Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Event Details


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Poster Session #90
DDA Saturday Poster Session: Odd-Numbered Posters
Saturday, May 28, 2022
1:00 PM–2:00 PM
Exhibit Level; Exhibit Hall A
Chair: Noor Younus Syed (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
101.

How am I Doing? The Role of Self-Evaluation in an Authentic Work Setting for Individuals With a Developmental Disability

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
TRACY EILEEN SINCLAIR (The University of Connecticut)
Discussant: Noor Younus Syed (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
Abstract:

Individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability experience poorer postsecondary outcomes compared to same-age peers. Research identified barriers to employment include soft skills. This single case study examined the application of self-evaluation to employable soft skill behaviors for three individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability. Technology was integrated into the evaluation process to increase efficiency. All participants worked in a Project SEARCH site for the majority of their school day fully immersed in an authentic work experience program. This study explored the effect of self-evaluation on a self-selected target employable soft skill behavior, how closely student self-evaluation scores matched with job coach evaluation scores, and the potential relation to self-determination. Data collection were halted due to the COVID-19 pandemic; however, results demonstrated self-evaluation may be a promising practice applied to employable soft skills. As students participated in the self-evaluation intervention, their target behaviors increased, and scores began to trend similarly to the job coach evaluation scores. Social validity evaluation showed key stakeholders felt the intervention was useful, easy to implement, and an important skill to learn to improve self-determined behaviors. Findings from this study provide practitioners with a practical, easy to incorporate strategy within an authentic work experience program.

 
103.

Assessing Interactions Between Array Size and Reinforcement Probability on Preferences for Choice and No-Choice Conditions

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
HANNAH EFFERTZ (Marquette University), Jeffrey H. Tiger (Marquette University), Madelynn A Lillie (Pier Center for Autism)
Discussant: Noor Younus Syed (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
Abstract:

Some human and non-human animals have been shown to prefer free-choice over forced-choice conditions, even when both conditions result in identical consequences. Some variables that may influence this preference for choice include variability of items, differing probabilities of reinforcement, and array size. Previous research has shown increasing array size to both increase and decrease individuals’ preferences of choice-making opportunities. Methodologically, these studies have varied and do not hold the probability of reinforcement or reinforcer loss steady. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to examine the main and interactive effects of (a) array size and (b) reinforcer probability on school-aged children’s preference for choice-making conditions.

 
Sustainability submission 105.

Children With Neurodevelopmental and Behavioral Challenges: A Descriptive Case Study Examining the Integration of Dance and Behavior Therapy Within Day Treatment

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
DANA KALIL (Brock University), Tricia Corinne Vause (Brock University), Linda Morrice (Brock University), Sarah Davis (Brock University), Priscilla Burnham Riosa (Brock University), Maureen Connolly (Brock University)
Discussant: Noor Younus Syed (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
Abstract:

Dance is a form of physical activity that may improve motor skills and coordination while simultaneously providing opportunities for social interaction and development of socio-emotional skills. A manualized program, Dance with a B-E-A-T! (Behavior Analysis and Therapy), combines recreational dance with components of behavior analysis and therapy to help facilitate improvements in motor skills, social skills, emotional regulation, and self-coping. Building on a pilot study completed by Davis and colleagues, the present study evaluated a similar program incorporating behavioral components such as antecedent strategies, positive reinforcement, shaping, priming, task analyses, and a token economy. In collaboration with day treatment staff of a mental health centre, the blended program was integrated within the school program provided by children’s day treatment. The intensive dance program was offered for five consecutive days to five participants who were 7-9 years of age from the same cohort according to COVID-19 protocol. These children presented with challenges including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and Oppositional Defiant Disorder. The aim of this project was to evaluate a behavior therapy and dance program to teach three dance combinations and examine collateral benefits. Observational probes at pre- and post-test measured percent of dance skills completed correctly (as per the task analyses), and in-person semi-structured interviews with a counsellor and elementary school teacher evaluated satisfaction and perceived challenges of the program within day treatment. Results suggest a positive impact on the motor skills of participants and high consumer satisfaction.

 
109.

Effect of Behavior Skills Training on Stimulus Control Transfer Procedures for Teachers of Adults With Developmental Disabilities

Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
LYDIA LIBRIZZI (Daemen College), Helen McCabe (Daemen University)
Discussant: Noor Younus Syed (SUNY Empire State College; Anderson Center International; Endicott College)
Abstract:

This study investigated the effects of Behavior Skills Training (BST) on classroom staff transfer of stimulus control techniques. These techniques included both least to most prompting procedures and the Limit-One Sd Delivery Method, limiting discriminative stimulus delivery to only one per opportunity. This study addressed the lack of training and knowledge of these techniques for classroom staff represented in the current literature. Without proper and systematic transfer of stimulus control, students are at risk of becoming prompt dependent, yet independent responding is essential for individuals with disabilities to live as independently as possible in their adult lives. The results of this study demonstrate that BST is an effective procedure to teach transfer of stimulus control techniques; all staff data represented an increase in their skills of prompting and Sd delivery. Although BST proved to be effective for the purposes of the current study, further research is needed, including more effective strategies for generalization and ways to address emotional distress that came with learning new, difficult skills with BST in this study.

 
111. An Evaluation of Procedural Drift in the Implementation of Crisis Management Techniques
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
STEPHEN F. WALKER (Northern Illinois University ), Lauren Michele Schwass (APARA Autism Center ), Brooke Nicole Koczmara (Oswego Community School District ), Natalie Andzik (Northern Illinois University )
Discussant: Matthew L. Edelstein (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract: Implementation of crisis management techniques (e.g., restraint) requires training from a certified instructor. Properly implementing these procedures can significantly reduce the risk of injury or death associated with crisis management techniques. The current studies evaluated the implementation fidelity of two crisis management techniques: the most and least frequently used at a local therapeutic day school, the two-person prone BARR technique (Study 1 & 2), and the two-person transportation technique (Study 2). In both studies, the fidelity of implementation of these techniques was evaluated across two groups of participants: staff who regularly implement crisis management procedures and staff who rarely implement crisis management procedures. If participants did not implement each of these procedures at 100% fidelity, Behavioral Skills Training (BST) was utilized to retrain these crisis management techniques. The results indicated that neither group of participants implemented either procedure with 100% fidelity during initial baseline sessions. However, BST was an effective method for teaching all participants to implement the procedures with 100% accuracy.
 
113. Modifications to the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) in the Classroom
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
ASHLEY BOUDREAU (Endicott College), Anna Linnehan (Endicott College), Lisa Tereshko (Endicott College)
Discussant: Matthew L. Edelstein (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract: When individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) do not begin to communicate vocally, they are often introduced to alternative means of communication. The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a picture-based system that allows these individuals to communicate with others. As written, the PECS system can be used by a wide variety of individuals. However, not all clients make progress as expected and the program is not as accessible to those with additional physical disabilities. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature surrounding modifications made to the PECS protocol that allow a wider variety of individuals access to communication in this system. The results can then be used to guide intervention and future research.
 
115. The Effects of Functional Communication Training on Multiply-Controlled Problem Behavior
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
JOCELYN VANESSA MCCORMACK (Salve Regina University/Pathways Strategic Teaching Center), Jesse Perrin (Pathways), Andrea Giacobbe (Pathways), Cody Morris (Salve Regina University )
Discussant: Matthew L. Edelstein (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract: Functional communication training (FCT) is an effective intervention for decreasing problem behavior. FCT procedures consist of teaching a client to engage in an appropriate alternative behavior in the form of a communicative act that produces the same reinforcement associated with the problem behavior. However, little research has been conducted that evaluates FCT procedures when more than one function controls the problem behaviors (i.e., the problem behavior is multiply-controlled). The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of FCT targeting to separate functions for a client whose problem behavior was maintained by multiple functions: escape from demands and access to tangibles. The results of this study determined that implementing FCT for both the tangible and escape functions separately decreased problem behavior and increased appropriate responding to respective picture cards per condition. IOA was collected for 70% of trials with a mean interval-by-interval exact agreement of 97% (range: 80% to 100%).
 
117. Assessment and Treatment of Challenging Behavior Maintained by Access to Restricted Interests
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
HANNAH CHRISTINE GREY (Pathways Strategic Teaching Center; Salve Regina University), Jesse Perrin (Pathways), Natanielle Hatfield (Pathways Strategic Teaching Center), Cody Morris (Salve Regina University )
Discussant: Matthew L. Edelstein (Kennedy Krieger Institute)
Abstract: Functional Communication Training (FCT) is an effective intervention to replace problem behavior with appropriate communicative acts. However, little research has evaluated the effectiveness of FCT in treating highly idiosyncratic functions of behavior such as gaining access to restricted interests. Thus, the purpose of this project was to demonstrate the effects of FCT in treating a client who engaged in problem behavior maintained by access to restricted interests. The participant was a 12-year-old male diagnosed with ASD who engaged in aggression related to a restricted interest. A trial based functional analysis (TBFA) was used to determine the function of the aggression. The results confirmed that the behavior was controlled by access to restricted interests. Next, an ABAB design with maintenance probes was used to evaluate the FCT treatment. The results of the treatment evaluation demonstrated that FCT was an effective intervention. IOA was calculated for 95% of TBFA trials with a mean trial-by-trial agreement of 100%. IOA was collected for 77% of treatment evaluation trials with a mean trial-by-trial agreement of 94% for latency to problem behavior and 97% for latency to approach.
 
 

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