Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

39th Annual Convention; Minneapolis, MN; 2013

Program by Day for Friday, May 24, 2013


Manage My Personal Schedule

 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How Do They Do That? An Introduction to Operant Conditioning at the Zoo
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
205 C-D (Convention Center)
Area: AAB/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christy A. Alligood, Ph.D.
CHRISTY A. ALLIGOOD (Disney's Animal Kingdom), ALLISON JUNGHEIM (Como Park Zoo and Conservatory), MICHELLE SKURSKI (Disney's Animal Kingdom)
Description: During the past several decades, zoos around the world have begun to use operant conditioning to implement husbandry training for the species in their care. Animals living in managed circumstances need regular veterinary monitoring and care to maintain optimal health. Traditionally, animals are restrained or chemically immobilized to receive this care. A well-planned program of husbandry training can reduce the need for these practices. In addition, the number of physical captures and handlings can be minimized, reducing safety hazards to both animals and caretakers. Training also can facilitate research at zoos and aquariums; results from these studies can enhance our abilities to understand and care for animals. In this exciting workshop, participants will travel to the Como Park Zoo and Conservatory, where they will have the rare opportunity to learn about various techniques used in husbandry training with exotic species and then to apply their newfound knowledge to hypothetical animal behavior scenarios. In addition to the classroom portion, participants will observe applications of operant conditioning first-hand at the zoo. The registration fee includes workshop materials, transportation to and from the zoo, and lunch. Net proceeds will benefit the Applied Animal Behavior Special Interest Group's student and membership support programs.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Give three examples of husbandry goals that can be facilitated through the use of operant conditioning; describe the benefits of training in each case. List five behaviors commonly included in husbandry training programs, and describe a typical procedure for training each behavior. Identify three obstacles commonly experienced in husbandry training programs, and describe potential solutions for each obstacle. Create a training plan to meet the needs described in various animal behavior scenarios.
Activities: Participants will travel to Como Park Zoo and Conservatory, where they will have the opportunity to directly observe operant conditioning at work with several different exotic species. Presentations, including video examples, will be interspersed with dynamic problem-solving activities in the classroom portions of the workshop.
Audience: Have you ever wondered how zookeepers conduct a physical examination of a crocodile, or move a venomous snake from one area to another, or weigh a giraffe? This workshop is designed for individuals interested in the application of operant conditioning to the behavior of animals at zoos. Participants will learn how zoos develop training programs to facilitate husbandry goals in a variety of species. Participants will travel off-site to Como Park Zoo and Conservatory to observe applications of operant conditioning first-hand. The registration fee includes workshop materials, transportation to and from the zoo, and lunch. Net proceeds will benefit the Applied Animal Behavior Special Interest Group's student and membership support programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Animal Training, Applied Animal Behavior, Operant Conditioning
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Motivating Learner Participation Without Blocking Escape, Forced Physical Prompts, or Nagging
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
200 A-B (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert Schramm, M.A.
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Knospe ABA)
Description: The goal of the workshop will be to teach the participants an approach to earning instructional control with unmotivated or otherwise challenging learners that does not employ traditional escape extinction procedures such as forced physical prompting, physically holding the learner in the teaching setting or nagging procedures. Through the Seven Steps to Earning Instructional Control, participants will be given an easy-to-teach and therefore, reproduce path to earning learner motivation while avoiding some of the potentially behavior escalating procedures common in behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Value the importance of learner assent in home, clinic, and education settings. Use creative and practical methods for controlling the access to reinforcement in all environments. Know the value and process of pairing oneself with reinforcement. Know the value and process of being meticulously contingent with words and actions. Describe the differences between positive and negative reinforcement and why one is valuable in earning instructional control with an unwilling learner. To effectively use and increase a variable ratio of reinforcement. Prioritize learning objectives and use differential reinforcement effectively. Know how to best use extinction and negative punishment procedures. Name three different types of discrete trial teaching. Use important motivating operations when teaching intensively. Describe the concept of a teaching arc and how you can prolong the value of your teaching over several different reinforcing teaching settings for the length of your teaching interactions.
Activities: Discussion, video demonstration, lecture on the seven steps to earning instructional control and create a teaching arc.
Audience: Board-certified behavior analysts and other professionals who are working directly with children with autism or other challenging disabilities that find themselves having trouble developing motivated learning settings regularly or are responsible to teach others how to earn instructional control in home, clinic, or school settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
24 Language and Learning Barriers for Children With Autism: Identification and Intervention
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 D (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jamie Hughes, M.A.
JAMIE HUGHES (University of Kent ), GWEN DWIGGINS (Summit Autism Services )
Description: It is important to find out what children can do, but it is also important to know what they can't do, and analyze why they can't do it. The VB-MAPP Barriers Assessment (Sundberg, 2008) provides an analysis and assessment of 24 common language and learning barriers often faced by children with autism. Once a specific barrier has been identified, a more detailed analysis of that problem is required to determine what the nature of the problem is, as well as what intervention program might be appropriate. This workshop will provide an analysis of each barrier and potential intervention strategies to remove or reduce the barrier. A major focus will be on how to conduct descriptive and functional analyses of weak or impaired verbal behavior using Skinner's (1957) analysis. Several case studies (with video examples) of impaired verbal behavior will be presented along with suggestions for how to analyze and ameliorate the repertoires. Research utilizing this assessment in applied settings for children with autism will be presented.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Conduct the VB-MAPP Barriers Assessment for beginning, intermediate and advanced learner profiles. Conduct a descriptive and functional analysis of absent, weak, or impaired verbal behavior. Conduct a descriptive assessment of common learning barriers. Identify and use a variety of evidence-based teaching strategies to address absent, weak or impaired repertoires.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of evidence-based teaching strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials for identifying language and learning barriers will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: It is appropriate for board-certified behavior analysts, board-certified assistant behavior analysts, special education teachers, consultants, and supervisors of ABA intervention programs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Verbal Behavior Approach: Using ABA/VB Strategies to Improve Autism Programming Across the Spectrum
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
200 F-G (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mary Lynch Barbera, Ph.D.
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (Barbera Behavior Consulting, LLC)
Description: Children with autism, regardless of age, ability level, or setting, need effective, individualized programming in order to reach their maximum potential. This workshop will utilize B.F. Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior to provide a framework for assessing and programming for children with autism. Dr. Mary Lynch Barbera will give an overview of her book: The Verbal Behavior Approach: How to Teach Children with Autism and Related Disorders and will highlight several strategies that can be used immediately to begin to assess and teach children with autism. Group activities will enable participants to quickly and easily become familiar with VB terminology. In addition to providing participants with specific ways to increase language in young, nonvocal learners, this workshop also will cover teaching higher level language skills such as answering questions, and learning to tact prepositions and pronouns. Through lecture, video examples and group activities, participants will leave with a better understanding of how to implement the verbal behavior approach with children and adolescents at various points on the autism spectrum.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop participants will be able to: Describe two similiarities and two differences between traditional discrete trial teaching and the Verbal Behavior Approach. Discuss the importance of utilizing a VB assessment such as the VB-MAPP (Sundberg, 2008). Give two examples of mands, tacts, intraverbals, and listener responding skills. Describe initial programs (utilizing common household toys) to implement the Verbal Behavior Approach within early intervention. Discuss ways to assess and teach more advanced VB skills such as prepositions and pronouns to intermediate level learners.
Activities: Lecture, video review, role playing, and group activities.
Audience: Behavior analysts, speech pathologists, educators, and psychologists are the primary target audience. Since this is an intermediate level workshop, those not seeking continuing education credits but who have knowledge of the basic principles of ABA are also welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): adolescent, autism, early intervention, verbal behavior approach
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Utility of Tact: Concepts and Teaching Protocols for Students With Autism Involving Tact Training
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 F (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael Miklos, M.S.
MICHAEL MIKLOS (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network), AMIRIS DIPUGLIA (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network/ Autism Initiative), WILLOW HOZELLA (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network), LAURA YATES (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network)
Description: Traditional approaches to teaching language to students with autism have often focused extensively on teaching expressive labels. As more educational programs have incorporated a functional approach to teaching language, instructional emphasis has shifted in some cases to instruction of a much a wider range of operant verbal responses including mand, intraverbal and tact repertoires (Carbone, 2004). In an operant analysis, teaching expressive labels is subsumed under the process of teaching the tact. While it is critical to teach all of the elementary verbal operants, teaching a wide range of tact responses is an important component of instruction to establish speaker competence for students with autism. Complex verbal behavior may become available as a response repertoire following artful instruction involving the tact as a component of multiply controlled conditional discriminations. This workshop will address the conceptual analysis of the tact repertoire in relation to its role in establishing speaker behavior for students with autism. Included will be a review of the role of the tact in early mand training. Procedures for teaching other forms of verbal behavior that utilize the tact repertoire will be reviewed. Specific tact-related procedures to be discussed will include joint control for establishing various listener responding skills and the role of the tact as a prompt in intraverbal training. Additionally, the workshop will present the role of extended tacts as the basis for conceptual skill development and instructional design.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Provide an overview of the operant relations for tact responding. Discuss conceptual basis for basic tact training and the utilization of tacts as an atomic repertoire (Palmer, 2012) in the development of complex verbal behavior. Describe tact control as an aspect of early mand acquisition. Demonstrate procedures for transferring mand to tact control Discuss and demonstrate procedures utilizing joint control (Lo.wenkron, 1998). Demonstrate tact to intraverbal transfer procedures. Discuss the role of extended tacts (procedures for teaching feature, function, and class) and concept development. List the role of the tacting of internal events and the autoclitic tact: specifically procedures for teaching responding to yes/no questions.
Activities: Lecture and participant practice involving analogue demonstration of various teaching procedures.
Audience: Consultants, behavior analysts, teachers, psychologists, and others serving individuals with autism that includes an educational approach utilizing an analysis of verbal behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessing and Teaching Social Referencing and Joint Attention in Children With Autism
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 G (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Gabriel Schnerch, M.A.
GABRIEL SCHNERCH (University of Manitoba), MARTHA PELAEZ (Florida International University), PER HOLTH (Oslo and Akershus University College), FLAVIA JULIO (University of Manitoba)
Description: Two key skills that children normally acquire early in their development are social referencing and joint attention. These skills are important for children to efficiently learn from the people and events in their environment. However, children on the autism spectrum usually show significant deficits in these areas, and thus early intervention is very important. This workshop will define and explain what social referencing and joint attention are (emphasizing a behaviour analytic model), elaborate on their importance, and provide guidance, examples, and hands-on practice with how these skills can be taught to children with autism using the methods of contemporary applied behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop attendees should be able to: Verbally define social referencing and joint attention in behaviour analytic terms. Be able to verbally describe some of the key research supporting a behaviour analytic model of joint attention and social referencing. Task analyze and assess the key components of joint attention and social referencing in a child with autism. Start to create behaviour analytic interventions targeting social referencing and joint attention skills. Implement procedures to effectively condition social reinforcers.
Activities: Participants will listen to a lecture-based presentation of the defining features, research, and assessment and intervention procedures of social referencing and joint attention with reference to autism. Participants also will engage in practice exercises in assessing, task analyzing, and teaching these skills.
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, psychologists, educators, and other professionals working with children with autism. This workshop also may be appropriate for parents and paraprofessionals, but the workshop does assume at least basic understanding of behaviour analytic principles and standard teaching methods.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Autism, Joint attention, Social referencing
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Assessment of Functional Living Skills (The AFLS)
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 B-C (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Michael M. Mueller, Ph.D.
MICHAEL M. MUELLER (Southern Behavioral Group), JAMES W. PARTINGTON (Behavior Analysts, Inc.)
Description: All learners, throughout the lifespan, and in all settings benefit from increasing behaviors that lead to independence. Beginning at a very early age when basic self-help skills are learned and progressing through adulthood when skills essential for utmost independence, community participation, and social involvement should be taught, functional skills are a priority. Functional skills are often thought of as survival skills and although very basic self-care and basic hygiene skills are included in functional skills lists, functional skills exist for all learners across the spectrum and across all areas of life. The Assessment of Functional Living Skills (The AFLS) contains six unique assessment protocols including: Basic Skills, Home Skills, Community Participation Skills, School Skills, Vocational Skills, and Independent Living Skills. Each protocol contains eight areas of assessment grouped around hundreds of skills. Having the familiar structure and feel of the Assessment of Basic Language and Learning Skills-Revised, the AFLS assessment, its use, scoring, and content will be examined. Selecting and teaching functional skills will be discussed and shown through expansive video segments.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Differentiate between developmental and functional skills. List a variety of settings in which functional skills are assessed. Describe how to assess functional skills in home, school, community, and vocational settings. Use the results of the AFLS to design functional teaching programs for learners of all ages.
Activities: Lecture, didactic interaction, handouts, practice assessments, practice program development, and copious use of videos.
Audience: Behavior analysts working with learners with autism and developmental disabilities, parents of learners and educators of learners with autism or developmental disabilities, and other professionals who work or care for those with autism of developmental disabilities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Assessment, Autism, Functional Skills
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Beyond Successive Approximations: Useful Shaping Strategies and Tactics to Improve Your Teaching
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
200 J (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jesus Rosales-Ruiz, Ph.D.
JESUS ROSALES-RUIZ (University of North Texas), MARY ELIZABETH HUNTER (University of North Texas), EMILY RULLA (University of North Texas), CHRISTINA NORD (University of North Texas)
Description: Shaping is a powerful tool for teaching new complex behaviors and producing engaged and confident students, but poor shaping can easily lead to learning plateaus and frustrated learners and teachers. Shaping is often described as an art and as a difficult skill to learn; however, shaping is an orderly and predictable process with rules. This workshop will teach several tactics and strategies for successful shaping and show different ways to engineer behavior (e.g., shaping, micro-shaping, and adduction). Participants will leave with a newly developed understanding of how to look at the shaping process beyond the general concept of successive approximations. Students will learn the rules regarding the mechanics of shaping, the requirements of a conditioned reinforcer, what to reinforce, how to reinforce, how to shape movements and actions, how to arrange the environment to facilitate shaping, how to use resurgence to accelerate shaping, and how to shape the stimulus control based on characteristics of the stimuli (e.g., touching red objects) or characteristics of the response (e.g., stacking objects).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Deliver cues, conditioned reinforcers and primary reinforcers efficiently. Deliver reinforcers in a way that facilitates shaping. Isolate movements through environmental arrangements. Establish stimulus control of behavior. Evaluate the student's behavior to decide where to begin shaping. Teach complex behaviors and concepts from simple behaviors.
Activities: The workshop will use video examples to illustrate key concepts about shaping. Participants will implement these concepts in interactive games designed to practice and master the strategies and tactics discussed. During the games participants will play both the roles of teacher and student. Group discussions will be used to summarize and reflect on the experience gained by playing the games as teachers and students.
Audience: This workshop is designed for anyone interested in the processes of shaping and learning or anyone interested in improving their teaching techniques. The concepts of the workshop can be applied to any population in any learning setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Learning, Shaping, Teaching, Therapy
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Self-Monitoring: Exploring a Systematic and Data-Based Intervention for Individuals with Autism and Other Related Disabilities
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
205 A-B (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Katharine M. Croce, M.Ed.
JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education), KATHARINE M. CROCE (Kinney Center for Autism Education and Support)
Description: This workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic, self-monitoring strategy. It will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will be presented, with specific focus on "Self & Match", a user-friendly, easy to implement system. Self-monitoring used as a motivational tool also will be discussed. The "Self & Match" system has been used internationally to support children with emotional disturbances, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. It has been implemented in educational, home, clinic, and recreational settings as individualized behavior systems, classwide, and schoolwide management procedures. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a "Self & Match" manual with substantial training materials. A case study will illustrate the application of the "Self & Match" system. Practical variations on application, progress monitoring (data collection), and fading procedures will be discussed. Additionally, necessary considerations before implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system will be analyzed. This interactive workshop will provide participants the opportunity to walk through these considerations to create their own systems.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Identify the benefits of self-monitoring. Identify the basic components of the Self & Match system. Effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system. Identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system. Create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace.
Activities: During the course of this practical workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose and rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and a case study with longitudinal data. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide before implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own "Self & Match" system.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, but also will cover areas of interest for consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who are seeking to increase their knowledge of systematic self-monitoring and motivational systems as behavioral interventions.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Behavior Management, Intervention, Self-monitoring
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Psychological Flexibility Workshops to Help Parents of Children With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
211 A-B (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas G. Szabo, M.A.
THOMAS G. SZABO (University of Nevada, Reno), Daniel J. Moran (Pickslyde Consulting)
Description: Parents and caregivers of children with special needs are often the mediators that deliver treatment prescribed by behavior analysts. Behavior analysts rely on the ability of these individuals to complete training sessions, respond effectively to challenging behavior, and accurately document events. However, parents and caregivers face enormous challenges themselves. When the psychological needs of these mediators are left unmet, their ability to implement behavior support is compromised. Participants in this workshop will learn to identify core psychological processes involved in behavioral flexibility and to design brief, targeted interventions aimed at improving mediator resilience and reducing problematic reactions to stress. Procedures introduced have a strong evidence base to support their inclusion in the behavior analyst's tool kit, and the content has been studied according to established procedures of scientific scrutiny that can be reasonably relied upon. All procedures are suitable for use by behavior analysts who are not credentialed to provide psychotherapy services. Participants will receive sample protocols and PowerPoint slides. Emphasis will be placed upon assessing the training needs of individuals and groups functionally. The workshop format will include both didactic and experiential elements.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Identify common functional barriers to psychological flexibility. Analyze role-plays for functional barriers to flexibility. Deliver classic acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) metaphors and exercises with fidelity. Identify elements of novel ACT-consistent metaphors and exercises.
Activities: During the workshop, trainers will present: 1. Key aspects of the psychological flexibility model. 2. Sample metaphors and exercises. 3. Sample role-plays to illustrate psychological processes. 4. Experiential exercises. Participants will: 1. Practice identifying psychological processes. 2. Engage in experiential exercises.
Audience: Board-certified assistant behavior analysts, board-certified behaivor analysts, staff trainers, and supervisors
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ACT, caregiver training, parent training, psychological flexibility
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Language Matrix in Intensive Early Intervention: Developing Generative Natural Social Language in Challenging Cases
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
M100 B-C (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest), KARA L. RIEDESEL (Lovaas Institute Midwest), CHARRYSE M. LUCKEY (Lovaas Institute Midwest), ANGELA M. KEENE (University of Kansas)
Description: In intensive early intervention with young children with autism, a great number of language skills are often taught. This workshop will show how such skills can be developed in a coherent conceptual framework, enabling productive treatment planning, trouble-shooting, and program evaluation. A four-dimensional matrix of social language skills will be used to design an overall generative process of language development. The matrix of skills is addressed across generalization modalities, syntax forms, conditional discriminations, and functional communicative relationships. After receptive and expressive skills are developed, the matrix naturally flows into auditory comprehension and creative language production skills. The organization of the language curriculum can be used to control the pacing of related social skills in a systematic manner. Complex social contingencies will be addressed to ensure that the child is not only acquiring social skills, but is using those skills functionally throughout the child's 24-hour and seven-day life. Data obtained from children in intensive early intervention will be presented to demonstrate how the generative curriculum can improve the progress of children with severely challenging language disorders.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Detail information necessary to plan and program children's language curriculums into a coherent whole. State how to develop generative language skills rather than rote language skills. Implement conditions that promote the production and comprehension of generative language learning. Program across generalization modalities, syntax forms, conditional discriminations, and functional communication relationships. Implement programs that promote creative language production and auditory comprehension through generative language learning. Program genuinely functional social language skills.
Activities: Participants will participate in didactic presentations, view video tapes, and demonstrations.
Audience: Parents, lead therapists, line therapists, consultants, and students. Participants should have a basic understanding of behavioral terms used in intensive early intervention. At least one-month's experience with intensive early intervention is preferable.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Comprehension, Generative Language, Language Matrix, Natural Environment Programming
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELLED: Advances in Treating Children with Motor and Vocal Tics, Tourette Syndrome, Trichotillomania, Skin Picking, and Other Body-Focused Repetitive Behaviors Using the Habit Reversal (HRT) and Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (C-BIT) Programs
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 J (Convention Center)
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: R. Gregory Nunn, Ph.D.
R. GREGORY NUNN (San Diego Unified School District), DOUGLAS W. WOODS (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
Description: Maladaptive and undesirable habits, motor and vocal tics, Tourette syndrome (TS), trichotillomania, skin picking, thumb-sucking, and other body-focused repetitive behaviors are extremely common problems that cause distress or significant functional impairment and can seriously affect the personal relationships and self-esteem of individuals who suffer from them. Because these problems can cause psychological distress, many different types of treatments for them have been developed. Habit Reversal is a behavioral treatment approach, which has proven to be an effective, evidence-based treatment for these types of problems (Azrin & Nunn, 1973; Azrin & Nunn, 1977; Woods, Piacentini, & Walkup, 2007; Grant, Stein, Woods, & Keuthen 2012; Bate, Malouff, Thorsteinsson, & Bhullar, 2011, among many others. In the past 10 or so years, a variety of additional treatments incorporating HRT have been developed and these have extended the original HRT and made it easier for clients to manage these unwanted behaviors and disorders.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Identify and differentially diagnose body-focused repetitive behaviors, tic disorders, and Tourette syndrome with children and adults. To describe the theoretical, biological, and behavioral rationales underlying the various models and evaluate their utility. The core components of the Habit Reversal and CBIT Treatment Procedures and adjunctive/supplemental therapies that been incorporated to extend their effectiveness. Common pitfalls of treatment and ways of overcoming them.
Activities: In this workshop, we will discuss the identification, diagnosis, developmental nature, and treatment of children and adults with these types of problems. Specifically, through didactic presentations participants will learn about body-focused repetitive behaviors including trichotillomania, skin-picking, and nail-biting; motor and vocal tics, and Tourette syndrome, their co-morbidities, and general methods of treating them including HRT and CBIT and extensions and variations of these evidence-based treatments. Then, participants will review various assessment tools that are currently used to measure clients' progress. Case studies, video, and live demonstrations will supplement the didactic presentations to assist participants in learning the critical components of the HRT and CBIT methods. Workshop participants are strongly encouraged to provide input.
Audience: Any practitioners, educators, and other professionals working with children, adolescents, or adults presenting with these types of problems.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): CBIT, Habit Reversal Treatment, Tourette Syndrome, Trichotillomania
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Supervisor Training using the New BACB Outline
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 I (Convention Center)
Area: CSE/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc. and TheBehaviorAnalyst.com), MARTA T. FIOL (Behavior Services of Brevard/UCF)
Description: Using the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline, this workshop prepares BCBAs to become approved supervisors. After December 31st, 2014, all pre-certification supervision and supervision for BCaBAs will have to be completed by a supervisor trained under these guidelines. This workshop will involve basic practical skills, ethics, documentation, and mock supervisory sessions with some interesting ethical dilemmas. Through the use of video clips, real-to-life supervision sessions will be presented, complete with the environmental problems faced by many supervisee-clinicians. Participants will be provided with multiple opportunities to practice brief supervisory scenarios; as supervisor, supervisee and observer. Participants will also be given access to an additional 2 hours of material at no additional cost on www.TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, including opportunities to test your understanding of the material. Participants will need their certificate from this 6-hour ABAI Workshop, AND the proof of completion of the online material (automatically sent by the website upon completion), in order to meet the 8-hour BACB requirement. This workshop will seem familiar to those who have taken our previous supervision workshops, but new elements have been added based on BCBA criterion. “This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.”
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Learn their role, and that of their supervisee, in the supervisory experience. Learn multiple ethical considerations through discussion and role play. Learn supervision skills and strategies, with feedback, through discussion and role play. Experience "supervising" a clinician who has just started working with an individual whose environment may or may not be supportive of an intervention. Experience being presented with novel situations, and will then be expected to give their supervisee tasks to perform before the next supervision, much like real life supervision.
Activities: Didactic lecture; critique of video scenarios; participation in multiple scenario triads taking the role of supervisor, supervisee and observer; and question-and-answer period.
Audience: Intermediate and advanced board-certified behavior analysts who are currently providing supervision, who are considering becoming supervisors, or who are considering providing supervision to community-based clinicians.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Documentation, Ethics, Supervision, Supervisor
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Special Education Law and the Practicing Behavior Analyst: Legal and Ethical Considerations
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
200 H-I (Convention Center)
Area: CSE/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies), REBECCA RYAN (Sandbox ABA)
Description: This day-long workshop will focus on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the issues that practicing behavior analyst should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments, writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term positive behavior supports as used in the IDEIA, and the requirements for independent educational evaluations including FBAs. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive questions and answers. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Identify the major components of the IDEIA Identify the areas of IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst. Identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may serve under IDEIA. Identify the legal requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation. Identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA. Identify when a BIP must be developed under the IDEIA. Identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, case study, question and answer.
Audience: Practicing behavior analysts supervisors or practicing behavior analysts school administrators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical issues, Legal issues, Special Education
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The ABCs of Behavior Analysis: A Review of the Basics for Students and Teachers
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
102 B-C (Convention Center)
Area: EAB/TBA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: A. Charles Catania, Ph.D.
A. CHARLES CATANIA (University of Maryland Baltimore County), CHRISTINE HOFFNER BARTHOLD (University of Delaware)
Description: The basics of behavior analysis will be reviewed in the context of an organization developed for the new fifth edition of the presenter's book, Learning, which may be useful to some participants but which is not required for this workshop. The first hour will be devoted to behavior in its biological context, including discussions of unlearned behavior, the significance of function and structure in evolution, and the selection of behavior by its consequences. The main body of the workshop will concentrate on basic concepts, including reinforcement contingencies and aversive control, shaping and fading, stimulus control and attention, schedules of reinforcement, and sources of novel behavior. The final hour will provide a brief introduction to the analysis of verbal behavior by showing how the basic processes can be extended to this area. Along the way extensions of the basic concepts to applications will be considered, particularly emphasizing behavioral terminology as it has evolved in research literatures and been reflected in the content of certification exams.
Learning Objectives: Along with the review of basic behavioral concepts such as reinforcement, aversive control, shaping, and attention, attendees will learn how different aspects of behavior can be accommodated within a coherent organization of behavior analytic concepts. They will become familiar with rationales behind important practices in applying our behavioral language, such as speaking of reinforcing responses rather than organisms, describing behavior in the context of three-term or higher-order contingencies, applying appropriate usages of the vocabularies of positive and negative reinforcement, specifying what is reinforced by what in the arrangement and/or interpretation of reinforcement contingencies, and considering multiple causation when interpreting complex behavior. They will learn about benefits and pitfalls of translations either from technical to colloquial vocabularies or in the other direction, as well as tactics for avoiding interpretations that call upon weakly defined and sometimes unmeasurable entities (as when behavior is said to be caused by feelings or emotions). They will also learn to identify and address misrepresentations of behavior analytic concepts and practices, as when reinforcement is falsely equated with bribery or when it is argued that reinforcement has hidden costs or when ignoring is suggested as the most effective treatment for reducing unwelcome behavior.
Activities: The workshop will include presentations supplemented by visual materials and discussions, videos of some basic phenomena as they have been displayed in classroom demonstrations, and computer simulations of shaping and of simple reinforcement schedules.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for: 1. Students of behavior analysis, especially those completing degrees or preparing for certification examinations. 2. Those seeking a refresher overview of basic phenomena. 3. Those preparing to teach or assist in courses covering the basics of behavior analysis. Those seeking an introductory treatment may also find this workshop appropriate, on the assumption that anyone attending these meetings will already have at least some familiarity with these topics from undergraduate course work or independent reading.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Attention and discrimination, Basic operant contingencies, New behavior, shaping, Verbal behavior overview
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELLED: Best Practice Instructional Routines for Teaching the K-5 Reading Foundational Skills of the Common Core State Standards
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 A (Convention Center)
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sonia M. Lewis, Ed.S.
SONIA M. LEWIS (Kalamazoo Regional Educational Service Agency)
Description: This workshop will provide an interactive overview of the K-5 Reading Foundational Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and how they align with three of the "big ideas of reading" (phonemic awareness, phonics and fluency) as defined by the National Reading Panel. Participants will learn best practice instructional routines to teach these critical foundation skills and how DIBELS (Dynamic Indicators of Basic Early Literacy Skills) can be used to identify students in need of support early, provide and evaluate progress toward instructional goals and help systems evaluate their core and supplemental reading programs. An emphasis will be placed on direct instruction and participants will learn how to differentiate instruction so that all learners are fluent in these foundational reading skills. Tips for implementing and sustaining these practices systemwide also will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Explain how three of the big ideas of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics and fluency) align with the Reading Foundational skills of the Common Core State Standards. Teach explicit phonological awareness, phonics and fluency instructional routines. Explain how to differentiate instruction in the area of foundational reading skills. Explain how to use DIBELS data to identify possible gaps in core reading instruction. Explain how to incorporate explicit instructional routines into core and supplemental reading instruction.
Activities: Participants will partake in small and large group discussions, practice explicit phonological awareness, phonics and fluency instructional routines, and plan for incorporating the instructional routines into core and supplemental reading instruction.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for a wide range of participants including elementary teachers, early childhood teachers, reading specialists, principals, curriculum directors, school psychologists, and university professors training future educators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Common Core Standards, Explicit Instructional Routines, Phonological Awareness/Phonics/Fluency, Reading Foundational Skills
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Standard Celeration Charting
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
208 A-B (Convention Center)
Area: EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kerri L. Milyko, Ph.D.
KERRI L. MILYKO (Precision Teaching Learning Center), ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center), JOHN W. ESHLEMAN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), HENRY S. PENNYPACKER (University of Florida)
Description: This workshop will teach participants the steps of precision teaching with particular emphasis on reading and charting human performance on the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC). Participants will learn a) to write precise performance statements (pinpointing), b) the three important dimensions of behavior to monitor, c) the features of the SCC, d) standard charting conventions, and e) how to analyze performance on the chart to assist in making data-based decisions. The instructors will draw from long and varied histories of success using the SCC in a range of setting to illustrate key concepts taught in the workshop. The presenters will use examples from university teaching, educational intervention with special needs and regular education students, and the monitoring of private events. Participants will receive a copy of the Handbook of the Standard Celeration Chart, all materials used in the workshop, and a CD containing selected articles and an electronic version of the SCC.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Write precise performance statements (pinpointing). Read performance data charted on the SCC Chart. Describe the frequency, celeration, and bounce of the data on the SCC. Describe changes in performance using SCC change terminology. Describe appropriate data-based change decisions.
Activities: Applying principles derived from behavior analysis of well-designed instruction, our world-class group of workshop instructors will use a range of activities to ensure participants learn the skills targeted in the objectives. Participants will engage in choral responding and paced practice, timed practice on key concepts and skills, and both small and large group discussions.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for anyone seeking an introduction (or refresher) to precision teaching and standard celeration charting, including persons interested in using the SCC to improve their teaching or clinical practice.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Celeration Charting, Precision Teaching
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Organizational Performance Engineering to Achieve Desired Client Outcomes
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
102 F (Convention Center)
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior analysis has developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees' performance, just like their clients' performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals, who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide you with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Define desired client results and necessary performance, measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "learning efficiency." Define desired organizational performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current organizational performance at each level. Perform a data-based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes. Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment. Design and implement those solutions, which may include resources, training, and management. Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: The workshop will provide case studies, practice exercises, practice cards, project worksheets, and computer-based charting software. Participants will be asked to practice some of the component skills necessary to complete an organizational performance engineering project and to begin planning their own projects.
Audience: Do you work as an employee, supervisor, or director of an agency that provides services to clients with learning difficulties? Are you satisfied with your clients' progress? Behavior Analysis has developed a powerful technology for helping people, but too many clients don't receive the benefits. Why not? The easy answer is that employees don't do what they are told. But the employees' performance, just like their clients' performance, is a product of their environment. Do employees have the resources, training, and management necessary to help their clients achieve their goals? What about their supervisors? What about their directors? Organizations are groups of individuals who must work together to provide their clients with the outcomes they want. The failure of clients to make adequate progress is not usually an individual employee performance problem, but a performance problem at the system process, and individual levels of the organization. This workshop will provide you with a set of tools to pinpoint organizational performance problems, analyze their causes, recommend the best solutions, solve the problems by designing and implementing solutions that might include more efficient resources, training, and management practices, and evaluate their effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Data Based Process, Learning Efficiency, Performance Objectives, System Performance
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Breaking Bottlenecks: Designing Workflow and Creating Efficiency
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
M100 A (Convention Center)
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Bryon Neff, Ph.D.
DONNIE M. STAFF (Optimal), BRYON NEFF (Optimal)
Description: Processes generate products and services, such as discrete trial training and social skills curricula, which are marketed and sold to consumers. In addition, well-designed processes yield high quality products and services at lower costs, thereby increasing the rate of quality products and services that are produced, which in turn lead to higher customer satisfaction. In this workshop, attendees will learn how to design business processes that are effective, save time and money, cut down on waste, and provide their companies with competitive advantages. In addition, attendees will have an opportunity to work with a human performance technology practitioner to determine the most efficient way to organize their internal processes. Participants will first learn how to visualize key processes, which is critical in order to make decisions more easily and execute improvements more reliably. Then, participants will learn many well-known methods for improving processes through the design and support of said process. The workshop will conclude with a discussion on how to measure process outputs as well as the performance of those contributing to key processes. The workshop facilitators will discuss how effective measurement systems help connect organizational components, thus ensuring that they operate in concert with one another. This allows managers to monitor, maintain, and improve performance on an ongoing basis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to create and improve processes.
Activities: Analyze processes and design or redesign processes.
Audience: Business owners, middle managers, upper managers, operations directors, and human resource representatives.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Business, Efficiency, Management, Process
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELLED: Selling the Evidence: Ethical Marketing for Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
200 C-E (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ann Brigid Beirne, M.A.
ANN BRIGID BEIRNE (Global Autism Project), MOLLY OLA PINNEY (Global Autism Project)
Description: With so much evidence to support applied behavior analysis, have you ever wondered why so many consumers choose pseudoscience? Do you want to expand your services or your agency's services but don't know where to begin? Have you tried to start a private practice but feel like you're not a "business person"? This high-energy, hands-on workshop will help you to build a thriving practice in behavior analysis. For nearly a decade, the Global Autism Project has been training professionals working with individuals with autism spectrum disorder in sustainable business practices. Using the simple strategies outlined in this workshop, participants will learn how to effectively disseminate behavior analysis through public outreach, as well as how to effectively market our services while still maintaining the high standard of ethics outlined by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Identify the need for effective marketing of behavior analysis (including relevant guidelines from the BACB's Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts). Identify the challenges to effective marketing of behavior analysis. Identify the essential behaviors of a successful marketing campaign. Identify the essential elements of a sustainable business practice. Create and self-manage achievable business goals (even if they're not business people!). Develop the ingredients for success that their businesses need.
Activities: This high-energy, hands-on workshop will help you develop the skills to build a sustainable practice in behavior analysis. We will guide you through practice activities to help you develop marketing skills including: selecting goals for your marketing, developing networking skills, building and sustaining referral partnerships, and creating and sustaining an effective list of potential clients
Audience: This workshop is open to anyone wishing to make their practice more efficient, more sustainable and able to serve more consumers. Whether you are looking for strategies to grow your private practice, expand your agency's outreach, or just looking for a way to spread the word about behavior analysis, this workshop will help you accomplish your goals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): business practices, dissemination, ethics, marketing
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Applying Precision Teaching to Behavior Challenges: The Is-Does Problem Solving System
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 E (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard M. Kubina Jr., Ph.D.
RICHARD M. KUBINA JR. (Pennsylvania State University), KIRSTEN K. YURICH (The Vista School)
Description: The stakes for producing behavioral change have never been higher. General education, special education, early childhood and even higher education have increasingly become the focal point for effective behavior change technologies. Precision Teaching (PT) provides one important part of the solution for maximizing behavioral output: a science-based method for selecting and identifying behavior, recording behavior, visually displaying data, and facilitating timely, learner-centered changes, providing recursive problem solving. Solving learning and behavioral challenges with PT has never been easier with the Is-Does Problem Solving System. The system was developed to uncover the orderly relations between behavior and learning environments. The Is-Does System includes: 1. Precise, action-based descriptions of behavior within the context of environmental events. 2. sensitive measurements of behavior with frequency/rate. 3. Data monitoring and analysis on Standard Celeration Charts. and 4. Decision making. Equipped with this information, teachers and behavior analysts precisely engineer effective learning environments, implement intensive data-monitoring procedures and employ on-going decision making. The workshop provides explicit instruction on the components of Is-Does Problem Solving System: 1. Planning sheet and component blueprint 2.Universal behavior change monitoring form. 3. Behavior change picture identification guide. 4.Is-Does recording forms. Applicable materials are provided on a CD-ROM.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Categorize learning environment variables across programs, program events, pinpoints and movement cycles, arrangements, and arranged events. State the steps involved in systematically analyzing learning environments when developing and modifying behavior change programs using the Is-Does Problem Solving System. Complete the Is-Does Planning Sheet using presenter and participant generated examples.
Activities: The workshop activities will instruct participants to use the Is-Does Problem Solving System to systematically evaluate learning environment variables to solve learning and behavioral challenges. The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, and frequency building exercises focused on the components of the Is-Does Problem Solving System. Participants will further evaluate behavioral data on Standard Celeration Charts. Participants will label behavior change pictures, celeration, and bounce significance.
Audience: This workshop is designed for teachers, precision teachers, behavior analysts, supervisors or any people with responsibility for systematically evaluating individual performances and learning environments in order to produce maximum behavior change. The material presented will be appropriate for participants with a moderate understanding of behavior analysis and/or a minimal knowledge of precision teaching, as well as those well versed in traditional practices. The workshop is specifically designed for individuals that routinely review learner behavior and have the responsibility to modify programming in order to produce positive learning outcomes and improve behavior challenges.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Challenging Behavior, Precision Teaching, Problem Solving
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELLED: Creating a Private Practice in the World of the Affordable Care Act
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
102 D-E (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terence G. Blackwell, M.S.
TERENCE G. BLACKWELL (Services for the UnderServed)
Description: The Private Practice Model, presented as both full day and half day workshops at ABAI in prior years, is updated to include the impact of the entry in several states of major medical insurance reimbuirsement for applied behavior analysis services and recent Supreme Court endorsement of the U.S. Affordable Care Act. Content covers "start up" considerations, developing an operating budget, defining a "niche," and anticipating the requirements of regulatory oversight in provision of services through an insurance-based reimbursement system along with considerations for planning to deliver services in the evolving environment of accountable care organizations.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Identify preparatory steps to start a "private" practice in deliery of ABA services. Describe the USP (unique service proposition) for ABA in the insurance market. Articulate four major components of insurance coverage for ABA services in national health care, and how these impact service delivery.
Activities: Audience participation, creation of a start up budget, development ofa "USP" (unique Service Plan) budget for an ABA private practice, and review and discuss key components, both positive and negative, of major medical-based insurance reimbursement.
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts, seeking to leverage their expertise beyong the role of an employee. Those considering development of a private practice based on the newly enacted insurance mandates for autism treatment in a number of states are encourged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Running Effective Behavior Analytic Social Skills Groups
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
101 H (Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Katherine Frances Carey, M.S.
KATHERINE FRANCES CAREY (Advances Learning Center), JESSICA WENIG (Advances Learning Center), ALYSSA L. FAMIGLIETTI (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: grouping students in effective clusters, using group contingencies, taking data on multiple students at once, and individualizing prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running effective activities that provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social stimuli. This workshop will teach specific learning activities that target skills in the domains of body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking. It also will provide training on how, when, and why to use group contingencies and give strategies for individualizing social instruction in a group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Use a variety of activities designed to provide students with frequent opportunities to respond to social cues. Facilitate activities that teach body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking. Group students into effective learning clusters. Use several different group contingencies and identify the reasons behind using each type of contingency. Collect data on multiple students. Individualize prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students. Take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups to complete guided notes and case studies and participate in video-modeled activities and role-plays.
Audience: The intended audience includes Board Certified Behavior Analysts, who train staff to run social skills groups; teachers; speech language pathologists; behavioral instructors, or therapists, who run social skills groups; school staff intending to implement social skills instruction as a part of their curriculum; and anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, group instruction, PSI, social skills
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Conducting Functional Behavior Assessments in School/Residential Settings: Balancing Rigor With Practicality
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
208 C-D (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Aaron Barnes, Ph.D.
AARON BARNES (Michigan's Integrated Behavior and Learning Support Initiative), AMY CAMPBELL (Grand Valley State University), BILLIE JO RODRIGUEZ (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Description: The scope of what constitutes a functional behavior assessment (FBA) in many educational and home settings is broad and varied. Practice may range from informal interviews and anecdotal narrative observation summaries to analog functional analysis, and everything in between. Both policy and resources play a role in determining what the FBA process entails for a particular case in a particular setting, but in many cases steps can be taken to increase both the efficiency and effectiveness of our efforts. This workshop will address practices to increase both the scientific rigor and treatment utility of FBA in natural settings. The presented practices will include the selection of indirect and direct assessment methods; conducting assessments with focused efficiency to yield more useful data in less time, utilizing data from indirect assessments to help guide direct assessment procedures, linking data collection from baseline to intervention progress monitoring, and troubleshooting common problems encountered in the assessment and intervention stages of service delivery. The presentation will incorporate the use of technology to enhance data-collection procedures. A focus of the workshop will be to share how increased precision during the assessment phase of FBA enhances the development and efficacy of behavior support plans.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Understand the rationale for selecting particular indirect and direct assessment tools in natural (e.g. school, home, community) settings. Increase the efficiency of FBA interviews by gathering information that contributes to a functional hypothesis and to the efficiency of conducting direct observations. Utilize technology to enhance data collection. Conduct targeted direct observation procedures with minimal disruption to naturally occurring contingencies. Collect data with high treatment utility in less time. Understand how to link the data to behavior support strategies.
Activities: This workshop will alternate between presentation and hands-on activities, including reviewing assessment methods, evaluating initial assessment data to inform subsequent assessment and support plans, demonstrating different ways technology can be utilized to enhance assessment, and reviewing videotaped exercises to practice newly acquired skills.
Audience: The workshop requires participants to have foundational knowledge of applied behavior analysis methods and terminology. The presentation is intended for professionals who design, implement, fund, support, and evaluate functional behavior assessment and subsequent interventions in natural settings including schools, homes, day programs, and residential facilities. This target audience may include educators, therapists, social workers, clinic or school-based psychologists, graduate-level students, and behavior specialists or analysts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Caregiver Collaboration, Functional Behavior Assessment, Teacher Collaboration, Technology
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELLED: A Model for Assessing and Training Experimental Analyses as Part of School-Based Functional Behavior Assessments
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
M100 D-E (Convention Center)
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sean D. Casey, Ph.D.
BRENDA J. BASSINGTHWAITE (University of Iowa Children's Hospital), SEAN D. CASEY (The Iowa Department of Education)
Description: Since 2009, the Iowa Department of Education and the Center for Disabilities and Development have been training challenging behavior specialists in school settings to use experimental analyses. The program has had 31 participants actively involved in the training across the state. As a result of their participation, a statewide increase was experienced in the use of preference assessments, functional analyses, structural analyses, and concurrent operants assessments in their practices. This workshop will provide an overview of the training, a description of the specialists who have been involved in the training, and the results of the training. During the workshop, participants will become familiar with the assessment tools that were developed for determining skill levels of the trainees and for evaluating progress of the trainees. This includes a self-assessment, an exam, and direct observation measures. An in-depth description of how all of these tools are used to customize training for the specialist will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Utilize the tools employed in this workshop to assess a variety of essential skill sets necessary to conduct high level experimental analysis of behavior specific to functional behavior assessments as they relate to behavior intervention plans for children who present challenging behaviors.
Activities: The activities employed will include an overview of the development and implementation of tools used to assess levels of one's performance in the area of FBA. We will describe the methods and tools used to assess skills of novice performers in the area of Applied Behavior Analysis, specifically FBA, and describe the teaching methods used. We will present pre- and post-training data for individuals who were trained using this methodology, highlighting areas where tailored improvements could be made to the model. We will focus training during this workshop on the tools used to identify areas of need and the specific "hands on" training provided to teach these skills, We will include data on the rate in which learning might be expected with similar individuals and will highlight the exit criteria we have utilized across all measures. The audience will be engaged with the tools and review data from the self-assessment and portions of the exam as a means to understand how the measures are used to focus training efforts. The audience also will review obtained direct observation data from the project, for evaluation in the decision making process regarding what skills should be targeted with future training opportunities.
Audience: Individuals who are at the intermediate level with their awareness of behavior analysis, and who are also responsible for training professionals with various levels of experience in the area of FBA and BIP. Individuals heavily involved in the training and supervising of FBA, BIP and/or behavior analysts would receive the most benefit from the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Teaching Behavior Analysis
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELLED: Creating Graphs and Data Summaries in Microsoft Excel 2007: Development of Basic Skill Repertoires and Setting up a Comprehensive Staff Training System Utilizing Behavioral Skills Training
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
102 A (Convention Center)
Area: TBA/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James W. Jackson, M.S.
JAMES W. JACKSON (Kinark Child and Family Services), SARAH M. DUNKEL-JACKSON (Southern Illinois University), SHANNON D. BORCH (Kinark Child and Family Services)
Description: The current workshop is aimed at helping attendees to develop a basic repertoire in utilizing Microsoft Excel 2007/2010 for the summarization and graphing of basic single subject design research and clinical practice data. Utilization of basic formulas and cell formatting will be highlighted, as will creating basic single subject design graphs including single or multiple dependent variables or phases of intervention. These skills will be taught in a Behavioral Skills Training format, and the final section of this workshop will cover the overall training format and how it can be applied to set up a comprehensive training program that attendees can take back to their daily work. Workshop attendees will be required to come equipped with a Microsoft Windows-based laptop computer equipped with either Microsoft Excel 2007 or 2010.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Create basic data summaries for single subject design research/practice/intervention data. Create single dependent variable intervention design graphs. Create multiple dependent variable reversal design graphs. Utilize basic formulas for calculating rate, percentage, and overall sum of dependent variables. Paste completed graphs into Microsoft Word. Setting up a training program for staff: A. Evaluation of baseline and post-training level of competence with Excel. B. Employing a Behavioral Skills Training model for teaching proficient use of Excel for summarizing and displaying behavioral data. C. Managing staff performance data for evaluation of the effectiveness of the training program.
Activities: Workshop activities will build upon each other sequentially as the day progresses. The workshop will be divided into several modules of content with each module delivered in a format in which instructors will initially provide instruction and modeling of the creation of data summaries and/or graphs. Attendees will then have the opportunity to rehearse the skills described while instructors walk around the room to provide feedback and individual instruction. Attendees also will be asked to complete short assessments of the skills targeted in the workshop throughout the day. Attendees will be provided with hypothetical intervention scenarios with data and asked to create data summaries and graphs utilizing the skills taught throughout the workshop. The final module of the workshop will cover how the training format utilized in the workshop can be adapted for attendees to transport to their own workplace or to train their own staff/colleagues. Module 1: Basic components of formatted graphs. Module 2: Basic components of a formatted data summary and creating single dependent variable intervention graphs. Module 3: Creating data summaries and multiple dependent variable intervention graphs. Module 4: Utilizing basic formulas in Excel for calculating rate, percentage, and sums. Module 5: Pasting completed graphs into Microsoft Word Module. 6: Setting up a staff training program for use of Excel.
Audience: Attendees of this workshop should possess a basic knowledge of single subject design and its application to clinical practice in applied behaviour analysis. A basic knowledge of how to use Microsoft Office 2007/2010 applications would be beneficial. The target audience for this workshop are individuals with interest in improving their skill level at summarizing and displaying behavioral data electronically, and who are interested in further disseminating that skills set to staff or colleagues.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavioral Skills Training, Microsoft Excel, Staff Training, Visual Analyis
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Establishment of Verbal Behavior Development Cusps and Capabilities Necessary for Successful Inclusion
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
202 A-B (Convention Center)
Area: VRB/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: JoAnn Pereira Delgado, Ph.D.
R. DOUGLAS GREER (Teachers College, Columbia University and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences), JOANN PEREIRA DELGADO (Teachers College, Columbia University), DEREK JACOB SHANMAN (Teachers College, Columbia University), VANESSA LAURENT (Teachers College, Columbia University)
Description: Children with and without disabilities may be missing critical reader/writer verbal cusps and capabilities that significantly limit their access to the general education curriculum. The presenters of this workshop will present research (which has been published in peer reviewed journals) that has successfully tested for and induced verbal developmental cusps and capabilities for a range of students. Once these cusps and capabilities were induced, students could learn in ways they could not have done before, thereby accelerating learning. The reader/writer protocols covered in this workshop will include: 1) The Intensive Tact protocol, 2) Increasing textual response rates, 3) Transformation of Stimulus Function Across Saying and Writing, 4) Observational Learning 5) Naming and 6) Writer Immersion. Participants will be taught to test for and identify studentswho do not have these cusps or capabilities. They will then be taught to implement the corresponding protocol and subsequently test that it has been induced. Lastly, participants will be taught to arrange instruction based on the student's acquisition of a particular cusp or capability in a way that the student can benefit.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Define a cusp and capability relative to student learning and outcomes. Identify, measure and implement a learn unit. Test for the presence and absence of the following developmental cusps and capabilities: 1) Generalized reinforcement for the emission of tacts, 2) Textual response rate at 80 words per minute, 3) Transformation of stimulus function across saying and writing, 4) Observational learning, 5) Naming, and 6) Technical writing precisely affects reader behavior and aesthetic writing affects emotions. Implement the relevant verbal behavior development protocol, including design, arrangement of materials and measurement for each of the above cusps and capabilities. Determine the next steps in instructional sequence and design of the curricula once a cusp or capability is induced.
Activities: Participants who attend this workshop will observe presentations on each protocol. They will become familiar with the seminal research studies and watch videos demonstrating the implementation of each protocol in a classroom setting. Participants will be provided with an outline (guided notes) for each protocol, which they will complete throughout the workshop. Participants also will practice designing and implementing protocols. They will select and design appropriate stimuli and identify the dependent and independent variables for each protocol. Participants also will learn how to collect data and graph results.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes behavior analysts, psychologists, speech therapists, supervisors or professors who are working with children with and without disabilities. Attendees should have a basic applied background in applied behavior analysis. Graduate students are encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Cusps and Capabilities, Inclusion, Naming, Observational Learning
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Identification and Establishment of Early Verbal Behavior Developmental Cusps: Laying the Foundations for Language Development
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
201 A-B (Convention Center)
Area: VRB/DEV; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jessica Singer-Dudek, Ph.D.
JESSICA SINGER-DUDEK (Teachers College, Columbia University), JEANNE MARIE SPECKMAN (Fred S. Keller School, Teachers College, Columbia University), LIN DU (Teachers College, Columbia University), JACQUELINE MAFFEI-LEWIS (Teachers College, Columbia University), JENNIFER LONGANO (Fred S. Keller School), JOAN A. BROTO (Fred S. Keller School)
Description: Often children with disabilities are missing the prerequisite repertoires necessary to acquire language. Recent research has led to the identification of crucial preverbal or verbal developmental cusps. Further, the successful establishment of these missing cusps in children has led to an acceleration in learning and further language development. These prerequisites include observing and attending to stimuli, including adults, in the environment, discriminating the auditory properties of speech, the establishment of mand and tact repertoires, and the induction of generalized imitation (see/do). This workshop will provide participants with the theoretical and practical knowledge to determine which verbal developmental cusps are present in a child's repertoire, and which are missing. Participants also will acquire mastery of the protocols necessary to establish or enhance missing foundational cusps necessary for the development of subsequent verbal behavior. Protocols to be covered in this workshop include: conditioned reinforcement for observing human faces and/or voices, conditioned reinforcement for observing 2- and 3-dimensional stimuli, generalized imitation, rapid motor imitation to induce speaker behavior, generalized matching of auditory stimuli, the listener emersion protocol to induce listener literacy, the speaker immersion protocol to establish a mand repertoire, and the intensive tact protocol to establish social reinforcement from the listener.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Measure and record observing responses. Determine the presence or absence of crucial developmental cusps. Select the appropriate corresponding protocol to induce missing cusps. Implement protocols to enhance or induce missing verbal developmental cusps. Describe the theories that drive verbal behavior development.
Activities: Participants will receive instruction on the theoretical underpinnings of the research presented in this workshop, followed by practical application training. Training will include watching videos of assessments and protocols to induce each of the verbal developmental cusps, followed by instruction on how to measure and record student responses to probe trials, training in the implementation of each protocol, role-play and practice in implementing the protocols, and ending with a written assessment of each participants' acquisition of both theoretical and practical knowledge of the identification and induction of the pre-verbal and verbal developmental cusps.
Audience: Behavior analysts, psychologists, speech therapists, supervisors, or other professionals who are working with children with and without disabilities. Participants should be well-versed in the vocabulary of the science of behavior and have some understanding of verbal behavior, including basic verbal operants. Graduate students are encouraged to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): verbal behavior development
 
Special Event #1
Run Around Lake Harriet
Friday, May 24, 2013
8:00 AM–10:00 AM
M101 A (Convention Center)
Chair: Annabelle Winters (Garden Center Services, Inc.)

Join us for a unique opportunity to run with fellow members on the Ground Rounds National Scenic Byway, specifically around Lake Harriet. Lake Harriet has a paved run/walk path, 2.75 miles in diameter. Dr. Andy Lattal will lead the run along with members of the Health, Sport, and Fitness SIG and ABAI’s Student Committee. All levels of runners and walkers welcome. Please wear appropriate attire and bring your own water bottle, if needed. Pre-registration is required and is available here.

Keyword(s): running
 
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELED: Using Physical Activity and Games to Enhance Learning, Social Skills and Self-Control With Autistic and Typical Populations
Friday, May 24, 2013
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
M100 H-I (Convention Center)
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eitan Eldar, Ph.D.
EITAN ELDAR (Kibbutzim College)
Description: The presented model emphasizes the uniqueness of movement and game as an ideal context enabling teachers and clinicians to design a challenging learning atmosphere for their students. The model is based on a series of scripts offering a simulation of real-life situations. It can support a specific clinical goal such as developing self-control; support a school curriculum; serve as an extended behavioral program for individuals or groups. The model has recently been implemented with children with autism, supporting communication and social skills on an individual level and as a preparation for inclusion. The rationale behind developing the model will be discussed and specific behavioral procedures and principles supporting the model will be cited. In addition, the structure of the model will be described, followed by different examples of its optional implementation. Components of the model, modified during the past 18 years, will then be portrayed. The workshop will conclude with recommendations and examples for utilizing the model in a variety of educational and clinical settings applicable to various populations. Attention will be devoted to the potential of using these procedures as a part of an individual program for ASD populations and for supporting their inclusion in the regular education system.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Explain the unique characteristics of physical activity and games as supportive learning contexts. Cite behavioral principles and procedures that enhance learning in these contexts. Present the general structure of the model and describe its components. Design various physical activities as clinical scripts, serving specific behavioral goals. Use and modify observation forms to evaluate students' progress. Adapt the components of the model to different populations and programs. Explain the rationale of the model to parents and practitioners.
Activities: 1. A presentation of the theoretical background of the model, defining the rationale behind it. 2. An open discussion: How physical activity can serve as a learning context. 3. A video presentation illustrating the implementation of the model in various settings and in different cultures. 4. Active demonstration of games involving workshop participants. 5. Planning trials, participants will practice activity and program design based on the model.
Audience: Behavior analysts, teachers, consultants, lead therapists, line therapists, and students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Movement, Social-skills, Self-contro
 
Special Event #2
Twin Cities Autism Services Providers Bus Tour for Students
Friday, May 24, 2013
12:00 PM–7:00 PM
M100 F-G (Convention Center)
Chair: Adam Lobermeier (St. Cloud State University)

The tour will provide students with an opportunity to take an inside look at different center-based agencies around the Minneapolis and St. Paul metro area offering behavioral intervention for children with autism. A representative from each agency will give students a tour of the facility as well as describe their clientele, intervention practices, and specific services that are provided. This tour may be especially valuable to students looking for employment or potential internship positions. The tour will end back at the conference site, where representatives from several providers of in-home services for children with autism will describe their programs and be available to speak with students and answer any questions that may arise. If you wish to reserve seats for the bus tour, please e-mail the chair of the event at load1101@stcloudstate.edu. Students will have first priority. This is a free event.

 
 
Special Event #3
Minnesota Northland ABA Tour
Friday, May 24, 2013
3:30 PM–6:30 PM
M100 J (Convention Center)
Chair: Timothy R. Moore (University of Minnesota)

The historical roots of behavior analysis in Minnesota are deep. The Minnesota Northland ABA invites a limited number of participants to join us on a bus tour of selected sites of historical relevance. Of particular interest will be the site where B. F. Skinner conducted research for Project Pigeon and the University of Minnesota, where Skinner served as a professor in the 1930s and '40s. Of less historical importance, a brief stop at a local brewery is planned before returning to the convention center.

 
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
International Service Delivery in Autism: Improving Consultative Service Effectiveness
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
102 B-C (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patricia I. Wright, Ph.D.
PATRICIA I. WRIGHT (Easter Seals), ANN BRIGID BEIRNE (Global Autism Project), MOLLY OLA PINNEY (Global Autism Project), EMILY ALEXANDRA WINEBRENNER (Universal Health Services)
Description: This session will address consultative autism service delivery in developing countries. The context of autism prevalence and service delivery in targeted developing countries and current international consultative service delivery models will be addressed. Many North American professionals travel to developing countries to promote effective interventions and influence the field of autism service delivery. Application of evidence-based practices within diverse cultures, language barriers and maintenance of skills and behaviors with itinerant models of consultation are just a few of the considerations that professionals must consider when working in cultures outside of their own. Participants will review the literature base currently available on the topic of autism in developing countries and international consultation and evaluate their current consultative behavior in the context of this available literature base.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: Define culture as it pertains to our work as behavior analysts. Review current data available regarding autism prevalence and autism treatment in developing countries. Evaluate current models of international consultation in autism service delivery. Identify challenges and solutions to providing culturally competent service in accordance with the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct.
Activities: Participants will engage in active learning to increase their knowledge and ability to deliver effective international consultation in the area of autism treatment. Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and targeted reading. Participants will be expected to reflect on their current knowledge and behavior, and incorporate knowledge gained within this workshop to assess need for potential behavior change to ensure they deliver quality consultative services.
Audience: Participants will engage in active learning to increase their knowledge and ability to deliver effective international consultation in the area of autism treatment. Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, small group breakout ,and targeted reading. Participants will be expected to reflect on their current knowledge and behavior, and incorporate knowledge gained within this workshop to assess need for potential behavior change to ensure they deliver quality consultative services.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Translating Neurodevelopmental Assessments and Neuropsychological Evaluations Into Operationally Defined Treatment Objectives for Children With ASD
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 D (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kelley Henry, Psy.D.
KELLEY HENRY (Beacon ABA Services), DENA SHADE-MONUTEAUX (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: This workshop is designed to provide educators and behavior analysts with strategies for understanding, interpreting, and translating neuropsychological evaluations into effective evidence-based, operationally defined treatment objectives for children with autism and related disorders. First, an overview of the basic components of a neuropsychological evaluation and commonly used standardized assessment tools will provide attendees with a basic understanding of how of testing is typically conducted. The key areas to be addressed will include: cognition, language, academics, learning and memory, visual spatial processing, fine motor, executive control, executive functioning, social problem solving, adaptive behavior, and socio-emotional functioning. Second, the workshop will investigate what these standardized measures tell us about a student's learning style focusing specifically on the neuropsychological profiles observed in children with autism, pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, and Asperger's syndrome. Finally, this workshop will teach providers how to translate this useful information into effective evidence-based and operationally defined treatment procedures. Specifically, attendees will learn how to prioritize goals and objectives and write instructional programs for students that include specific domains, responses, response definitions, probe procedures, teaching procedures, measurement procedures, data collection procedures, complex criterion, next steps, and maintenance planning.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Identify key components of neuropsychological and neurodevelopmental reports and understand the significance of clinical findings as measured by standardized assessment procedures. Summarize key components of the neuropsychological profiles commonly observed in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Describe fundamental steps to translating neuropsychological findings into operationally defined treatment objectives for children. Develop clinically and educationally appropriate Applied Behavior Analytic interventions to be implemented in home and school settings based on the resulting operationally defined treatment objectives.
Activities: The workshop will begin with informational lecture introducing the key comments of a neuropsychological evaluation, reviewing commonly used standardized assessment tools and how to interpret and understand the meaning of scores, and highlighting trends and variations commonly observed in children with autism spectrum disorders. The participants will be given guided lecture notes to support their understanding of the material introduced through the PowerPoint presentation. Three clinical cases of young children will be introduced (e.g., 2-year-old with pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified, 5-year-old with Autism and 7-year-old with Asperger's syndrome) this will serve as the foundation for the discussion of commonly observed trends within the profiles of children with ASD. A discussion will follow regarding the design and implementation of relevant applied behavior analytic interventions and the prioritization of goals and objectives for clinical and educational treatment protocols. The participants will divide into three small groups to review each student profile and discuss how they would prioritize interventions. The session will end with a summary of each group's findings and review the priorities for intervention treatment goals and objectives for each student.
Audience: Child focused practitioners including early intervention specialists, educators, special education teachers, speech therapists, occupational therapists, behavior therapists, school psychologists, social workers, clinical psychologists, developmental pediatricians, and graduate students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELLED: Use of Technology Applications and Tablet-Based Data Collection in Community-Based Instruction for Individuals With Autism
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 E (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Thomas L. Zane, Ph.D.
GLORIA M. SATRIALE (Preparing Adolescents and Adults for Life), AVRAM GLICKMAN (Mission for Educating Citizens with Autism), THOMAS L. ZANE (Institute for Behavioral Studies, Endicott College)
Description: The use of readily available technology is transforming the way we approach education. At this moment, there are more than 600 applications (apps) available in the iTunes store targeting education for individuals with autism. Advances in technology are transforming historical uses of "adaptive" devices and are decreasing stigma and increasing generalized use across environments. Portable devices, such as iPads, iPods, iPhones, or PDAs have the potential of taking teachers out of the equation in the instructional interaction. Furthermore, the increasingly available technology provides more opportunities for electronic data collection with real-time graphing, data analysis, and archiving. During this presentation, participants will learn to use four specific applications and a Tablet-Based data collection system. iRewards, GeeTasks, MyTalk, and Visual Impact Pro apps, are apps for iPhone, iPad, iPod, and Android platforms and have been shown to enhance skill acquisition, independent functioning and behavioral improvement for adolescents with autism and other developmental disabilities. Participants will learn about these apps and, during the session, actually program each, leaving with competence in developing and applying each for targeted skill development. The participants will practice with the tablet-based data collection system, scoring videotapes, and master the graphing functions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Describe the functions of each of the apps demonstrated. Use each app to develop a particular program for an individual. Demonstrate the use of the app in an analog scenario. Describe the components of the tablet-based data collection system.
Activities: Lecture; demonstration; hands-on use of each app; each participant will actually load the apps onto his/her own devices, open the app, and develop software programs applicable to clients and students in his/her care (this will involve most of thethree-hour workshop); hands-on use of the tablet-based, data-collection system, with the goal of successfully taking data with it and implementing the graphing function.
Audience: Includes: behavior analysts; special education teachers; administrators; program developers, who develop and implement instructional programs to teach academics social, vocational, and ADL skills. In addition, the audience includes all teachers and professionals who take data on their different learning and behavioral targets.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism, data collection, technology
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Developing Social Skills in Learners With ASD: From Assessment to Intervention
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
201 A-B (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mary Ellen McDonald, Ph.D.
MARY ELLEN MCDONALD (Hofstra University), ERIN SPARACIO (Eden II Programs/ The Genesis School), GINA CORNICELLI (Eden II Programs/ The Genesis School)
Description: Children with autism exhibit many deficits in the area of socialization. It is difficult for children with autism to respond to peers in social situations as well as to initiate to others. There are many other areas of socialization that children with autism have great difficulty with, such as ending a conversation, listening to another conversation to obtain information, and knowing how to join in a conversation. This workshop will discuss a variety of innovative strategies that have been successful for improving social skills in children with autism. Specific strategies to be discussed will include topics such as the use of behavioral rehearsal, role playing, using video modeling and video rehearsal, along with other technology-based interventions, and conducting ABC analyses of social situations. Carol Gray's social stories also will be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Name a minimum of three methods for increasing social skills in children with autism. Name ways to operationalize advanced concepts such as friendship when teaching a child with autism. Know how to use social skills interventions with children with high-functioning autism or Asperger's syndrome to improve social skills. Know how to use self-monitoring for children with autism to help them to monitor their social skills.
Activities: Participants will watch video clips of a variety of strategies that can be used to increase social skills in individuals with autism. Specific activities will include writing a story about a social situation or a student, conducting an ABC analysis on a social situation, and operationalizing a variety of advanced social concepts.
Audience: Psychologists, special educators, social workers, speech pathologists, and parents.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Group Instruction for Children With Autism: A Training Package for Supervisors and Teachers
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
102 D-E (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica Seeman, M.A.
JESSICA SEEMAN (New York Center for Autism Charter School), REBECCA WELLS (New York Center for Autism Charter School), EMILY NICKERSON (New York Center for Autism Charter School)
Description: Children with autism grow up to be adults with autism, and often continue to require intensive education in order to be successful. Currently, settings that offer this type of intensive instruction are rare. Programs that are available require that adolescents/adults have prerequisite skills associated with learning and working alongside peers. For this reason, it is important for early childhood and elementary educational programs to effectively train teaching staff so that students are able to benefit from group instruction. By providing this type of training to teachers, school programs will better prepare students for transitions to less restrictive adolescent and adult settings by reducing student-to-teacher ratios, providing more opportunities for socialization and observational learning, and maximizing meaningful instruction during down-staffed periods. This workshop will emphasize the importance of group instruction with children with autism with a focus on identifying student prerequisite skills and learning objectives, use of effective protocols for training classroom staff, organization of the classroom environment, and efficient use of classroom support staff.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Gain an understanding of the value of effective group instruction from a financial and societal standpoint. Gain an understanding of the value of effective group instruction for individual student progress and transition planning. Learn effective methods of training staff to plan, organize, and operate group lessons. Learn to evaluate student assessments to develop individual learning objectives for group instruction. Learn to utilize support staff in an efficient and productive way.
Activities: Look at and discuss video footage, complete worksheets to apply information, practice evaluating student assessments to determine objectives for group instruction, and practice training model.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for anyone who has an understanding of behavior analysis and either supervises or works directly with children with autism in a school setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Group Instruction
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Educational Environment Design and Adaptation for Students With Autism: Rules of Thumb for Teachers, Clinicians, and Service Providers
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 A (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eitan Eldar, Ph.D.
EITAN ELDAR (Kibbutzim College), JONATHAN FOGELSON (University of Pennsylvania School of Design and Michael Singer Studio)
Description: The goal of this workshop is to help teachers, clinicians, and other professional service providers adapt the spaces in which they work with individuals who have autism spectrum disorder to the particular needs of this heterogeneous population, even with the most modest of resources. The workshop accomplishes this goal by introducing participants to the main considerations to be addressed in creating classrooms and other spaces that are to serve individuals with ASD, and by empowering them to realize the significant positive influence they may affect on the environment in better adapting it to their client population. Workshop content is based on a collaborative endeavor bringing together a group of behavior analysts in Israel and an American research group funded by the National Endowment for the Arts. Activities will be based on this mutual project, presenting the accumulated knowledge in behavioral principles and procedures terms, that commensurate with the BACB 2015 task list. This workshop may contribute to devising behavioral tools and techniques by which behavior analysts can measure the success of “architecture” as part of functional assessment of a building or space.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Empower professional service providers to positively affect physical changes to spaces so that they may better serve their ASD client population. Expose workshop participants to the main parameters and considerations to be addressed when creating or improving spaces dedicated to serving individuals with ASD, and provide them with the skills necessary to affect positive change. Encourage conference attendees and the ABA community to consider developing behavioral methods to measure the success of architectural and other design interventions; so that these can be assessed objectively in the context of human behavior.
Activities: 1. Presenters will share the main research findings derived from the National Endowment for the Arts funded effort: the main parameters to consider when creating a space to serve individuals with ASD. This will include brief summary of relevant literature and publications, survey and observation results, and the review of case study precedents. 2. Presenters will relate findings and precedents to behavioral principles and procedures. 3. Participants will actively partake in identifying possibilities and difficulties while reviewing precedents. 4. Participants will share and describe their own ASD client work spaces, and work to identify challenges and opportunities for modification. In preparation to this activity, participants that pre-register will be given simple directions (optional) by which to easily document their work spaces using digital photography. Presenters will process the digital photography and incorporate it into the workshop content. 5. Participants will be challenged to devise strategies, relating to the physical design of their own work environment with ASD clients. 6. Participants will be introduced to the types of imagery produced by architects and design professionals as well as their inherit limitations and drawbacks. This is so that they will be able to actively engage in design processes that affect their client population and their institutions, and guide them toward higher levels of compliance with their ASD client population’s (as well as their own) needs.
Audience: Behavior analysts, teachers, principals, consultants, lead therapists, line therapists, administrators, and students.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): autism-environmental design, architecture
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Verbal Language and Cognition to Children With Autism Using the PEAK Relational Training System
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 B-C (Convention Center)
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Seth W. Whiting, M.S.
SETH W. WHITING (Southern Illinois University)
Description: The PEAK Relational Training System developed by Dr. Mark R. Dixon is a program designed to promote verbal behavior and related skills for children with autism. It has already been field tested by practitioners with more than 100 children with autism. Stemming from recent advances in basic and applied research in behavior analysis, PEAK starts the learner at the earliest stages with programs that directly train a beginning repertoire including prerequisite skills and Skinner's verbal operants, yet advances the learner much further by including skills such as extended tacts, autoclitics, metaphor, and perspective taking. PEAK also expands beyond Skinner's approach to language by building the repertoire through stimulus equivalence and relational frames. Instructors utilizing the Peak Relational Training System proceed through the program book while collecting data during each session that demonstrates the learner's progress and allows for ongoing adjustment. Attendees will be trained on how to assess language deficits, identify goals and objectives for students, and how to implement the most efficient prompting and training techniques to produce evidence-based results. This workshop will walk attendees through the PEAK system, the behavioral concepts underlying its development, role play data collection and program implementation, and provide outlines of PEAK for immediate implementation.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Describe how Skinner's verbal behavior has been incorporated into the Peak Relational Training System. Describe how the system utilizes stimulus equivalence and relational frames to promote language. Conduct sessions with a participant in each component of the system, including direct training, generalization, stimulus equivalence, and relational responding. Collect data on learner responding during sessions. Describe the layout of the Peak Relational Training System and how the programs proceed.
Activities: Participants will view videos of a board-certified behavior analyst conducting sessions using the Peak Relational Training System, collect data from vignettes, fill out, and design sample programs, and conduct brief role plays with others.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for applied behavior analysts, who wish to teach verbal behavior skills to their clients, and administrators, who are seeking a verbal behavior program to implement, or verbal behavior researchers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, relational frame theory, stimulus equivalence, verbal behavior
 
Workshop #W36
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELLED: Behavioral Sex Therapy: Fifty Shades Grey(ter)
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 F (Convention Center)
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert D. Holdsambeck, Ed.D.
ROBERT D. HOLDSAMBECK (Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies)
Description: In the winter of 1915, Dr. Sigmund Freud shocked the medical school audience in Vienna by stating that sexual impulses were at the core of mental disorders, healthy development, and extraordinary achievements. In 2011, a series of novels by E. L. James sold more than 40 million copies in 37 countries, confirming the veracity of that assertion. While much of contemporary behavior therapy focuses on children with autism, a small but growing number have chosen to talk about sex. This workshop will explore the intersection of clincal psychology and behavior analysis applied to issues in human sexuality. Respondent and operant learning paradigms will be used to help understand some of the complex issues involved in human sexual responding. This will include the diagnosis and treatment of sexual dysfunctions which are often present in intimate relationships.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: Define human sexual responding from a behavioral perspective. Organize and outline procedures used to understand the contigencies in operation for specific sexual issues. Discuss limitations to current research in human sexuality. Describe behavioral treatment strategies for two of the sexual issues most commonly presented during relationship counseling.
Activities: This workshop will be primarily lecture and disucussion. Data sheets and other data collection procedures will be discussed and demonstrated however, participants will not be asked to disclose personal information.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for all board-certified behavior analysts and psychologists interested in expanding their knowledge of human sexuality.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Sex education
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behavior Therapy and Schizophrenia
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 G (Convention Center)
Area: CBM/TPC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jannette Cross, Ph.D.
JANNETTE CROSS (Independent Practice)
Description: An approach to shaping behavior among those with schizophrenia will be discussed. Included in the presentation will be the shaping of attention and cognitive functions (i.e., cognitive remediation). Targets of behavior change also will be discussed. This approach was presented in the landmark research by Gordon Paul, Ph.D., (Paul & Lentz, 1977) and has a long line of empirical support. An integrated and objective assessment system, the Clinical Frequency Recording System (CFRS), is utilized to guide and monitor the shaping process. The CFRS assessment process, indices, utility and application will be discussed. While an inpatient application will be the focus of this presentation, community applications will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Apply learning principles to shape target behaviors among those with schizophrenia. Identify important areas of treatment focus. Apply an assessment strategy that guides and monitors the shaping process. Identify the concepts and methods of the Clinical Frequency Recording System. Complete one of the Clinical Frequency Recording System forms.
Activities: In addition to the presentation of information, participants will engage in active discussion and role play of shaping procedures. Participants will practice recording on the Clinical Frequency Recording System forms.
Audience: Practitioners and administrators of inpatient and community settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Harnessing the Power of ABA to Save Lives: A Review of and Practice Using Relevant Injury Prevention and Preventive Medicine Concepts and Tools, Combined With ABA Methodologies
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
200 A-B (Convention Center)
Area: CSE/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Cook, M.D.
RICHARD COOK (Pennsylvania State University)
Description: In 2009, the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI) Conference's Presidential Address asked "Why Are We Not Saving Lives?" The president called on behavior analysts to help change behaviors, and thus likely the health outcomes, related to health promotion and injury prevention. This workshop reviews foundation principles and methodologies as well as selected prominent papers from the disciplines of injury control and preventive medicine, as well as the small but growing body of such in the applied behavior analysis literature. It will provide those ABA clinicians interested in heeding the ABAI president's call to save lives some of the applicable concepts and skills from public health (literature supported standards of care, including citations and examples as applied within the disciplines in which they were derived) that the behavior analyst can apply to health-related behaviors, in conjunction with ABA principles and skills. Participants will review and discuss relevant literature from ABA as well as from the disciplines of injury control and preventive medicine as targeted for combination with ABA principles to address example specific health problems and problem behaviors, as well as examples noted to be of interest by program participants. Doing so will address another ABAI mandate to increase the application of ABA to more mainstream issues in psychology and society.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Combine relevant established principles from preventive medicine, public health with relevant ABA methodologies to create behavior modification strategies for changing behaviors related to injury control and preventive medicine/prohealth topics of interest to them. Develop working knowledge and application skills for the use of Haddon's Injury Control Strategies and Matrix as applied to health-related behavior change in areas of their personal/professional interest. Discuss and advocate for the learning about and incorporation of foundation principles in public health injury control and preventive medicine with the clinical application of ABA concepts in clinical practice better achieving sustained change in prohealth related behaviors.
Activities: Attendees will participate in lecture-based discussions reviewing foundation concepts and noteworthy papers in the injury control, preventive medicine, and relevant ABA literature. In group and individual exercises, they will perform functional assessments and task analyses related to example injuries and prohealth behaviors (such as cigarette smoking, alcohol-related problems, and injuries in various population cohorts), and develop behavior plans using the Haddon Matrix paradigm and strategies that incorporate alternative behaviors as well as changes to the prebehavioral environment. Attendees also will practice applying these approaches specifically to target behaviors within topics of their individual interest with the supervision and support of program faculty.
Audience: Teachers, health care clinicians and administrators, behavior analysts wishing to apply ABA societal and individual injury control and health promotion behavior change.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ABA Saving Lives, Health Behavior Change, injury control, Preventive Medicine
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Behaviorally Based Programming to Meet the Needs of Young Children With Down Syndrome
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 H (Convention Center)
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen Feeley, Ph.D.
KATHLEEN FEELEY (Long Island University), EMILY A. JONES (Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York), Sara Bauer (Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York), NICOLE NICHEN (Queens College and The Graduate Center, City University of New York)
Description: Researchers have identified characteristic deficits (communication, short-term memory, problem solving, etc.) and relative strengths (visual processing, social behaviors) associated with Down syndrome (a chromosome disorder resulting from an extra 21st chromosome). This workshop will begin with an overview of these characteristics and a discussion of how they impact outcomes for children with Down syndrome. We will overview the evidence base for behavioral interventions with learners with Down syndrome and discuss several studies demonstrating the effectiveness of behaviorally based interventions to address core deficits. We also will provide step-by-step procedures for implementing the interventions along with video illustrations. Intervention also will be discussed in terms of intensity with a discussion of how increasing intervention intensity enhances acquisition. Procedures will be presented for implementing interventions across a range of intensities.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participants should be able to: Identify core characteristics (both weaknesses and relative strengths) associated with Down syndrome. Identify a series of interventions that directly address the core characteristics associated with Down syndrome. Develop progress monitoring systems to accurately document learner performance. Identify factors related to treatment intensity. Describe procedures for implementing evidence-based interventions sampling a range of treatment intensities.
Activities: Participants will identify a learner with whom they work and document specific skills that warrant attention in that learner. Participants will then develop an intervention protocol that addresses each of these skills demonstrating their knowledge of several intervention strategies which sample a range of treatment intensities.
Audience: This workshop is targeted for individuals who provide educational, psychological, or related services (e.g., speech pathologists, occupational therapists, physical therapists) to young children (birth-kindergarten) with young children with Down syndrome. It is also appropriate for individuals providing parent or professional training to others who work with children with Down syndrome.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Down-syndrome, early intervention
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Teaching Creativity in Play Skills: Why and How Behavior Analysis Can Do This Well
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 I (Convention Center)
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), JENNIFER SMITH (Beacon ABA Services), VICTORIA SADLER (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: The workshop will focus on teaching participants procedures for establishing simple play repertoires and procedures for reinforcing the use of these basic play skills in novel settings, with novel materials and in novel combinations. The instructors will describe creativity and generativity in play skills from a behavior analytic perspective. All procedures will be described in terms of basic principles and demonstrated live or via videos. Participants will be trained in the use of research-supported strategies to teach play skills and to then to support their generalized and expanded use. These strategies will include (but are not limited to; matrix training (Goldstein & Mousetis, 1989), video modeling (MacDonald, Sacramone, Mansfield, Wiltz & Ahearn, 2009), activity schedules (MacDuff, G. S., Krantz, P. J., & McClannahan, L. E., 1993), and the use of visual/text supports for motor and vocal actions in the context of play scenarios. Creativity will be defined using behavioral descriptions with an emphasis on how to support stimulus generalization, response generalization and recombinative generalization of play skills. Participants will receive materials to support a range of basic play repertoires for children 2-5 years old, along with opportunities to practice using these materials.
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: Describe and understand creativity from a behavior analytic perspective Describe the deficits in children with ASD that result in the need for formally teaching creativity. Describe specific procedures to support stimulus, response, and recombinative generalization. Identify different types of play skills to be established and a hierarchy for doing so. Describe Matrix training and create a matrix for a pretend play activity. Describe Video Modeling and one scenario in which to implement it. Establish a basic play activity schedule.
Activities: Outline - Teaching Creative Play Workshop Proposed Schedule .45 Overview of creativity in play behavior What it is? Why we need to directly teach it for learners with ASD? Review of current research on play skills .5 ASD and Instruction Visual learning strengths Response to language instruction Instructional support "Critical Keys" Stimulus, Response and Recombinative Generalization .25 Break .75 Review Matrix training /Video Modeling Demonstrations and practice .75 Review Text/Visual Checklists and Picture Activity Schedules Demonstrations and practice
Audience: Practitioners working with individuals with ASD who currently have a limited play skill repertoire and who want to learn how to establish play skills and support extended play and more varied play repertoires
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How to Design Efficient Learning Programs
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
101 J (Convention Center)
Area: EDC/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: What type of performance do you need to teach clients and staff? How do you decide? What types of performance measures will provide the most useful information about current client and staff performance and progress, measures that will allow you to evaluate current performance and predict future performance? What is "learning efficiency" and why is it a useful measure of client and staff progress? What are the elements and features of the efficient learning activities? How can you use frequency and learning efficiency measures to evaluate and improve the efficiency of your learning activities for clients and staff? This workshop will provide you with tools to evaluate and improve "learning efficiency," a new measure of performance improvement per amount of learner interaction time.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Define necessary client and staff performance, measure and evaluate current performance. Perform a data-based analysis cf client and staff performance problems to identify their causes. Design efficient learning activities for clients and staff. Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those learning activities.
Activities: The workshop will provide case studies, practice exercises, practice cards, project worksheets, and computer-based charting software. Participants will be asked to practice some of the component skills necessary to design and evaluate an efficient learning program and to begin planning their own projects.
Audience: Those who manage staff or work with clients.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Instructional Design, Learning Efficiency, Performance Objectives, Staff Training
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using ABA to Enhance the Efficiency and Effectiveness of Academic Interventions in Schools
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
200 F-G (Convention Center)
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: John C. Begeny, Ph.D.
JOHN C. BEGENY (North Carolina State University)
Description: As highlighted by national statistics of student achievement, schools face major difficulties meeting all children's learning needs. Contemporary approaches to assisting struggling learners include pre-referral intervention teams and multi-tier models of response-to-intervention (RTI). Despite some promising indicators of these approaches, too many students fail academically because most schools still face major pragmatic challenges when using these approaches (e.g., inefficient use of training and resources, ineffective problem-solving, low "buy-in" from teachers, inconsistent documentation of interventions). Using principles, practices, and research from applied behavior analysis in education, this workshop will describe a well-aligned and flexible system of academic support that can supplement and enhance nearly any school's existing approach to improving student learning outcomes in reading, math, and writing. The workshop will offer recommendations and provide hands-on activities so that attendees can meet all stated workshop objectives. All recommendations for practice have peer-reviewed, published support, and they are consistent with legal and "best-practice" educational guidelines. There is no commercial support for this workshop, but some recommendations also are described in a low-cost guidebook written by the presenter and co-authored by Dr. Kent Johnson (Morningside Academy). This guidebook is NOT needed to benefit from the workshop, but information about it is at: www.sopaaforschools.org.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant should be able to know about and assist their elementary or middle school with: Implementing and documenting an effective and efficient intervention system for struggling learners. Selecting appropriate and research-based interventions in reading, writing, and math. Selecting appropriate and research-based academic progress monitoring tools in reading, writing, and math. Using a low-cost professional development system that helps to establish a key "expert" within the school in the area of academic instruction, interventions, and assessment. Initiating an incremental approach to enhancing intervention services for struggling learners so that the approach is well-received by teachers in the school, can grow over time, and is sustainable. Note: The objectives stated above are relevant for educators working in schools that use or do not use RTI, but for those familiar with RTI, some of the objectives above are most aligned with strengthening schools' Tier 2 level of services in reading, math, and writing.
Activities: Participants will receive information about various research-supported (and ABA-relevant) recommendations for improving the efficiency and effectiveness of delivering academic intervention services in schools. They also will be given ample hands-on activities that allow everyone to practice using those recommendations. In most cases,because all schools have unique characteristics, attendees will engage in applied activities that will allow them to conceptualize the content of the workshop within the specific context of their own schools. During applied activities, the presenter also will be available to answer questions as attendees consider how to apply the information to their own school-based settings. Throughout the workshop, topics will be broken into multiple "units" so that within a unit, brief amounts of didactic information will be presented and then immediately followed by the applicable hands-on activities.
Audience: This workshop is primarily intended for school-based practitioners (e.g., school psychologists, special education teachers, Title I teachers, reading specialists, intervention specialists, school principals, etc.) who work in elementary or middle school settings and have at least some role in facilitating academic interventions for struggling learners (e.g., as an interventionist, member of a problem-solving team, consultant, trainer, curriculum coordinator, etc.). The workshop is also relevant for college/university faculty members who teach graduate courses in academic consultation, academic interventions, academic assessment, and/or models of schoolwide (systems-level) change. Graduate students who anticipate working in elementary or middle schools also could benefit from this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): academic interventions, response-to-intervention, schools, systems-level interventions
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Are Your ABA Skills up to Snuff? Effective Strategies for Applied Settings
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
200 H-I (Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan E. Henson, M.S.
SUSAN E. HENSON (Addison Behavioral Resources)
Description: Routinely providing services in applied settings, we've become very good at using strategies as written in our textbooks (or spouting behavior analytic terms); however, implementing strategies exactly as written in a textbook is not exactly applied, is it? It is imperative that we as behaviorists individualize programs to the consumer while remaining effective and ethical. How do we strike the balance between effective for a client and true to our science in an applied setting? This workshop will review how to implement specific principles, such as extinction and parameters of reinforcement, in applied settings to achieve significant changes in behavior while building and maintaining buy-in and compliance from staff, parents, and additional caregivers. Learning objectives of this workshop will include such topics as motivation, parameters of reinforcement, preventative strategies, types of differential reinforcement, and applying additional strategies to minimize extinction bursts. Interaction is a must in this workshop. A comprehensive teaching style will be used, including but not limited to active verbal discussion, video, tricky case examples, and practice activities. Take-home materials will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Implement differential reinforcement effectively. Use parameters of reinforcement to decrease maladaptive behavior and increase alternative skills. Problem-solve motivation for the consumer. Practice strategies to minimize extinction bursts and increase buy-in and compliance with staff, parents, and additional caregivers.
Activities: This workshop will include videos, interactive verbal discussion, demonstration, and interactive practice activities.
Audience: This workshop's target audience includes introductory and intermediate level board-certified behavior analysts looking to upgrade their skills in applied settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Ethical Issues in Home-Based Behavior Intervention
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
102 A (Convention Center)
Area: PRA/CSE; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Vicki Madaus Knapp, Ph.D.
AMY L. JABLONSKI (Summit Educational Resources), VICKI MADAUS KNAPP (Summit Educational Resources), KATHLEEN B. HONER (Summit Educational Resources)
Description: A home-based Early Intensive Behavior Intervention service delivery model for children with pervasive developmental disorders provides an excellent vehicle for parent training and involvement. However, behavior analysts encounter a multitude of ethical dilemmas when providing and supervising services in homes. This is increasingly true when direct service delivery is provided by noncertified individuals. Clearly delineated standards exist in the BACB guidelines, but the application of these standards to clinical practice may still be a subjective process, especially in a home setting. Various circumstances arise in the home environment (e.g., infrequent direct supervision, lack of environmental control, temptations to cross professional boundaries) which may jeopardize the ability of professionals to apply ethical standards in a consistent manner. Because of the nature of home-based instruction, adequate descriptions of how to behave ethically in those settings appear to be deficient. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a framework for identifying ethical issues and strategies for addressing these issues when delivering home-based behavior intervention to young children with pervasive developmental disorders. Issues concerning direct service delivery, supervision, confidentiality and record keeping, consultation, professional boundaries, crisis intervention in the home, and the extension of services into community settings will be addressed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Apply the BACB ethical guidelines to home-based behavior intervention models for young children with pervasive developmental disorders. Identify and evaluate literature that guides the ethical practice of home-based behavior intervention for young children with pervasive developmental disorders. Apply a framework for identifying ethical issues and develop strategies to address these issues. Develop polices to address future potential ethical conflicts.
Activities: Participants will review the Behavior Analyst Certfication Board ethical guidelines and discuss their applicability to home-based service delivery. A framework for identifying and addressing ethical issues will be presented. Case studies will be discussed to illustrate ethical dilemmas. Sample policies and procedures also will be provided.
Audience: Behavior analysis practitioners who deliver or supervise the delivery of EIBI services in homes.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ethics, home-based intervention, service delivery, supervision
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: BACB
Incorporating iOS (Apple) Apps Into Effective Behavioral Programming in Applied Settings
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
102 F (Convention Center)
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica Wenig, M.S.
JESSICA WENIG (Advances Learning Center), KAYLA MCALISTER (Advances Learning Center)
Description: “There’s an app for that”™. In September 2012, Apple announced that it had 700,000 approved applications available in The App Store, with 250,000 specifically for the iPad. The Apple App Store itself is currently the largest digital application distribution platform. With the number of approved apps increasing exponentially, the spillover of this new resource into the field of ABA is a tremendous opportunity to further realize Skinner’s dream of a “teaching machine.” The four capacities reviewed in this workshop include instructor tools, teaching, communication, and fun. Instructor tools apps include apps designed to facilitate data collection, graphing, and assessment. Apps for teaching include apps that are either designed specifically or used incidentally to promote skill acquisition. Apps for Communication outlines apps created to facilitate Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), and apps for fun highlight some of the countless apps that may function as reinforcers. This workshop will outline multiple apps from each of these capacities, incorporate learning activities demonstrate use of these applications in behavior analytic programming, discuss ethical considerations in using apps for applied programming, and review tricks of the trade and helpful resources to find apps for programming.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants should be able to: Identify evidence-based apps appropriate for programming and practice using apps from the following capacities: 1. Instructor tools apps: Including data collection, discrete trial implementation, graphing, preference assessments, assessment of target behavior, self-monitoring, social stories, video modeling, and data conversion. 2. Apps for Teaching: Including activity schedules; apps to promote independence in vocational settings and fine motor skills; discrete trial apps to teach expressive and receptive language and pre-academic and academic skills across multiple subject areas. 3. Apps for Fun: Using preference assessment apps to determine potential reinforcers, new hot games on the market, lesser known activities and apps designed to teach functional skills hidden in “kid friendly” activities. 4. Apps for Communication: Based on AAC features including cost, age range, compatibility, text to speech output, accessibility (i.e. switch access, eye gaze, etc.), sentence/phrase mode, shared library, computer-based interface, support site and additional features. Utilize assistive technology terminology to select appropriate AAC applications based on learner need and pre-requisite skills. Implement creative strategies using applications to replace stigmatizing methods commonly used to monitor behavior in community settings. Reference ethical considerations in selecting applications including determining reputable sources, evidence-based apps, pre-requisites, informed consent, privacy, treatment efficacy, and noting which considerations directly reference sections of the BACB guidelines. Use the same resources as professionals in the assistive technology field to find even more applications in addition to discounted costly applications.
Activities: Alternating among lecture and hands-on activities and demonstrations, participants will work in groups to use apps from each capacity, review case studies, and participate in creating sample videos for video modeling.
Audience: The intended audience includes board-certified behavior analysts currently providing behavior analytic services in the home, school and/or community setting; teachers; speech and language pathologists; physical therapists; behavioral instructors or therapists who facilitate behavior analytic services; school staff intending to utilize apps to access portions of the curriculum, or who work with students that have assistive technology services written into their individualized education plans; and anyone currently using applications in the field or wishing to use them in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ABA, Autism, iOS (Apple) Apps, Technology
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using CyberRat Effectively: Instructor Workshop on Assignment Designs and Student Progress Management
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
200 J (Convention Center)
Area: TBA/EDC; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Roger D. Ray, Ph.D.
ROGER D. RAY ((AI)2, Inc.), KEVIN M. MIRAGLIA (Rollins College)
Description: This workshop is for instructors using or interested in using the CyberRat animal laboratory simulation software system in their courses. CyberRat adds highly realistic and interactive Operant Conditioning and Multi-Behavioral Systems Analysis experiences for students taking courses where such skills and principles are relevant. Such courses include, but are not limited to, Introductory Psychology, Learning, Principles of Behavioral Analysis, Descriptive Research Methods, Behavioral Systems Analysis, Educational Psychology, and Behavioral Modification courses. This workshop focuses on ways to enhance the effective use of CyberRat and its supplemental tools. The workshop will be 1) sharing with instructors direct experience with the CyberRat system, 2) reviewing the support systems in place to assist instructors and their instructional process, and 3) covering various exemplary assignments along with reflections on what these assignments' relevance might be for supplementing or illustrating course content. Participants will take home a free copy of a CyberRat and will be given a URL for downloading the course administration tools for exploratory use. Adoption procedures for establishing a course's presence on the CyberRat course administration servers also will be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Demonstrate how students may purchase, register, login, and use CyberRat as a laboratory tool to supplement their course content either in laboratory or home-based experiments on multi-behavioral descriptive research methods and a broad range of operant conditioning principles. Adopt CyberRat for course use, which includes establishing a course section for each adopting instructor on CyberRat's course administrative servers. Design and establish a variety of alternative assignments that are administered, monitored, and graded using the CyberRat course administration software system. Variations in assignment types covered include simple "note" forms of assignments, single-session assignments, and multi-phased experiments where all parametric specifications are communicated and/or established by the instructor. Establish experimental conditions for a broad range of laboratory simulations, including habituation, elicitations, magazine training, response shaping, schedule evaluations, and stimulus discrimination. Instructors also will know when to assign fast-simulation mode use for simulating "black-box" sessions as typically used for demonstrating schedule maintenance, schedule transitions, and the acquisition of stimulus control. Assign and monitor student progress on assignments targeting multi-behavioral systems analysis techniques for descriptive research on animal behavior within an operant chamber.
Activities: After a brief multi-media overview presentation of CyberRat and its supporting resources, including CyberRat's web site resources and CyberRat's course administration software system, participants will have an opportunity to practice with CyberRat by using one of several small-group shared laptop computers that participants are asked to bring to the workshop. Working in small groups, participants will learn to add new subjects, select a subject from their personal colony, set experimental parameters, and conduct experimental sessions both in video and fast-simulation (black box) modes. They will then learn how to use effectively various graphing options to review a session's results and associated video playback of behaviors. Members of each group also will be taught to conduct a multi-behavioral analysis of one of their experimental sessions. After exploring CyberRat features in detail, participants will be shown how to use the CyberRat course administrative and student management system that is included with the course administration system for CyberRat.
Audience: College and university instructors of undergraduate and/or graduate courses where interactive animal laboratory simulations are desired, such as (but not limited to) Introductory Psychology, Learning, Principles of Behavioral Analysis, Descriptive Research Methods, Behavioral Systems Analysis, Educational Psychology, and Behavioral Modification courses.
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): CyberRat, Experimental Simulations, Laboratory Exercises
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
CANCELLED: Demystifying RFT: An Introduction to Relational Frame Theory
Friday, May 24, 2013
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
200 C-E (Convention Center)
Area: VRB/TPC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Daniel J. Moran, Ph.D.
DANIEL J. MORAN (Pickslyde Consulting)
Description: Arbitrarily applied what? Derived relational who? If you started learning about Relational Frame Theory (RFT), and then stopped when you read: Crel {ArxB and BrxC…}, or have just been interested in learning the basics of RFT, this is the introductory workshop for you. This workshop will outline and explain the basic concepts of RFT and help the audience members understand an expanded functional approach to verbal behavior. The workshop will simplify functional contextualism principles and discuss the basic RFT research methods and results in a manner that will help people who are new to RFT to begin applying the concepts to their own clinical and research endeavors. The presenters will make clear the core assumptions of functional contextual behavior analysis and how they apply to discussing language and cognition.The goal is not let your eyes glaze over as the presenters discuss transformation of stimulus functions, generalized operants, and the different types of derived relating. Most importantly, the presenters plan to help everyone have an enjoyable time while “framing events relationally” about RFT.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants should be able to: Describe what is relational frame theory. List what the fundamental assumptions of modern functional contextual behavior analysis compared to mainstream psychology’s fundamental assumptions. State what occurs with transformation of stimulus functions.
Activities: The workshop will be guided by an animated slide show and will be punctuated with audience participation, and small group participation.
Audience: ABAI professionals who want to learn more about a post-Skinnerian account of language and cognition.
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Relational Frame Theory
 
Special Event #4
Friends of SABA Reception
Friday, May 24, 2013
6:30 PM–7:30 PM
Minneapolis Grand Ballroom E (Hilton)
Chair: Richard W. Malott (Western Michigan University)

ABAI members who made donations to the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis (SABA) in 2012 and 2013 are invited to a reception in honor of their contributions and commitment to the field. We are very grateful for the generosity of those who support the activities of ABAI and SABA.

Keyword(s): donations, grants, SABA
 
 
Special Event #5
International Reception
Friday, May 24, 2013
7:30 PM–9:00 PM
Minneapolis Grand Ballroom A-C (Hilton)
Chair: Martha Hübner (University of Sao Paulo, Brazil)

The International Reception is scheduled for the first evening of the convention to welcome international members and review the international development of behavior analysis being conducted at ABAI. All members are welcome.

Keyword(s): development, international
 
 
Special Event #6
Welcome Reception Organized by the ABAI Student Committee
Friday, May 24, 2013
9:00 PM–11:00 PM
Minneapolis Grand Ballroom D, F, G (Hilton)
Chair: Megan D. Aclan (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology, Los Angeles)

ABAI welcomes all of its members to Minneapolis. Join us for a night of fun and entertainment organzied by the ABAI Student Committee.

Keyword(s): reception, student committee
 

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