Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

48th Annual Convention; Boston, MA; 2022

Event Details


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Symposium #321
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity submission Applications of Behavior Analysis in Sustainability: How Small Steps Create Behavioral Waves
Sunday, May 29, 2022
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Meeting Level 1; Room 103
Area: CSS/OBM; Domain: Translational
Chair: Julia H. Fiebig (Ball State University; AGI)
Discussant: Susan M. Schneider (Western Michigan University)
CE Instructor: Susan M. Schneider, M.S.
Abstract:

Climate Change and Human Health. What can Behavior Analysts do? Lincoln Kamau Carbon Purple and Autism Resources & Therapy Center of Massachusetts Abstract: Climate Change is the greatest single threat to human health on the planet today. Air pollution alone is estimated to cause 7 million deaths a year. That is at least double the number of people who died globally from COVID-19 in 2020 (WHO, 2020). B.F. Skinner was concerned with the application of behavioral science to solve important human problems, such as overpopulation, nuclear war, pollution, opportunities for minorities and more (e.g., Skinner, 1987, 1971/2002). He maintained that the solution to these problems required the modification of behavior and, therefore, a technology of behavior. Given the threat climate change presents to humanity, but also cognizant of the effective technologies’ behavior analysts have in their tool kit, this presentation will challenge behavior professionals to embrace a range of micro and macro-level interventions such as targeted feedback, environmental arrangements, group contingencies, renewable energy use, food production, waste recycling and reduction etc. to increase and improve sustainable practices. Behavior analysts will also be challenged to collaborate with other experts and policy makers to improve sustainable practices in a variety of areas including environmental conservation and preservation, renewable energy, emission control and transportation. The Environmentalist Behavior Analyst: Identifying Opportunities and Feasibility of Behavior Analytic Careers in Sustainability Julia H. Fiebig (Ball State University; AGI), Jessica Ghai (Boston University), Holly Seniuk (Behavior Analyst Certification Board) Abstract: The effects of climate change are primarily issues of social and environmental justice. They are symptomatic of a lack of sustainable and regenerative systems that could offer a stable social foundation for the entire population, without exceeding the ecological ceiling of the earth’s resources (Raworth, 2017). While most behavior analysts work within the fields of education and human services, a growing number of practitioners and researchers recognize the urgency to expand work into other sectors. Environmental sustainability is one area that continues to grow as a legitimate professional opportunity for behavior analysts. Given the complexity and urgency of this Super Wicked Problem, there exist a vast number of issues that behavior analysts can meaningfully impact. This paper presents the array of environmental sustainability issues behavior analysis can help solve as well as a systematic framework for those behavior analysts thinking of focusing their behavior analytic work on sustainability. An overview of an iterative process is offered, inclusive of values clarification, evaluation of situational needs and assets, and creation of an action plan. This process creates opportunity for the behavior analyst to consider how they may augment, or shift, their work to critical issues of environmental sustainability and justice. Meg Martineau (New England Behavior Analysts for Sustainability) The Ripple Effects of Committing to Sustainable Action at your Place of Work Abstract: One of the largest challenges facing our society is the climate crises, yet there are very few BCBA certificates where this is their area of focus. The primary area of focus for BCBAs continues to be in the treatment of autism spectrum disorder (Behavior Analysis Certification Board, 2021). As the climate crisis unfolds, the demand for behavioral based climate solutions will continue to grow. Behavior analysts have the opportunity to make a significant impact on climate change initiatives at their place of work, home, or community. This talk will describe the implementation of a behaviorally based climate solution based on a community-based social marketing framework (Mackenzie-Mohr, 2017). This presentation will describe the implementation of a school wide composting program, discuss how behavior analysts already possess leadership skills in sustainability efforts, and describe the larger ripple effects created through targeted actions.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Environmental Sustainability, Justice, Sustainability Practices
Target Audience:

Intermediate: Individuals who are interested in learning more about how behavior analysts can become more involved with sustainability efforts. The talk will focus on immediate actions that can be taken to make a positive change and will also, look at long-term efforts of each author for improving sustainability practices.

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: 1. Identify steps that they can take in their practice to incorporate sustainability practices 2. Identify the consequences of not using behavioral technology to sustainability practices 3. How to incorporate values clarification and committed action to get others involved in sustainability practices.
 
Diversity submission 

CANCELED: Climate Change and Human Health: What can Behavior Analysts do?

(Theory)
LINCOLN Z. KAMAU (Carbon Purple)
Abstract:

Climate Change is the greatest single threat to human health on the planet today. Air pollution alone is estimated to cause 7 million deaths a year. That is at least double the number of people who died globally from COVID-19 in 2020 (WHO, 2020). B.F. Skinner was concerned with the application of behavioral science to solve important human problems, such as overpopulation, nuclear war, pollution, opportunities for minorities and more (e.g., Skinner, 1987, 1971/2002). He maintained that the solution to these problems required the modification of behavior and, therefore, a technology of behavior. Given the threat climate change presents to humanity, but also cognizant of the effective technologies’ behavior analysts have in their tool kit, this presentation will challenge behavior professionals to embrace a range of micro and macro-level interventions such as targeted feedback, environmental arrangements, group contingencies, renewable energy use, food production, waste recycling and reduction etc. to increase and improve sustainable practices. Behavior analysts will also be challenged to collaborate with other experts and policy makers to improve sustainable practices in a variety of areas including environmental conservation and preservation, renewable energy, emission control and transportation.

 
Diversity submission The Ripple Effects of Committing to Sustainable Action at Your Place of Work
(Theory)
MEGHAN ELIZABETH MARTINEAU (Newton Public Schools)
Abstract: One of the largest challenges facing our society is the climate crises, yet there are very few BCBA certificates where this is their area of focus. The primary area of focus for BCBAs continues to be in the treatment of autism spectrum disorder (Behavior Analysis Certification Board, 2021). As the climate crisis unfolds, the demand for behavioral based climate solutions will continue to grow. Behavior analysts have the opportunity to make a significant impact on climate change initiatives at their place of work, home, or community. This talk will describe the implementation of a behaviorally based climate solution based on a community-based social marketing framework (Mackenzie-Mohr, 2017). This presentation will describe the implementation of a school wide composting program, discuss how behavior analysts already possess leadership skills in sustainability efforts, and describe the larger ripple effects created through targeted actions.
 
Diversity submission The Environmentalist Behavior Analyst: Identifying Opportunities and Feasibility of Behavior Analytic Careers in Sustainability
(Theory)
JULIA H. FIEBIG (Ball State University; AGI), Jessica Ghai (Boston University), Holly Seniuk (Behavior Analyst Certification Board)
Abstract: The effects of climate change are primarily issues of social and environmental justice. They are symptomatic of a lack of sustainable and regenerative systems that could offer a stable social foundation for the entire population, without exceeding the ecological ceiling of the earth’s resources (Raworth, 2017). While most behavior analysts work within the fields of education and human services, a growing number of practitioners and researchers recognize the urgency to expand work into other sectors. Environmental sustainability is one area that continues to grow as a legitimate professional opportunity for behavior analysts. Given the complexity and urgency of this Super Wicked Problem, there exist a vast number of issues that behavior analysts can meaningfully impact. This paper presents the array of environmental sustainability issues behavior analysis can help solve as well as a systematic framework for those behavior analysts thinking of focusing their behavior analytic work on sustainability. An overview of an iterative process is offered, inclusive of values clarification, evaluation of situational needs and assets, and creation of an action plan. This process creates opportunity for the behavior analyst to consider how they may augment, or shift, their work to critical issues of environmental sustainability and justice.
 
Diversity submission 

CANCELED: Increasing Sustainability Behaviors Using Experiential Practices

(Service Delivery)
LAWRENCE PLATT (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Abstract:

One of the biggest obstacles that we currently face in slowing down global warming is increased human consumption. Human consumption behaviors have increased greenhouse gas emissions faster than technology has been able to reduce emissions (Arto & Dietzenbacher, 2014). Popular opinion holds that humans will find a solution to greenhouse gas emissions, as innovation given environmental strain has historically been true (Harari, 2015). It is estimated that in 20 years the temperature of the earth will rise by 1.5?, which will result in increased heat waves, longer warm seasons, shorter cold seasons, and natural disasters (IPCC, 2021). One area of consumption that has drastically increased recently is food waste (Hall et al., 2009). Food waste is one of the largest producers of methane emissions, a more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide (Miller et al., 2013). An intervention was piloted that looked at decreasing food waste by practicing contemplative practices aimed at increasing a sense of community with humanity and engage in less I/me/my behavior and increase behaviors towards humanity.

 

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