Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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47th Annual Convention; Online; 2021

All times listed are Eastern time (GMT-4 at the time of the convention in May).

Event Details

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Poster Session #95
Saturday, May 29, 2021
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Online
78.

The Effects of Repeated Exposure to an Arithmetic Problem of Rates of Mediating Verbal Behavior

Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
MIKE HARMAN (Briar Cliff University), Summer Williams (Briar Cliff University ), James House (Briar Cliff University), Tiffany Kodak (Marquette University)
Discussant: Lauren K. Schnell (Hunter College)
Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which a final verbal response is dependent on mediating verbal behavior (covert or overt) occurring between the offset of the discriminative stimulus and the target response. Furthermore, this study measured changes in rates of mediating verbal behavior across five exposures to a discriminative stimulus. Participants solved fifty arithmetic problems with no accompanying visual stimuli while continuously emitting overt verbal behavior. For some problems, distractor stimuli were present (experimental condition) and for others, distractor stimuli were absent (control condition). The experimenter collected data on participants’ mean latency to respond, accuracy, and rates of echoic and self-echoic responses emitted during the response interval. Participants’ mean latency to respond significantly decreased across exposures, but decreased to a greater degree in the control condition. Participants’ mean accuracy significantly increased across exposures, but increased to a greater degree in the control condition. Participants’ mean rates of echoic and self-echoic responses significantly decreased across exposures, but decreased to a greater degree in the control condition. The results of this study indicate that the necessity of verbal mediation may depend on (a) the presence of distractor stimuli, and (b) the learning history with the discriminative stimulus.

 
79.

Content Validity Evidence for the Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program

Area: VRB; Domain: Theory
KRISTEN LENAE PADILLA-MAINOR (Baylor University), Jessica Akers (Baylor University)
Discussant: Lauren K. Schnell (Hunter College)
Abstract:

The purpose of this study is to provide content validity evidence for the Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program (VB-MAPP). A national panel of 13 experts provided an evaluation of the domain relevance, age appropriateness, method of measurement appropriateness, and domain representation across the three levels of the Milestones Assessment, Early Echoic Skills Assessment (EESA), and Barriers Assessment. Overall, the content validity evidence for the VB-MAPP Milestones, EESA, and Barriers Assessment was moderate to strong across the evaluated areas although there were areas with limited or conflicting support. The evidence suggests that the scores of the VB-MAPP provide information relevant to the target behaviors of interest but a few domains may not be fully represented by their specific items.

 
80.

Teaching Sentences by Equivalence-Based-Instruction and Effects Over Other Sequential Performances in a Child With Cochlear Implant

Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
ANA CLAUDIA MOREIRA MOREIRA ALMEIDA VERDU (Universidade Estadual Paulista; National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition and Teaching), Matheus Shibukawa (Universidade Estadual Paulista), Leandra Silva (Rehabilitation Hospital for Craniofacial Anomalies; University of São Paulo), Anderson Neves (Universidade Estadual Paulista; National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition and Teaching)
Discussant: Lauren K. Schnell (Hunter College)
Abstract:

Working Memory (WM) and Syntactic Awareness (SA) are operationally described as sequential performances. Children with deaf and hard hearing (DHH) who use cochlear implant (CI) shows deficits in WM scores compared to normal-hearing, and few studies have reported the effects of teaching on these skills. This work assessed the effects of Equivalence-Based Instruction (EBI), involving sentences, on standard measures in WM and SA, in a 10-year-old boy with DHH and CI. Data collection was remote, computer-based, during the covid-19 pandemic. EBI included conditional discriminations teaching between dictated sentences and pictures via Matching-to-Sample, and between dictated sentences and printed sentences construction via Constructed-Response-Matching-to-Sample. Three sets of sentences (regular, difficulties to decoding and pseudo - words), 4-terms (subject-verb-article-object, in Portuguese), and organized in matrices (overlapping the syntactic function) were adopted. Reading, tact, constructed-response, WM and SA tests were interposed to teaching sets. An increase was observed in speech accuracy for pictures tact (mainly with pseudo-sentences, from 49% to 98%) and WM percentile (from 0.3 to 3); SA scores decreased (from 20 to 16). The relations between the teaching of sentences, and WM and SA measures should be clarified with DHH and CI users; increasing the participants sample and adjusting designs are recommended.

 
81.

Participation of Self-Stimulation in the Recall of Copying Text and Taking Dictation Verbal Operants

Area: VRB; Domain: Basic Research
JAMIIKA THOMAS (University of Nevada, Reno), Linda J. Parrott Hayes (University of Nevada, Reno)
Discussant: Lauren K. Schnell (Hunter College)
Abstract:

Despite the vast amount of research generated by Skinner’s (1957) Verbal Behavior, elementary verbal operants are arguably understudied in basic research settings. To this point, the purpose of this study was to investigate the participation of self-stimulation (responding to one’s own visual response products) among copying text and taking dictation verbal operants by measuring performance in a novel intraverbal recall task. Using an online platform, undergraduate students completed a series of trials in which they (1) performed either a copying text or taking dictation response (dependent on group assignment), (2) completed a distractor task, and (3) recalled the initial response in an intraverbal test. Contingencies were arranged such that participants could earn points when copying text, taking dictation, and completing intraverbal tests and could avoid losing points during the distractor task. In half of the trials participants could see their response products, and in the other half they could not. Results suggest the extent to which the modality of antecedent verbal stimuli and self-stimulation participate in recall events and complex verbal behavior.

 
82.

Preparing to Transition into the Workforce Through Derived Relational Responding

Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
TAYLOR ANNALISE JANOTA (Missouri State University), Lindsey Audrey Marie Dennis (Missouri State University), Raymond burke (APEX Regional Program ), Steven L. Taylor (Apex Children's Center), Earl Schenck (APEX Regional Program )
Discussant: Lauren K. Schnell (Hunter College)
Abstract:

The present study sought to assist in preparing an individual with developmental and behavioral disabilities to transition into the workforce settings using stimulus equivalence training. The purpose of the training was to establish derived equivalence relations of job titles, responsibilities, and hypothetical individuals who serve in those positions. Conditional person (A) to job title (B) (A-B) relations were directly reinforced and conditional job title (B) to job responsibility (C) (B-C) relations were directly reinforced. Transitive person (A) to job responsibility (C) (A-C) and equivalence job responsibility (C) to person (A) relations were tested throughout the study. Results in a multiple baseline across employment settings (i.e., restaurant, school, and hospital) supported the efficacy of equivalence-based instruction. The participant was able to master directly trained and derived relations supporting this procedure in assisting adolescents to obtain necessary information to perform well in vocational settings.

 
83. Evaluating Gamified Delivery of PEAK Programming and Transformations of Stimulus Function
Area: VRB; Domain: Applied Research
BRITTANY SELLERS (Missouri State University), Jordan Belisle (Missouri State University), Lindsey Audrey Marie Dennis (Missouri State University), Raymond burke (APEX Regional Program), Steven L. Taylor (Apex Children's Center), Earl Schenck (APEX Regional Program)
Discussant: Lauren K. Schnell (Hunter College)
Abstract: This study was conduced to evaluate the effectiveness of the Relational Accelerator Program (RAP; Belisle, Burke, Dennis, 2020), an automated technology used to gamify discrete trial training, in establishing derived relations and transformations of stimulus function. Participants were trained to match arbitrary words and symbols to pictures of familiar stimuli containing 2 recognizable features (size and texture). Derived relational responding was tested throughout the study to assess participant’s ability to appropriately match the given arbitrary stimuli to the features. Following mastery of the gamified relations, we tested for transformation of function in a comparative matrix task. The participants in the current study engaged in either an individual contingency with the game, where they themselves directly played the game, or and interlocking contingency, where the participants instructed the implementer on which answers to choose, and the implementer interacted directly with the game. The study was conducted using a multiple baseline across participants design to evaluate the effectiveness of the individual and interlocking contingencies. The results were replicated across multiple participants with both individual and interlocking contingencies.
 
84. Relational Density Theory: Self-Organization of Human Cognition
Area: VRB; Domain: Theory
JORDAN BELISLE (Missouri State University)
Discussant: Lauren K. Schnell (Hunter College)
Abstract: Relational Density Theory (RDT; Belisle & Dixon, 2020) provides a quantitative model of human cognition that integrates advances in Relational Frame Theory, Behavior Momentum Theory, and behavior dynamics. The purpose of the model is to explore apparent self-organization in the development of relational frames that may contribute to socially significant transformations of stimulus functions. Research is emerging exploring the higher-order self-organizing properties proposed in the model and we will summarize this work along with figures from translational research conducted within our lab. We will also discuss the standard equations within the model including volumetric-mass-density, relational coherence, and relational resistance, along with accompanying research supporting each of these dimensions. The purpose of this poster presentation is to provide attendees with the opportunity to ask questions about this theoretical account and to discuss future research directions. To support this discussion, we will propose an extension to the current model that includes relations other than coordination, with a focus on frames of distinction, frames of opposition, and hierarchical relational frames. We will provide a summary overview of applied avenues for future research utilizing the model to predict and influence complex human behavior that is socially significant, including: language and cognitive training, coherence in the formation of false beliefs, and protecting people from misinformation. Research in this area is timely with the expansion of social media and echo-chamber ecosystems that can even further exacerbate self-organization in ways that contribute to social suffering.
 
 

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