Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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  • AUT: Autism

    BPN: Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroscience

    CBM: Clinical/Family/Behavioral Medicine

    CSS: Community, Social, and Sustainability Issues

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    EDC: Education

    OBM: Organizational Behavior Management

    PCH: Philosophical, Conceptual, and Historical Issues

11th International Conference; Dublin, Ireland; 2022

Program by Invited Events: Saturday, September 3, 2022


 

Invited Paper Session #80
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
How to Develop Basic Knowledge About Behavior-Based Safety Through its Application at a National and International Level
Saturday, September 3, 2022
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Auditorium
Area: CSS/CBM; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Fabio Tosolin, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: FABIO TOSOLIN (Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis)
Abstract:

The presentation will focus on the importance of the application and divulgation of Behavior Based Safety processes, underlining the essential elements of the science of Behavior Analysis. There are various barriers in such divulgation for a number of reasons. Through the use of detailed examples, these will be presented and exposed, demonstrating the gaps that must filled in order to move on to the following steps. One of the common difficulties all behavior analysts encounter, is illustrating, to individuals and society how B-BS is used and the efficiency of such process. Nationally, one of the main challenges that all behavior analysts are needing to face, in relation to the divulgation of such science, are individuals’ beliefs, spanning credential, cultural and religious points of view. When specifically talking about B-BS, we are explaining a scientific method that involves making significant changes in the usual activities and routines of all the individuals that are adopting it. Such change is of great impact, requiring dedication and will, needing to be adopted and viewed as a new ‘lifestyle’ inside the firm, hospital, school and etc. Laws are another aspect that nations should widely take into consideration. Laws have the aim to clearly state and describe what behaviors should be adopted by all individuals, in a specific situation. Analyzing it under a behavioral perspective, laws should describe, under the three-contingency models (Antecedents, Behavior, Consequences) what are the behaviors that society needs to follow or base themselves on. However, when reading laws (in Italy in particular), everything is defined under the use of punishment, a consequence that has clearly demonstrated its inefficiency in relation to the adoption or changing of behaviors.

The points discussed above expose the main aspects that need to be addressed when developing, at a national and international level, the B-BS process, specifically when adopting the scientific application of Behavior Analysis. In order to continue with the divulgation of the use of B-BS process it's essential to make use of marketing tools. A possible technique that could be adopted, to convince individuals to adopt a B-BS process, is the use of negative reinforcement. Demonstrating, through clear evidence the effectiveness and efficiency of B-BS, through the support of higher hierarchy levels, can definitely be a strong method for individuals to start identifying the importance of the use of such process.

Various solutions and developments in the field of behavior analysis can be adopted, in order to promote and continue with the growth of such field and science. The change and modification of laws could be one, focusing on determining and describing how behaviors can be obtained, rather than just saying what the behaviors are that individuals should follow. All behavior analysists should work in collaboration to continue with the growth and divulgation of the science of behavior analysis, not only through a national point of view but rather under an international one. The help and support through the different International Chapters, should be the starting point.

Throughout the presentation, a clear example of the application of a B-BS process, in the industrial or social field, will be presented and described. This will allow the audience to have a better understanding on how such a method is applied and the change it can bring in relation to individuals behaviors and lives.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

The primary audience consists of OBM’ers, Behavior Analysts, Chapter Leaders and individuals signed at the ABAI special interest groups (for example: Behavior Development, Dissemination of Behavior Analysis, Ethics and Behavior Analysis, Organizational Behavioral Network, Practitioner Issues in Behavior Analysis).

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Acquire the basic knowledge in the field of behavior analysis, in relation to its divulgation, in specific under a national perfective; (2) Develop the knowledge of the importance of the creation and building up of relations, in the field of Behavior Analysis, in specific in the OBM field; (3) Know the basic and minimal elements to proceed and complete a Behavior Based Safety process.
 
FABIO TOSOLIN (Association for the Advancement of Radical Behavior Analysis)
Fabio Tosolin is the Behavior Analyst and consultant that since the 1980s has been introducing, spreading and applying Behavior Analysis and Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) principles both in Italy and Europe. In 1985, he founded his own consulting company, FT&A, that is specialized in Performance Management, Learning Technologies and Behavior-Based Safety for the last of which he’s also a referent of European level. His company implemented hundreds of PM and B-BS processes in plants and construction sites in Italy and around the world. He is currently Professor of Human Factor in HSEQ Management (BBS) at the Polytechnic of Milano (Safety Engineering Master’s Degree Course, Faculty of Industrial Processes), and President of the Italy Associate Chapter of ABAI, these two being the oldest and largest Italian Behavior Analysis Scientific Societies (AARBA and AIAMC). Since 2003 he has been the Chair of the European Scientific Conference on OBM, PM & B-BS, held by AARBA. He got the Outstanding Contribution Award in 2014 by OBMN and in 2019 he received the SABA Award for his contribution to the international dissemination/development of Behavior Analysis.
 
 
Invited Symposium #92
Are Single-Case Experiments the Antidote to the Replication Crisis?
Saturday, September 3, 2022
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Auditorium
Area: EAB/PCH; Domain: Translational
Chair: Michael Perone (West Virginia University)
Abstract:

To date, mainstream behavior analysis has not been tainted by the so-called “replication crisis” that has embroiled much of the behavioral and social sciences. In this symposium, we summarize key elements of the replication crisis, identify the methods of behavior analysts that have tended to insulate our field from the crisis, describe trends in published research suggesting that behavior analysts are drifting away from these methods, consider the professional contingencies (for example, from granting agencies) that support these trends, and explore the implications of these trends for the long-term vitality of our field. We suggest that our field’s success may be attributed to its longstanding embrace of rigorous single-case experimental methods, and we caution against the adoption of group experiments and correlational studies that rely on statistical inference, especially those that survey subjects about their potential behavior in hypothetical situations instead of observing what subjects actually do under controlled environmental conditions.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): replication crisis, single-case methods
 
Is Behavior Analysis Immune to the Replication Crisis?
(Theory)
MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Abstract: There appear to be several factors underlying the replication crisis that are evident throughout the life sciences. These include limited emphasis on, and publication of, replications (e.g., the file drawer problem) and over-reliance on null hypothesis testing. Because the science of behavior analysis has traditionally eschewed statistical inference and emphasized inclusion of replication both within- and across subjects, it might be assumed that the discipline is immune to the crisis. The present talk will review some of the history and key features of the replication crisis in biology, psychology, and related disciplines and consider various accounts of its causes and potential fixes. This analysis will highlight key factors in behavior analysis that have helped the field avoid the crisis (e.g., single-case research designs), but also will identify issues and trends in our discipline that may lead to vulnerability. The importance of demonstrating validity and replicability of novel behavior-analytic methods will be emphasized.
Dr. Galizio received his BA from Kent State University and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee where he worked with Dr. Alan Baron. In 1976, he joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where he is currently Professor of Psychology. His research interests include behavioral pharmacology, stimulus control/concept learning, aversive control, and human operant behavior. He has published two books, more than 100 articles and his research has been supported by NIDA, NSF and NICHD. He is a Fellow of ABAI and four APA divisions and is a past-president of APA Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) and of the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis and served as an At-Large member of the ABAI Executive Council. He has served on numerous NIH study sections and chaired two of them. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
 
When Replications Fail
(Theory)
MICHAEL PERONE (West Virginia University)
Abstract: Discrepancies in the results of putatively similar experiments – replication failures – are inevitable features of an active science. If the methods of each experiment are sound, the discrepancies are informative and useful: They may tell us about the boundary conditions of a phenomenon, misunderstandings about the relevant variables, or inadequacies of experimental control. The methods historically associated with the experimental analysis of behavior have supported productive responses to such replication failures: Experiments are conducted to address the discrepancies, resolve them, and advanceour science. Replication failures constitute a crisis when confidence in a research finding is misplaced. The methods of mainstream psychology have contributed to the problem by fostering over-reliance on statistical inference and, along with it, various forms of p-hacking. These are defects in the behavior of scientists, and they cannot be wiped away by raising the sophistication of the scientists’ statistical toolbox. In this presentation, I will discuss the difference between good and bad replication failures, how to identify them, and how to address them.
Dr. Michael Perone is a professor in the Department of Psychology at West Virginia University. He has made substantial contributions to behavior analysis through his research, service, administration, and teaching. He is well known for his programmatic research on conditioned reinforcement, avoidance, and transitions from rich to lean schedules of reinforcement, and more generally for the elegance and ingenuity of his experimental methodology. He has secured support from NICHHD, OSHA, and NSF for much of his research. His investigations with animals and extensions of basic mechanisms to humans serve as a prototype for research translation. Dr. Perone's accomplishments in administration, service to the discipline, and teaching are similarly noteworthy. Dr. Perone served for 12 years as chair of the West Virginia University Department of Psychology, one of the foremost programs in behavior analysis. He has served as president of ABAI, SABA, SEAB, and SEABA. He has been appointed to key editorial positions for major journals in behavior analysis, represented behavior analysis on the Federation of Behavioral, Psychological, and Cognitive Sciences, and served on numerous committees. In each of those roles, his skill and humor have been instrumental in bringing a charge to effective completion. Dr. Perone has received numerous awards for his teaching and mentoring, which, along with the successes of his former students, are testaments to his effectiveness in that arena as well.
 
The Replication Crisis in Translational Research: How Behavior Analysis Might Help Develop Novel Treatments
(Theory)
DEAN WILLIAMS (University of Kansas)
Abstract: Translational research on neuro-behavioral disorders (e.g., schizophrenia; Autism) is in a replication crisis. Rather than failing to replicate results across experiments, positive results from laboratory models fail to reproduce similar results in clinical trials with humans. This problem is so severe that no novel treatment for any behavior disorder has come from animal models in the last 20 years. In this replication crisis, the fault lies less in the design and statistical inference of the laboratory research than it does in the assumptions made about human and animal behavior, and the failure to engage in proper cross species replication at intermediate stages of treatment development and testing. This paper will argue that the fault lies largely in the "behavioral assays" used to test animal models. These rely largely on formal similarity of behaviors across species (face validity) rather than functional similarity of the behavioral process operating in the laboratory and clinical settings. Using single-subject designs, behavior analysis readily replicates results across animal and human subjects because it stresses functional models (similarity in subject's reactions to common environmental variables) rather than formal models. This emphasis of cross species replicability can be of tremendous use to translational research to produce novel treatments.
Dean Williams, Senior Scientist Emeritus at the Schiefelbusch Institute for Life Span Studies at the University of Kansas, received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1989. His work is a model of bi-directional translational research in which his parallel animal and human studies have contributed to the design of treatment programs for clinical populations as well as to the analysis of basic principles of behavior. For more than 25 years, Dr. Williams’ research has been continuously funded by the NIH for his innovative research in stimulus control, behavioral pharmacology, schedule change-over effects, and issues of broad interest in the behavioral, social, and biological sciences. His creative synthesis and integrative approach to research have built connections between behavior analysis and a number of scientific disciplines. Through his publications in a wide array of leading journals and numerous conference presentations, Dr. Williams has made his work visible to a broad community and served as an effective ambassador for behavior analysis.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #96
CE Offered: BACB
Induction, Reinforcement, and Their Contribution to Behavioral Excess
Saturday, September 3, 2022
10:30 AM–11:20 AM
Auditorium
Area: EAB; Domain: Basic Research
Chair: Julian C. Leslie (Ulster University)
CE Instructor: Ricardo Pellon, Ph.D.
Presenting Author: RICARDO PELLON (Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia)
Abstract: Through extended evidence we have shown in the past that what was initially called adjunctive behavior in fact responds to similar environmental manipulations as conventional operant behavior, and that perhaps in all cases behavior is initially elicited by the delivery of the reinforcer and then strengthened by it, thus combining to result in excessive behavior. The dynamic combination of induction by reinforcer delivery (the elicitation part) and reinforcement (the strengthening part) can be seen in results on the control of behavior by past and future events. We are currently advancing on this issue by the proposal of a chaining model that combines both types of influence on behavior, showing an excellent fitting to steady-state data generated by intermittent food reinforcement schedules. We plan to extent its application to other models of excessive behavior, in particular those that deal with risky hyperactivity.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to:( 1) refresh the notion of induction; (2) acknowledge how induction and reinforcement can be combined; (3) understand the roles of induction and reinforcement in the initiation of maladaptive behavior.
 
RICARDO PELLON (Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia)
Ricardo Pellón got the Degree in Psychology in 1980 and in 1987 defended his PhD in the area of Experimental Psychology, both at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (Spain). He has held research positions at University of Wales College of Cardiff, UK (1981-1984) and the Addiction Research Centre of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Baltimore, USA (1990-1991). In 2005-2006 he spent a sabbatical leave at Arizona State University, USA. He is currently Professor of Psychology at Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia (UNED), Madrid, Spain, where he directs an Animal Learning and Behaviour Lab working predominantly (but not exclusively) on animal models of excessive behavior, such as schedule-induced polydipsia and activity-based anorexia, both using laboratory rats as experimental subjects. He has published in international journals in the areas of learning and behavior, behavioral pharmacology, and neural substrates of behavior. He has supervised 14 PhD thesis in different Spanish universities and is currently supervising 5 PhD students at UNED. He has served as external examiner in many committees, including 42 PhD dissertations.
 
 
Invited Panel #108
CE Offered: BACB/QABA
Issues, Practices, and Tips for Publishing in Behavior Analytic Journals
Saturday, September 3, 2022
11:30 AM–12:20 PM
Auditorium
Area: CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Chris E. Hughes (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Stephanie Peterson, Ph.D.
Panelists: ERIK ARNTZEN (Oslo Metropolitan University), MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington), STEPHANIE PETERSON (Western Michigan University)
Abstract:

This presentation will include a short introduction to each of the journals edited by the panelists (European Journal of Behavior Analysis, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and Behavior Analysis in Practice). Following this introduction, the panelists will respond to questions from the chair and audience regarding journal-specific details (e.g., submission and acceptance statistics, downloads, top citing sources), issues facing the journals (e.g., self-citations, impact factors, open access, participant descriptions, diversity and inclusion), and current issues in the field’s verbal behavior and the variety of audiences for behavior analytic publications. Finally, panelists will describe strategies researchers and practitioners in behavior analysis can use to become more involved with behavior analytic journals related to their work.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior analytic researchers and practitioners

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Participants will state the missions of the following journals: European Journal of Behavior Analysis, Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and Behavior Analysis in Practice; (2) Participants will describe at least one issue facing behavior analytic journals and how this issue impacts the field; (3) Participants will describe at least one issue related to diversity and inclusion in behavior analytic publications; (4) Participants will describe at least one strategy they can use to become involved with a behavior analytic journal as an author or reviewer; (5) Participants will describe issues that face the field, particularly in behavior analytic journals, surrounding our own verbal behavior when describing our work.
ERIK ARNTZEN (Oslo Metropolitan University)
Dr. Erik Arntzen received his Ph.D. from University of Oslo, Norway. Arntzen’s dissertation focused on variables that influenced responding in accordance with stimulus equivalence. He also holds a degree as a specialist in clinical psychology. He is currently a full-time Professor in Behavior Analysis at Oslo Metropolitan University. His research contributions include both basic and applied behavior analysis, with an emphasis on research in relational stimulus control and verbal behavior. He has also been interested in ethical considerations and core values in the field of behavior analysis. Furthermore, he has ongoing research projects within the areas of gambling behavior and consumer behavior. He also runs a research group, Experimental Studies of Complex Human Behavior, at Oslo Metropolitan University. Dr. Arntzen has published papers 190 articles in international and national peer-reviewed journals including Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB), Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), Perspectives on Behavior Science, The Psychological Record (TPR), Behavioral Interventions, European Journal of Behavior Analysis (EJOBA), Analysis of Gambling Behavior, the Analysis of Verbal Behavior, American Journal of Alzheimer's Disease & other Dementias, and Psychopharmacology. Dr. Arntzen has served as the president and past-president of the European ABA (2008–2014) and serve as the president from 2017–2020. Dr. Arntzen has been a member of the board of the Norwegian Association for Behavior Analysis from 1987–1993 and from 2006 to present, holds the position as the secretary of international affairs. Dr. Arntzen is a trustee of Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies. He has presented papers at conferences worldwide. Dr. Arntzen has been recognized with awards, including the SABA award for the dissemination of behavior analysis, ABAI award for outstanding mentoring, the research award at Akershus University College, and publication award at Oslo Metropolitan University. Dr. Arntzen is one of the founders and the editor of EJOBA since 2000. He has also served as the editor of Behavior & Philosophy. He has served on the editorials board of several journals, including JEAB, JABA, TPR, International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the Behavior Analyst, and The Behavior Analyst Today.
MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Dr. Galizio received his BA from Kent State University and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee where he worked with Dr. Alan Baron. In 1976, he joined the faculty at the University of North Carolina Wilmington where he is currently Professor of Psychology. His research interests include behavioral pharmacology, stimulus control/concept learning, aversive control, and human operant behavior. He has published two books, more than 100 articles and his research has been supported by NIDA, NSF and NICHD. He is a Fellow of ABAI and four APA divisions and is a past-president of APA Division 25 (Behavior Analysis) and of the Southeastern Association for Behavior Analysis and served as an At-Large member of the ABAI Executive Council. He has served on numerous NIH study sections and chaired two of them. He is currently Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
STEPHANIE PETERSON (Western Michigan University)
Stephanie M. Peterson, Ph.D., is Professor Psychology and Associate Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Western Michigan University, previously serving as the Chair of the Department of Psychology for 8 years. She earned her doctorate in Special Education at The University of Iowa in 1994. Previously, she taught at Gonzaga University, Utah State University, The Ohio State University, and Idaho State University. Her primary research interests are helping to decrease chronic severe behavior problems in children with developmental disabilities. Specifically, she studies choice making in the treatment of problem behavior, functional communication training, reinforcement-based interventions for children with problem behavior, concurrent schedules of reinforcement in the treatment of severe problem behavior, functional analysis of problem behavior, and teleconsultation. She also has interests in applications of behavior analysis to educational interventions and teacher/behavior analyst training. She has served on a variety of editorial boards, including the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice and is currently the editor of Behavior Analysis in Practice. She also served as a Senior Editor for Education and Treatment of Children for many years. She served two 3-year terms on the Board of Directors for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board and was been appointed by the Governor of Michigan to the Michigan Board of Behavior Analysts, Michigan’s licensing board for behavior analysts. She served as the President of the Board for two years.
 
 
Invited Symposium #116
CE Offered: BACB
Positive Behaviour Support in Applied Settings
Saturday, September 3, 2022
2:00 PM–2:50 PM
Auditorium
Area: EDC/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Geraldine Leader (National University of Ireland)
CE Instructor: Marguerite Hoerger, Ph.D.
Abstract:

TBD

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts who work in schools

Learning Objectives: At the end of this session, attendees will be able to: (1) Identify the three tiers of SWPBS; (2) Consider how to measure the success of behavioural intervention in maintained schools; (3) Describe the complexities and benefits of working in a mutli-disciplinary framework
 
Implementing Universal Interventions in Prison: Challenges, Wins, and Lessons Learned
CHRISTOPHER SEEL (University of South Wales)
Abstract: Violent and disruptive behavior is a universal problem in prisons. Although there is a wealth of research quantifying and assessing prisoner behavior, research on effective behavior change strategies (particularly for in-prison behavior) has been much less prevalent. Further, expectations for prisons to focus more on rehabilitation and less on punishment have occasioned a proliferation of strategies for increasing meaningful engagement, but often without rigorous evaluation of efficacy. This presentation will describe the development and implementation of a Tier 1 intervention in a Class B prison housing nearly 2000 adult offenders. Importantly, it will describe how prisoners played key roles in each step of the process and were ultimately responsible for intervention implementation. The presentation will discuss the effects of the intervention from prisoner perspectives, as well as addressing some of the challenges of enacting meaningful behavior change in prison environments.
Christopher J. Seel, MSc. has worked in the field of behavior analysis for over a decade. Having worked initially in early intervention for autistic and developmentally disabled children, his clinical interests began to shift after working on placement at one of the largest prisons in the UK. Along with Dr. Jennifer Austin, Chris received funding from the European Social Fund to evaluate the effects of behavior analytic interventions on prisoner misconduct and rehabilitation. Chris is currently a doctoral researcher at the University of South Wales (USW) and teaches on behavior analytic programs at USW and Swansea University. He is the current student representative to the UK Society for Behaviour Analysis.
 
Positive Behavior Support in Maintained Schools in Wales
MARGUERITE HOERGER (Bangor University)
Abstract: Behaviour analysis provision in maintained schools in the UK remains rare, despite robust research evidence supporting the use of school-wide positive behaviour support (SWPBS) and function based behaviour interventions. In this talk, we will share our experience implementing SWPBS in mainstream primary schools in Wales. Behaviour analysts worked with teachers and school leaders to design universal behaviour provision in each school. We sought to identify, teach, measure, and acknowledge positive behaviours in the classroom. Data showed that after implementing SWPBS, the students showed an increase in on-task behaviours and a decrease in disruptive behaviours. We used qualitative data to understand that factors that impact implementation fidelity. In our practice and research, we have collaborated with local authorities, school leaders, and teachers to make ABA an effective intervention in each setting. We will discuss the collaborative process, the compromises, and role of culture in setting up provision. We will give special consideration to how SWPBS can be implemented alongside a trauma informed schools programme. Our data shows that collaborative models produce significant, long-term positive behaviour change.
Dr. Maggie Hoerger, BCBA-D is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Education at Bangor University, where is she the course director of the MSc in Applied Behaviour Analysis. Her research interests and practice include working with school leaders and teachers to integrate behaviour analysis into maintained schools. She works with Local Authorities, SEN schools, and Pupil Referral Units to establish universal behaviour analysis provision with an emphasis on early years teaching and functional based interventions. The work has been funded by the Welsh Government. Maggie is currently serving as the President of the UK Society for Behaviour Analysis.
 
 
Invited Symposium #126
CE Offered: BACB
A Class of One: Remembering Murray Sidman, His Contributions, and His Legacy
Saturday, September 3, 2022
3:00 PM–4:30 PM
Auditorium
Area: EAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Carol Pilgrim, Ph.D.
Abstract:

In a career spanning 60+ years, Murray Sidman’s work has had immeasurable impact on the conceptual, methodological, and empirical make-up of behavior analysis, from its early beginnings and continuing to this day. The papers in this symposium will provide insightful reflections on Sidman’s influence as experienced first-hand by three individuals whose own work and perspectives were shaped directly by his input. Dr. Julio de Rose will address the unequaled role played by Sidman’s Tactics of Scientific Research as foundation for the training and research practices of behavior analysts around the world, and as inspiration for the vibrant status of our science in Brazil. Dr. Paula Braga-Kenyon will speak on Sidman’s landmark experimental and conceptual developments related to stimulus equivalence, with emphasis on the important but thorny implications of his later theoretical treatments. Dr. Bill McIlvane will review Sidman’s comprehensive approach to the study of stimulus control, with particular attention to its many implications and opportunities for research directions yet to be explored. Our discussant, Dr. Per Holth, will offer commentary on the papers in the context of his own career-long relationship with Sidman.

Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe key contributions to behavior analysis made by Dr. Sidman; (2) Describe the impact of Strategies and Tactics on training and research in behavior-analysis; (3) Describe empirically-inspired developments in Sidman’s conceptualization of stimulus equivalence; (4) Describe still-to-be explored implications of Sidman’s program of study in stimulus control.
 

Tactics in Brazil

JULIO DE ROSE (Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos)
Abstract:

Professor Carolina Bori used to teach a course on Tactics at Universidade de São Paulo (USP), in the seventies. I took the Tactics course in my first year as graduate student, in 1973. Students had to read Sidman’s book and participate in discussions about every chapter. USP was, at that time, the major influence on behavior analysis in Brazil, and virtually all students interested in behavior analysis took the Tactics course. Therefore, Tactics became central in the training of Brazilian behavior analysts. Students learned to ask questions to nature, seeking experimental control to reduce variability and find order in their data. In my graduate research, with rats and pigeons, I tried to apply the lessons of Tactics, as many other colleagues did. I met Professor Sidman after my PhD and, at his advice, took a post-doctoral position in the lab he had established at the Shriver Center, near Boston. Sidman no longer had an official position there, but participated in most lab meetings. He then made his first visit to Brazil, for a celebration of the 25th anniversary of Tactics. He returned there several other times, now following the steps of Fred Keller and influencing personally the development of Brazilian behavior analysis. Considering Sidman’s deep influence, initially by his book and later in person, it is not surprising that in the recent special issue of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior dedicated to Sidman, eight articles had at least one Brazilian author.

Dr. de Rose was one of the founders of the Research Group on Behavior, Cognition, and Learning, who evolved into the National Institute for Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition, and Learning, of which he is the Research Director. He has conducted research on the analysis of symbolic function and applications to educational, social, and cultural issues. Among his scientific contributions (always collaboration with colleagues and/or students) are pioneering research on the transfer of stimulus functions and equivalence-based instruction (EBI), and on the strength of stimulus relations. He has been also involved in the application of derived relational responding to experimental studies of attitudes, prejudices, and preferences.
 
Do You Know What I Mean? Murray Sidman’s Contributions to Stimulus Control and Equivalence Relations
PAULA RIBEIRO KENYON (Northeastern University)
Abstract: Dr. Murray Sidman’s contributions to the science of behavior analysis span across many areas, one of which shaped my career. While living in Brazil and taking undergraduate courses during one of his many visits to the country, I was introduced to stimulus control and more specifically, stimulus equivalence. Dr. Sidman treated the stimuli in a class according to the mathematical concept of equivalence such that a class of equivalent stimuli should have the properties of reflexivity, symmetry, and transitivity (i.e., the stimuli in a class should be substitutable). In order to verify this, he designed an experimental methodology that enabled researchers to test each of these three properties of classes of stimuli. In so doing, Dr. Sidman captivated the interest of many Brazilian students and professors, and hence, stimulus control became a strong line of research in Brazil. Later, in 2000, he suggested that equivalence relations consist of all the positive elements that participate in a conditional discrimination. This was an intriguing statement to me. Between 1996 and 2000, while studying towards my graduate degree under Dr. Sidman’s guidance, we initiated research in demonstrating that responses too could become part of equivalence classes. While we produced some very interesting results, Dr. Sidman opted for not publishing the data at that time, and he engaged me in rich discussions on how to separate response from the stimuli it produces. This presentation will discuss the framework of stimulus equivalence and will expand to the inclusion of responses and prompts in equivalence classes.
Dr. Paula Kenyon is a Board-Certified Behavior Analyst since 2001. She received a degree in Psychology in 1995 from the Catholic University of São Paulo (PUC/SP), and continued her education leading to a Master of Science degree in Applied Behavior Analysis in 2000 from Northeastern University in Boston, Massachusetts, followed by a PhD in Applied Behavior Analysis in 2012 from Western New England University in Springfield, Massachusetts. During her graduate and doctoral work, Dr. Kenyon studied under Professor Murray Sidman and Dr. William Dube. Her research interests include stimulus control and discrimination learning. She currently serves as guest reviewer for a variety of peer-reviewed publications including Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Revista Brasileira de Analise do Comportamento, Journal of Experimental Analysis of Behavior, European Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Behavior Analysis in Practice and Psychological Records. Dr. Kenyon has published in peer reviewed journals with focus in Behavior Analysis (e.g., EJOBA and Psychological Records) as well as journals in other areas (e.g., Nature and Autism Research). With more than 25 years of professional experience, Dr. Kenyon has held numerous academic positions including Adjunct Faculty at both the University of Massachusetts and Northeastern University (NEU) in Boston, where she taught Organizational Behavior Management and Research Designs & Methods courses. Dr. Kenyon is currently an Adjunct Professor at NEU and teaches four BACB-approved courses. Dr. Kenyon’s work experience covers working at non-profit and for-profit organizations and non-public schools. At Spectrum Center for Educational and Behavioral Development, Dr. Kenyon held the position of Educational Coordinator for four years and worked directly with Dr. Ronnie Detrich and Dr. Cynthia Blackledge. Additionally, she worked for over 10 years at The New England Center for Children (NECC) where she held various positions including Program Specialist in the Staff Intensive Unit and Program Director for three residential programs. Dr. Kenyon was also was the assistant to the executive director at Melmark New England and she served as the Chief Clinical Officer for Trumpet Behavioral Health. Dr. Kenyon has been the Chief Clinical Officer for Kadiant since May of 2019.
 
Some Reflections on the Stimulus Control Research of Murray Sidman
WILLIAM J. MCILVANE (University of Massachusetts Medical School)
Abstract: My presentation will provide an overview of the career contribution of Dr. Murray Sidman to help behavior analysts more fully understand their full range. As one of a small number of doctoral students who trained at the Shriver Center in the 1970s, I participated in the formative stages of his stimulus control research program. While virtually all behavior analysts are familiar with stimulus equivalence research, my own career experience has been that few know about and fewer still appreciate the depth, directions, and implications of his larger program. While the next generation of Shriver behavior analysts continued and expanded upon several of its aspects, our opportunities led us to focus mainly on those pertaining to neurodevelopmental disabilities. Thus, certain key aspects of Sidman’s scientific program did not survive his retirement from Shriver in 1980 and from Northeastern University several years later. My presentation will highlight program development opportunities that (1) were explicit or implicit in Sidman’s larger program and (2) have been underdeveloped or virtually missed. My hope is to inspire revitalization of research in the neglected areas, and I will suggest some strategies and tactics that might help that come to pass.
Dr. Mcllvane has conducted broad research that addresses a variety of scientific problems relevant to understanding and perhaps ameliorating behavior deficits of persons with and without neurodevelopmental disabilities. One area concerns behavioral prerequisites for symbolic communication (speaking, listening, reading, writing, etc.). Research has focused mainly on stimulus equivalence and other relational discriminations and on development of methods to encourage rapid learning of symbolic behaviors (e.g., learning by exclusion). This program has also adapted behavioral neuroscience methods to further understanding of brain processes involved in symbolic behavior. A second focus of Dr. Mcllvane's program is research to develop valid nonverbal neuropsychological test methods for use with nonverbal individuals and populations. Such methods have been adapted to further understanding of the behavioral profiles associated with disorders such as autism, depression, and neurotoxicant exposure. Overall, Dr. Mcllvane's program has a strong research-to-practice emphasis. For example, methods from his laboratory research are being used to teach practical skills in regular and special education classrooms in the United States, Brazil, and elsewhere. Dr. McIlvane’s career contributions were recognized by translational research awards from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Behavior Analysis-International and by his designation as a Fellow of both organizations.
 
 
Invited Panel #142
CE Offered: BACB/PSY/QABA
Behavior Analysts Playing Well With Others: Challenges and Successes in Extending Bridges to Other Disciplines
Saturday, September 3, 2022
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Auditorium
Area: EAB; Domain: Service Delivery
Chair: Carol Pilgrim (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
CE Instructor: Carol Pilgrim, Ph.D.
Panelists: PAULINE HORNE (Bangor University), SUZANNE MITCHELL (Oregon Health & Science University), KATHRYN SAUNDERS (The University of Kansas)
Abstract:

Since its earliest days, behavior analysis has been envisioned as a science uniquely well suited to the study and enhancement of the broadest possible range of human endeavors and behavioral phenomena, all with a consistent conceptualization and a common methodological approach. It is arguably still the case, however, that the lion’s share of work within our field falls within a limited number of spheres. The three panelists here each provide exemplary exceptions to this pattern. All three have braved the challenges of working outside the typical boundaries of our field, translating our approach to those who speak different scientific languages, and in doing so have fostered increased recognition and appreciation for behavior-analytic approaches from other disciplines. Dr. Pauline Horne is known for her pioneering work in synthesizing behavior analysis and more traditional approaches from human development, with attendant benefits to targets ranging from imitation to early verbal behavior to children’s diet and health. Dr. Suzanne Mitchell’s influential work on impulsivity, discounting, and behavioral pharmacology spans multiple disciplines and has been tremendously impactful in representing to them the strengths of a behavior-analytic approach. Dr. Saunders’ program of study is a model in showcasing strategies for introducing state-of-the-science behavior-analytic approaches in reading to the conventional outlets and funding agencies of public education. These three women will reflect on their experiences with the challenges and the reinforcers that can result from extending bridges.

Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience:

Behavior Analysts

Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Describe projects illustrating an extension of behavior-analytic approaches to nontraditional arenas; (2) Describe some common obstacles that may be encountered in such work; (3) Describe the potential reinforcers to be gained from taking a behavior-analytic approach to new disciplines.
PAULINE HORNE (Bangor University)
Pauline Horne is Professor of Child Psychology at the School of Health and Behavioural Sciences at Bangor University, Wales, UK. In 1996, Horne & Lowe formulated a new account of early language development in which "Naming" is defined as a bi-directional speaker-listener relation which can produce behaviours not overtly trained. With the late Professor Fergus Lowe, Pauline has also led the development and evaluation of Food Dudes, a healthy eating programme for 2-12 year old children at home and school. The program incentivises children's repeated tasting of target fruit and vegetables using role-modelling videos that show each Food Dudes character gaining "special energy" when they eat their signature fruit/vegetable. Children receive Food Dudes-customised reinforcers initially for tasting each target fruit and vegetable, and thereafter for eating whole portions of those foods. The program also trains both the specific and category name for each target fruit and vegetable to promote name-based generalisation of the intervention to other "fruits" and "vegetables". Food Dudes was first developed and delivered regionally in UK main stream primary and special education schools. From 2007, using the same inclusive model, Food Dudes was next rolled out to all schools in the Republic of Ireland. To date 1.7 million children worldwide have benefitted from taking part. The positive and lasting impact of Food Dudes on children's diets has been recognised by awards including the World Health Organisation and UK Chief Medical Officers, UK. More recently, Pauline has developed "Dynamic Dudes" a complementary program in which the Food Dudes characters harness the "special energy" they acquire from eating fruit and vegetables to perfect their favourite activity skills (football; dance; martial arts; football). Dynamic Dudes targets children's cardiorespiratory fitness and mental wellbeing by increasing their daily moderate-high intensity activity at school. The combination of Food Dudes and Dynamic Dudes is termed "Super Dynamic Food Dudes".
SUZANNE MITCHELL (Oregon Health & Science University)
Suzanne H. Mitchell, Ph.D., is a Professor at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in the Behavioral Neuroscience and Psychiatry departments, and in the Oregon Institute for Occupational Health Sciences. She obtained her undergraduate degree at the University of Hull, England and her Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Her thesis examined the economics of foraging behavior of rats, examining the role of the energetic costs and benefits in feeding. Her committee was chaired by Howard Rachlin, whose influence made her sensitive to the role of temporal costs as well as energetic costs in determining the value of food rewards. During a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago, Dr. Mitchell worked with Harriet de Wit focusing on using behavioral economics as an explanation for use of alcohol, cigarettes, and amphetamine in humans. Dr. Mitchell moved her lab to OHSU in 2001 from the University of New Hampshire to devote more time to research examining why drug users tend to be more impulsive than non-drug users using human and animal models. Most recently she has returned to her earlier interests in energetic costs and her research has increased its scope to include effort-related decision-making in clinical populations and understanding the genetic bases of choice. She has been continuously funded through NIH since 2003, has served on numerous NIH study sections as a member and as an ad hoc participant, and has received awards for education and for mentorship. She is currently the Science Board coordinator for the Association of Behavior Analysis International, President-Elect of the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior, and an Associate Editor for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.
KATHRYN SAUNDERS (The University of Kansas)
Dr. Saunders is a Senior Scientist in the Life Span Institute at the University of Kansas, where she is a member of the NICHD-funded Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center. Her current primary research interest is in the basic-process informed development of computerized instructional programming for early reading skills, with a specific focus on phonemic awareness and the alphabetic principle. There is incontrovertible evidence that the skill of phonemic awareness greatly enhances the benefit that children derive from phonics instruction. Phonemic awareness can be defined as the abstraction of individual phonemes from whole syllables. As such, the conceptualization of how to promote abstraction provided by Skinner (in Verbal Behavior), Englemann and Carnine (In Theory of Instruction) is a scientific interest in common with Speech-Language and Special Education Instructors. In addition to crossing scientific disciplines, her career has combined basic research on relational learning with applied research on the development of individualized instructional programming, and her publication record reflects a combination of publications in both basic and applied journals, the latter in both Behavior Analytic and Speech-Language journals. Her work has been funded nearly continuously for over two decades, primarily by NICHD, but recently by the Institute of Education Sciences. She also has been the PI for two NIH postdoctoral training grants. Dr. Saunders is a Fellow and former President of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association, a Fellow and a former member of the Board of Directors of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), a voting member of the Society for the Scientific Study of Reading, and the 2019 winner of the Distinguished Contribution Award for substantial long-term contributions to the Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior (ABAI). She has served several terms on the editorial boards of JABA, JEAB, and The Behavior Analyst, and as an Associate Editor for the latter two journals, as well as numerous guest reviews for other journals in the fields of BA, Speech-Language, and Intellectual Disabilities.
 

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