Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Event Details


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Poster Session #272
CSS Sunday Poster Session: Odd-Numbered Posters
Sunday, May 29, 2022
1:00 PM–2:00 PM
Exhibit Level; Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Kaston Dariel Anderson-Carpenter (Michigan State University)
Sustainability submission 59. Evaluating Changes in Pro-Climate and Anti-Climate Verbal Relations: An Application of Relational Density Theory
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
MEREDITH MATTHEWS (Missouri State University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Lauren Rose Hutchison (Missouri State University ), Caleb Stanley (Utah Valley University)
Discussant: Kaston Dariel Anderson-Carpenter (Michigan State University)
Abstract: Prior research has documented that relational behavior can impact purchasing patterns of consumers with potential implications for influencing earth's climate (Matthews et al., under review). In the present study conducted with 34 participants, we utilized procedures consistent with relational density theory to analyze how relational frames respond to environmental stimuli using a multidimensional scaling procedure. Patterns of relational responding based on climate impact were evident in the pretest multidimensional scale, where participants appeared to relationally frame events in terms of climate impact and organic versus inorganic elements; however other organization dimensions were present. Then, we conducted a stimulus pairing observation procedure (SPOP) to establish arbitrary symbols as either pro-climate or anti-climate-harmful. Following the relational training, we conducted the multidimensional scaling analysis using the same pro-climate and anti-climate stimuli. We observed the items collapse within the space into two dense classes based solely on Earth impact, and a closer view of dimension two shows similar latent patterns as in time one suggesting that those latent patterns remain evident. Results have implications for understanding how relational frames may self-organize around climate change and the relative influence of the environment.
 
Diversity submission 61. Meaningful Applications of Culturo-Behavior Systems Science to Social and Global Issues
Area: CSS; Domain: Theory
JOSE ARDILA (University of Nevada), Traci M. Cihon (University of North Texas), Kendra Combs (Sparks Behavioral Services), Richard F. Rakos (Cleveland State University), Kathryn M. Roose (University of Nevada, Reno), Sarah M. Richling (Auburn University), Holly Seniuk (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Discussant: Kaston Dariel Anderson-Carpenter (Michigan State University)
Abstract: Meaningful applications of behavioral systems science to social and global issues have been limited, largely due to lack of preparation and access to critical systems and limited conceptual guidance. In the Matrix Project, Behaviorists for Social Responsibility has worked for six years to address these limitations, emphasizing the potential for behavioral systems analysis to advance the underlying science. The Project currently includes active work groups in four areas: (a) development of a draft training and mentorship directory; syllabi and course units in areas of social importance; (b) development of state BFSR chapters, with strong emphasis on student involvement, and supporting individual student engagement in socially significant efforts; (c) examining options for increasing integration of behavior analytic data into state and federal policy; and (d) encouraging and disseminating information related to behaviorists’ involvement in activism and advocacy. The role of volunteers is increasingly emphasized for the advancement of the Project and training procedures for measuring volunteerism are being developed. These projects offer exemplars of the conceptual framework underlying and structuring all of these projects—a systemic integration of Goldiamond’s constructional approach and Lutzker’s ecobehavioral work, relying primarily on shifting interlocking and recursive patterns of antecedents (particularly SDs and motivative operations), reducing response effort, and accessing already established reinforcers.Meaningful applications of behavioral systems science to social and global issues have been limited, largely due to lack of preparation and access to critical systems and limited conceptual guidance. In the Matrix Project, Behaviorists for Social Responsibility has worked for six years to address these limitations, emphasizing the potential for behavioral systems analysis to advance the underlying science. The Project currently includes active work groups in four areas: (a) development of a draft training and mentorship directory; syllabi and course units in the areas of sustainability, diversity, education and other areas of social importance; (b) development of state BFSR chapters, with strong emphasis on student involvement, and supporting individual student engagement in socially significant efforts; (c) examining options for increasing integration of behavior analytic data into state and federal policy; and (d) encouraging and disseminating information related to behaviorists’ involvement in activism and advocacy. The role of volunteers is increasingly emphasized for the advancement of the Project and training procedures for measuring volunteerism are being developed. These projects offer exemplars of the conceptual framework underlying and structuring all of these projects—a systemic integration of Goldiamond’s constructional approach and Lutzker’s ecobehavioral work, relying primarily on shifting interlocking and recursive patterns of antecedents (particularly SDs and motivative operations), reducing response effort, and accessing already established reinforcers.
 
63.

Shape Up: A Review of the Effectiveness of Behavioral Interventions to Increase Physical Activity

Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
ASHLEY SIMONE OWENS (Endicott College), Jessica Piazza (Endicott College), Anna Linnehan (Endicott College), Lisa Tereshko (Endicott College)
Discussant: Kaston Dariel Anderson-Carpenter (Michigan State University)
Abstract:

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is commonly utilized to address the core deficits of autism spectrum disorder and other intellectual disabilities. However, the use of behavioral change tactics has been demonstrated to be effective in increasing physical activity levels across intervention type and populations. Identified using the PRIMSA Model, 50 articles, which investigated the application of behavior analytic interventions to increase physical activity in individuals with sedentary lifestyles, illness, and/or disease, were included in this analysis. Various measures were delineated to evaluate the research including participant age and diagnoses, number of participants setting, experimental design, type of intervention implemented, treatment package or independent intervention, duration of intervention, and outcome and maintenance. The measures revealed 90% of reviewed experiments demonstrated meeting mastery level criterion, statistical significance, or high statistical significance. A review from this analysis also includes the effectiveness of utilizing behavior analytic interventions, behavior analysts’ responsibility to this area, current implications in involving behavior analysts in this specialized of application of ABA, limitations, and relevant areas for future research.

 
65. Analysis of Behavior Skills Training with the VirTra 300 LE Training Simulator to Increase De-Escalation Behaviors of Law Enforcement Officers
Area: CSS; Domain: Applied Research
DAYNA BEDDICK (University of West Florida), Leasha Barry (University of West Florida), Jerry Charvat (University of West Florida), Christopher Hinnant (University of West Florida Police Department)
Discussant: Kaston Dariel Anderson-Carpenter (Michigan State University)
Abstract: Law enforcement training and education in the United States vary remarkably. Although an associate or bachelor’s degree is not required in most law enforcement departments, decades of research focused on the education level of individual police officers (Roberg & Bonn, 2004). Many rebut formal education and cite work experience as the best mode of training for police officers (Bayley & Bittner, 1997), indicating that police work is an art to be mastered only by repeated experience in the field. As Paoline and Terrill (2007) surmised their argument “policing cannot be taught in a classroom but must be learned on the streets over time” (p. 182). While on-the-job experience is paramount, young officers cannot be expected to handle deadly force situations with neither the education nor experience. However, mimicking on-the-job skills training via simulators and a behavioral curriculum can equip officers with more effective training. This study is utilizing a multiple-baseline design across dyad participants to examine the effectiveness of a behavior skills training package, in conjunction with the VirTra 300 LE training experience simulator, to improve officer de-escalation behaviors based on a Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scale (BARS).
 
 

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