IT should be notified now!

Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

Search
Donate to SABA Capital Campaign
Portal Access Behavior Analysis Training Directory Contact the Hotline View Frequently Asked Question
ABAI Facebook Page Follow us on Twitter LinkedIn LinkedIn
  • AUT: Autism

    BPN: Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroscience

    CBM: Clinical/Family/Behavioral Medicine

    CSS: Community, Social, and Sustainability Issues

    DDA: Developmental Disabilities

    DEV: Behavioral Development

    EAB: Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    EDC: Education

    OBM: Organizational Behavior Management

    PCH: Philosophical, Conceptual, and Historical Issues

    PRA: Practice

    TBA: Teaching Behavior Analysis

    VRB: Verbal Behavior

    SCI: Science

    OTH: Other

44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Program by Invited Events: Monday, May 28, 2018


 

Invited Paper Session #388
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Behavioral Pharmacology of Prescription Drugs: Their Effects on Learning and Remembering
Monday, May 28, 2018
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom B
Area: SCI
CE Instructor: Mark Galizio, Ph.D.
Chair: Jonathan W. Pinkston (Western New England University)
MARK GALIZIO (University of North Carolina Wilmington)
Dr. Mark Galizio earned his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and currently serves as professor of psychology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, having previously served as department chair (2004–2011). Dr. Galizio’s highly productive research career includes more than 80 published articles and chapters, a textbook now in its seventh edition, an edited book, more than $1 million in grants, service as associate editor and editorial board member of multiple prominent behavior analytic journals, and extensive leadership service to the field (e.g., president of APA Division 25, NIH Study Section on Biobehavioral Regulation, Learning, and Ethology). His contributions have included empirical, conceptual, and methodological advances across an impressive range of specialties within the experimental analysis of behavior, including rule-governed behavior, aversive control, complex stimulus control, behavioral pharmacology, and learning and remembering. His work exemplifies the best of the benefits of translational research, taking a thoroughly behavior analytic approach to issues of broader interest in the behavioral, social, and biological sciences, for which he has been recognized as a Fellow in four different divisions of APA. Dr. Galizio’s teaching and mentorship are also noteworthy, and have resulted in numerous awards and recognitions.
Abstract: This talk will provide a brief overview of procedures used in the behavioral pharmacology of learning and remembering with a focus on prescription drugs used to treat clients with intellectual disabilities. The talk will also provide a more detailed analysis of research using novel procedures that vary the number of stimuli to remember as well as the retention interval. We will briefly review findings from the animal laboratory on drugs that impair learning and memory as well as the search for “cognitive enhancers.” Factors that have made it difficult to translate findings from the animal behavioral pharmacology laboratory to improvements in human learning and remembering will be discussed and we will consider the implications of these difficulties for the treatment of clients with intellectual disabilities.
Target Audience: Researchers and practitioners interested in the behavioral pharmacology of learning and remembering.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify and describe procedures used to study drug effects on learning and remembering in non-human subjects; (2) evaluate the strengths and limitations of these procedures with respect to internal validity and translational significance; (3) describe potential issues raised by the basic research literature that are relevant to pharmacotherapy.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #399
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Don Baer Lecture: Simple Is Better: Helping Ordinary People Apply Behavior Science
Monday, May 28, 2018
8:00 AM–8:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Grand Ballroom 7-9
Area: PRA
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Carl V. Binder, Ph.D.
Chair: Robert K. Ross (Beacon ABA Services)
CARL V. BINDER (The Performance Thinking Network, LLC)
Dr. Carl Binder is CEO of The Performance Thinking Network, LLC, where he develops performance consultants, leaders and managers in organizations worldwide. Starting in 1970 as a student with B.F. Skinner at Harvard, he worked for ten years in B.H. Barrett's Behavior Prosthesis Lab, conducting laboratory and classroom research and training teachers. An early contributor to Precision Teaching, he was mentored by Ogden Lindsley and Eric Haughton. In 1982, he founded his first consulting firm, Precision Teaching and Management Systems, Inc., and became active in the International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) where his mentors included Tom Gilbert, Joe Harless, Robert Horn and Donald Tosti. He founded Product Knowledge Systems, Inc., a Boston consulting firm specializing in sales enablement for Global 1000 companies. Carl is currently known for Six Boxes Performance Thinking, a plain English viral approach to organizational performance improvement. APA Division 25 honored Carl with the Fred S. Keller Award (2004), ISPI recognized his contributions to performance improvement with Honorary Lifetime Membership (2009) and the Thomas F. Gilbert Award (2012), and the OBM Network gave him its Lifetime Achievement Award (2015). Contact Carl at carlbinder@sixboxes.com and learn more about his work at www.sixboxes.com and www.fluency.org.
Abstract: As with scientists and technicians in many fields, we applied behavior scientists use precise language and we value our language highly. In addition, we often value detail and complexity because they illustrate the depth of our analysis of behavior and of the variables that influence it. But when we attempt to engage clients, parents, colleagues in other disciplines, and others not schooled in our science, our language and the complexity of our analyses and models often become barriers. We must not be simplistic in our communication with others, but we need to learn how to be simple. We can accelerate our impact by using language, models, and concepts that make sense to ordinary people and are relatively intuitive for them. We want people to "get it," and simplicity can help. Carl Binder has spent the 47 years since he first studied with B.F. Skinner learning from masters in the field of behavior science and performance engineering, and attempting to pass on what he learns to others. He has consulted with, trained and coached educators, parents, clients, business people, training and process professionals, and others not schooled in behavior science. In this lecture he will trace a path from Skinner's elegant measurement technology through his own work in precision teaching, behavioral fluency, sales and marketing enablement, organizational performance consulting, leadership and management, and talent development with examples of how simplicity and plain language have enabled "viral" diffusion of models and methods in organizations and communities. Key takeaways will include the forewarning that things get complicated before they get simple, and that we need to develop intermediate vocabularies that link our science with the vocabularies and experience of ordinary people who can benefit from what we can provide.
Target Audience: Anyone who communicates about our science or application to people outside our field.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe how jargon and complexity in our models and language interfere with our effectiveness; (2) cite examples of models and language that communicate simply without being simplistic; (3) explain how and why the term fluency was adopted by Binder and his colleagues who were early Precision Teachers; (4) describe the two models of Binders Six Boxes Performance Thinking approach to performance improvement.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #418
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Plotting a New Course: A Presidential Address Fantasy
Monday, May 28, 2018
9:00 AM–9:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom B
Area: SCI
CE Instructor: Stuart A. Vyse, Other
Chair: Derek D. Reed (The University of Kansas)
STUART A. VYSE (Independent Scholar)
Stuart Vyse received BA and MA degrees in English Literature at Southern Illinois University, and MA and Ph.D. degrees in psychology from the University of Rhode Island. He was a visiting scholar at Harvard University, where he worked in the pigeon laboratory, then under the supervision of Richard Herrnstein. The majority of his teaching career was spent at Connecticut College, where he was Joanne Toor Cummings' 50 Professor of Psychology. He is author of Believing in Magic: The Psychology of Superstition (2014/1997), which won the William James Book Award of the American Psychological Association, and Going Broke: Why Americans Can't Hold on to Their Money (2nd edition forthcoming in 2018). His research interests are in decision-making, behavioral economics, philosophy, and belief in the paranormal. His essays and opinion pieces have appeared in the Observer, Medium, The Atlantic, Huffington Post, and Tablet. As an expert on superstition and irrational behavior, he has been quoted in many news outlets, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, New Statesman, Vox, and the Los Angeles Times, and he has appeared on CBS Sunday Morning (twice), CNN International, the PBS NewsHour, and NPR's Science Friday. He is a Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry, and he writes the "Behavior & Belief" column for Skeptical Inquirer magazine, where he is a contributing editor.
Abstract: With behavior analytic laboratories closing and many of the second generation of scientists reaching retirement age, basic behavior analysis is at a crossroads. The applied area is strong, because behavioral methods have achieved recognition as the treatment of choice for autism spectrum disorders and because professional certification programs and state regulatory requirements have further solidified applied behavior analysis as an established therapy. But the future of the basic area is unclear. Furthermore, because basic science provides much of the theoretical underpinning for the applied area, the future positioning of the applied area as an academic discipline is also somewhat uncertain. Constructed as an imaginary presidential address, this presentation will offer an assessment of the current status of the wider field of behavioral science and make suggestions for the future role of behavior analysis within that wider field. In "Changing Course," a recent essay in The Behavior Analyst (Vyse, 2013), I outlined personal reasons for turning my attentions away from the field of behavior analysis. The current presentation will take a different tack, imaging a new course for basic behavioral analysis (with implications for the applied area) that might help ensure the field's continued contribution to behavioral science. Among the topics considered will be: (a) the role of theory in behavioral science, (b) the limitations of a field so tightly bound to a distinct set of research methodologies, (c) future directions for graduate training, (d) the role of ABAI, and (e) the prospect of behavior analytic contributions in as yet unexplored areas. Basic behavior analysis is not alone in facing existential challenges. The "reproducibility crisis" has had profound effects on psychology and other social and biological sciences. At this moment of flux, there are new opportunities for innovation and collaboration that could strengthen our field.
Target Audience: Basic and applied researchers who are interested in the future of the field.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, the participant will be able to: (1) identify several challenges facing the continued vitality of basic behavior analytic science; (2) identify some effects the current and future status of the basic area may have on the development of the applied area; (3) identify some changes in training and practice in basic behavioral science that could strengthen the field; (4) list several new research areas to which behaviorally trained researchers could contribute.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #426
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Behavior Analysis and Evolution Science: Implications for Human Yearning
Monday, May 28, 2018
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Grand Ballroom 7-9
Area: CBM
CE Instructor: Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.
Chair: Amy Murrell (University of North Texas)
STEVEN C. HAYES (University of Nevada, Reno)
Dr. Hayes received his Ph.D. from West Virginia University and currently serves as professor in the behavior analysis program in the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Hayes has a record of voluminous research and substantial impact, within behavior analysis and beyond, with 43 books and more than 600 publications. He is one of only three behavior analysts in the world with an h-index above 100 in Google Scholar (www.webometrics.info/en/node/58). He is the principal developer of relational frame theory and acceptance and commitment therapy, highly influential behavior analytic approaches to language and cognition, and evidence-based intervention, respectively, that have generated considerable research and achieved widespread adoption. Dr. Hayes’s contributions to teaching and service have also been exemplary. He served as department chair at UNR, and with Linda Hayes launched the behavior analysis program there. Dr. Hayes has held many influential service (e.g., president of Division 25, the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science [ACBS], and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies [ABCT]) and editorial (e.g., associate editor of Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis) positions, and has received numerous awards for his work (e.g., the SABA Awards for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis and the Impact of Science on Application, the APA Don Hake Award, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from ABCT). His contributions span philosophical, methodological, basic, and applied domains with remarkable breadth and depth.
Abstract: Skinner argued that behavior analysis was part of the larger field of evolutionary approaches. Advances in evolution science and in a contextual behavioral account of human language suggest that human beings have common motivations that needed to be taking into account when dealing with possible reinforcers for human behavior. In this talk I will argue that a small set of typical human yearnings emerge from this way of thinking, and surprisingly, that these connect behavioral thinking to some ideas often seen as oppositional to behavioral thinking.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe B. F. Skinner's views on evolutionary processes; (2) describe the implications of multi-level selection for arbitrarily applicable derived relational responding; (3) list six generally applicable establishing operations that commonly emerge from our evolutionary history and verbal relations.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #429
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Playing it Safe or Taking a Risk: The Role of Extreme Outcomes in Risky Choice and Memory
Monday, May 28, 2018
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom B
Area: EAB
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Marcia Spetch, Ph.D.
Chair: Eric S. Murphy (University of Alaska Anchorage)
MARCIA SPETCH (University of Alberta)
Marcia Spetch is a Professor in Psychology at the University of Alberta, Canada. She obtained her Ph.D. from UBC 1981, was a postdoctoral fellowship at UCSD and an Assistant Professor at Dalhousie University prior to joining the University of Alberta in 1987. Her research spans many topics in behavior, learning and comparative cognition, including timing behavior, memory processes, spatial learning, navigation, choice behavior and gambling. Her lab studies are primarily conducted with pigeons and adult humans, but she has conducted collaborative research on ants, bees, fish, chickadees, rats, monkeys, apes, and human children. Her current research focuses primarily on spatial navigation and risky choice behavior. She has received uninterrupted grant support throughout her career from NSERC (Canada) and her research on risky decision making has been funded by the Alberta Gambling Research Institute. She has published well over 100 research articles and several book chapters. She has been consulting editor for several journals, was associate editor for Animal Learning & Behavior and is currently co-editor of Comparative Cognition and Behavior Reviews. She has supervised many students and postdoctoral fellows and she has collaborated with numerous researchers from Canada, USA, UK, and Australia. She is a past president of the Comparative Cognition Society (CCS), recipient of the 2018 CCS Research Award, and in 2017 was inducted into the Royal Society of Canada.
Abstract: Life is full of choices between moderate-value rewards and risky higher-valued rewards (e.g., a decent restaurant that always has room versus a fabulous restaurant that is often full). One factor that influences risk preference is how these options are presented. When choices are described (common in behavioral economics), people are typically more risk seeking when choices involve losses (e.g., -$20 vs a 50/50 chance of -$40) than when they involve gains (e.g., +$20 vs. a 50/50 chance of +$40). In contrast, if outcomes are learned through experience (typical in operant research), people tend to be more risk seeking for relative gains that for relative losses. We proposed an extreme-outcome hypothesis, in which the best and worst outcomes have more impact than moderate outcomes on experience-based choices and on self-reported memory. In several studies, we have shown that outcomes at the ends of a distribution are weighted more, leading to biases in choice behavior and over-estimations in memory; moreover, these effects on choice and memory are correlated. The effects are also context dependent—outcomes are overweighted only when they are the best or worst outcomes in the current context. The fluidity of risky choice has implications for understanding risky behaviors such as gambling.
Target Audience: Graduate students and researchers interested in behavioral analysis, choice behavior, or gambling.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe differences between choices based on description and experience-based choices; (2) explain how extreme outcomes have been shown to affect choice and memory reports; (3) discuss the role of context and memory biases in risky choice.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #445
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
The Elephant in the Room: Addressing Psychotropic Medications When Assessing Behavior
Monday, May 28, 2018
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom DE
Area: DDA
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Maria G. Valdovinos, Ph.D.
Chair: Eric Boelter (Seattle Children's Autism Center)
MARIA G. VALDOVINOS (Drake University)
Maria Valdovinos, Ph.D., BCBA-D, is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience at Drake University. She received her doctorate in Developmental and Child Psychology from the University of Kansas and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Vanderbilt University's Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development. Prior to beginning her studies in Kansas, Dr. Valdovinos worked in residential and day treatment settings with adults diagnosed with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Her experiences in these settings lead to her interest in evaluating the pharmacological treatment of challenging behavior, research which has received federal funding. Dr. Valdovinos is a Fellow of the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and a member of the Board of Directors for the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts.
Abstract: Psychotropic medications are commonly prescribed to adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities who engage in problem behavior. This presentation will provide a behavior analytic conceptualization of medication effects and review the results of a study that evaluated the extent to which changes in psychotropic medications altered functional relations between problem behavior and the environment for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Research findings suggest continued surveillance of behavior function when using psychotropic medication to address problem behavior. Further suggestions for assessing psychotropic medication impact will be shared.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss how psychotropic medication effects can function as motivating operations; (2) identify measures one can collect to monitor psychotropic medication effects on behavior; (3) describe how therapeutic and adverse side effects of psychotropic medication can impact behavior.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #467
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Become a Better Practitioner by Being Your Own Best Behavior Therapist
Monday, May 28, 2018
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Coronado Ballroom AB
Area: CBM
Instruction Level: Intermediate
CE Instructor: Robert Stromer, Ph.D.
Chair: Amy Murrell (University of North Texas)
ROBERT STROMER (George Brown College)
During the first 3.5 decades of his career, Robert was a school psychologist, educational consultant and program coordinator, mental health clinician, university teacher, and researcher. Published accounts of his work are mostly about research on stimulus control and derived performances in humans. He served on the editorial boards of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and The Behavior Analyst, and was both a board member and an associate editor for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis. For the last 12 years, Robert's been teaching in George Brown College's behavioral science programs for undergraduates: he also supervised services for a classroom of children with autism. In areas of personal and professional development, his current interests concern matters of medical and health care, self-management, treatment adherence, behavior therapy, and today's mindfulness-based therapies and self-help practices. He maintains an ambitious program of self-experimentation on matters of health and wellness, coaches others in such practices, and pursues advanced studies and teacher certifications in mindfulness meditation and compassion. Going forward he hopes to share lessons learned from self-help investigations with college students, parents, and colleagues, and with peers who are enjoying old age as best they can.
Abstract: Learning to be "your own best therapist" may be essential to becoming a competent and joyful practitioner. An informed self-care repertoire often leads to satisfying ways to manage stress and deal with emotional issues; and, importantly, it prepares the practitioner to help other analysts take care of themselves and their clients. To accomplish such results, we suggest a self-care approach that draws from basic learning principles and self-management strategies, combined with the values, attitudes, and practices of mindfulness meditation. Using this approach, I'll describe how I revamped my daily life for a more satisfying and productive existence. Initially, the aim was to address health and emotional issues; later, the focus turned to maintenance and elaboration of skills learned. My procedures targeted both public and private events and included: direct and indirect measures, journaling, formal and informal practices, and social networking. Recent variants of the program use neurofeedback and experience sampling technologies to monitor and evaluate formal and informal practices, respectively. The outcomes have been remarkably satisfying, "cusp like" in nature, and impactful across several key personal values: health and wellness, relationships, professional and personal growth. Colleagues have conducted similar investigations and achieved satisfying results. College students have responded favorably to a program designed expressly for emerging adults, and selected graduates are being groomed as peer facilitators in the program. Our hope is to offer the program college-wide to help address growing concerns about students' health and wellness.
Target Audience: Anyone interested in the topic.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) state potential benefits of mindfulness practices as a supplement to one’s existing self-management repertoire; (2) describe some of the key elements of the skill set involved in mindfulness meditation and everyday self-care; (3) identify exemplary digital and other supports for establishing and maintaining self-care practices.
 
 
Invited Panel #474
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Has "Translational Research" Been Lost in Translation?
Monday, May 28, 2018
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Grand Ballroom 7-9
Area: SCI
CE Instructor: Claire C. St. Peter, Ph.D.
Chair: Claire C. St. Peter (West Virginia University)
ISER GUILLERMO DELEON (University of Florida)
MICHAEL PERONE (West Virginia University)
ANNA I. PETURSDOTTIR (Texas Christian University)
Iser DeLeon earned his Ph.D. at the University of Florida, where he is now Professor in the Department of Psychology. Recent prior positions include Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Director of Research Development for the Department of Behavioral Psychology at the Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, MD. Dr. DeLeon is also the current President of the Board of Directors of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board. He has previously served as Associate Editor for both the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior as well as on the editorial board for several other journals in behavior analysis. His research has focused on assessment and treatment of aberrant behavior in persons with neurodevelopmental disorders, identification of preferences and determinants of choice, and translation of basic behavioral processes towards enhancing therapeutic and instructional outcomes.
Michael Perone earned his Ph.D. in 1981 at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. He was an assistant professor at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington before joining the faculty at West Virginia University in 1984, where he is a professor of psychology and an associate dean. Much of his current research is concerned with developing laboratory models of behavioral processes involved in problem behavior such as failures of self-control. He has served the field of behavior analysis as an associate editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and as President of ABAI. He currently serves as Coordinator of the ABAI Accreditation Board.
Anna Ingeborg Petursdottir received her Ph.D. from Western Michigan University under the supervision of James E. Carr. She is currently a tenured associate professor at Texas Christian University (TCU), where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses and supervises Ph.D. students in Experimental Psychology. She also holds an appointment as a part-time lecturer at Reykjavik University in Iceland. Anna’s research encompasses both basic and applied interests and focuses primarily on verbal behavior acquisition and the relationship between verbal behavior and derived stimulus relations. Her work has been published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB) and The Analysis of Verbal Behavior (TAVB), among other journals. Anna is a previous editor of TAVB, a previous associate editor of JABA, and a current associate editor of JEAB. She is also a past coordinator of ABAI’s Publication Board and a past president of the Texas Association for Behavior Analysis.
Abstract: This panel discussion will provide a dialog on the potential schism between basic and applied behavior analysis. Panelists will discuss their experiences in the conduct of translational research that informs basic process or applied technologies. Panelists will also share their interpretations on what constitutes "translational" research, the role of translational research in bridging divides between basic and applied sciences, and how researchers might arrange translational research programs in ways that advance both basic and applied science. Finally, panelists will suggest potential fruitful avenues for future translational research.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Researchers or consumers of behavior-analytic research.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe various kinds of translational research, including use-inspired basic research; (2) describe the continuum of translational research; (3) identify contemporary strains on relations between basic and applied behavior analysis; (4) state uses of translational research to bridge basic and applied science; (5) name areas in which translational research might make valuable contributions to behavior-analytic science.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #496
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Transfer and Transformation of Stimulus Functions in Cultural Phenomena: Attitudes, Values, and Aesthetic Responses
Monday, May 28, 2018
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom B
Area: PCH
Instruction Level: Advanced
CE Instructor: Julio C. De Rose, Ph.D.
Chair: David C. Palmer (Smith College)
JULIO C. DE ROSE (Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos)
Julio de Rose received his Ph.D. at the University of S?o Paulo, Brazil, in 1981, and was a postdoctoral Fulbright fellow at the Eunice Kennedy Shriver Center for Mental Retardation. He is now Professor of Psychology at the Federal University of S?o Carlos, Brazil, and Research Director of the Brazilian National Institute of Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition and Teaching, of which he is one of the founders. He is the author and co-author of more than 130 articles and chapters on experimental, applied, and conceptual Behavior Analysis, and has served in the editorial boards of several international journals in the field of Behavior Analysis.
Abstract: Stimulus functions are transferred or transformed across relational networks. Studies in our laboratory, for instance, have shown that evaluative functions of meaningful stimuli, such as facial emotional expressions, transfer to abstract stimuli equivalent to them. These abstract stimuli become symbols of the emotional expressions. However, stimuli related by opposition to happy facial expressions are subsequently rated as sad. This has been confirmed with several measurement procedures, such as Semantic Differential ratings, IRAP, Semantic Priming, and Event-Related Potentials. The influential cultural anthropologist Clifford Geertz has characterized cultures as sets of symbolic devices that control behavior. Transfer and transformation of stimulus functions across relational networks may be the foundation of a behavioral account of how symbolic devices control behavior. In this presentation we will focus on cultural phenomena such as attitudes, values, and aesthetic responses, interpreting them on the basis of transformation of evaluative, consequential and discriminative functions in complex stimulus networks. Thus, the concept of attitude, in mainstream Psychology, although not precisely defined, points toward evaluative responses to stimuli. These evaluations may often originate in direct conditioning experiences with the stimuli. They may also be based on experience with stimuli related by equivalence or other types of relations. Similar analyses will be advanced for values and aesthetic responses. Skinner defined values in terms of reinforcers, and studies have confirmed that reinforcing (and punishing) functions are also transformed in relational networks, so that humans may value stimuli based on their experience with related stimuli. Works of art constitute complex packages of stimuli that participate in complex relational networks. Although responses to art may, to some extent, involve phylogenic dispositions, personal histories will shape individual responses to a work of art.
Target Audience: Researchers or students interested in basic and translational research on stimulus equivalence and transfer of functions and social and cultural implications.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify trained and derived relations in diagrams of relational networks; (2) describe transfer and transformation of functions across relational networks; (3) define symbols and how they can control behavior by transformation of discriminative, eliciting, and consequential functions; (4) explain how the traditional concepts of attitudes and values may be recast in terms of transfer and transformation of evaluative functions; (5) explain how works of art may be conceived as packages of stimuli that control aesthetic responses.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #509
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Efficient, Cost-Effective Approaches for Disseminating ABA Methodologies Into Public School Classrooms Serving Students With Developmental Disabilities
Monday, May 28, 2018
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom DE
Area: AUT
Instruction Level: Advanced
CE Instructor: Dorothea C. Lerman, Ph.D.
Chair: Tiffany Kodak (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
DOROTHEA C. LERMAN (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Dorothea Lerman is currently a Professor of Psychology at the University of Houston - Clear Lake, where she directs a master's program in behavior analysis and serves as Director of the UHCL Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities. She received her doctoral degree in Psychology from the University of Florida in 1995, specializing in the experimental analysis of behavior. Her areas of expertise include autism, developmental disabilities, early intervention, functional analysis, teacher and parent training, and treatment of severe behavior disorders (e.g., aggression, self-injury). Dr. Lerman has published more than 80 research articles and chapters, served as Editor-in-Chief for the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Analysis in Practice and has secured more than $2 million in grants and contracts to support her work. She was the recipient of the 2007 Distinguished Contribution to Applied Behavioral Research Award and the 2001 B.F. Skinner Award for New Researchers, awarded by Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. She also was named a Fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis-International in 2008. Dr. Lerman is a Licensed Psychologist and a Board Certified Behavior Analyst.
Abstract: The successful dissemination of ABA methodologies into public school classrooms requires efficient, low-cost staff training models. In this presentation, I will describe a line of research on an intensive, five-day training program for public school teachers and paraprofessionals that covers foundational skills in ABA. Highlights from a line of research spanning more than 20 years will be described, along with the implications of working with teachers and paraprofessionals in public school settings.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the essential elements of effective behavioral skills training; (2) identify foundational skills in ABA that are beneficial for public teachers and paraprofessionals; (3) state the benefits and limitations of pyramidal training; (4) describe the outcomes and benefits of a computer-based training program for teaching school personnel to detect antecedents and consequences of problem behavior.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #517
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
How is it Possible That in Peru People With Autism and Other Developmental Disorders Not Only Work, but Help to Reduce Poverty
Monday, May 28, 2018
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Grand Ballroom 7-9
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Maria E. Malott, Ph.D.
Chair: Maria E. Malott (Association for Behavior Analysis International)
LILIANA MAYO (Centro Ann Sullivan del Peru)
Dr. Liliana Mayo received her doctoral training in the Department of Applied Behavior Science at the University of Kansas. She is the founder and executive director of Centro Ann Sullivan del Peru (CASP), in Lima, Peru, which serves more than 400 students with different abilities (especially those with the most severe limitations) and their families. Dr. Mayo is a professor of special education at the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia and the Universidad Catolica, in Peru, and an Adjunct Faculty Member in the Department of Applied Behavior Sciences at the University of Kansas. Also she is a member of the National Council of Education in Peru. She is the representative of CASP in the formal cooperative agreement between CASP and the Schiefelbusch Institute for Research in Life Span Studies at the University of Kansas, in the United States. Dr. Mayo has received numerous awards and recognitions due to her contributions to the development of successful practices that promote progress and full inclusion of people with different abilities in society through the high participation of parents in the School of Families, and the implementation of effective educational programs following a Functional Natural Curriculum. Among them are the Queen Sofia of Spain 1999, Award for Rehabilitation and Integration, the International Dissemination of Applied Behavior Analysis award in 2000, the Peruvian Government that is the Order 'El Sol del Peru' in the Commander Grade in 2007. She was honored by the government of Panama with the Order 'Maria Ossa de Amador' in the Grade of Grand Medal in 2012 and for the government of Domenican Republic, with 'Christopher Columbus' Heraldic Order' in 2014.
Abstract: How is it that the best businesses in Peru and even the Congress hire people with autism and developmental disorders, some who have worked for 22 years continuously? Because they have found that they are good workers, don't gossip, ask for more work, and are loyal to the business where they work. Centro Ann Sullivan del Peru (CASP) has more than 100 students working in 46 businesses; 60% of them have autism. All receive the same pay and benefits as other employees and are included in all social activities in their work places. Many help their families economically by paying for utilities like water and electricity, paying for the medication of their parents, or even starting the construction of their own home. CASP students/workers receive the same social benefits as all Peruvian workers. It is important that persons with developmental disorders, especially those from extreme poverty, work in a supported employment program because it leads to including them in all aspects of society and because it leads to poverty reduction.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: Pending
 
 
Invited Paper Session #527
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Why Children Need to Talk to Themselves: The Foundation of Reasoning and Questioning
Monday, May 28, 2018
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Coronado Ballroom AB
Area: DEV
CE Instructor: Joanne K. Robbins, Ph.D.
Chair: R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
JOANNE K. ROBBINS (Morningside Academy)
Joanne Robbins is Principal and Associate Director of Morningside Academy, Seattle, Washington, and co-founder of Partnerships for Educational Excellence and Research (PEER), International. Her contributions in program development, curriculum design, teaching, and supervision were initially guided by Susan Markle, Philip Tiemann, and Herb Walberg. As Principal at Morningside Academy for more than twenty years, she has participated with her colleague Kent Johnson, fine faculty and staff, and hundreds of children and their families in the creation, modification, implementation, and assessment of effective and efficient instruction. As Executive Director of PEER International, Joanne helped create an international team that assists numerous township primary schools and high schools in South Africa. She is the author of Learn to Reason with TAPS: a Talk Aloud Problem Solving Approach, which is being translated into Italian, Hebrew, Spanish, and Portuguese. She is co-author of Fluent Thinking Skills: A Generative Approach. A local community advocate, she served as co-chairperson of the Superintendent's Positive Climate and Discipline Advisory Committee for Seattle Public Schools.
Abstract: When we set out to educate the whole child, we must design academic goals, provide instruction in self-management and self-instruction, teach problem solving, and promote expansion of the child's community of reinforcers (Greer, 2002). Often overlooked, but essential to each of these facets of instruction is the use of self-dialogue. Children talk to themselves at an early age in environments that recruit problem solving; self-dialogue occurs naturally (Berk, 1994). However, in the school environment the effective use of self-dialogue, which is essential to the development of reasoning skills, must often be taught. This is particularly true for children with special needs. This presentation will describe the need, and effective procedures for establishing reasoning skills. Two strategies presented include Talk Aloud Problem Solving (TAPS) and Question Generating. When equipped with these repertoires learners can tackle a range of academic and social problems that may otherwise occasion avoidance. A healthy educational environment fosters talking out loud, provides challenging problems, and values self-instruction.
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) identify the qualities that comprise the Problem Solver and Active Listener repertoires; (2) identify components required to generate questions; (3) describe the value of supplemental verbal behavior in maintaining the problem solvers behavior.
 

BACK TO THE TOP

 

Back to Top
Modifed by Eddie Soh
SABA DONATE ABAI HOTLINE