting), MICHAEL D. HIXSON (Central Michigan University)
Description: LiveCode is a free, simple to learn, yet powerful platform for creating custom computer programs and phone apps (IPhone and Android). Based on HyperCard, the software uses English-like terminology to facilitate the creation of software. This workshop will provide an introduction to the platform, provide an overview of how it works, and then provide some initial hands-on training to create a simple program. The software will be provided on a USB drive, so participants should bring laptops (Mac or PC with a USB slot). During the actual training, participants will create their own computer programs as directed by the facilitators (but see the advanced course for more complex programs). The workshop also will cover actual and potential applications that LiveCode programs can be used for (e.g., tact training, use in stimulus-equivalence studies). Finally, participants will be provided with self-study materials and completed applications (source-code) for them to review, modify, and use.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) have an overview of the software; (2) install and interact with the LiveCode software; (3) create one or more simple computer programs
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, demonstration, hands on activities with support from facilitators, programmed activities.
Audience: Behavior analysts who would like to use technology to facilitate research or application. No programming experience is necessary, but general familiarity with a computer is useful (opening documents, saving them, etc.).
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Computer Technology, Software App, technology
 
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Part 1: Effective Supervisors Do What It Takes! Improving Staff and Organizational Performance to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Skyway 260, Hyatt Regency, Blue East
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients’ progress? Behavior analysis developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don’t receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don’t do what they are told. But the employees’ performance, just like their clients’ performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide participants with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment. Please note: This workshop takes place in three parts; attendees must register for all 3 parts (WPBID #20; WPBID #50; WPBID #80) and must attend all 3 parts to receive continuing education credits.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels; measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop provides a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and computer-based charting software.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, staff trainers, program designers, and directors of schools and agencies serving people with learning difficulties. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to ensure that employees are effective in helping clients achieve their goals! Earn a total of 12 CEUs by completing all three parts. (You may use 3 of these to meet the new BACB requirement for supervisors.)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Celeration Efficiency, Improvement Process, Organizational Performance, Pragmatism
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Use ABA to Sustain Leanand Six Sigma Results in Business and Industry
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall IJ, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: OBM/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael McCarthy, M.Ed.
MICHAEL MCCARTHY (www.SustainLeanGains.com)
Description: When companies adopt Lean or Six Sigma methods, they often conduct many “Rapid Improvement Events” also known as “Kaizen Events.” Although many of these activities are conducted, and many process improvements are discovered, only a small percentage survive as standard operating procedure for the company operations. This means the time spent on these process improvement activities are wasted because the new methods are not used. The improvement gains are not sustained. In the analytical ABC model of applied behavior analysis, these activities are “antecedents,” which last only a short time. In order to build these new methods into daily habits, consequences are needed, specifically positive reinforcement. This workshop gives OBM consultants and company managers an ABA “preventive maintenance” methodology for sustaining gains called “process behavior maintenance” (PBM). Participants learn three skills for sustaining lean gains. They can add these skills to their own leader standard work for maximum effectiveness.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) name 3 common causes for failure to sustain Lean & Six Sigma programs within companies and healthcare organizations; (2) complete an ABC analysis of one case study; (3) name 3 ABA skills that will enable supervisors in organizations to sustain the new process behaviors derived from a process improvement project using Lean or Six Sigma methodologies.
Activities: Lecture,small group break-out,guided practice of ABC analysis of case studies,group discussion
Audience: OBM practitioners, ABA students considering a career in OBM, managers and supervisors in healthcare, manufacturing, and service delivery, and ABA professors considering part-time consultation/projects with business, industry, and healthcare.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
CANCELED: A Behavioral Practitioner's Guide the Practice and Ethics of Providing Home-Based Treatment Supported by Healthcare Mandates to Families Affected by Autism Spectrum Disorder
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Lucerne I, Swissotel
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Steven Woolf, Ph.D.
STEVEN WOOLF (Beacon ABA Services), CHRISTIAN BENAVIDES (Beacon ABA Services), KELLEY HENRY (Beacon ABA Services), COLLEEN DEMELLO (Beacon Services of CT)
Description: This workshop is designed to guide behavior analysts through the process of obtaining third party health care funding to provide home-based ABA therapy for families affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The workshop will also explore and address some of the most common ethical issues practitioners of ABA services encounter when providing home-based treatment and working under the prevue of health care funding. First, the presenters shall complete a historical overview and clinical justification of health insurance mandates relative to the treatment of ASD and identify legal components associated with providing home-based/community-based ABA services supported by health insurance services. The workshop will provide problem-solving strategies for negotiating with insurance companies. Finally, the workshop will address the ethical issues commonly encounter by home-based behavioral professionals. These ethical issues include best practices to address the supervision of paraprofessional staff, appropriate discharge and termination of cases, potential fraudulent billing, school consultation, documentation of services, and maintaining of clinical records.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) describe the ten most frequent ethical dilemmas that home-based ABA practitioners encounter; (2) work in small groups to problem solve the best practice methods for resolving the common ethical dilemmas encounter by ABA home-based practitioners; (3) name the four key components of federal law and state mandates when assessing ASD treatment legislation; (4) state the three key differences between the DSM-IV and DSM-V relative to the diagnosis of ASD; (5) describe the five key elements to successful negotiation with insurance companies and developing a positional standpoint; (6) identify the differences between procedure and CPT codes used by health insurance providers to fund ABA services; (7) write client-specific goals/objectives that permit health insurance service care coordinators to approve ABA treatment.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a various methods including lecture, guided practice, and small and large group discussions. Timeline breakdown: 1.5 hours of lectureand 1.5 hour of small group discussion identifying essential elements in behavioral assessments and concurrent reviews required for health provider funding, and on ethical questions relevant to delivering best practice services within the bounds of insurance mandated guidelines.
Audience: This workshop is designed for BACB certificants, licensed behavior analysts, licensed psychologists, behavior analysts and supervisors who are currently providing or supervising those who provide home-based or community-based ABA treatment to children and families affected by ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Implementing Effective Competency-Based Parent and Caregiver Training
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Montreux 3, Swissotel
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Gail Clifford, M.S.
GAIL CLIFFORD (Advances Learning Center), WENDY GREENHALGH (Advances Learning Center), GINA FUGAZZOTTO (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center)
Description: The importance of generalizing effective behavioral support strategies and techniques to parents and caregivers of clients with challenging behaviors is critical. Providing an effective and successful training model for teaching parents and caregivers to implement these strategies with competence and fluency can promote the generalization of these strategies.This workshop will present a competency-based parent/caregiver training model. The components include a social validity rating scale to measure the parent/caregiver’s interest relative to topics in ABA, pre-test and post-test measures of relevant skills, didactic instruction, modeling and role-plays of appropriate techniques for responding to challenging behavior, procedural integrity data collection on the implementation of skills practiced during role-plays, and performance feedback. Hands-on activities for each component will be included, along with strategies for individualization of both content and pacing, and for utilizing data-based programming decisions to ensure optimal success and effectiveness.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) develop individualized, competency-based parent training models based on specific client profiles; (2) effectively utilize teaching strategies, including lecture, modeling, role-play, and performance feedback when educating parents/caregivers of clients with ASD and developmental disabilities; ( 3) develop a data collection system to accurately record procedural integrity of parent/caregiver implementation of behavior support strategies; (4) design user-friendly behavior support guidelines for parents/caregivers; (5) implement data-based decision-making strategies relative to ongoing content and pace of instruction.
Activities: Learning objectives will be met by alternating between lecture, discussion, and small group activities including role plays.
Audience: The intended audience includes: BCBAs who design and implement parent/caregiver training; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors, or therapists who implement parent/caregiver training under BCBA supervision;anyone interested in developing effective parent/caregiver training models for clients and their families.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Competency-Based Training, Generalization, Parent Training, Social Validity
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Physical Activity to Enhance Learning, Social Skills, and Self-Control With Autistic and Typical Populations
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 3, Swissotel
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eitan Eldar, Ph.D.
EITAN ELDAR (Kibbutzim College, Israel)
Description: The presented model (Eldar, 2006) emphasizes the uniqueness of movement and game as an ideal context enabling teachers and clinicians to design a challenging learning atmosphere for their students. The model is based on a series of scripts offering a simulation of real-life situations. It can support a specific clinical goal (such as developing self-control); support a school curriculum; serve as an extended behavioral program for individuals/groups. The model has recently been implemented with autistic children, supporting communication and social skills on an individual level and as a preparation for inclusion. The rationale behind developing the model (Eldar & Ayvazo, 2009) will be discussed and specific behavioral procedures and principles supporting the model will be cited (Eldar, 2008). The structure of the model will be described, followed by implementation examples. Components of the model, modified during the past 18 years, will then be portrayed. The workshop will conclude with recommendations and examples for utilizing the model in a variety of educational and clinical settings applicable to various populations. Attention will be devoted to using these procedures as a part of an individual program for autistic populations and for supporting their inclusion in the regular education system.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) explain the unique characteristics of physical activity and games as supportive learning contexts; (2) cite behavioral principles and procedures that enhance learning in these contexts; (3) present the general structure of the model and describe its components; (4) design various physical activities as clinical scripts, serving specific behavioral goals; (5) use and modify observation forms to evaluate students’ progress; (6) adapt the components of the model to different populations and programs; (7)explain the rationale of the model to parents and practitioners.
Activities: Activities will include: a presentation of the theoretical background of the model, defining the rationale behind it; an open discussion on how physical activity can serve as a learning context; a video presentation illustrating the implementation of the model in various settings and in different cultures; active demonstration of games involving the workshop's participants; planning trials involving the participants practicing activity and program design based on the model.
Audience: Behavior analysts, teachers,clinicians, psychologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Physical-Activity, Self-Control, Social-Skills
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: BACB
Navigating the 10th Circle of Hell: A Road Map to Writing Medically Necessary Treatment Plans
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Grand Suite 3, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William Tim Courtney, M.S.
WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), VINCENT LAMARCA (Little Star Center), BREANNE K. HARTLEY (Little Star Center ), MARY ROSSWURM (Little Star Center)
Description: Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) are very well-trained in the implementation of procedures that are conceptually systematic and evidence based. Even if you have an intervention with several peer reviewed studies, if it is not presented to the insurance company, highlighting the medical necessity, then it will not be funded. In this workshop, we cover an equally necessary component to intervention that is often neglected in BCBA training activities: writing treatment plans that are based upon medical necessity. The presenters will review strategies for evaluating diagnostic reports as well as assessment probes to provide sufficient justification for areas targeted for intervention. The presenters will discuss developing goals specifically addressing symptoms and impairments directly related to an autism diagnosis. The workshop will review discharge and transition planning, as well as determining the intensity of intervention. Workshop attendees will be provided with a treatment plan template. The treatment planning process presented in this workshop has resulted in the approval of countless hours of insurance-funded comprehensive ABA intervention for individuals with autism. The organization has been in effect for over 10 years, practicing in a state with mandated ABA coverage.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) define medical necessity; (2) create goals and objectives directly related to symptoms and impairments related to an autism diagnosis; (3) describe the necessary components of a comprehensive treatment plan, to include background, progress, transition, discharge, and recommendations; (4) discuss factors to consider when determining the intensity of ABA services.
Activities: The workshop will follow a behavior skills training format. The presenters will provide instructions and model relevant behavior. The attendees will complete activities to demonstrate competency in key areas of the treatment planning process. The workshop consists of both lecture and small group activities.
Audience: This workshop is designed for all levels of practitioner. The workshop covers basic strategies, such as headings and formatting of the treatment plan, to more advanced topics like translating verbal behavior targets into medically necessary ones.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA Practice, Autism, Treatment planning
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Maximizing Your Behavior Analytic Results by Changing Others' Behaviors
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
St. Gallen 3, Swissotel
Area: PRA/TPC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kent A. Corso, Psy.D.
KENT A. CORSO (NCR Behavioral Health, LLC)
Description: There are many ways for us to maximize our behavior analytic interventions. Certainly, behavior analysts have been trained to use various models of teaching to increase or decrease overt behaviors of those who they serve. But the magnitude of our impact sometimes depends on our ability to change others' behavior including caretakers, parents, and supervisors. Applying behavioral science to the behavior of those people who are not our direct client can be elusive. Even more challenging is applying operant principles to their inner behaviors. This workshop focuses on what the behavioral addictions literature calls motivational interviewing, an evidence-based method of helping others change their behaviors. In behavior analytic terms this means targeting another's antecedent inner behaviors which precede the overt behavioral changes in the individual's life. Attendees will learn the applications, nuts and bolts of motivational interviewing as this pertains to behavior analytic services and non-clinical professional responsibilities (e.g., management, supervision, collaboration). At the conclusion of the workshop, learners will be able to apply motivational interviewing to maximize the impact of their practice, particularly when their success relies on changing others' inner behavior - something which is very difficult for an "outsider" to do.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) explain the transtheoretical model of behavior change; (2) describe the mechanics and techniques of motivational interviewing; (3) apply the course material to your own challenges with changing others' behavior in clinical or non-clinical contexts; (4) demonstrate one motivational interviewing skill which may be applied to your job.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, discussion, video clips, and role plays in order to practice these skills. Learning objectives will be met through a combination of these activities.
Audience: The target audience is advanced practitioners who operate in clinical, supervisory, and other team-based roles. Anyone who has ever been frustrated by the challenges of having someone else implement a behavior plan or program that you created, would find this helpful.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): inner behaviors, motivational interviewing, operant conditioning, practice enhancement
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
ABA for Adult Managed Care: Building a Clinical Package That Works and Passes Audits
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Vevey 1, Swissotel
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elizabeth McKee, M.S.
RISHI CHELMINSKI (Services for the UnderServed), VIVIAN A. ATTANASIO (Services for the UnderServed), ELIZABETH MCKEE (Services for the Underserved, Inc.)
Description: Implementing applied behavior analysis (ABA) based services within a managed care setting can be a daunting task. In these settings, Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) work within interdisciplinary teams, alongside clinicians from other disciplines who may have different clinical standards and practices. Their work is scrutinized by auditors, accreditors, and funders who require varying degrees of procedural rigor. Finally, their work must ultimately be implemented by direct support professionals who have a wide variety of learning histories and proficiencies with clinical services. The facilitators of this workshop will present a standardized, yet flexible clinical package that meets the needs of all of these various stakeholders, while remaining true to the standards and practices recommended by the field of ABA. This clinical package has been honed for over three years at a New York City-based agency providing adult residential services, and has proven robust through many audits, while streamlining the inputs required of BCBAs. The facilitators' discussion of their design process may prove helpful to attendees who wish to implement similar packages within their own agencies.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) identify some essential components of behavior support plans; (2) identify some fundamental clinical standards common to many regulatory environments (examples will be drawn from the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities, an international accreditation agency, and the New York State Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities); (3) identify ways in which required inputs of BCBAs can be minimized, while still meeting the needs of multiple stakeholders.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, targeted reading, and breakout practice.
Audience: Clinicians and administrators tasked with creating and overseeing agency policies, procedures, standards, and practices.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Compliance, Implementation, Organizational Management, Systems
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Supervision
Ethics and Technology in BACB Supervision: Safe and Effective Practices
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Randolph, Hyatt Regency, Bronze East
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dana R. Reinecke, Ph.D.
DANA R. REINECKE (Long Island University Post), CHERYL J. DAVIS (7 Dimensions Consulting/Endicott College)
Description: Current training and supervision requirements of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) require prospective BCBAs to receive supervision from trained supervisors. After the initial 8-hour training, supervisors are required to earn 3 CEUs in supervision skills every cycle. This workshop addresses specific supervision skills related to the BACB's Compliance Code (implemented as of 2016), with particular attention to the use of technology in the implementation of evidence-based supervision practices. Distance supervision is a common practice in the field, and relies increasingly on various forms of technology, which may or may not meet ethical requirements for confidentiality, privacy, and effective teaching and training. Participants will learn about how the Compliance Code applies to their practice in providing supervision, and how they may use technology safely and effectively to facilitate both distance and face-to-face supervision. A variety of applications of technology will be discussed and practiced during the workshop. This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) discuss and implement the Compliance Code with regard to the use of evidence-based practices in supervision; (2) describe the ethical implications of using various forms of technology in supervision, as per the Compliance Code; (3) implement the use of at least two applications of technology to the practice of effective supervision.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, whole-group demonstrations of technology, and small-group breakouts to practice specific applications of technology. Objectives will be described through lecture and discussed and demonstrated with the group as a whole. Small groups will be formed based on common interests and needs, and workshop facilitators will work with each group to practice developing and using supervision strategies to meet learning objectives on an individual level.
Audience: Target audience is BACB supervisors who have completed an 8-hour supervision training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): ethics, supervision, technology
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Practicing Stimulus Equivalence Experiments With MTSLab Software
Friday, May 27, 2016
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Columbus Hall CD, Hyatt Regency, Gold East
Area: TBA/EAB; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Celso Socorro Oliveira, Ph.D.
CELSO SOCORRO OLIVEIRA (UNESP - Sao Paulo State University)
Description: MTSLab is a simple software that uses ASCII text files to design matching-to-sample (MTS) sessions. It was first developed by the presenter during his doctorate in 2002 to attend sign language teaching of mentally retarded deaf students of a Brazilian special school. This workshop proposes to prepare MTS sessions using this software considering the graph theory approach. The software will be freely distributed. The theoretical part of the workshop aims to introduce the concept of MTS as an operator in stimulus equivalent classes, which includes the concepts of nodes, arcs, trees, nodal distance, and strength of the relations. The practice will be conducted preparing sample sessions based on papers usually taught within stimulus equivalence experiments in behavior analysis journals. The sample stimuli used will be available through a website. At the end of the workshop, the audience should be able to prepare different sessions with the software and analyze its data to decide if the equivalence emerged or not.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) review concepts of stimulus equivalence and MTS; (2) prepare MTS sessions with MTSLab software; (3) evaluate data resulted of the practice and registered by the software
Activities: Lecture of stimulus equivalence under graph theory approach and guided practice of sessions preparation using the software MTSLab.
Audience: Undergraduate professors;teachers of disabled people who want to use stimulus equivalence as a tool
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): matching-to-sample, MTS software, stimulus equivalence

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