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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Program by Day for Friday, May 25, 2018


 

Workshop #W36
CE Offered: BACB
Our "Concrete" Children With Autism or Other Developmental Disabilities: Are We Teaching Them What Will Matter in Their Adult Lives?
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Patrick E. McGreevy, Ph.D.
PATRICK E. MCGREEVY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A. and Associates), TROY FRY (Patrick McGreevy, Ph.D., P.A., and Associates)
Description: This workshop will describe children who can be respectfully described as 'concrete' (rather than children with autism or developmental disabilities) and the value of functional, life skills, as opposed to developmental skills, for these children.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the behavioral repertoires and skill deficits of "concrete children;" (2) describe examples of functional life skills; (3) describe why and how functional life skills are essential for "concrete" children.
Activities: This workshop will include lecture and discussion with participants so that learning objectives can be achieved for each participant.
Audience: The audience will be BCBAs who provide services to children with autism or other developmental disabilities
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W37
CE Offered: BACB
A Comprehensive Look at Authorizations, Appeals,and Peer Reviews
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ashley Williams, M.S.
JULIE KORNACK (Center for Autism and Related Disorders ), ASHLEY WILLIAMS (ABACS), THEA H. DAVIS (Autism Bridges), BRANDON HERSCOVITCH (ABACS, LLC), CATHY J. BOOTH (Autism Bridges)
Description: In this workshop, attendees will be guided through the authorization and appeals processes. Attendees will be exposed to state and federal laws that all clinicians should be aware of that guide and support clinical recommendations, continuity of services, and access to care for the populations served. This workshop provides an emphasis on creating internal processes and procedures to lend support to clinician's recommendations for service delivery based on medical necessity. Attendees will be provided with guidance on submitting authorizations and appeals, preparing for and holding a utilization/peer reviews, holding external reviews, and contacting relevant representatives when violations occur. Common reasons for denial of services and recommendations for generating support for these services will be a focus of this workshop (i.e., insurance-funded services in schools, role of parent training, location of services, services that are "educational" in nature).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the peer review and appeals process for insurance-funded ABA services; (2) identify the materials needed in preparing for a peer-review; (3) list at least one state or federal regulation that governs insurance-funded ABA services in New England.
Activities: Workshop activities will include small group discussions, large group discussions, scenario-based exercises, and oral/written practice opportunities.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is behavior analysts who provide insurance-funded services (Master's/PhD-level).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): authorizations, insurance appeals, insurance services, peer review
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP — 
Supervision
Activity-Based Model for BACB Supervision
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cheryl J. Davis, Ph.D.
CHERYL J. DAVIS (7 Dimensions Consulting; SupervisorABA), DANA R. REINECKE (Long Island University Post/SupervisorABA)
Description: BACB supervision is an ever-evolving, challenging process that is crucial to the field of behavior analysis. Task List 5 includes a section regarding personnel supervision and management, highlighting the importance of these skills for behavior analysts. This workshop reviews ethical considerations for BACB supervision, as well as literature on effective supervision practices. In addition, recent supervision publications will be reviewed to discuss current practices being utilized is BCBA supervision. This activity-based model sets project-defined benchmarks for progress through supervision, and includes specific and clear rubrics for evaluation of mastery of each project aligned to the BACB Task List. Ongoing evaluation of supervisee progress and supervisor effectiveness are components of the model. Participants will receive the activities reviewed to utilize with supervisees.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss and implement the Compliance Code/Task List 5 Section E with regard to the use of evidence-based practices in supervision; (2) Describe the implementation and measurement of ten projects based on the 4th and 5th edition task list that can be used as benchmarks for progression through supervision; (3) Develop and implement at least one method of evaluating supervisee progress; (4) Develop and implement at least one method of evaluating supervisor effectiveness;(5) Summarize Task List 5 Section I components of supervision skills and have a plan to teach and assess these with supervisees.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, whole-group demonstrations of ethics in supervision, and small-group breakouts to practice specific applications of evaluating supervisor effectiveness and supervisee progress. Objectives will be described through lecture and discussed and demonstrated with the group as a whole. Small groups will be formed based on common interests and needs, and workshop facilitators will work with each group to practice developing and using supervision strategies to meet learning objectives on an individual level.
Audience: The target audience is BACB supervisors who have completed an 8-hour supervision training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Activity-based Supervision, BACB Supervision, Effective Supervision, Supervisory skills
 
Workshop #W39
CE Offered: BACB
Mastered PECS: What's Next? Transitioning From PECS to Speech Generating Devices
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jesseca Collins, M.Ed.
JESSECA COLLINS (Pyramid Educational Consultants), JAIME WEDEL (Pyramid Educational Consultants), PAIGE PANETTA (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: High-tech Speech Generating Devices (SGD) are being used more frequently with children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. While research is expanding on the use of various communication apps on smart tablets, many recent publications are fraught with procedural and logical problems. There are no standard protocols established regarding how to teach the use of an SGD. The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an evidence-based protocol. This workshop will review the key elements that are necessary to demonstrate that the use of an SGD would qualify as verbal behavior (Skinner, 1957) and which teaching issues, especially regarding discrimination, should be incorporated into training protocols. We will briefly review the main components of the PECS protocol and review how to best transition users to an SGD. We will review published guidelines (Frost and McGowan, 2012) identifying key variables that may influence successful transitioning. We will review recent studies looking at the effectiveness of either attempting to begin communication training with an SGD or how to effectively transition from PECS. Participants are encouraged to bring either an SGD or an app for a tablet to actively practice key transitional steps including how to identify SGD features that may influence learning.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe key elements to demonstrate verbal behavior via SGD use; (2) describe key elements of the PECS protocol; (3) describe assessment targets to transition from PECS to an SGD; and (4) describe how to evaluate planning and functional use of an SGD.
Activities: Review of recent literature regarding SGD use, review PECS protocol, review published guidelines on how to effectively transition from PECS to SGD, review videos demonstrating effective use and potential problems with transitions, and review how to transition from PECS to SGDs and/or tablet apps brought to workshop by participants.
Audience: Anyone working with current users of PECS or with individuals for whom an SGD or tablet app is being considered. This may include behavior analysts, speech/language pathologists, teachers or others involved with communication training with children and adults with disabilities including ASD.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Augmentative Communication, PECS, SGD, Teaching Communication
 
Workshop #W40
CE Offered: BACB
Adulthood Begins in Preschool: Identification and Intervention With Skills That Support Competent Adulthood
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Peter F. Gerhardt, Ed.D.
PETER F. GERHARDT (The EPIC School), ANGELA RODRIGUEZ (Educational Partnership for Instructing Children ), CRISTINA BATTAGLIA (EPIC school ), MEAGHAN BRACCHITTA (The EPIC School), KATHERINE MOORE (The EPIC School)
Description: Baer, Wolf and Risley (1968), noted that competently applied behavior analytic interventions should result in strong, socially important, and generalizable outcomes which, in this case, should mean positive adult outcomes in ASD. Unfortunately, despite an emphasis on evidence-based intervention in ASD, adult outcomes remain poor "for almost any outcome you choose" (Roux, et al, 2015, p.8). While there may be several reasons for such continued poor outcomes, the potential of applied behavior analysis to support more positive adult outcomes has yet to be fully explored or realized. More positive outcomes should, however, be well within the reach of our behavior analytic technology. This workshop will provide and overview of a number of interventions and protocols designed to address this "outcome-deficit" via a better understanding of linkages between skills targeted in preschool, elementary, middle and high school to those required in adulthood. In addition, challenges related to translating effective behavior analytic intervention from the clinic or classroom to the community at large will be reviewed. This workshop will end with a discussion of the ethical issues associated with the provision of effective behavior analytic intervention with adolescents and adults with ASD.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define "positive adult outcomes" in a way that is observable and measurable on a case by case basis; (2) Identify a cohort of skills, from preschool to post-graduation, with direct relevance to post-21 success in the community; (3) Identify a minimum of three challenges to the transfer of behavior analytic interventions from the classroom to the community along with potential solutions; (4) Discuss the ethical considerations that come into play when identifying skills targeted for acquisition; (5) Implement a "5-year planning" protocol to identify longer term goals, objectives, challenges, and risks.
Activities: Lecture and discussion
Audience: Intermediate/advanced.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, evidence-based intervention, life-skills, transition
 
Workshop #W41
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Part 1: Early Start Denver Model Introductory Workshop
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lauren Elder, Ph.D.
LAUREN ELDER (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing), MELISSA MELLO (UC Davis MIND Institute)
Description: Learn about the theoretical and empirical framework, curriculum and teaching principles of the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a developmental, behavioral and relationship-based intervention program for infants and toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder ages 12-48 months. Topics include: Administering and completing a developmental assessment of children's skill levels;Developing individualized, developmentally appropriate teaching objectives;Implementing the ESDM teaching practices and fidelity system to evaluate technique use;Maintaining data management and addressing poor or limited child progress, when needed. Please note this is a two-part workshop and registrants must attend both workshops.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Learn to administer and score the ESDM curriculum assessment and select developmentally appropriate learning goals; (2) Learn to identify the key components of the ESDM intervention including teaching strategies; (3) Describe the empirical research support for ESDM 4; (4) Implement a decision tree to address lack of treatment progress as needed.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, discussion, small group activities, and video examples.
Audience: Master's level clinicians with experience with young children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): early intervention, ESDM, toddler intervention
 
Workshop #W42
CE Offered: BACB
Using a Practical Functional Assessment Model to Develop Skill-Based Treatments of Problem Behavior
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
JOSHUA JESSEL (Queens College)
Description: The functional analysis is a powerful tool that can provide an effective and humane treatment for problem behavior (Hanley, Iwata, & McCord, 2003). Despite its growing empirical support, a recent survey (Oliver, Pratt, & Normand, 2015) suggests that many practitioners are not conducting functional analyses. Practitioners may be avoiding the functional analysis because of concerns that it places the patient and clinician at risk of injury and requires too much time. I will be teaching the audience how to conduct a practical functional analysis that takes around 25 minutes (Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, & Hanratty, 2014; Jessel, Hanley, & Ghaemmaghami, 2016; Santiago, Santiago, Hanley, Moore, & Jin, 2016). I will then discuss how to use the results of the functional analysis to design effective, function-based treatments that include (a) the teaching of complex and developmentally appropriate functional communication skills, and (b) skill-based delay tolerance procedures that increase other behaviors such as compliance, task engagement, and social interaction (Ghaemmaghami, Jessel, & Hanley, 2016; Jessel, Ingvarsson, Metras, Kirk, & Whipple, in press). The goal of the entire assessment and treatment process is to effect more global changes in the functional repertoires needed to be successful in complex environments with natural reinforcement contingencies.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) conduct a functional analysis of problem behavior in 25 minutes, (2) teach a child complex functional communication skills, (3) teach a child how to tolerate delays and denials to reinforcement, (4) program for generalization and maintenance of these skills.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture. Supplemental materials such as workbooks and assessments will be provided in order to support participant learning.
Audience: BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers who need to learn a fast and safe approach to assessing and treating problem behavior. This approach has been empirically validated for those with and without intellectual disabilities, with children as young as 1 and adults as old as 30, and can be conducted in multiple contexts such as classrooms, clinics, or homes.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): functional assessment, functional communication, problem behavior, tolerance training
 
Workshop #W43
CE Offered: BACB
Using ABA/VB for Toddlers With Developmental Delays and/or Newly Diagnosed With Autism
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Mary Lynch Barbera, Ph.D.
MARY LYNCH BARBERA (Barbera Behavior Consulting, LLC)
Description: Toddlers with signs of autism need effective and individualized ABA programming in order to reach their fullest potentials. Parents of toddlers often have to wait months or even years for an evaluation and often struggle to find quality behavioral therapy. Many behavior analysts do not have experience working with very young children and have difficulty working within early intervention teams within homes. This workshop will utilize B.F. Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior and specifically Dr. Mark Sundberg's VB-MAPP Assessment and Curriculum Guide (2008) to provide a framework for assessing and programming for very young children newly diagnosed or showing signs of autism. Dr. Barbera will use her book: The Verbal Behavior Approach: How to Teach Children with Autism and Related Disorders (2007) and the VB-MAPP (Sundberg, 2008) to give participants practical strategies that can be implemented immediately. In addition to providing participants with specific ways to improve milestone scores, especially in the areas of language for toddlers, this workshop will also provide information on ways to reduce scores on the barriers assessment for early learners.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss advantages of utilizing B.F. Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior and utilizing the VB-MAPP for assessing and programming for toddlers with signs of autism; (2) Discuss the general abilities of Level 1 learners and easy early learner programs that can be taught to parents and other EI providers (3) Describe 3 strategies to reduce the barriers assessment score on the VB-MAPP; (4) Discuss the importance of working with parents and other early intervention providers to enable each child to reach his or her fullest potential.
Activities: Through lecture, video examples and group activities, the participants will leave with a better understanding of Applied Behavior Analysis utilizing the VB-MAPP assessment and curriculum guide as it relates to programming for very young children.
Audience: The primary audience for this workshop is BCBAs, licensed psychologists, and educators working in homes or ABA settings with toddlers with autism or developmental delays. Participants should have some familiarity with Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior, the elementary verbal operants and the VB-MAPP. BCaBAs, students, and parents with some background in ABA/VB are also welcome.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Developmental Delays, Parent Training, VB-MAPP, Verbal Behavior
 
Workshop #W44
CE Offered: BACB
Enhancing Curriculum Design in Autism Interventions: Analysis of Instructional Content, Selection of Stimuli, and Beyond!
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Allaina Douglas, M.A.
ANDREW BULLA (Armstrong State University ), THOM RATKOS (Berry College), ALLAINA DOUGLAS (University of Oregon ), NICOLE BAUER (North Shore Pediatric Therapy )
Description: A variety of behavioral skill assessments exist that allow practitioners to get a snapshot of a learner's current repertoire. These assessments typically describe what deficits exist, but do not provide a detailed scope and sequence of specific instructional tasks to be mastered. Often times, it is left up to the clinician to select which targets are to be taught and with what stimuli to teach those targets. The current workshop will present attendees with strategies to analyze instructional content prior to teaching (Tiemann & Markle, 1990). More specifically, attendees will learn how to conduct a concept analysis and select teaching and testing stimuli from this analysis (Shimamune & Malott, 1995). Additionally, strategies will be shared on how to select targets across a variety of skills (e.g., tacting, listener responding, basics of math, etc.) for learners of all ability levels, and how to teach these skills in a way that leads to discrimination between stimulus classes and generalization within the stimulus class (Tennyson, Woolley, & Merrill, 1972). Attendees will complete concept analyses for the learners they typically work with and leave with a complete set of teaching and testing stimuli based on their analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to (1) state the critical components for developing a concept; (2) write the steps of a concept analysis for early intervention procedures; (3) list strategies to enhance discrimination between stimulus classes and generalization within stimulus classes.
Activities: The workshop will combine lecture and small group/individual activities targeted towards early intervention instructional design.
Audience: Basic; early intervention practitioners
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): early intervention, instructional design
 
Workshop #W45
CE Offered: BACB
Programming for Pragmatics: Bringing Assessment to Practice for Advanced Learners on the Autism Spectrum
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alexia Stack, M.Ed.
ALEXIA STACK (A Block Above Behavioral Consulting), MAGDALENA A. MARKIEWICZ (A Block Above Behavioral Consulting)
Description: It is well known that individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) experience qualitative impairments in social skills development (DSM--5, 2013), including especially impaired pragmatic language skills. Moreover, the long term consequences of pragmatic language deficits place individuals with ASD at risk for social bullying, limit their ability to develop and maintain friendships and romantic relationships, and increase their likelihood of suffering from anxiety and depression. Support for the assessment and development of pragmatic language skills is crucial for individuals with high functioning ASD. There is an increase in evidence based practice within the fields of applied behavior analysis, speech and language pathology, and developmental psychology for pragmatic language assessment and programming. Therefore, early intervention addressing pragmatic language skills is necessary for individuals with ASD. Learning to use assessment tools to select goals for intervention, designing programs based on assessment results, and ongoing data analysis to monitor learning are all skills required by behavior analysts in delivering services to high functioning learners on the Autism Spectrum.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define pragmatic language skills; (2) Discuss higher order pragmatic language skills that are known to be challenging for learners on the Autism Spectrum; (3) Name the assessment tools that can be used to guide program development; (4) use assessment tools to identify missing component skills needed for higher order pragmatics; (5) design programs based on assessment results; (6) define target behaviors and effective measurement procedures.
Activities: -Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, group discussion, data analysis, video analysis, sample assessment data, small group practice, program development coaching, and application of data-based decision making. -Participants will receive supplemental materials to follow lecture material and for note taking purposes. Example assessment data will be made available for small group practice. Sample worksheets, and sample data will be included for small group learning objectives.
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Assessment-practice, Pragmatic Language
 
Workshop #W46
CE Offered: BACB
After the Functional Behavior Assessment: The Behavior Intervention Plan and Essential Curriculum for Middle and High School Students With Autism to Reduce Disruptive Behavior and Teach Independent Life Skills
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Kenneally, Ed.D.
LAURA KENNEALLY (Advance Learning Center)
Description: Many middle and high school aged students with autism engage in a range of disruptive behavior, which severely limits their abilities to participate in typical family, school, and community activities. Their behaviors have effectively punished caregivers and providers from intervening and changing their behaviors. Left untreated, these behaviors will continue to prohibit their ability to gain meaningful employment or live in residential settings. This workshop highlights several successful data-based case studies of middle and high school students who learned to manage their behavior. The workshop focuses on a student who was toilet trained at age 15, and two other students whose disruptive behavior were reduced to near zero levels and maintained for years. The simple evidence-based interventions will be described using video, hands-on activities, and a step-by-step visual manual in order to help parents, special educators, and BCBAs to enact these methods with their students quickly and easily.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify 3 common barriers to change; (2) measure treatment integrity and adherence using the simple behavior intervention plan; (3) collect data and evaluate successful using data-based strategies; (4) implement a simple toilet training schedule program; (5) implement a simple response interruption procedure to reduce disruptive behavior, specifically aggression; (6) generalize this simple easy format to use with a range of students to increase their independence and reduce their need for ABA services.
Activities: The format combines lecture, video examples, small group hands on activities, and guided practice.
Audience: BCBAs, teachers, administrators, CST members
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavior management, curriculum, parental adherence, response interruption
 
Workshop #W47
CE Offered: BACB
A Systematic Approach to Teaching Play Skills
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Nancy J. Champlin, M.S.
NANCY J. CHAMPLIN (ACI Learning Centers), MELISSA SCHISSLER (ACI Learning Centers)
Description: Research supports evidence-based play interventions impact on future communication and language skills, cognitive functioning, as well as social interactions for individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. Sigman and Ruskin, 1999, found a correlation between the ability to engage in appropriate functional play and early language ability with long-term gains in expressive vocabulary. Encompassing a developmental sequence of play with behavioral interventions should be the focus of programming (Lifter, 2011). Based upon the instructors' clinical and research experience teaching functional play through sociodramatic play, participants will learn how to incorporate the developmental sequences of play and language to systematically teach play, from assessment through mastery criteria. The ACI Play Protocol incorporates a systematic approach to teaching preschool-aged children appropriate play skills and language. Play components, which include appropriate play with figures (dolls/stuffed animals), adults, and peers are taught using individualized treatment packages. Specific skills include abstract play with and without objects, rotating between play schemes, combining items from 2 or more play schemes, initiating, responding and expanding on current play targets. Workshop objectives will be met by alternating between didactic instruction, discussion, video modeling, and small group activities including role plays.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) discuss the developmental stages of play for typically developing children; (2) discuss the language development during play for typically developing children; (3) assess play and implement behaviorally-based interventions to teach each developmental stage of play; (4) modify play at each developmental stage of play; (5) assess mastery and track data for each developmental stage of play.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met by alternating between didactic instruction, discussion, video modeling, and small group activities including role plays.
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, RBTs, and other professionals working with clients with autism
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Language Development, Pretend Play, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W48
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Medication Boot Camp: A Behavior Analyst's Guide to Medications and the People Who Prescribe Them
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James Chok, Ph.D.
ANNA MARIE DIPIETRO (Melmark), ELIZABETH DAYTON (Melmark), JENNIFER QUIGLEY (Melmark), TIMOTHY NIPE (Melmark), JAMES CHOK (Melmark Pennsylvania), ART GLENN DOWDY (Melmark), SAMANTHA SARIN (Melmark)
Description: This workshop will provide an in depth review of psychotropic medication classes with a focus on how to evaluate the effects of medications from a behavior analytic perspective. Educational content will be presented by a psychiatric prescriber with experience working with both behavior analysts as well as individuals with high risk challenging behavior. This workshop will focus on medication education, competency based evaluations of knowledge acquired, and experimental analysis of psychiatric interventions. Participants will have the opportunity to role play with a prescriber in groups facilitated by BCBAs currently working within an integrated model with a prescriber. Examples will be provided from the existing literature as well as case studies from a residential treatment facility. A guide to operationally defining effects of psychotropic medications will also be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) understand classes of psychotropic medication, intended uses, potential side effects, and other considerations as applicable to clinical practice; (2) communicate effectively with prescribers, including presenting relevant behavioral data and engaging in meaningful and productive discussion; (3) utilize single-subject design in collaboration with prescribers to assess relevant behavior and medication effects
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture addressing medication education and relevant background information by a prescriber; competency quizzes and activities related to medication education provided, discussion targeting group experience and barriers to effective communication and collaboration; modeling of effective communication between the prescriber and behavior analysts; small group breakout sessions in which participants will role play effective communication with a prescriber with oversight by medication prescriber and behavior analysts; role play exercises to assist in the behavior analytic experimental analyses of psychiatric interventions, supplemental materials including a reference guide to medication information presented and handouts to guide practitioners in the discussion of relevant data with prescribers.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop includes behavior analysts, clinicians, and related practitioners who interact with medication prescribers including psychiatrists and nurse practitioners or anyone interested in learning about psychotropic medications, their use in applied settings, and how behavior analysis can enhance prescribing practices.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): collaboration, medication, psychiatry, psychopharmacology
 
Workshop #W49
CE Offered: BACB
Managing Sexually Harmful Behaviour Presented by Children and Young People With Developmental Disabilities
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: DDA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Duncan Pritchard, Ph.D.
DUNCAN PRITCHARD (Aran Hall School), HEATHER PENNEY (Aran Hall School)
Description: Sexually harmful behavior (SHB) presented by children and young people (CYP) with intellectual and other developmental disabilities presents a significant challenge for those behavior analysts providing assessment, treatment, prevention, and ongoing monitoring programs for this vulnerable population. This workshop is based on an established multi-component behavioral intervention (Pritchard et al., 2012; 2016) comprised of a points-and-level system, activity planning, skill teaching, psychotherapy, sex and relationships education, and behavior contingency contracting. The program has been correlated with reductions in SHB (and other severe problem behaviors) with concomitant increases in educational attainment, independent living and vocational skills, and community participation.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop,participants will be able to: (1) identify the risks involved when working with CYP who present SHB; (2) design individualized behavior support plans; (3) use data to help inform the decisions necessary to limit the likelihood of treatment relapse; (4) ethically manage SHB across home, school, and community settings.
Activities: Lectures, large and small group discussions, review of case histories and critical incidents, developing risk assessments, activity schedules, behavior support plans, behavior contingency contracts, risk-benefit analyses, and collecting and presenting data.
Audience: Behavior analysts who (a) work directly with children and young people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities who present sexually harmful behavior, and (b) behavior analysts who train and/or manage direct care staff working with these vulnerable clients.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Data-based decisions, Ethics, Sexually-harmful behavior
 
Workshop #W50
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Special Education Law and Ethical Issues for Practicing Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This day long workshop will focus on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEIA) and the issues that practicing behavior analyst should be apprised of. Participants will learn about federal requirements for conducting functional behavioral assessments, writing behavior intervention plans, understanding the term positive behavior supports as used in the IDEIA, and requirements for independent educational evaluations including FBAs. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusionof the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the major components of the IDEIA; (2) Identify the areas of IDEIA that impact the practicing behavior analyst; (3) Identify the types of disabilities that behavior analysts may serve under IDEIA; (4) Identify the legal requirements of an Independent Educational Evaluation; (5) Identify when an FBA must be completed under the IDEIA; (6) Identify when a BIP must be developed under the IDEIA; (7) Identify how often data must be collected under the IDEIA; (8) Describe how the 2016 Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to SPED Law.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study, Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts, Supervisors of Practicing Behavior Analysts, School Administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethics, School Consultation, School Law
 
Workshop #W51
CE Offered: BACB
Part 2: Pragmatic Supervision: Evaluate, Analyze, Change, and Repeat
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Pragmatic supervisors collect frequent, accurate, sensitive measures of client progress, and when clients are not meeting their progress goals, those supervisors make changes. A pragmatic supervision process includes the following steps: 1) Evaluate client progress and staff performance. 2) Analyze causes of inadequate client progress and staff performance. 3) Change staff resources, training, and management, and 4) Repeat the process until clients achieve desired outcomes. Organizations that operate pragmatically can achieve amazing results for their clients and stakeholders, but most don’t. This is an organizational performance problem, which could be solved if organizations had the necessary resources. One such resource is ProgressCharter, a mobile and web application that will make it easier to evaluate client progress, identifying which clients are not meeting progress goals, analyze the causes of inadequate client progress, using evaluations of staff performance and resources to identify can-do, know-how, and want-problems, and recommend specific changes in staff resources, training, and management, to ensure that each client makes desired progress. Please note, this is a three-part workshop and attendees must register for all three parts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) Define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current staff performance at each leve; (3) Perform a data based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) Design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop will provide a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and a web/mobile charting application.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, program designers, staff trainers, and directors of schools and agencies serving individuals with learning difficulties. All participants will receive a one-year subscription to ProgressCharter, an application that makes it easier to evaluate client progress, analyze causes of inadequate progress, and recommend changes so that all clients can make efficient progress. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to improve the performance of your staff so that every client can achieve success. Participants should bring their laptops and smartphones or tablets to the workshop so that they can practice using ProgressCharter. Those who pre-register will receive some materials prior to the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W52
CE Offered: BACB
Join Us "Under the Dome": A Behavioral Analysis of Dissemination and Successful Application in the "Real World"
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jamie Waldvogel, M.S.
JAMIE WALDVOGEL (Behave Your Best, LLC), ERIN M. COTE (Behave Your Best, LLC)
Description: Since its inception the field of behavior analysis has touted its applications and social benefits. The call for greater dissemination of the science is frequent, yet the acceptance and use of behavior analysis outside the academic arena and autism community is minimal. The opportunities to disseminate the strategies and value of behavior analysis are extensive, but requires the ability to develop trust and buy-in from the broader community. Behave Your Best has succeeded in running a fee for service model that trains behavior analysts to supervise the implementation of behavioral strategies in an approachable way, such that parents and educators in early childhood with minimal previous behavioral training or experience can successfully impact behavior "under the dome." Through its carefully designed programming and promotion, Behave Your Best empowers caregivers with evidence-based behavioral strategies designed to proactively teach children communication, social, and behavior regulation skills as early as 18 months using a brief consultation model with proof of concept. Using hands-on behavior analytic activities, participants create a draft of a business plan that stays true to our science. This workshop offers a practical guide to move from an idea of dissemination to being a pioneer and entrepreneur in behavior analysis.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) analyze how to market behavior analytic services "under the dome"; (2) communicate behavioral strategies precisely without using behavioral jargon; (3) isolate the variables critical to establishing oneself as the likeable expert to propects "under the dome;" (4) list at least three ways to respond using ethical practices when clients "under the dome" question behavioral strategies; (5) identify at leastthree essential skills needed to successfully oversee the implementation of behavior analytic practices by others "under the dome."
Activities: 1) TA for marketing behavior analytic services to a target market "under the dome" 2) Convert technical recommendations to layperson-friendly recommendations for participant's in target market "under the dome". 3) Role play first interaction with a client in participant's target market "under the dome" and demonstrate expertise while gaining rapport (i.e., know, like, trust). 4) Using behavioral strategies throughout the workshop to create a business plan designed to target people "under the dome". 5) Group discussion: Ethical challenges we have encountered in practice, anticipate ethical challenges in participant's chosen target market "under the dome". 6) Group discussion: vignettes anticipating potential rebuttals from participant's target market/client "under the dome", vignettes with first visit errors, omissions, and solutions for establishing expertise while gaining rapport
Audience: This advanced workshop is designed for those with BCBA and BCBA-D that have at least 5 years of experience supervising and teaching others to implement behavioral strategies.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): dissemination, ethical practice, generalization, service delivery
 
Workshop #W53
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Towards Identifying, Shaping, and Maintaining Professional Soft Skills for Behavior-Analytic Practitioners
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Linda S. Heitzman-Powell, Ph.D.
JANA M. SARNO (Northshore Pediatric Therapy), KATRINA OSTMEYER (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.; Behavioral Technologies Consulting Organization ), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center; Behavioral Technologies Consulting Organization)
Description: Soft skills are personal attributes that enable someone to interact effectively and harmoniously with other people such as effective problem-solving, active listening, managing transitions/change, and collaboration skills. Beyond technical abilities, soft skills are imperative as behavior analysts initiate, develop, and sustain relationships with clients and families. Going a step further, it is not enough to identify and design effective and sustainable interventions; rather, clinical effectiveness also hinges on the ability of the behavior analyst to master more traditional psychology domains (e.g., active listening, establishing a therapeutic relationship, giving and receiving feedback from others, and promoting parent acceptability/treatment adherence (Heitzman-Powell, White, & Perrin, 2007). Soft skills, like technical skills, can be introduced, acquired, and shaped in our professional repertoires, using Behavioral Skills Training (BST). Specifically, the soft skills of active listening, giving feedback, receiving feedback, leadership, collaboration, and managing change/transitions will be discussed. A curriculum using BST will be provided to conceptualize, teach, and maintain professional soft skills. The curriculum includes task analyses for each skill, lecture materials, role-play opportunities, observations, and performance feedback. Data will also be presented from pilot projects using this curriculum.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define at least three behavior analytic principles that are used in the conceptualization of soft skills (2) Provide a behavior analytic definition of six key soft skills (3) Define and describe key behaviors that are to be exhibited for successful demonstration of six key soft skills (4) Engage in identified behaviors for each of the six key soft skills through role play scenarios, as measured by the completion of the task analysis checklist.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through various methods including lecture with supporting materials (i.e., task analyses, review and coding of videos, and survey measures), role-play opportunities with feedback from the workshop presenters, and small- and whole-group discussions. Competency checks and active responding by participants during the workshop will also occur
Audience: BCBAs, Supervisors, Licensed Behavior Analysts, Academics, and BCaBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): professional development, Soft Skills, Training
 
Workshop #W54
CE Offered: BACB
Behavior Analytic Social Skills Group Assessment and Skill Development
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ashley Rodman, M.S.
HAZEL BAKER (Advances Learning Center; Endicott College), ASHLEY RODMAN (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center)
Description: Teaching social skills in a group setting requires a multitude of skills: assessment of appropriate social skills, assigning clients to appropriate groups, planning prompting and reinforcement for a large caseload, staff training for targeted social skills support, and programming activities that are conducive to supporting social skills. This workshop will prepare participants to choose the best social skills assessment tools available, efficiently place students into groups conducive to optimal service delivery, individualize programming across a large caseload of learners, track skill development across semesters, and train staff to implement skill acquisition procedures in a small-group setting.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Facilitate activities that teach body language, conversation, independent, pretend, and cooperative play, social conventions, and perspective-taking; (2) Program individualized prompt levels and reinforcement schedules while running an instructional activity with several students; (3) Take procedural integrity and reliability measures on social skills group leaders; (4) Create systems to collect data on multiple students simultaneously and graph student data in a standardized and flexible way; (5) Choose assessment tools that are appropriate to students and settings; (6) Develop attainable social objectives for varied student profiles; (7) Identify common objectives or overlapping supporting activities to group students into effective learning clusters.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups and individually to practice components of the outcome skills and receive feedback on their work product.
Audience: The intended audience includes: --BCBAs who train staff to run social skills groups --Public school ABA professionals whose students participate in group social skill support --Anyone currently running social skills groups or wishing to run them in the future --Program directors planning to introduce or develop social skills groups at their practice
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W55
CE Offered: BACB
Treating Food Refusal With a Spoonful of ABA
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Barbara Endlich, Psy.D.
BARBARA ENDLICH (Behavior And Education)
Description: This workshop provides a comprehensive overview of various research-based ABA interventions used to treat food refusal, along with their relative effectiveness and recommendations for use with individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Additional variables such as the use of functional analyses and a consideration of respondent conditioning influences are explored. Participants will be presented with a multi-modal approach to applying content presented within a didactic teaching approach (e.g., video, modeling, role playing, discussion). Workshop content is derived from a compilation of over 50 research articles related to the subject area, as well as a comprehensive meta-analysis of the research investigated. Ethical issues related to feeding interventions are discussed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe various topographical, demographic prevalence, and ethical considerations related to food refusal behaviors; (2) Explain possible contributing factors associated with food refusal behaviors in individuals with autism spectrum disorders; (3) Examine the existing use of functional assessment in the treatment of food refusal behaviors, summarize functional analysis procedures for food refusal, discuss research findings on the distribution of identified function of food refusal, and classify operant-controlled food refusal behaviors by functional category; (4) Differentiate the contributions of respondent versus operant conditioning in established food aversions, and identify how to incorporate respondent conditioning methods within the treatment of food refusal behaviors; (5) Define and demonstrate various antecedent-based, consequence-based, and reinforcement-based ABA feeding interventions; (6) Determine the most appropriate technique to apply for a particular situation, based on comparative effectiveness, contextual variables, and ethical considerations; (7) Explore areas for future research to further our knowledge of food refusal treatments.
Activities: The workshop will include a balance of lecture, video observation, role play, small group activities, and interactive discussion. The workshop activities are intended both to apply content presented and also to support a deeper understanding and analysis of the variables involved in feeding interventions.
Audience: The workshop is presented at a Basic level, and is appropriate for any certificant holder (BCaBA, BCBA, and BCBA-D) who wants to further their understanding and application of food refusal treatments.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): feeding interventions, food refusal, food selectivity
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
BACB-Compliant Multi-Media Supervisor Training With Updated Requirements
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc; TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: Hundreds of BCBAs and BCaBAs have participated in this mixed-media, BACB-Compliant Supervision Training workshop since 2013! This workshop prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors, including new BCaBA and RBT supervision responsibilities. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional 2 1/2 hours online through www.TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost 9 hours of content while using only 6 hours of conference time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and interesting video situations, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Multiple populations and environments are represented, including child welfare, education and in-home. Additionally, participant-trios will participate in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, an additional 3 CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. *This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the purpose of supervision; (2) determine the criterion for signing supervision documentation and skill acquisition; (3) demonstrate more relevant questioning skills when Supervisees present difficult ethical or behavioral scenarios; (4) indicate how ABA services must integrate with other social services and systems, and demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback.
Activities: Participants will engage in: Didactic lecture, critiques of video supervision scenarios, and guided and directed discussions of professional and ethical responsibilities. Additionally, all participants will be divided into triads for multiple role play scenarios, taking turns as supervisor, supervisee and observer with each new scenario.
Audience: This workshop is for BCBAs who will be supervising pre-certification interns, BCaBAs, and Registered Behavior Technicians, as well as BCaBAs who will be supervising RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Supervision, Ethics, Supervision, Supervisor
 
Workshop #W57
CE Offered: BACB
Navigating the 10th Circle of Hell: A Road Map to Writing Medically Necessary Treatment Plans
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Breanne K. Hartley, Ph.D.
BREANNE K. HARTLEY (Little Star Center ), WILLIAM TIM COURTNEY (Little Star Center), MARY ROSSWURM (LittleStar ABA Therapy), MICHELE TRIVEDI (Little Star Center)
Description: In the Middle Ages, Italian writer Dante wrote about the nine circles of hell in his epic poem, "Dante's Inferno." Perhaps, though, if Dante were alive today, his work would have included a 10th circle--health insurance. This workshop will help clinicians learn how to write successful treatment plans that support medical necessity for health-insurance funded individuals with autism. As more states adopt insurance mandates for autism, behavior analysts are supporting more clients whose services are being paid for by health insurance. To be successful with this new stream of funding, behavior analysts have to learn about how to navigate the medical insurance system. Topics covered in this workshop include credentialing, in-network vs. out-of-network plans, self-funded vs fully funded plans, how to write a treatment plan that supports medical necessity and an introduction to the appeal process. Once mastered, clinicians can focus on the more enjoyable circles of hell, such as treachery, heresy, and wrath.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) state the necessary components of a comprehensive and focused treatment plan; (2) identify the information required for credentialing; compare in network and out-of-network plans; (4) distinguish between self-funded and fully funded plans; (5) analyze determination letters and construct appeal letters/reports; (6) organize all of the steps from preauthorization through reauthorization; (7) assess sample treatment plans to determine if they meet medical necessity; (8) interpret diagnostic reports, as well as behavioral assessments to justify medical necessity.
Activities: The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, and frequency building execises.
Audience: Practicing BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Systematizing the Supervision Process: Using a Curriculum-Based Measurement System Through Technology to Provide Competency-Based Supervision
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jamie Hughes-Lika, Ph.D.
LAUREN LESA LANIER (CARE, LLC / Endicott College), JAMIE HUGHES-LIKA (Summit Autism Services), JESSICA PIAZZA (CARE LLC), KAREN E. HANS (The University of Kent), AMY LANIER (University of Texas Health Science Center- Houston )
Description: The purpose of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) supervision experience is to improve behavior analytic, professional, and ethical repertoires of the supervisee, and monitor the performance of supervisees in the field. Effective supervision is critical to the quality of ongoing behavioral services, the professional development of the supervisee, the continued growth of the supervisor, and the overall development of our field and its practice. Additionally, supervisors have a responsibility to adhere to our specific ethical code covering supervision (Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts 5.0, Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2014). The supervision experience should be carefully programmed, with competency-based assessments conducted of the supervisee's skills. There should be a clear course of study, supervisee's behavior should be operationally defined with objective and measurable goals to determine the application of their skills, and supervisees should receive prudent guidance to establish their professional development repertoire. Additionally, supervisees should clearly demonstrate acquisition and mastery of the competencies outlined in the BACB task list, as this will increase the quality of their experience, uphold the values of the field, and ensure practice requirements are of the highest fidelity and rigor. This workshop will guide participants through a proposed scope and sequence of a curriculum-based systematic supervision process (e.g., evaluation rubrics, goal setting, the development of unrestricted indirect and direct activities, etc.), designed to provide both performance and knowledge-based competencies for individuals pursuing BACB certification. Participants will learn how create an online tracking system, e-portfolio, and evaluation system through the Google platform. Additionally, participants will learn how to use an interactive cloud-based video software to provide time-coded descriptive feedback and scoring rubrics for supervisee's performance, to exactly pinpoint areas in need of improvement. *Participants should bring laptops, smartphones, and tablets to the workshop to practice using the technology applications.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) Discuss and implement the PECC with regard to the use of evidence-based practices in supervision; (2) implement the use of at least two applications of technology to the practice of effective supervision; (3) utilize methods to evaluate supervisory effectiveness and supervisee satisfaction; (4) Develop competency-based supervisee scoring rubrics; (5) Design and implement organizational strategies to track supervisee performance; (6) describe and demonstrate components of effective, efficient, and evidence-based supervision
Activities: Activities for this workshop will include lecture, discussion, guided practice, video demonstration, live whole-group demonstrations of technology, and small-group breakouts to practice specific applications of technology.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for BCBAs or BCBA-Ds providing behavior analytic supervision to students, educators, or other professionals seeking certification as a BCBA or BCaBA, as well as to individuals certified as RBTs. It would also be appropriate for those involved in the organization and arrangement of BCBA supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BST, Competency-based, Supervision, Technology
 
Workshop #W59
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Safe Assessment and Treatment After Adverse Experience: Using Evidence- and Function-Based Strategies in a Trauma-Informed Environment
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Teresa Camille Kolu, Ph.D.
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence)
Description: Behavior analysts are increasingly tasked with providing "trauma-informed support" in educational, clinic based, day treatment, hospital and other settings. However, behavior analysts may be unprepared to collaborate effectively, document and manage risks, and apply behavioral principles appropriately to this population. Participants in this workshop will be armed with resources, tools and initial training that prepares them to discuss trauma and aversive histories in behavioral ways, collect data meaningful to behavior change in this sensitive population, and expand their repertoires to leverage their behavior analytic skills to support persons and their families who have faced adverse experiences. Workshop includes guided support and practice to generate individualized materials supporting individuals, families and teams who need trauma-informed behavioral support in home, educational and clinic settings. Participants will receive and practice using tools use to support ethical functional behavior assessment, risk documentation and assessment, and development of function- and evidence-based behavioral strategies that take into account an individual's conditioning and reinforcement history related to adverse events and previous environments. This workshop also discusses risks of local functional assessments that avoid assessing or documenting historical contributions, and strategies for supervising trauma cases in ethical ways consistent with the Task List and Ethical Compliance Code.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop,participants will be able to: (1)state some clinical differences between the repertoires of clients and caregivers in populations with and without evidence of adverse childhood experiences; (2)state examples operationalizing terms related to trauma and trauma history from a behavior analytic perspective; (3)state critical elements of ethical behavioral supervision supporting cases after traumatic backgrounds; (4) state critical features of documentation and assessment of risk for teams that support cases after significant adverse experiences; (5) name key features of an ethical functional behavior assessment for clients whose families are affected by adverse experiences; (6) state key features of a preventative schedules approach to behavior support after adverse experiences, in the context of evidence based interventions; (7) list ways the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code relates to appropriate assessment and treatment for clients affected by trauma; (8) use tools provided to identify and engineer example features of a preventative behavioral environment (and related behavior strategies) for case studies with abuse and neglect related history; (9) use tools provided to document and discuss risks for case studies with medical related aversive events.
Activities: Activities will include surveys, lecture, discussion, choral responding, small group discussion, role plays, and case studies. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and role play demonstrations of responding to case study scenarios. Supplemental materials will be provided so that participants will be able to review all surveys and tools after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This intermediate workshop is suggested for participants who are asked to, are considering, or are already accepting clients with a history others call trauma-related or whose care is discussed as trauma-informed. Participants' clients are not discussed in detail, but information will be provided to familiarize certified behavior analysts with minimizing and documenting risks, using appropriate techniques for completing ethical behavior assessment and supervision, and identifying evidence-based treatment for their own clients and teams. A model for ethical supervision and treatment after aversive histories will be discussed in the context of the current BACB task list and Ethical and Compliance Code. Participants will be encouraged to self-detect their own limitations and needs for further expanding their repertoires, to minimize risk to those affected by their practice when conducting behavior analysis with individuals after adverse experiences
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): aversive conditioning, ethics, trauma, trauma-informed
 
Workshop #W60
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Unraveling the Complexities of Documenting Applied Behavior Analysis as a Medically Necessary Service
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Brian Lopez, Ph.D.
BRIAN LOPEZ (JumpStart Autism Center), ALLISON BARTSCH (JumpStart Autism Center- Colorado), KARA BATSON (JumpStart Autism Center- Colorado), SARAH BANKS (Jumpstart Autism Center- Colorado), CASSIE L MOHR (JumpStart Autism Center- Colorado)
Description: The ACA has increased the accessibility of ABA services; however, providers continue to receive denials because of insufficient documentation of a client's medical needs for ABA services. This workshop is aimed at reducing denial rates during the prior authorization process and increasing the success rate of appeals. Discerning components of medically necessary services can be a complex process, and the process can be an enigma for most BCBAs and psychologists. Denials are on the rise because insurance companies view a diagnosis of ASD as insufficient documentation for the medical necessity of ABA. The workshop is targeted at psychologists, BCBAs and other autism treatment providers. Participants can expect to learn the following: 1) identify components that make ABA services medically necessary, 2) how to collaborate with medical/behavioral health professionals to document comorbid diagnoses, 3) document level of care, 4) develop treatment goals that address medical necessity, and 5) develop a report template that fully documents medical necessity of ABA services. The content of this presentation is derived from scientific summaries of standard practices in the medical/behavioral health fields in order to establish standards of practice for psychologists and BCBAs to document medical necessity and levels of care for patients receiving ABA services.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) gather and report behavioral and medical data to effectively document medical necessity; (2) gather, interpret and report data that is needed to demonstrate a client's medically necessary level of care; (3) interpret and report findings from standardized questionnaires that support a client's level of care for ABA services being requested; (4) collaborate with community medical/behavioral health providers to document various diagnoses that support medical necessity of ABA services, the recommended level of care (intensity of ABA services), and ABA treatment goals; (5) have the necessary information needed to write a prior authorization report that documents all facets needed to support the medical necessity of ABA and the level of care that is requested.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion.
Audience: The targeted audience of this workshop are psychologists, BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, behavioral health providers, and medical providers who support individuals with ASD
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Care Levels, Insurance, Medical Necessary, Treatment Goals
 
Workshop #W61
CE Offered: BACB
Creating Free Online Data Sheets With Automatic Graphing: No Programming Skills Necessary
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paul W. Heering, M.A.
PAUL W. HEERING (May Institute)
Description: This workshop will guide attendees through the entire process of creating free, online data sheets with automatically updating graphs. Attendees will create data sheets that can easily be shared and filled out on any Internet-connected device including smartphones and tablets. These data collection systems will be created through the use of free Google Docs software. The workshop will demonstrate how to create behavioral data sheets, task analysis data sheets, skills acquisition data sheets, forms for staff to complete, and more. The data sheets created will use many time-saving features such as drop-down menus, checkboxes, scales, and pop-up calendars to enter information. Attendees will be given instruction, video demonstrations, and live demonstrations on all the steps needed create these online data-collection systems. Attendees will be walked through every step in the process from initially logging onto the website to viewing graphs of results. Attendees will also be given time to practice the skills learned during the workshop. During this time, attendees will be given instruction and guidance on how to set up their own data sheets and/or program books. Because of the hands-on nature of this workshop, it is strongly recommended that attendees bring a laptop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) navigate the website used to create online data sheets; (2) create data sheets; (3) use nine possible data-collection types and four document elements; (4) use advanced features such as decision trees and randomization; (5) share data sheets; (6) automatically receive email notifications when data sheets are completed; (7) set up automatically updating graphs; (8) use advanced graphing features such as automatically converting words (e.g., prompt levels) to numbers that can be graphed and automatically creating color coded tables to quickly show task analysis data; (9) build a library of programs; (10) set up folders on an iPad or other portable device with direct links to data sheets for all programs for a specific child.
Activities: Workshop activities will include: (1) demonstrations of data sheet capabilities; (2) lecture-based instruction with step-by-step instructions containing screen shots; (3) recorded video demonstrations of how to perform all steps (all videos will be made available to workshop attendees after the conclusion of the workshop); (4) live demonstration of all steps; (5) guided practice of all skills; and (6) attendees will be guided and instructed while building their own custom program book.
Audience: This workshop is designed for anyone interested in creating online data-collection systems. It is not required that attendees have any computer coding knowledge or experience but attendees should be comfortable working on a computer and navigating websites.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Data Collection, Technology
 
Workshop #W62
CE Offered: BACB
Play Should Be Fun
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Kat Chapman, M.S.
KATHLEEN BERRY (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing), KAT CHAPMAN (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing)
Description: Play is a fundamental skill that facilitates the development of language, social, and cognitive skills. Play can be used to enhance motivation for learning as well as a teaching strategy. Most of all, play should be fun. This workshop will focus on how to effectively teach play in a way that enhances a child's natural motivation. It will include the sequencing of skill acquisition and strategies for targeting play during therapy sessions and in the natural environment, as well as strategies for engaging with clients typically considered "non-responders," and how to improve and increase a client's duration of engagement and play routines. Research into play interventions will be covered along with example goals, teaching steps, and video examples. Teaching play through interventions such as JASPER, Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) and the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM) will be used as examples of evidenced-based strategies for facilitating play development.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) assess a client's play level; (2) develop goals for play; (3) teach basic play skills.
Activities: Instructional Strategies will include: lecture, discussion, video examples, and small group activities. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided.
Audience: BCaBAs and any higher credentialed people interested in improving clients language, social, and cognitive skills through play.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Child Development, Naturalistic Intervention, Play Levels, Play Skills
 
Workshop #W63
CE Offered: BACB
Verbal Behavior Stimulus Control Ratio Equations
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: VRB/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lee L Mason, Ph.D.
LEE L. MASON (University of Texas at San Antonio), ALONZO ALFREDO ANDREWS (The University of Texas at San Antonio)
Description: Skinner (1957) writes, "It is my belief that something like the present analysis reduces the total vocabulary needed for a scientific account." In many ways, then, this seems to me to be a better way of talking about verbal behavior" (p. 456). Language is a much sought after, yet elusive subject matter for scientific investigation. Skinner (1957) proposed that language fell within the scope of a science of behavior, and was therefore open to functional analysis and interpretation. Over the past 60 years, much has been done to further the scientific explanation, prediction, and control of verbal behavior as a function of environmental variables. This workshop provides a hands-on approach to conducting the Verbal Behavior Stimulus Control Ratio Equation (SCoRE), and analyzing the results of this assessment for developing individualized treatment plans for individuals with autism and other language disorders. Specifically, we describe language as a continuous variable, and explain procedures for assessing and remediating verbal behavior deficits. The procedures described in this workshop are empirically supported (Lerman et al., 2005; Mason & Andrews, 2014), and conceptually systematic with a behavior-analytic approach to language assessment and intervention (Mason & Andrews, In Press).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe the strength of verbal operants in relation to one another; (2) conduct a verbal operant analysis; (3) derive individualized treatment objectives from a stimulus control ratio; and (4) explain the process for transferring stimulus control across verbal operants.
Activities: The format combines lecture, small group activities, guided practice, and frequency building exercises.
Audience: Participants should be familiar with the elementary verbal operants as described by Skinner (1957).
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Control Ratios, Stimulus Equivalence, Transferring Control, Verbal Operants
 
Workshop #W64
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
If You Are a BCBA, Are You/Can You Become a Dog Trainer? Some Ethics and Some Steps in That Direction
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AAB/EAB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Terri M. Bright, Ph.D.
TERRI M. BRIGHT (MSPCA Angell)
Description: When you have studied behavior analysis, you find yourself being asked about the behavior of non-human species, usually dogs. Do you pause before stepping into the breach and making suggestions? Until you have the tools to implement the assessments and interventions you have used with humans, you will likely not be able to generalize your skills to another species. Safety is also a reason: 4 million people are bitten by dogs each year. To a trained professional, the precursors of aggression are like a blinking neon sign; to a novice, they are unnoticed. Whether in your neighborhood, your home, or your workplace, dogs pose a bite risk to humans. This workshop will first remind BCBAs and others what the ethics are of teaching outside of their scope of training and experience. It will also teach attendees to identify precursors of canid aggression as well as what to do when they see them. Finally, if you are interested in dog training, this workshop will demonstrate generalization of such skills as preference assessments and functional assessment/analysis of dog behavior, and give some simple tools for training dogs, as well as instructions on how to refer to the right dog trainer.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) via videos and textual prompts, identify the precursors of dog aggression and how to stay safe in the presence of an aggressive dog; (2) identify how your behavioral skills are skewed towards humans and how your dog-training skills may be skewed away from science; (3) identify when and if you should intervene with a dog's problem behavior; (4) identify an ethical dog trainer in their geographical area should they need a referral; (5) learn to perform preference assessments and use the Functional Assessment of Dog Behavior (FADB), an assessment created by the workshop presenter.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, discussion, surveys, choral responding, small group breakout, still photos of dogs, dog behavior videos and textual prompts. Objectives will be met through a mixed presentation of discussion, self-scoring, lecture and video demonstrations of dog behavior. Supplemental materials will be provided such as participants will be able to review all photos, videos and surveys after they leave the workshop.
Audience: This basic workshop is meant for those who find themselves in the company of dogs and who are tempted to train them. Though participant's individual dogs' behaviors are not the target of the workshop, enough information will be disseminated so that participants can, perhaps, begin their dog-training at home, using the tenets of ABA and within the scope of the BACB Task List; they will be able to recognize the limits of their behavioral skills across species. Those who come into contact with dogs in the community or workplace and who are fearful or uncertain will be better equipped to act appropriately, be it to gain safety or to find referrals.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W65
CE Offered: BACB/QABA/NASP
Behavioral Relaxation: Training and Scale
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Victoria Stout Kubal, M.S.
VICTORIA STOUT KUBAL (Madera County Behavioral Health Services)
Description: Relaxation techniques are an integral part of the successful treatment of those exhibiting anxiety-related, pain-related, and/or anger-related behaviors. The sooner a client learns relaxation and other types of self-control techniques, the safer his/her internal and external environments may become. In addition, due to limitations in funding, providers must often demonstrate that extensive treatment progress has been made within a relatively short period of time. Poppen's (1998) Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) is an assessment tool for measuring the progress of an individual demonstrating the 10 overt relaxed behaviors taught to criterion with Behavioral Relaxation Training (BRT). BRT can be an effective part of treatment for individuals with emotional/mental disorders, hyperactivity, schizophrenia, traumatic brain injury, physical limitations, and/or restricted cognitive/intellectual capabilities. This workshop will provide an opportunity to experience Poppen's (1998) Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT) by means of labeling, modeling, imitation, practice, and corrective feedback. Once workshop participants are proficient in demonstrating URT and can verbally describe these 10 relaxed behaviors and corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors, they will be taught how to assess URT using the BRS.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Position his/her own body in alignment with the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT); (2) Write a description of each of the 10 overt relaxed behaviors from URT in his/her own words and provide corresponding examples of unrelaxed behaviors; (3)Give another individual appropriate feedback so that the other individual can correct himself/herself according to the 10 URT postures; (4) Observe, record, and assess another individual's performance of the 10 relaxed behaviors from URT by accurately using the Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS).
Activities: Verbal Behavior: Listen to a presentation regarding the physiological effects of relaxation, the history of using relaxation training to treat psychological and physical disorders, and Poppen's (1998) development of Behavioral Relaxation Training and the Behavioral Relaxation Scale. Labeling and Modeling: View a live demonstration of the 10 postures included in Upright Behavioral Relaxation Training (URT). Each relaxed posture will be labeled, described topographically, and demonstrated physically. Modeling and Imitation: Learn how to breathe diaphragmatically, then imitate the other 9 relaxed behaviors of URT while viewing an instructor as model. After each participant has proficiently demonstrated each posture separately, he/she will practice relaxing all 10 areas at the same time. Feedback: Practice silently while the instructors are giving each participant individual corrective feedback. Later, workshop participants will form pairs and alternate practicing URT and giving each other corrective feedback. Criterion Tests: Take URT Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion test. Take BRS Written Criterion Test; score one another's criterion test. Assessment: Behavioral Relaxation Scale (BRS) scoring methodology will be explained and demonstrated. All observers, including the instructor, will simultaneously score the BRS for the model.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is comprised of practitioners who are certified by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board at the doctoral (BCBA-D), master's (BCBA), or bachelor's (BCaBA) degree levels and who work with the following populations: clients with anxiety disorders, pain-related difficulties, or anger management problems; individuals who suffered a traumatic brain injury; individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, or other developmental disability; persons exhibiting hyperactive or repetitive behaviors; clients exhibiting schizophrenic behaviors; and persons who experience an extreme amount of stress. Professionals with a strong interest in behavioral medicine, clinical behavior analysis, family and child therapy, and/or health and fitness training will also benefit from attending this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Mindfulness, Relaxation, Self-control, Stress management
 
Workshop #W66
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
How to Talk to Teachers to Increase Procedural Fidelity in Classrooms
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Wendela Whitcomb Marsh, M.A.
WENDELA WHITCOMB MARSH (PIPS: Positive Intervention Problem Solving)
Description: Behavior analysts are ethically required to communicate using language that is fully understandable to the recipient. 1.05 (b) Working in the school system presents unique challenges. Educators are professionals, and talking down to them risks alienation. On the other hand, teaches are not usually well-versed in behavioral terminology. They may believe they understand concepts such as extinction, without fully grasping them. They may misunderstand key differences, such as reinforcement vs. bribery. Finally, if they are not completely on board with our plan, they may not follow the procedures with fidelity, either discontinuing the plan prematurely, or unintentionally (or intentionally) sabotaging it. This workshop discusses ways to communicate with teachers so that they will hear us, understand us, and follow through with integrity.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to:(1) avoid communication pitfalls by understanding why, how, and when to talk with teachers; (2) explain basic behavioral concepts (e.g., bribery vs. reinforcement) in easily understandable terms; (3)increase teacher engagement to improve procedural integrity.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, examples, role modeling, paired practice, and group games
Audience: This is a basic workshop appropriate for any BCBA or BCABA working in school settings, or who may work with teachers in the future.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): classroom teachers, procedural fidelity, school-based, team communication
 
Workshop #W67
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Solving Ethical Dilemmas in the Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/PCH; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Weihe Huang, Ph.D.
WEIHE HUANG (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum), KARRE WILLIAMS (Creating Behavioral + Educational Momentum )
Description: This workshop is designed to increase participants' ability to ethically practice applied behavior analysis (ABA) by describing the characteristics of ethical dilemmas, discussing Guidelines for Responsible Conduct, and introducing an ethical decision making model. This approach incorporates codes of ethics for behavior analysts and ethical reasoning strategies. When making ethical decisions, many behavior analysts tend to believe that these decisions are solely based on the analysis of objective data and relevant evidences. However, in reality the decision-making process is also influenced by behavior analysts' values, as well as societal values including those of services recipients. Behavior analysts often encounter ethical dilemmas when these values conflict. In facing ethical dilemmas, behavior analysts need codes of professional conduct and ethically sound strategies to reach reasonable and practical resolutions. The Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts is helpful in many situations. In some cases, however, ethical dilemmas cannot be resolved by appealing to the existing guidelines or regulations. Part of this workshop is aimed at providing applied behavior analysts with ethical reasoning strategies in the event that the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct alone are insufficient. These strategies are based on the relevant experience of the presenters and the available literature in the field of behavior analysis and related areas. The emphasis of the discussion will be on the application of Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts and the Ethical Decision Making Model to various clinical settings, including natural homes, residential facilities, day programs, and educational programs.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) list and describe at least five core ethical principles in the field of applied behavior analysis; (2) select and define a core ethical principle from a group of 4 mixed rues/principles; (3) identify and describe some most common ethical dilemmas faced by behavior analysts; (4) discriminate among ethical dilemmas, clinical problems, and administrative issues by selecting the correct one from a group of four different challenging situations; (5) demonstrate a working knowledge in the Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts by being able to identify appropriate guideline(s) that could address a particular ethical issue; (6) identify, define, and explain problem-solving strategies in a variety of ethical situations; (7) perform the Six-Step Ethical Decision Making Model and generalize the learned skill in different scenarios by completing the required steps described in the ethical decision making model for different ethical dilemmas.
Activities: This workshop will use cases both provided by the presenters and generated by participants to illustrate the implementation of Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts and the steps in the Ethical Decision Making Model. Participants of this workshop will be encouraged to (1) identify their values and to associate these values with primary ethical principles; (2) recognize the characteristics of ethical dilemmas in the field of ABA; and (3) apply codes in Guidelines for Responsible Conduct and six steps specified in the Ethical Decision Making Model to cases that involve ethical dilemmas.
Audience: Board certified behavior analysts at all levels are the primary audience of this workshop. In addition, licensed psychologists, licensed therapists, and social workers could benefit from the content of this educational event as well.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Dilemmas
 
Workshop #W68
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Evidence-Based Practice: A Decision-Making Model for Ethically Selecting Interventions for Your Client
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan Wilczynski, Ph.D.
SUSAN WILCZYNSKI (Ball State University), TIMOTHY A. SLOCUM (Utah State University), RONNIE DETRICH (The Wing Institute)
Description: Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a decision-making model that practitioners can use to make sound ethical decisions for their clients (Slocum et al., 2014; Wilczynski, 2017). EBP involves using professional judgment to integrate the best available evidence with client factors and contextual variables. By using the EBP model, practitioners are well-positioned to select, reject, adapt, or retain a treatment while considering their ethical responsibilities to provide effective treatment, to work in collaboration or consultation with other professionals, to communicate effectively with clients (and their families) and involve clients and in planning, and to individualize behavior-change programs. This workshop will introduce an EBP checklist to attendees to help them integrate each of these components of the ethics code. Participants will actively work through examples in which they select the best intervention option given the complex and sometimes conflicting expectations in our field (e.g., most effective interventions versus social validity). Participants will be coached on how to apply the EBP model to make ethical decisions (BACB, 2014) regarding treatment choices for their own clients. Behavior analysts who seek to better understand how to apply the ethics code under real world conditions will find the EBP Checklist a useful tool to guide their decision-making.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to (1)identify the relationship between the evidence-based practice decision-making model and the ethics code; (2) use the evidence-based practice checklist to guide their decisions to select, reject, adapt, or retain a treatment; (3) apply the EBP decision-making model to make ethical decisions regarding their clients.
Activities: This workshop is designed to help evidence-based practitioners of ABA to learn how to apply the EBP checklist to make sound and ethical decisions when initially selecting treatments as well as using data to determine if a given intervention should be rejected, adapted or retained. The training methods applied in this workshop is didactic instruction and discussion. Examples of how to apply the EBP decision-making model to clients with a range of identified disabilities (e.g., autism spectrum disorder, traumatic brain injury, etc.) as well as non-examples that provide clarification between accurate and inaccurate use of the EBP checklist will be provided. These examples and non-examples will be based on the clinical decision-making of the workshop presenters drawn from decades of experience. Finally, participants will be coached regarding how to apply the EBP checklist to their current cases. At the conclusion of the workshop, participants should be able to incorporate multiple competing components into their decision-making in order to ethically select, reject, adapt, or retain interventions.
Audience: Intermediate: Our goal is to teach practicing behavior analysts or professors teaching practitioners how to effectively and ethically integrate the various demands for science-based and socially valid described in our field.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethics, evidence-based practice, social validity
 
Workshop #W69
CE Offered: PSY
Applying Behavioral Principles to Interactions With Consumers, Treatment Providers, and Other Professionals
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: William C. Follette, Ph.D.
WILLIAM C. FOLLETTE (University of Nevada, Reno), AMANDA MUNOZ-MARTINEZ (University of Nevada, Reno), CORY STANTON (University of Nevada-Reno), ANDREW AHRENDT (University of Nevada, Reno)
Description: Behavior analysts providing consultation and analysis to direct care providers can be discouraged by the poor implementation of programs. This workshop is intended to help providers behave more effectively with front-line service providers by using behavior analytic tools to functionally analyze and become more potent influences of the way programs are implemented. Often, behavior analysts view, for example, an autistic child as the intervention target. In fact, the direct intervention target is the implementer of the program, such as a parent or paraprofessional who is in direct contact with child. Behavior analysts have the analytic tools at hand to understand the interpersonal relationship with frontline service provider, but do not correctly identify the importance of that relationship. This workshop addresses how to apply behavioral principles to effect changes in the behavior of the direct service provider to enhance outcomes.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Give a behavior analytic account of "resistance;" (2)Give a behavior analytic account of interpersonal relationships; (3) Analyze specific interpersonal interactions using behavior analytic terms and concepts; (4) Preliminarily identify how their own stimulus properties may affect others in professional settings; (5)Preliminarily identify the strengths and weaknesses in their interpersonal repertoires; (6) Begin to generate and test informal interventions aimed at improving their interactions in real professional settings.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and videos. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of problem identification.The format will include lecture, discussion, and self-assessment.
Audience: The target audience is intended to include agency heads and their teams, and consultants who design programs to produce behavior change but find their efforts are less effective because their programs are not properly implemented. The intended audience is intermediate and advanced program developers and disseminators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Clinical BA, Interpersonal Repertoire, Principle Application, Professional Communication
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Effective Supervision in Center and Home-Based Settings: Maximizing Outcomes for Students and Staff
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan Buttigieg, Ph.D.
SUSAN BUTTIGIEG (Columbia University; Fred S. Keller School; Manhattanville College), LIN DU (Teachers College, Columbia University), CESIRA K. FARRELL (Fred S. Keller School; Manhattanville College)
Description: This workshop is geared towards professionals who hold BCBA licensure and serve in a supervisory capacity in center- or home-based settings. We are targeting the behavior-analytic, ethical, and professional repertoires of professionals in the field, and hope to arm the attendees with a variety of evidence-based tactics and materials to directly and indirectly increase learner outcomes. Effective supervisors set clear expectations for supervisees and use a variety of the tactics and principles of behavior analysis to help their supervisees achieve objectives. We will review the CABAS Teacher Performance/Rate Accuracy procedure (Ross, Singer-Dudek & Greer, 2005), the CABAS Decision Protocol (Keohane & Greer, 2005), supervision forms, and types of feedback. We will discuss different situations that arise when supervising in a variety of settings and with staff with a wide range of experience.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify the different components of a TPRA and errorlessly code five different programs using the antecedent-behavior-consequence data collection method; (2)identify how a supervisor can appropriately respond in a way that benefits the supervisee and most importantly, the learner, in a way that maintains the integrity of the position and behavior analysis in general; (3) understand the decision analysis protocol and make decisions to intervene or continue with objectives accordingly.
Activities: Instructional strategies: lecture, discussion, small group break out, videos Supplemental materials will be distributed.
Audience: Intermediate and advanced. This workshop is for newly appointed supervisors or newly licensed BCBAs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Staff training, Supervision
 
Special Event #1
Closed Meeting: Affiliated Chapter Leadership Training
Friday, May 25, 2018
2:00 PM–5:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom C
Chair: Steven Woolf (Beacon ABA Services)
ABAI is pleased to offer a Leadership Training Session for officers of ABAI affiliated chapters for the purpose of providing strategies for guiding the growth of chapters and providing services to members and constituents. Although this training is free for up to three officers per chapter, advanced registration is required and attendance is by invitation only.
 
 
Special Event #2
Closed Meeting: Special Interest Group Leadership Training
Friday, May 25, 2018
3:00 PM–6:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall D
Chair: Michael J. Dougher (University of New Mexico)
ABAI is pleased to offer a Leadership Training Session for officers of ABAI Special Interest Groups (SIGs) for the purpose of providing strategies for guiding the growth of SIGs and providing services to members and constituents. This training is for SIG leaders only. Although the SIG training is free for up to three officers per SIG, registration is required. This event is closed; attendance is by invitation only.
 
 
Workshop #W71
CE Offered: BACB
Empirical Dog Training at the Animal Shelter: Training for Adoption Outcomes With a Focus on High Populations of Animals
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AAB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Erica N. Feuerbacher, Ph.D.
ALEXANDRA PROTOPOPOVA (Texas Tech University), MEGAN ELIZABETH ARANT (Texas Tech University), ERICA N. FEUERBACHER (Virginia Tech)
Description: Training the family pet differs from the training of dogs in the shelter setting. Typically dog training has the purpose of improving the dog-owner bond and improving the behavior of the dog to make life easier for the owner; however, in the shelter environment, dog training has the purpose of altering the behavior of visitors towards the dogs, thus resulting in an adoption. This workshop will cover research on determining effective reinforcers, conducting crucial toy preference assessments to incorporate into meet-and-greets, and providing empirically assessed behavioral interventions. The workshop will involve reviewing the literature, demonstrations and practice with live dogs, as well as role-playing. Content has peer reviewed, published support beyond those publications and other types of communications devoted primarily to the promotion of the approach.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants would be able to: (1) Describe the importance of using an effective reinforcer to train dogs; (2) Employ the most efficient and effective toy preference assessments for the shelter environment; (3) Provide empirically-assessed behavioral training programs for a high-capacity shelter; (4) Train other staff/volunteers in these techniques to ensure success of the programs.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be achieved through lecture, discussion, role-playing, and demonstrations.
Audience: Participants should be interested in learning how to effectively implement dog training programs at animal shelters. Participants may be behavior analysts (no specific boar certification required), students in animal behavior, and animal professionals and enthusiasts.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): animal shelter, dog training, human-animal interactions, preference assessments
 
Workshop #W72
CE Offered: BACB
Teaching Creative Play
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert K. Ross, Ed.D.
ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services)
Description: The purpose of this intermediate workshop is to train participants in the use of various strategies to teach creative play, through the use of visual supports. Creativity will be defined using behavioral definitions with an emphasis placed on planning for generalization. A variety of systematic strategies for teaching creative play using visuals will be reviewed with participants. Some of these strategies will include: Matrix training, Video modeling, Visual checklists and Picture Activity Schedules. Video modeling has been shown to be a successful teaching strategy in increasing pretend play skills in children diagnosed with autism (MacDonald, Sacramone, Mansfield, Wiltz & Ahearn, 2009), while matrix training has demonstrated successful results in teaching generalized language responses without direct teaching (Goldstein & Mousetis, 1989). Picture Activity schedules have also been used to foster independent play in children with ASD (MacDuff, G. S., Krantz, P. J., & McClannahan, L. E., 1993), This workshop will describe the expanded use of visual supports to facilitate generalization of materials, settings and play skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe and understand creativity; (2) describe the deficits in children with ASD to rationalize a need for teaching creativity; (3) identify the need to plan for generalization; (4) describe matrix training and create a matrix for a pretend play activity; (5) describe video modeling and one scenario in which to implement it; (5) identify settings and occasions to use them and learners to use them with; (6) describe various forms and modalities of activity schedules and match them to individuals' learning styles.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of lecture, small group instruction, guided practice, and video observation.
Audience: Certified behavior analysts, graduate students, ABA practitioners
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): picture-activity schedules, play, video modeling, visual schedule
 
Workshop #W73
CE Offered: BACB
Using Evidence-Based Practice in ABA to Treat Packing in Children With Pediatric Feeding Disorders
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Bryant C. Silbaugh, Ph.D.
BRYANT C. SILBAUGH (The University of Texas at San Antonio)
Description: Pediatric feeding disorders are highly prevalent in developmental disorders, and a wide variety of behavioral interventions based on applied behavior analysis have been developed. Yet, few behavior analysts are trained to treat feeding problems. Based partly on a recent synthesis of the literature (Silbaugh, Swinnea, & Penrod, 2017), this workshop takes a step towards reducing the research-to-practice gap by providing practitioners with an introduction to behavioral interventions for packing, a topography of disordered feeding characterized by holding food in the mouth for an extended time. Participants will learn about packing, multiple interventions shown to improve packing, the certainty of the evidence, how to treat packing safely in the context of the evidence-based practice of ABA, and some ethical considerations. Participants who fully participate and complete the workshop will not necessarily be prepared to treat feeding problems without supervision, but will take away a completed study guide and many prerequisite skills useful for furthering their professional development pertaining to the treatment of packing and other topographies of disordered feeding.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define and discriminate between examples and nonexamples of pediatric feeding disorders; (2) Discriminate between food refusal and food selectivity in scenarios; (3) List topographies of disordered feeding and discriminate disordered feeding from mealtime challenging behavior; (4) Define and describe packing; (5) Identify various clinical rationales for intervening on packing; (6) Identify the relationship between packing and interventions that increase acceptance; (7) List, describe, and discriminate between behavioral interventions that improve packing; (8) List behavioral mechanisms that may control packing during intervention; (9) List the three primary components of the evidence-based practice of ABA; (10) State the certainty of the evidence for behavioral interventions for packing and describe some implications for the evidence-based practice of ABA; (11) List some of the ethical considerations pertaining to intervening on packing; (12) Complete a checklist-based self-assessment of evidence-based practice of ABA as it pertains to feeding problems and write at least one behaviorally-stated goal pertaining to the future use of evidence-based practice to treat packing.
Activities: (1) Lecture (2) Individual active student response opportunities using Poll Everywhere via cell phone or laptop (3) Completion of a guided notes packet (4) Small group breakout and discussion
Audience: Currently practicing BCaBAs, BCBAs, and BCBA-Ds
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Autism, Evidence based, Feeding disorders, Packing
 
Workshop #W74
CE Offered: BACB
From the Classroom to Workforce: Teaching Vocational Skills to Individuals With an Autism Spectrum Disorder
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Julie S. Weiss, M.Ed.
JULIE S. WEISS (New England Center for Children), JULIENNE FAIRCHILD LEBLANC (New England Center for Children), CHRISTINE ANN PELLERIN (New England Center for Children )
Description: Developing a successful vocational program for individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a process that begins in elementary school and continues through high school. Teaching functional skills is essential for successful career planning. In this workshop, we will review current methods to determine children's job preferences and strengths. Secondly, we will review the importance of both work and social skills in establishing a career plan and goals. School-based vocational training includes teaching appropriate work habits, developing positive attitudes toward employment, and learning basic vocational tasks. Evidence-based instruction, including discrete trial teaching, task analysis, and incidental learning, are essential for acquisition. For an individual with an ASD, "vocational academic" activities aimed at increasing career awareness and employment preparation are essential. In this workshop, we will describe the components of career education and school-based vocational training in an ABA program for children with an ASD. Examples of vocational training, including curriculum development, successful job matches, means for developing opportunities for children to sample potential work options, and long-term development of career goals, will be reviewed. Case examples of children with an ASD engaged in vocational activities will be presented.
Learning Objectives: At theconclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the components of school-based vocational training for children with an ASD; (2) describe steps for determining strengths and preference for job skills for children with an ASD;(3) describe steps of the career planning model for children with an ASD; (4) develop a vocational programming plan for a learner with an ASD.
Activities: Instruction strategies will include lecture, discussion and small group breakout. Content will be taught through lecture, videos and group discussion. Objectives will be met through completion of activities during breakout sessions and small and large group discussions. Participants will develop a vocational plan for a learner through individual land group activities throughout the workshop.
Audience: Target audience should include practitioners working with individuals with ASD with a present or future focus on vocational and employment planning and skill development. Practitioners whom are involved in development and implementation of transition planning goals and objectives would also benefit
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): evidence based, transition planning, vocational
 
Workshop #W75
CE Offered: BACB
Hot Topics in Communication Intervention
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Catherine Horton, M.S.
CATHERINE HORTON (Pyramid Educational Consultants), LORI FROST (Pyramid Educational Consultants)
Description: A variety of communication options are available for our learners with complex communication needs. Practitioners must routinely make a choice between implementing low-tech versus high-tech options. This presentation will review the literature related to this topic, including review of the teaching strategies related to the Picture Exchange Communication System. This evidence-based protocol can also be used to successfully teach leaners to use Speech Generating Devices (SGDs) and/or tablets with communication apps. Additional concepts related to use of technology for communication purposes will be explored. The concept of Core Vocabulary will be addressed, including characteristics of each individual Core Vocabulary item, with a particular focus on vocabulary functions and relationships to vocabulary size during development. Considerations for appropriately teaching Core Vocabulary will be discussed. A popular approach to teaching Core Vocabulary, known as Aided Language Stimulation, will be reviewed including both pros and cons associated with the approach. In addition, other current approaches to teaching communication skills will be discussed and analyzed in terms of behavioral principles. The talk will conclude with discussion and recommendations for making informed, data-based decisions for teaching communication skills to our learners.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) analyze specific functions of Core Vocabulary items; (2) describe criteria for determining when a given vocabulary item should be introduced into a learner's communicative repertoire; (3)describe teaching strategies related to both high and low-tech communication systems.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be targeted via a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion and analysis of videos demonstrating key concepts.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for any team member working with learners with complex communication needs. This may include behavior analysts, speech language pathologists, teachers and/or others involved in communication training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): AAC, Aided Language, Core Vocabulary, Speech Pathology
 
Workshop #W76
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
The Lovaas Midwest Social Language Curriculum: Current Innovations
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eric V. Larsson, Ph.D.
ERIC V. LARSSON (Lovaas Institute Midwest; University of Minnesota), ANGELA BROWN (Lovaas Institute Midwest), CHARRYSE M. LUCKEY (Lovaas Institute Midwest)
Description: This workshop will provide an overview of the current Lovaas Institute Midwest curriculum and give specific examples of innovative objectives and programs. Treatment planning, trouble-shooting, and program evaluation will also be discussed. The curriculum is organized in a four-dimensional matrix of social language skills and generative mastery in the natural environment. Specific programs include auditory comprehension, creative language skills, and advanced cooperation. The organization of the curriculum is used to individualize and pace the introduction of interrelated social skills in a systematic manner. Complex social contingencies are also addressed to ensure that the child is not only acquiring social skills, but is using those skills functionally throughout their 24-hour and seven-day life. Data obtained from children in intensive early intervention will be presented to demonstrate how the generative curriculum can improve the progress of children.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the information about a child's current skill profile that is needed to plan and program for the next phases; (2)State the difference between a generative and a rote skill; (3)Describe aspects of generative creative language production and comprehension skills; (4)Describe aspects of genuinely functional social skills.
Activities: Didactic and written presentation of the overall curriculum design with specific examples of actual short-term objectives and programs. Interactive responses to questions from the audience.
Audience: Practitioners of Early Intensive Behavioral Interventions for Autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Generalization, Language, Program Management, Social Behavior
 
Workshop #W77
CE Offered: BACB
Assessing and Addressing Anxiety-Related Behavior in Students With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joanne Sgambati, Ph.D.
HESTER BEKISZ (The Genesis School), JOANNE SGAMBATI (Eden II; Genesis Programs)
Description: Description There is considerable evidence that children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are at increased risk of anxiety and anxiety disorders. Anxiety may worsen during adolescence, as young people face increasingly complex social situations. In some instances individuals with ASD may become more aware of their differences and interpersonal difficulties and this in turn may lead to higher levels of anxiety. This workshop will address assessment of anxiety through multiple means. The role of functional assessment and functional analysis in the assessment of behavior related to anxiety will be discussed. This workshop will discuss the prevalence of anxiety, a description of anxiety based on the research, specific potential causes of anxiety and clinical interventions. There will be a focus on the use of self- assessment and self-management. Clinical case examples will be provided throughout the session. Attendees will have an opportunity to work on cases of students with ASD during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe specific risk factors for anxiety in ASD; (2) select tools for assessment of anxiety-related behavior; (3) develop at leasttwo proactive strategies to address anxiety-related behavior; (4)identify at leasttwo self-management strategies to be used with students.
Activities: 1. Participants will work on clinical cases provided in a case study format. 2. Participants will watch videos of interventions and develop alternative strategies to be used. 3. Participants will develop a proactive intervention based on a student case.
Audience: Psychologists, sped teachers, Social workers, speech pathologists, parents, individuals with ASD
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W78
CE Offered: BACB
The Acquisition of Behavioral Cusps as the Basics to Develop Language
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard E. Laitinen, Ph.D.
GLADYS WILLIAMS (CIEL, SPAIN), RICHARD E. LAITINEN (Peronalized Accelerated Learning Systems (PALS)), SARA GARBARINI (David Gregory School )
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to discuss the acquisition of behavioral cusps as basic elements to develop language. Research has shown that basic prerequisites greatly enhance an individual's ability to develop functional language. In this workshop we will provide an overview of the teaching procedures designed to develop these basic skills and tactics to strengthen observational learning in the individual. We will discuss several strategies developed to bring vocal emissions under stimulus control. This discussion will include some basic strategies for teaching tacts as well as a detailed outline of the Rapid Tacting protocol. Building on that knowledge we will introduce a structure that contains elements of Direct Instruction (DI), Precision Teaching (PT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT), designed to gradually increasing the sophistication and complexity of language with the goal of becoming a functional speaker.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify and describe repertoires that support generative clinical practice; (2) Identify and describe component skills of each repertoire;(3) Formulate training activities that facilitate the emergence of generative clinical application of each repertoire.
Activities: I. An Overview of Pre-Requisite Skills (First hour) a. Why verbal behavior approach b. Behavioral CUSPS of learning c. Conditioning d. Pre-requisite programs in the curriculum e. (Videos of group conditioning and one to one conditioning) II. The Acquisition of basic verbal operants (Second hour) a. Review of standard procedures & protocols c. VideosPractice III. Becoming Fully Verbal (30 min) a. Formulate training activities that facilitate the emergence of generative clinical application of each repertoire b. Videos - IV. Practice and Questions
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W79
CE Offered: BACB
How to Teach "Learning How to Learn”: Curriculum Development in Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Francesca Degli Espinosa, Ph.D.
FRANCESCA DEGLI ESPINOSA (ABA Clinic, UK)
Description: Following the publication of the Me book, the first textbook that outlined a behaviourally based instructional sequence for children with autism, numerous curriculum manuals have been published. Manuals have been invaluable in providing both parents and practitioners with sequences of objectives and behavioural procedures to establish verbal and nonverbal skills in children with autism. While some manuals have organised their objectives across traditional developmental areas, favouring a more structural approach to teach language skills, other have employed a functional approach to categorise language objectives. Regardless of their conceptual premise, all published manuals share common characteristics: they all provide a list of objectives that are operationally defined, for each objective they describe a prompt hierarchy, and a corresponding mastery criterion based on a number of specific responses to be demonstrated. In this presentation, I will attempt to illustrate a functional analysis of curriculum development and suggest an additional level of specificity in the design and implementation of behaviourally derived instructional sequences for children with autism. Firstly, I will suggest a way of organising skills based on whether they constitute a generalised operant class or cumulative/finite skills and how such classification necessarily induces a consideration of mastery criteria for each skill. Secondly, I will endeavour to demonstrate how when behavioural topographies are brought under the relevant sources of environmental control they lead to rapid and generalised learning, enabling the child to acquire novel responses with minimal teaching. This conceptual framework will be illustrated in relation to two pivotal skills that may lay the foundation for the development of multiply controlled generalised verbal behaviour: Simple and conditional discriminative learning and naming.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) discriminate between and identify generalised and cumulative skills; (2) describe the difference between simple and conditional discrimination; (3) describe the repertoires required for the emergence of tacting.
Activities: Lecture and video illustrations
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W80
CE Offered: BACB
But What Do I Teach Now? Determining Where to Begin With Individualized Program Development
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Amy Foley, M.Ed.
AMY FOLEY (Melmark New England), KRISTIN J. COLBERT (Melmark New England)
Description: Over time, experts in varied fields including education and psychology have provided theories regarding learning, methods of instruction, and precisely what skills should be included (Lipsey & Wilson, 1993). When working with exceptional clients, professionals need to be versed in evidence-based theories, methods, and skills, as well as processes to individualize targets. We will be reviewing educational theories as they relate to teaching exceptional clients in a behavior analytic format, the importance of technological response definitions when assessing skills, and focusing on selecting skills to assess (referencing common core curriculum, client history of learning and prior knowledge, motivation, chaining methods, etc.). The analysis of formal assessment data, scope and sequence of skills and specific, fluid baseline data collection methods will be outlined. The importance of data analysis in relation to program development, and the review of graphical displays when interpreting data will be highlighted. Workshop participants are expected to actively participate in the analysis of visual displays of assessment and baseline data across multiple conditions, and determining skill level through video observations of skills being completed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Query research with educational terms and theories that align with applied behavior analysis;(2) Identify skills to assess with their client;(3) Create a data collection method, individualized to their client, for each skill being assessed; (4) Analyze baseline assessment data; (5) Determine where in the Proximal Zone of Development the assessed skill falls, and whether the skill should be targeted for instruction, reassessed for prerequisite skills, labeled as "mastered," or replaced with a more functional alternative.
Activities: Lecture; Small group breakout for data analysis;Guided practice through case studies;Group discussion following video observations;Supplemental materials will be provided for practice in the analysis of baseline assessment data
Audience: Intermediate (e.g. junior BCBAs)
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Baseline assessment, Data analysis, Educational theories, Scope/sequence
 
Workshop #W81
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Implications of Addressing Stereotypical Behavior in Children With Autism: What Practitioners Need to Know
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kathleen McCabe-Odri, Ed.D.
KATHLEEN MCCABE-ODRI (Partners In Learning, Inc.), NICOLE M. RZEMYK (Partners in Learning, Inc.), LORI LORENZETTI (Partners in Learning, Inc,), ADRIENNE RIZZO (Partners in Learning), MELANIE ERWINSKI (Partners inLearning, Inc.), SAMARIA JUANANDRES (Partners in Learning, Inc.)
Description: According to the American Psychiatric Association, "restricted, repetitive, and stereotyped patterns of behavior are one of three core diagnostic features of autistic disorders and are a frequent target of behavioral interventions for children with autism." (Cunningham & Schreibman, 2008). Current functional analysis methodology provides the general label "automatic reinforcement" for behaviors that persist in the absence of social consequences. (Lanovaz, Rapp & Fletcher, 2010). Various peer-reviewed research has addressed the clinical concerns of repetitive behaviors, as "stereotypy can occur at high rates in children with and without developmental delays (and) these behaviors can interfere with the acquisition of new skills and social interactions" (Korneder, 2014), as well as cause injury in exacerbated rates (Cervantes et.al, 2014). The literature provides an array of antecedent and consequence interventions, often in multi-component presentations with frequent use of punishment protocols, (Boyd, 2013) with varied degrees of socially significant change. This workshop addresses evidence-based treatment options for stereotypical behaviors via literature review and case study analysis. Participants will discuss the ethical implications of various treatment options, including suggested guidelines to assist practitioners on how and when to intervene in these class of behaviors that "often persist in the absence of social consequences" (Lovaas, Newsom & Hickman, 1987).
Learning Objectives: At the end of this presentation, attendees will be able to: (1) analyze the historical review of literature re stereotypical behavior and interventions; (2) analyze varied treatment components to address stereotypes via case studies; (3)assess the possible functions of varied types of stereotypies; (4) discuss and describe potential ethical considerations via the BACB code the pros and cons of addressing stereotypical behaviors, as well as current best practice recommendations.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met via a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through case study presentations. Supplemental materials for identifying the function of repetitive behaviors and levels for intervention will be provided.
Audience: BCBAs, child study team members, behavior specialists/consultants
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W82
CE Offered: BACB
Conducting Functional Analyses in Applied Settings
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Meghan Van Nostrand, M.S.
STEPHANIE PHELAN (Avenue Behavior Analysts; Simmons College), ASHLEY WILLIAMS (ABACS; Simmons College), MEGHAN VAN NOSTRAND (ABACS; Simmons College), BRANDON HERSCOVITCH (ABACS), ANGIE QUERIM CAMPANALE (ABACS)
Description: Functional analysis (FA) is a powerful tool for the assessment of challenging behavior in students with autism and other disabilities. FAs systematically manipulate the antecedents and consequences of target behavior so as to experimentally determine the function(s) of that behavior. The literature indicates that treatments based on the results of functional analyses are more effective than treatments based on other assessment methodologies. However, FAs may not be conducted regularly in home- or school-based settings. Several reasons have been cited for this, including the lack of resources typically needed to conduct these analyses. Given that functional analysis is the only experimental methodology available to determine the function of behavior, and that function-based interventions have been demonstrated to more effective, it is important to extend this methodology to applied settings. The current workshop is designed to prepare practitioners to develop and implement FAs in their current setting, within the scope of time and resources typically available for home-based services. Participants will work through the entire assessment process, from identification of procedures, steps to take, analysis of data, and selection of function-based intervention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) articulate in writing the importance of conducting functional analyses in applied settings; (2) articulate in writing the steps to preparing for a functional analysis in an applied setting; (3) articulate in writing what resources should be taken into account when planning to conduct a functional analysis in an applied setting and analyze how to work within the constraints of the available resources; (4) articulate in writing his or her evaluation of functional analysis outcomes; (5) match function-based treatments with the functional analysis outcomes; (6) articulate in writing a variety of issues that occur while planning for and conducting functional analyses and will articulate in writing how to respond to such issues.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, group-discussion, and targeted case studies. Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, group discussion, and guided practice. Core content will be taught through lecture, video, and a guided discussion of case studies to be presented. (Supplemental materials for identifying language and learning barriers will be provided in order to support participant learning). The format combines lecture, video, group discussion, and guided practice.
Audience: Behavior analysts with background knowledge of functional analysis research, seeking to expand their repertoire in implementing functional analyses in home-based settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Applied settings, Assessment, Functional analysis
 
Workshop #W83
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Part 2: Early Start Denver Model Introductory Workshop
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lauren Elder, Ph.D.
LAUREN ELDER (ABA Behavior Therapies & Testing), MELISSA MELLO (UC Davis MIND Institute)
Description: Learn about the theoretical and empirical framework, curriculum and teaching principles of the Early Start Denver Model (ESDM), a developmental, behavioral and relationship-based intervention program for infants and toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorder ages 12-48 months. Topics include: Administering and completing a developmental assessment of children's skill levels;Developing individualized, developmentally appropriate teaching objectives;Implementing the ESDM teaching practices and fidelity system to evaluate technique use;Maintaining data management and addressing poor or limited child progress, when needed. Please note this is a two-part workshop and registrants must attend both workshops.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) administer and score the ESDM curriculum assessment and select developmentally appropriate learning goals; (2) identify the key components of the ESDM intervention including teaching strategies; (3)describe the empirical research support for ESDM 4; (4)implement a decision tree to address lack of treatment progress as needed.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, discussion, small group activities, and video examples.
Audience: Master's level clinicians with experience with young children with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W84
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
It's a Two-Way Street: Behavior Analysts Promoting Activityand Activity Promoters Applying Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CBM/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University), KELLI MINTON (East Carolina University )
Description: Traditional physical activity promotion strategies including educational and persuasion-based interventions are largely ineffective or yield mixed results which has further contributed to the increase in sedentary lifestyles (i.e. both typically developing and developmentally delayed) and obese individuals. Employing several unique example studies, the presentations will demonstrate the novel applicability of FBA as best practice to assist individuals in overcoming exercise related obstacles. Training direct care staff to promote activity requires use of approachable and easily understood terminology and practices. Thus, alternative ways of describing complex ABA terminology to non-behaviorists will be provided. Attendees will discuss the application of FBA in activity promotion for behaviors of both new and current exercisers and learn to functionally classify behaviors including avoidance behaviors (e.g. excessive transition time during exercise), escape behaviors (e.g. taking unauthorized or prolonged breaks) and attention seeking behaviors (e.g. socializing rather than exercising). The workshop will include model interventions to promote positive exercise experiences and behaviors for individuals who are developmentally delayed and typically developing as well as methods for feasible and effective direct care staff training.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop participants will be able to (1) describe functions of exercise abating behaviors for in,dividuals who are developmentally delayed and typically developing; (2) develop data forms and record exercise behaviors; (3) develop interventions based on functions of activity abating behaviors; (4) successfully communicate FBA principles and applications to those outside of ABA; (5) assist direct care staff in applying behavioral analysis to promote activity.
Activities: Activities will include lecture, guided practice, video observation and data collection, role-playing, and group discussion.
Audience: Behavior analysts, direct care staff, behavior analysts interested in physical activity promotion and activity promoters interested in applying behavioral principles and strategies.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): activity promotion, functional assessment, physical inactivity, staff training
 
Workshop #W85
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Inner Behavior: Changing Thoughts, Feelings, and Urges
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CBM/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Abigail B. Calkin, Ph.D.
ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center)
Description: Thoughts, feelings, and urges are inner behaviors that a person can observe, count, and change as needed. Eleven research studies include over 1,000 charts across the past 40 years and show that behavioral observation and methods can change a person's inner behavior. Therapists, teachers, and researchers using this radical behavior approach have seen the need to use these techniques in residential, public school, university, geriatric, and therapeutic settings. The workshop reviews the history of the field with an emphasis on various charts and techniques for applying the techniques to change people's pleasant and unpleasant inner behaviors. Some of the charts and information include people with PTSD and children on the autism spectrum. While the workshop assumes minimal knowledge of the standard celeration chart, it details how to use the chart for prediction, analysis, and change procedures of inner behaviors.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define and state that thoughts, feelings, and urges are different inner behaviors that a person can observe, count, and change as needed; (2) name some of the researchers and also to state key points of the research; (3) state some of the American and European journal articles that report these results; (4) state important aspects of history of the field with an emphasis on various charts and techniques, including how to apply the principles and practices to change a person's pleasant and unpleasant inner behaviors; (5) state the variety sources of the charts and information; (6)have adequate working skills to use the standard celeration chart to record, predict, analyze, and change the inner behaviors, specifically with the clients they work with.
Activities: State the theoretical and research background for observing and changing inner behavior.Define a thought, a feeling, and an urge, and name specific examples of each.Practice writing pleasant thoughts, feelings, and behaviorally stated responses to urges at 20 to 35 per minute and to say them at 50 to 75 per minute.Count and record some specific inner behaviors for the duration of the workshop, which can be continued or revised later.Bring any charts to share if s/he has done any counting and charting of inner behavior before.Develop, write, and discuss a plan to change inner behaviors of self or a client.
Audience: This workshop is for clinicians, those teaching behavior analysis, and graduate students in behavior analysis or psychology, special education teachers who work with students with behavior disorders and who are on the autism spectrum disorder, and others interested in changing inner behaviors.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W86
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Applied Clinical Interview Techniques and Strategies in Clinical Behavior Analysis: Capturing Critical Information While Building Rapport
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joseph N. Ricciardi, Psy.D.
JOSEPH N. RICCIARDI (Seven Hills Foundation; Seven Hills NeuroCare)
Description: Like all other clinical disciplines, behavior analysts utilize clinical interviews as an initial part of the assessment process. Before a direct assessment can be performed, clinical-behavior analysts must gather background information; develop a working definition of behaviors of concern and determine their course; spot possible contributing medical conditions; detect markers of risk (Ricciardi, Rothschild, 2017); and establish rapport with the individual and their supports. Done skillfully, this best practice can lead to testable hypothesis for direct assessment and add efficiency and precision to functional analyses (Hanley et al, 2014). This workshop will provide behavior analysts with an approach to gathering important case information in advance of direct assessments that are useful in developing a comprehensive case formulation (Sturmey, 2008). Participants will learn techniques for eliciting maximum engagement from interviewees; strategies for ensuring comprehensiveness; and how to identify risks markers and what to do about them. Additionally, participants will learn how to control complex group interviews (such as consultation meetings with support staff); how to share sensitive case formulations with recipients of intervention and their families; and how to share a case formulation with other clinicians from other disciplines.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1)report an operational definition of clinical interviewing, and its targeted outcomes; (2) list three core techniques used to elicit information during a clinical interview; (3) demonstrate key questions for eliciting information about antecedent stimuli and reinforcing events from caregivers and support staff; (4) implement a contextual assessment and explain its value in intervention design; (5) describe a comprehensive method for identifying high risk topographies of challenging behavior in new cases; (6) list three strategies for managing risk outside of scope of one's practice; (7) organize case material into a summary presentation for other clinicians; (8) explain the 4-quadrant approach to managing group clinical interviews.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, review of structured interview tools, didactic role play, and model/demonstrations of practice
Audience: Intermediate: This is valuable for a behavior analyst within 3-5 years of practice, who can bring case experiences into the sessions, and looking to refine and deepen clinical assessment skills
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W87
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Mobilizing Behavioral Science to Address Climate Change
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CSS/EAB; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Anthony Biglan, Ph.D.
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute), MAGNUS JOHANSSON (Oslo and Akershus University College)
Description: Despite overwhelming evidence of the catastrophic consequences of accelerating climate change, very little effective research is being done on how to bring about widespread changes in people's behavior. The workshop will review the evidence regarding looming climate change. We will identify policies that could significantly contribute to reducing climate change. Then, the principles of interrupted time series experimental designs will be reviewed and we will discuss their relevance for addressing the problem of climate change. In essence, we will propose that a series of multiple baseline designs evaluating community wide strategies for getting communities to adopt effective policies could greatly increase our knowledge about how to bring about policy change in climate relevant behavior. We will attempt to organize those attending the workshop to create a network of behavior analysts from around the world who are experimentally evaluating strategies for affecting climate change.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the major threats to human wellbeing that are posed by climate change; (2) specify at least five policies that could have benefit in reducing greenhouse gas emissions; (3) create a plan for conducting experimental evaluations of community intervention strategies to get communities to adopt effective climate change policies.
Activities: The content of the workshop that we will present as described in other part of this submission. In each topic we will employ random calling procedures to ensure that participants are meaningfully involved in the group developing plans for research to greenhouse gas emissions. Of particular importance will be the segment of the workshop that asks groups of participants to develop concrete plans for advancing research on promoting effective climate change policy.
Audience: We believe that any person with training and behavior analysis would benefit from this workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Behavior Change, Climate change;, Community Intervention;, Policy;
 
Workshop #W88
CE Offered: BACB
Taking Your State ABA Association to the Next Level: A Workshop for Board Members and Future Leaders
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CSS/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Aaron Blocher-Rubin, Ph.D.
AARON BLOCHER-RUBIN (Arizona Autism United)
Description: This workshop is designed for board members of state ABA associations, or BCBAs who would like to join their association's board and help the organization grow. Since I was elected president of the Arizona Association for Behavior Analysis (www.azaba.org) two years ago, our board has implemented a series of behaviorally-based strategic objectives to drastically enhance the reach and impact of AzABA. Our membership has grown from 100 to 600. Instead of holding one event per year, we now hold one per month, and most of them offer free CEUs. We have built up our financial reserves and rewritten our bylaws to give us the flexibility and sustainability the association needs to continue thriving as board members and presidents change each year. We now represent over 80% of all BCBAs in Arizona, which gives us much greater public policy influence. We have also streamlined our membership database, website, and event registration systems so that all members can easily communicate with the board, our management company, and each other anytime. All of this has been achieved while simultaneously reducing the volunteer hours burden on board members. The goal of this presentation is to share the techniques we have used to be successful, so that you can improve the success of your own state association.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Explain how this approach to improving a state association is based on interrelated behavioral contingencies; (2) Identify opportunities and develop a plan to improve your own state association; (3) Implement specific techniques to increase membership and activities for your own state association.
Activities: This will be a hands-on workshop. The first part will include a lecture explaining the behaviorally based strategies used to establish contingencies for BCBAs to become members and participate in events, as well as the sustainability systems developed to support the operation. Then, participants will complete a series of activities to identify goals and objectives for their own associations, so that everyone leaves the workshop with a series of developed strategies that are ready to be implemented.
Audience: Board members for state ABA associations, or anyone that wants to join their state ABA association board.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): behavioral systems, organizational sustainability, state association
 
Workshop #W89
CE Offered: BACB
Exploring the Systematic Use of Self-Monitoring as a Behavioral Intervention: The Self & Match System
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: EDC/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Katharine M. Croce, Ed.D.
KATHARINE M. CROCE (Self & Match; The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), JAMIE SIDEN SALTER (San Diego County Office of Education)
Description: This interactive and hands-on workshop will provide an excellent opportunity for individuals to learn a well-defined, systematic self-monitoring intervention and motivational system. Participants attending this workshop will leave with a comprehensive tool in hand to implement immediately. This session will explore peer-reviewed research that supports the implementation of self-monitoring systems for students of various ages and developmental levels. A discussion of self-monitoring procedures incorporating a "match" component will be presented, with specific focus on the Self & Match System, a user-friendly, easy to implement, empirically-supported system. Participants in this training will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. Participants will strengthen their knowledge of necessary considerations prior to implementing any self-monitoring or motivational system. Additionally, participants gain an understanding of implementing Self & Match in a General Education classroom. The Self & Match System has been used internationally to support individuals with emotional behavior disorders, autism, learning disabilities, and unidentified students in general education. Self & Match can be incorporated into individualized behavior systems, class-wide, and school-wide management procedures as a part of SWPBIS and has been successfully implemented in a variety of settings; including (but not limited to): public and private schools, clinics, homes, and recreational settings.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the research-based benefits of self-monitoring; (2) Effectively apply, individualize, and monitor progress of a self-monitoring system; (3) Identify the necessary components of an effective motivational system; (4) Identify the importance of pre-treatment planning on the effectiveness of intervention; (5) Identify the basic components of the Self & Match System; (6) Understand the implementation Self & Match System in a variety of settings including a General Education Setting, Home Setting, and Special Education Setting; (7) Systematically individualize an intervention based on collaborative and critical thinking; (8) Create a Self & Match self-monitoring system to implement in their workplace.
Activities: During the course of this hands-on workshop, participants will strengthen the skills needed to effectively develop self-monitoring interventions incorporating a match component. This workshop will review the purpose/rationale of self-monitoring, the benefits of self-monitoring, the Self & Match system, and consider the role of technology in supporting this behavioral intervention. Additionally, participants will interactively complete a systematic considerations guide prior to implementation to lead them on their way to creating their own Self & Match System. The format combines lecture, small group collaboration, whole group responding utilizing interactive digital polling software, and discussion. Core content will be taught through a combination of lecture, video examples, data analysis, and guided practice.
Audience: Participants will engage in active learning to increase their knowledge of implementing systematic self-monitoring as a behavior intervention. Workshop attendees will acquire a systematic guide to planning self-monitoring systems, as well as a Self & Match manual with substantial training materials. This workshop is designed for behavior analysts, consultants, school psychologists, autism specialists, special educators, teachers, administrators, parents, students, and/or others who primarily support individuals from pre-K to 21 in school, home, or clinic settings. Great workshop for individuals and/or teams!
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, behavior intervention, self-monitoring, SelfandMatch
 
Workshop #W90
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Translating Applied Behavior Analytic Research Methodologies Into the Classroom Setting
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sunny Kim, Ph.D.
SUNNY KIM (University of California, Santa Barbara - Extension; Koegel Autism Consultants;  Direct-Ed)
Description: As there is a major push from the federal government for implementation of school-wide positive behavior support systems, it is important for school staff to learn how to create and manage successful classroom environments. This workshop will discuss the key tenets of applied behavior analysis and how they translate into the classroom setting. Participants will leave the workshop with a better understanding of how to implement evidence-based strategies, provide resources in order to enhance students' overall engagement in the school environment, and systematically monitor students' progress via effective and efficient data collection.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe general classroom management strategies rooted in the methods of applied behavior analysis; (2) describe empirically supported interventions and strategies to support students who exhibit challenging behaviors in the school environment; (3) effectively and efficiently collect data.
Activities: The format combines lecture, small group activities, and guided practice.
Audience: The target audience for the proposed workshop include: teachers, practitioners, educators, administrators, school psychologists, speech-language pathologist, occupational therapists, and paraeducators/paraprofessionals
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ABA, classroom, education, school
 
Workshop #W91
CE Offered: BACB
"Mastery" Defined Functionally and Measured Behaviorally
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Donny D. Newsome, Ph.D.
DONNY D. NEWSOME (Fit Learning), KENDRA B. NEWSOME (Fit Learning), TIMOTHY C. FULLER (University of Nevada, Reno)
Description: Generally speaking, the concept of mastery is well understood. We know a masterful performer when we see one. His or her performance seems to come naturally, quickly and accurately. Difficult or complex tasks are made to look effortless and novel problems are readily overcome. On the other hand, the absence of mastery is equally apparent. Critical skill deficits result in measurably slow, frustrating, inflexible performance and can adversely affect one's quality of life. As such, mastery is a commonly stated goal of educators in their crafting of skill acquisition plans. Unfortunately, inspection of common goal setting practices by behaviorists and educators reveals an unsettling divide. Whereas the characteristics of mastery listed above represent broad programmatic goals, the specific mastery criteria for acquisition targets are often woefully inadequate to produce such results. In this workshop, barriers to adequate goal setting such as inappropriate measurement systems and charting conventions will be addressed. Additionally, attendees will have ample opportunity to create functional mastery instructional program criteria that can be implemented in their practice. The intention of the workshop is to empower attendees to move away from goals like, "80% correct across three consecutive trials," and toward criteria more fitting from our experience of functional mastery in everyday life.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the pitfalls of non-dimensional measures of behavior; (2) define functional mastery and appropriate measures thereof; (3) critically analyze mastery criteria in their research and practice.
Activities: Pick a behavior/skill for acquisition (e.g., hand washing, 2D-2D matching, adding sums of money, sorting laundry, reading, write name).What Success Looks like in the Real World: Possible Component skills for behavior/skill: How will you sequence the instruction? Describe your plan below. Establishing Frequency Aim Ranges for Components and Composite behavior/skills Through Normative Sampling (NOTE: You may also use duration, or latency).
Audience: Applied behavior analysts and educators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Fluency, Mastery, Measurement, Precision Teaching
 
Workshop #W92
CE Offered: BACB
Part 3: Pragmatic Supervision: Evaluate, Analyze, Change, and Repeat
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Pragmatic supervisors collect frequent, accurate, sensitive measures of client progress, and when clients are not meeting their progress goals, those supervisors make changes. A pragmatic supervision process includes the following steps: 1) Evaluate client progress and staff performance. 2) Analyze causes of inadequate client progress and staff performance. 3) Change staff resources, training, and management, and 4) Repeat the process until clients achieve desired outcomes. Organizations that operate pragmatically can achieve amazing results for their clients and stakeholders, but most don’t. This is an organizational performance problem, which could be solved if organizations had the necessary resources. One such resource is ProgressCharter, a mobile and web application that will make it easier to evaluate client progress, identifying which clients are not meeting progress goals, analyze the causes of inadequate client progress, using evaluations of staff performance and resources to identify can-do, know-how, and want-problems, and recommend specific changes in staff resources, training, and management, to ensure that each client makes desired progress. Please note, this is a three-part workshop and attendees must register for allthree parts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) Define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) Perform a data based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) Design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management;(6) Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop will provide a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and a web/mobile charting application.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, program designers, staff trainers, and directors of schools and agencies serving individuals with learning difficulties. All participants will receive a one-year subscription to ProgressCharter, an application that makes it easier to evaluate client progress, analyze causes of inadequate progress, and recommend changes so that all clients can make efficient progress. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to improve the performance of your staff so that every client can achieve success. Participants should bring their laptops and smartphones or tablets to the workshop so that they can practice using ProgressCharter. Those who pre-register will receive some materials prior to the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W93
CE Offered: BACB
Using Behavioral Science to Produce Organizational Change
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Florence D. DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D.
FLORENCE D. DIGENNARO REED (University of Kansas), TYLER ERATH (University of Kansas), MATTHEW NOVAK (University of Kansas)
Description: The purpose of this workshop is to describe a behavioral science framework and consultation model for producing organizational change at a non-profit human service setting. The presenters will share real-world examples of organizational change initiatives involving collaborations between consultants, human resources, community living staff, senior leadership, and a staff training department. To date, efforts have addressed quality assurance, staff turnover, hiring timelines, and staff training among others. The workshop will emphasize the development of staff and agency performance metrics to promote quality assurance and novel practices and systems to engage agency staff in reviewing and understanding the data. The presenters will also describe assessment- and data-based decisions that influenced organizational change initiatives and system-level improvements. Through hands-on and small-group activities, attendees will develop metrics and scorecards for use in their own employment settings. Moreover, attendees will receive printed materials of consultation products (e.g., quality assurance scorecards, staff training materials).
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the importance of using behavioral science for organizational change and staff support; (2) identify and describe a performance scorecard and performance diagnostics in a human service setting; (3) develop strategies to use in their own employment settings.
Activities: Workshop activities include lecture, discussion, and individual and small-group tasks including creating quality assurance performance metrics and measurement systems.
Audience: The target audience should include mid- and upper-level management staff or owners of human service companies interested in developing agency- or department-level metrics for measuring quality or other performance indicators.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): organizational change, performance diagnostics, performance scorecards, quality assurance
 
Workshop #W94
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Behavior Analytic Leadership: How to Use Behavioral Science to Leader Ethically in Our Field
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Natalie A. Parks, Ph.D.
ADAM E. VENTURA (World Evolve, Inc.), ASHLEY TUDOR (Behavior Leader), NATALIE A. PARKS (Pulse Business Strategies LLC)
Description: When considering leadership behavior in our field, several questions emerge, namely, What is leadership in behavior analysis? Why is it important, Who can lead others, and most importantly how do you shape the behavior of a behavior analysis leader? More specifically, how do you shape ethical leadership behavior? Identifying all of the elements that yield the ideal behavior analysis leadership mixture can be challenging. Leaders in our field are made up of a variety of different behavioral particles that if heated to the appropriate temperature can create a catalyst that brings out the best OR worst in their followers. But what is the appropriate formula for developing leaders and how can current leaders help energize their followers towards accomplishing the mission in an ethical manner? This workshop will provide answers to those questions and provide details on the specific leadership behaviors that will help grow your organization, achieve a high level of prominence within our field, and help to establish a long lasting (and positive) legacy for everyone at your organization.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and define the definition of leadership in behavior analysis; (2) identify leadership behavioral cusps; (3) determine individual behaviors that will maximize leadership skills; (4) identify and execute steps for leading others in behavior analysis.
Activities: Instructional Strategies Include: lecture, discussion, small group discussion Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, discussion, modeling, and role plays.
Audience: Target audience include BCBAs or business administrators who are in or will transition into a leadership position and want to learn how to lead in behavior analysis and using behavior analytic principles. Participants must have an understanding of behavior analytic terms.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethical leadership, leadership, leading others
 
Workshop #W95
CE Offered: BACB
A Practical Application of Evidence-Based Training Strategies
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Alyssa Kavner, M.A.
ALYSSA KAVNER (Easter Seals Southern California), KIMBERLEY ANDREA ENLOE (Easterseals Southern California), YENDRI DIAZ (weTrain)
Description: The recent growth in ABA based services for individuals with an autism spectrum disorder has led to the rapid hiring and training of RBTs, BCaBAs, and BCBAs. This has resulted in a need to establish competency-based curriculum for both trainers and clinicians. Building and maintaining effective training within any ABA practice is paramount to its effectiveness and success. Trainers are responsible for training staff to fluency and ensuring readiness to work in the field.This workshop will demonstrate how evidenced-based training methodologies can be adapted to various learning environments. There will also be discussion on the establishment and maintenance of a training program, training staff to become effective trainers, training curriculum development, and ongoing support at various ABA programs. Topics include but are not limited to: fluency training; video modeling; e-learning/ online training;active student responding;behavioral skills training;competency based training;feedback during skills practice;in-field follow-up; training goal setting; competency checklists.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and define evidence-based training strategies; (2) create an outline for training content using evidence-based training strategies; (3) identify next steps in implementing their training; (4) identify how to measure quality and effectiveness of their training; (5) set goals for trainers and trainees; (6) plan for generalization of skills from the training environment into the clinical field.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met using behavioral skills training through the following activities: 1. Instructor presentation and group discussion 2. Individual and small group guided practice 3. Individual and small group competency building exercises
Audience: Audience: Workshop target audience is ABA Clinical and Training Managers or Supervisors
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Leadership, OBM, Training
 
Workshop #W96
CE Offered: BACB
Treatment “Failures” in Applied Behavior Analysis: What They Are and How to Remedy Them
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sarah C. Mead, Ph.D.
SARAH C. MEAD (University of Kansas)
Description: Using the basic principles of behavior as a guide, behavior analysts typically design interventions by arranging environmental variables in a systematic manner with a goal of changing the future probability of a response or responses. However, sometimes the outcome of the intervention does not match the behavior analyst’s expectation. Typically, either a problematic behavior did not decrease to socially-acceptable levels, an alternative, acceptable behavior did not increase to desired levels, or both. This unfortunate state of affairs, sometimes referred to as a treatment failure, requires the behavior analyst to identify the variable(s) responsible for the unexpected outcome and then to correct the problem. After attending this workshop, participants will be able to describe how to systematically and efficiently identify and remedy common variables that can affect treatment efficacy in clinical practice in the field of applied behavior analysis. All assessment and intervention approaches presented during the workshop are well-studied procedures that have been published in peer-reviewed journals; a comprehensive reference list will be provided to participants. Additionally, content is related to the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts, and the Code will be referred to throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) explain why “treatment failure” is somewhat of a misnomer in applied behavior analysis; (2) identify when to consult with professionals in related fields to rule out interfering variables outside the scope of behavior analysis (e.g., an underlying medical issue); (3) describe how to identify and remedy problems with data collection and data analysis; (4) describe how to identify and remedy problems with treatment implementation and integrity; (5) describe how to identify and remedy problems with reinforcer identification and efficacy, including behaviors that are maintained by multiple variables and/or idiosyncratic variables; (6) describe how to identify and remedy problems with teaching procedures; (7) describe how to identify and remedy problems with the generalization and maintenance of treatment effects; (8) articulate how the Behavior Analyst Certification Board’s Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts is relevant to issues related to treatment failure.
Activities: The workshop will be centered around a guiding lecture. Small-group activities and discussions will be interspersed throughout the workshop to promote application of the material.
Audience: Current Board Certified Behavior Analysts, current master’s students in applied behavior analysis
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical practice, Treatment efficacy, Treatment failure, Treatment integrity
 
Workshop #W97
CE Offered: BACB
Using Physical Activity and Game to Enhance Learning, Social Skills, and Self-Control With Autistic and Typical Populations
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Eitan Eldar, Ph.D.
EITAN ELDAR (Kibbutzim College, Israel)
Description: The presented model (Eldar, 2006) emphasizes the uniqueness of movement and game as an ideal context enabling teachers and clinicians to design a challenging learning atmosphere for their students. The model is based on a series of scripts offering a simulation of real life situations. It can support a specific clinical goal such as developing self-control; support a school curriculum; serve as an extended behavioral program for individuals / groups. The model has recently been implemented with Autistic children, supporting communication and social skills on an individual level and as a preparation for inclusion. The rationale behind developing the model (Eldar & Ayvazo, 2009) will be discussed and specific behavioral procedures and principles supporting the model will be cited (Eldar, 2008; Eldar, Ayvazo, & Hirschmann, 2017). The structure of the model will be described, followed by implementation examples. Components of the model, modified during the past 18 years, will then be portrayed. The workshop will conclude with recommendations and examples for utilizing the model in a variety of educational and clinical settings applicable to various populations. Attention will be devoted to using these procedures as a part of an individual program for Autistic populations and for supporting their inclusion in the regular education system.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Explain the unique characteristics of physical activity and games as supportive learning contexts; (2) Cite behavioral principles and procedures that enhance learning in these contexts; (3)Present the general structure of the model and describe its components; (4) Design various physical activities as clinical scripts, serving specific behavioral goals; (5) Use and modify observation forms to evaluate students' progress; (6) Adapt the components of the model to different populations and programs; (7) Explain the rationale of the model to parents and practitioners.
Activities: 1. A presentation of the theoretical background of the model, defining the rationale behind it. 2. An open discussion: How physical activity can serve as a learning context. 3. A video presentation illustrating the implementation of the model in various settings and in different cultures. 4. Active demonstration of games involving the workshop's participants. 5. Planning trials - participants will practice activity and program design based on the model.
Audience: Behavior Analysts, Teachers, Clinicians, Psychologists, Physical Educators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W98
CE Offered: BACB
Prompting, Stimulus Control, and Error Correction: What's Your Teaching Ritual?
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Andy Bondy, Ph.D.
ANDY BONDY (Pyramid Educational Consultants, Inc.)
Description: Behavior analysis involves the study of behavior under what conditions. While the emphasis on behavior per se is novel to many, the most unique characteristic of behavior analysis is the emphasis on how environmental conditions systematically influence behavior. In the study of operant behavior Skinner placed emphasis on the role of consequences and on how the three-term contingency brings about stimulus control. The development of stimulus control is central to many teaching strategies. We will review the establishment of stimulus control using examples from laboratory-based discrimination training. The definition of prompt is just as dependent upon behavior as is the term reinforcer. While our field includes many overlapping descriptions of prompts and cues, we will detail a critical distinction between prompts and cues. The next focus is on a major current challenge to effective teaching, the removal of prompts during teaching. We will discuss whether strategies such as prompt hierarchies are logically consistent. Finally, we will address stimulus control and error-correction, with particular focus on the relationship between error-correction strategies and particular lesson formats. This will include reviewing whether any strategy truly can be descripted as errorless. Be prepared to have your own teaching rituals revealed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define and distinguish between stimulus control, prompts, cues and error correction; (2) Compare and contrast different types of prompts within different types of lessons; (3) Describe the role of stimulus control in relation to teaching strategies; (4) Describe the role of stimulus control in relation to error correction strategies.
Activities: The format will combine lecture and small group activities. Each participant will be asked to answer specific questions related to their specific applied practice. Each participant will be asked to describe potential modifications of current teaching and error correction strategies. Small group activity will include review of several vignettes describing current teaching practice.
Audience: While the primary target is an intermediate level, previous beginners and advanced participants have also left positive reviews.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W99
CE Offered: BACB
Treatment Goal Development for Insurance Approval
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Linda S. Heitzman-Powell, Ph.D.
KATRINA OSTMEYER (Integrated Behavioral Technologies, Inc.; Behavioral Technologies Consultating Organization), LINDA S. HEITZMAN-POWELL (The University of Kansas Medical Center; Behavioral Technologies Consulting Organization)
Description: Over the past fifteen years, the forty-three states and the District of Columbia have instituted insurance reforms covering applied behavior analysis (ABA) therapy for individuals affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD: Autism Insurance Reform, 2015). With these mandates, ABA clinicians are increasingly called to work with third-party payers for approval and ongoing review of ABA treatment plans, a skill set many clinicians have to develop through practice and trial-and-error learning. In this workshop, we will identify many of the difficulties faced by clinicians in working with insurance companies as they work to provide evidence-based interventions for the individuals they serve such as disagreement about appropriate goals, dosage recommended by "medical-necessity," insurance mandate, and best-practices, and what constitutes sufficient progress for continued coverage. Possible solutions and strategies to these challenges will be discussed with a focus on goal development and tracking. Finally, recommendations for successfully working through the appeal process will be discussed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) Identify common problems faced by clinicians working with third-party payers (2) Identify the core deficits in autism spectrum disorders based on both DSM-IV-TR and DSM-5 criteria (3) Be able to tie identify goals that map onto the core deficits of autism spectrum disorder without compromising treatment plan integrity (4) Be able to write goals that meet common "medical necessity" criteria (5) Identify the steps in an appeals process and strategies for a successful appeal.
Activities: During the course of the workshop, lecture will be utilized to convey information prior to moving to guided practice and small group. During guided practice and small-group activities, participants will review treatment goals that have been denied for a variety of reasons and work to rewrite goals for increased likelihood of approval and/or develop rationales for approval without reworking. During guided practice, the group will also work through an appeal. Participants will have the opportunity to share identified goals and plans for feedback on changes to make to increase the likelihood of plan approval.
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analysts who work with third-party payers to provide ABA services to individuals diagnosed with autism.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Insurance, Insurance Appeals
 
Workshop #W100
CE Offered: BACB
Professional Presentations: Public Speaking Skills for Behavior Analysts
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Derek D. Reed, Ph.D.
DEREK D. REED (The University of Kansas)
Description: Behavior analysts routinely speak in front of interdisciplinary teams, collaborators, peers, and colleagues. Whether presenting research or advocating behavioral practices, public speaking is a job requirement for many behavior analysts. Yet, behavior analytic training often excludes this critical skillset. Beyond the importance of representing themselves well, behavior analysts often find themselves needing to convince outside professionals of the legitimacy of their science or practice, placing the behavior analyst in an even more substantial role as ambassador of the discipline. This workshop provides foundational knowledge and strategies for professional-level public speaking. Topics covered include: planning for public addresses, outline a successful story to tell, slide deck development, stage presence, and general trips and strategies to handle public speaking. Attendees will leave the workshop with timelines to prepare talks, outlines and templates for creating presentation story boards, and tips for delivering impressive and memorable presentations. This workshop will not provide training on specific slide deck software platforms, however. A unique aspect of this workshop is that it provides a behavior analytic approach to public speaking references to behavioral studies will be provided, and content generated and provided by the workshop speaker will be grounded in relevant behavioral research.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1)describe the important roles that behavior analysts play in disseminating the field's science and practice via public speaking; (2)provide a review of existing behavior analytic research on how behavior analysts successfully disseminate information in public forms; (3)describe successful strategies for outlining and planning talks, and tips for delivering effective presentations.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a combination of didactic instruction, small group activities, and larger group discussions. Core content will be taught through lecture, in-vivo demonstrations, and video-based models. Tangible tip sheets will be provided to support implementation of skillsets outside the training environment.
Audience: Basic: anyone planning or preparing a professional presentation to deliver to non-behavior analysts is appropriate.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): dissemination, public speaking
 
Workshop #W101
CE Offered: BACB
Beyond the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code: An Approach to Ethical Reasoning in Applied Behaviour Analysis
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Elin Walker Jones, DClinPsy
ALEXANDER TOOGOOD (Bangor University), ELIN WALKER JONES (Bangor University), J. CARL HUGHES (Bangor University)
Description: We make decisions regarding the lives of those with whom we work on a regular basis. Most of these decisions have ethical elements, and we are required by our professional body, the BACB, to abide by our Professional and Ethical Code of Conduct (BACB, 2016) in all our professional activities. However, we cannot escape ourselves in this process, and Skinner's ideas regarding exploring the science of ethical conduct is an enduring concern. How do we ensure that we make decisions that are truly ethical? Who decides? Can we have a science of ethical reasoning? This workshop will briefly review the current BACB Professional and Ethical Code of Conduct, as well as Skinner's ideas regarding the development of a science of ethics. We will also discuss the philosophical underpinnings of modern ethical thinking, based on Seedhouse's ideas of ethics in healthcare. This workshop will explore the extent to which the Ethical Grid (Seedhouse, 2009) has utility in behaviour analysis. We will discuss cases.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the main components of the BACB Ethics code; (2) Use core concepts embedded in ethical thinking in discussion; (3) Verbally reflect on their own decision making strategies; (4) Use some of Seedhouse's constructs to verbally describe ethical decision making processes; (5) Estimate the value of the Ethical Grid (Seedhouse, 2009) to reason complex clinical ethical issues.
Activities: A balanced presentation of lectures, small group discussions, guided practice
Audience: Our target audience are qualified behaviour analysts seeking to obtain Ethics CEUs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W102
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Working Through an Ethical Dilemma Step-by-Step Using the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Amanda L. Little, Ph.D.
AMANDA L. LITTLE (The University of Texas at Austin, The Meadows Center), NANETTE L. PERRIN (LifeShare USA )
Description: The Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014) is the go-to document for behavior analysts when studying ethical behavior. This code gives valuable guidance to behavior analytic practitioners in everyday practice. This workshop will discuss the 10 guidelines/codes that comprise the new Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014). Participants will engage in a pre-quiz to assess their baseline knowledge on each of the 10 guidelines/codes. The instructors will then review each guideline and foster conversation around appropriate actions that could be taken if those ethical dilemmas occur. Bailey and Burch (2016) provide seven steps to making a conclusion when an ethical dilemma has occurred. An example ethical dilemma will be given to participants, and the group will use those seven steps to come to a conclusion. A post-quiz will also help review the workshop information.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop participants will be able to: (1) State the 10 guidelines/codes of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code (BACB, 2014); (2) Accurately identify Bailey and Burch (2016) seven steps to work through an ethical dilemma; (3) Accurately identify which guideline addresses the example dilemma; (4) State a conclusion for the example dilemma using Bailey and Burch (2016) seven steps; (5) Increase percentage of correct quiz questions related to ethics in behavior analysis.
Activities: Take pre/post quizzes regarding ethical behavior of behavior analysts Lecture on the 10 Guidelines/Codes in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) Lecture on Bailey and Burch (2016) viewpoints on ethical guidelines of behavior analysts Exercise on using Bailey and Burch (2016) seven steps to make a conclusion for an example ethical dilemma
Audience: Board Certified Behavior Analysts-Doctorate, Board Certified Behavior Analysts, Board Certified Associate Behavior Analysts, and Registered Behavior Technicians, or those training to be any of these who are seeking additional practice identifying and appropriately responding to ethical dilemmas they may face in their professional interactions with individuals/families, supervisors/supervisees, and other service providers.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): ethical behavior, ethics, home/community
 
Workshop #W103
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Ethical Issues in Billing for ABA Services
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa L. Olive, Ph.D.
MELISSA L. OLIVE (Applied Behavioral Strategies LLC)
Description: This workshop will focus on ethical issues specifically related to billing for ABA services. Participants will learn about confidentiality requirements related to billing, federal laws related to billing, coding rules and procedures, internal policies to prevent billing fraud, and available software to assist agencies in billing ethically. Information will be provided in lecture format with case studies as examples. The legal and ethical responsibilities of a behavior analyst will be discussed. Time will be allotted for extensive question and answer. Detailed handouts will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe how the current BACB Professional and Ethical Compliance Code applies to providing and billing for ABA services; (2) describe key components of HIPAA and HITECH and how they relate to providing and billing for ABA services; (3) describe relevant policies from the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare; (4) describe the relevant CPT coding rules that apply; (5) describe the appropriate use of new and old CPT codes; (6) compare and contrast documents from ABAI and from AMA related to billing for services; (7) identify strategies for prevention of billing fraud.
Activities: Lecture, Discussion, Case Study, Question and Answer
Audience: Practicing Behavior Analysts, business owners, supervisors of practicing behavior analysts
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Billing, Business, Ethics, Insurance
 
Workshop #W104
CE Offered: BACB
Implementing Effective Competency-Based Parent and Caregiver Training
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Frances Nieves Serret, M.S.
KATHERINE FRANCES COREY (Advances Learning Center), FRANCES NIEVES SERRET (Advances Learning Center), KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center), GINETTE WILSON BISHOP (Advances Learning Center)
Description: The importance of generalizing effective behavioral support strategies and techniques to parents and caregivers of clients with challenging behaviors is critical. So too is providing an effective and successful training model for teaching parents and caregivers to implement these strategies with competence and fluency. This workshop will present a competency-based Parent/Caregiver Training model, components of which include a social validity rating scale, pre-test and post-test measures, lectures, role-plays, modeling, procedural integrity data collection, prompting guidelines, and performance feedback. Hands-on activities for each component will be included, along with strategies for individualization of both content and pacing, and for utilizing data-based programming decisions to ensure optimal success and effectiveness.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Develop individualized, competency-based parent training models based on specific client profiles; (2) Effectively utilize teaching strategies, including lecture, modelling, role-play, and performance feedback when educating parents/caregivers of clients with ASD and developmental disabilities; (3) Devise data collection systems to accurately record procedural integrity of parent/caregiver implementation of behavior support strategies; (4) Design user-friendly behavior support guidelines for parents/caregivers; (5)Implement data-based decision-making strategies relative ongoing content and pace of instruction.
Activities: Alternating between lecture and hands-on activities, participants will work in groups to complete activities and role plays.
Audience: The intended audience includes: BCBAs who design and implement parent/caregiver training; teachers, SLPs, behavioral instructors, or therapists who implement parent/caregiver training under BCBA supervision;anyone interested in developing effective parent/caregiver training models for clients and their families.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W105
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Gender-Affirming Clinical Skills for Behavior Analysts: Looking Through the Lens of BACB Ethics
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Worner Leland, M.S.
WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates), JANANI VAIDYA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Description: Transgender and gender nonconforming identities have gained increasing visibility within recent years, and gender plays a significant role in how social interactions are constructed for people of all gender identities. This workshop provides an overview of key concepts and social practices related to gender, as well as ways that the BACB's Professional and Ethical Compliance Code addresses gender. The instructor will facilitate a nonjudgmental space for participants to ask questions, explore new content, and brainstorm ways to build gender-affirming practices in their professional work. Participants will learn specific strategies of how Behavior Analysts can promote gender-affirming interactions with their clients, staff, and others. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and audience questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state which guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) are applicable to gender;(2) select key differences between gender identity, biological sex, gender roles, gender expression/presentation, and sexual orientation; (3) describe ways that the gender binary may restrict responding for all individuals, not only transgender people;(4) state several concrete strategies to apply to the professional workplace that create a gender affirming environment for clients and staff.
Activities: Activities will include: Pre/post quizzes, lecture, small group discussion, FreeWrite exercises, worksheets, video examples, and online learning activities.
Audience: Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are interested in building their competence around the topic of gender. Teachers, therapists, and other helping professionals are also welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): diversity, ethics, gender, sexuality
 
Workshop #W106
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using Motivational Interviewing Techniques to Alter Motivating Operations and Increase Parent Engagement in ABA Therapy
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monica Gilbert, M.S.
MONICA GILBERT (Albizu University; Crystal Minds New Beginning ), JACQUELINE R MOLINA (Lumiere Child)
Description: Behavior Analysts often find barriers when providing parent training. Although Behavior Analysts offer empirically validated strategies and successfully change behaviors, it can be difficult for parents to adhere to treatment. A reason for parents inability to engage in treatment may be due to their "resistance". Resistance is defined as a private event that is evoked by an antecedent stimuli (clinician's confrontational language), which is reinforced by escape of the aversive stimuli. Motivating Operations have a behavior/value altering effect in that they make "escaping" the stimuli (clinician) by engaging in resistant behaviors more or less reinforcing. Motivational Interviewing (MI) is an empirically proven intervention that has shown substantial success in the literature in changing addictive behaviors in substance abusers, medication adherence, and developmental disabilities. MI is the route by which private events can be altered by using "change talk" strategies to decrease resistant behaviors and increase cooperation between parents and clinicians. In this workshop, we will discuss private events as Skinner defined it and as they relate to MI strategies. We will also present the proven strategies of MI to decrease resistance and foster a collaborative working relationship between parent and clinicians. Transtheoretical model (stages of readiness) will also be presented. Attendees will build skills in assessing level of resistance and use change talk procedures to successfully decrease them.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Assess parent's motivation based on the trans-theoretical model and using different proven measures; (2) Provide examples of effective change talk strategies to develop and build collaborative relationships with parents; (3) Describe motivation using private events; (4) Identify traps that can harm clinician-parental relationships; (5) Describe key features of effective MI strategies; (6) Measure change talk vs. counter-change talk; (7) Identify key features necessary for cooperative relationships between caregivers and clinicians.
Activities: Workshop activities will include didactic instruction, small group breakout, guided practice and role plays.
Audience: BCaBA, BCBA, graduate students, and licensed psychologists.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ABA, Behavior Management, Mental Health, Private Events
 
Workshop #W107
CE Offered: BACB
Caught on Camera: Creating Video Models to Improve Our Teaching
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Eleanor Giles, M.S.
ELEANOR GILES (New England Center for Children), REBECCA P. F. MACDONALD (New England Center for Children)
Description: It is widely known that high rates of consistent procedural integrity are important for behavioral interventions to be effective. In order to provide the best and most consistent treatment for our students, it is crucial that we offer effective training procedures to those implementing behavior analytic procedures. One method of enhancing staff and parent training and increasing procedural integrity is the use of video modeling. This workshop is designed to provide educators with the tools they need to quickly create brief and effective videos for staff training and procedural integrity across a range of areas including social skills, play skills, self-help skills, vocational skills, and behavior management. First, we will provide a brief review of the research findings regarding video modeling as a training tool. Then we will review tips and protocols for creating training videos. As part of the workshop, participants will break up into groups, choose programs to address, and create videos models. Video editing techniques such as adding textual cues and voice-over will also be reviewed. In addition we will present data from our research on the efficacy of these procedures. Participants should bring a tablet or computer with recording capabilities for use during the exercises.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify the critical elements of a training video; (2) create and edit a video model; (3) teach a skill or prompting procedure using video modeling.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, guided practice, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is supervisors in the behavior analysis field who are looking to improve staff procedural integrity or implement parent training. The material will be presented at an intermediate level.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Parent Training, Procedural Integrity, Staff Training, Video Modeling
 
Workshop #W108
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Keys to Success: Strategies for Providing Effective and Efficient Behavior Analytic Supervision and Mentorship
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training (IBT)), CECILIA KNIGHT (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: Supervision and training of individuals seeking BCBA/BCaBA certification as well as the ongoing supervision of BCaBAs and RBTs has become an increasing responsibility for BCBAs over the past several years. Due to the large volume of new professionals entering the field of applied behavior analysis, our field is growing at a substantial rate. More than ever, this growth requires BCBAs to ensure proper supervision and development of new professionals in order to maintain high quality in our field and to ensure that the treatment consumers receive is appropriate. This workshop will focus on reviewing the most recent changes to the BACB supervision and experience standards as well as several key components of effective supervision to facilitate quality training and development of candidates. Specifically, practical strategies will be discussed to help BCBA supervisors utilize time effectively and efficiently while providing practical, individualized supervision and training. Topics discussed will include curriculum development, organizational tools for tracking skill competency and training topics, as well as strategies for providing effective group supervision, and the importance of Behavioral Skills Training in developing a practical skill set among supervisees.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify recent updates to experience and supervisory requirements according to current BACB guidelines; (2) identify practical strategies to facilitate effective and efficient supervision, including organizational tools, curriculum development ideas, and strategies to facilitate effective group supervision; (3) identify and review several key components of effective behavior analytic supervision, including behavioral skills training (BST) and delivering effective performance feedback.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, group discussion, and video demonstration and review.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for BCBAs providing behavior analytic supervision to individuals seeking BCBA/BCaBA certification, or ongoing supervision to BCaBAs and RBTs. It would also be appropriate for any therapist, educator, administrator, or professional who is supervising and managing the performance of staff, parents, instructional aides, or others.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BCBA Supervision, Effective Supervision, Supervisory Practices, Training
 
Business Meeting #3
Montana Association for Behavior Analysis
Friday, May 25, 2018
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom B
Chair: Jackie Mohler (Montana Association for Behavior Analysis; Region IV Family Outreach)
We welcome current and new members to attend the Montana Association for Behavior Analysis business meeting. Business items will be reviewed along with updates on licensure, changes to bylaws made in 2017 will be reviewed and other Chapter events. This meeting is open to all current members of Montana Association of Behavior Analysis and those who are interested in how behavior analysis is growing in Montana!
Keyword(s): Affililated Chapter, Business Meeting, Montana, Professional Development
 
 
Business Meeting #4
ABA Professional Committee of China Association of Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons (ABA-CARDP)
Friday, May 25, 2018
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Torrey Pines 1
Chair: Dorothy Xuan Zhang (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology; George Mason University; ABA Professional Committee of China Association of Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons (ABA-CARDP))
This meeting will provide an update about the growth of the ABA Professional Committee of the China Association of Rehabilitation of Disabled Persons (ABA-CARDP) during the past year, including the current status of board-approved applied behavior analysis training course, research, and other activities.
Keyword(s): Behavior Analysis, China, International
 
 
Business Meeting #5
Wisconsin Association for Behavior Analysis Business Meeting
Friday, May 25, 2018
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Presidio 1
Chair: Roger Frank Bass (Bass Behavioral Consulting)
A full agenda is planned: (1) Building relationships with neighboring chapters including memberships, conference coordination, advocacy, and more; (2) The WisABA website will be discussed, comments taken, and revisions implemented based on feasibility and level of agreement regarding changes; (3) Discussion regarding governance will address bylaws, parent participation, and legislative action and outreach; (4) Reports from representatives will be presented or reported in absentia; (5) Reports from area coordinators will be requested and either presented or read in absentia.Topics include: Legislative Review/Action, Newsletter Coordinator, Website Coordinator, Secretary, Treasurer, CE Coordinator, Conference Coordinator, Membership Coordinator, WisABA University Coordinator. Please try to be there; substantive issues will be covered and decisions made regarding them.
 
 
Business Meeting #6
Louisiana Behavior Analysis Association
Friday, May 25, 2018
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom A
Chair: Derek Jacob Shanman (Nicholls State University)
The Louisiana Behavior Analysis Association is a nonprofit membership organization which supports ABAI's mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing , and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice, and to promote access to responsible behavior analytic services by professionals sufficiently trained in the discipline of behavior analysis and compliance with relevant ethical standards. LaBAA was established in 2012. LaBAA is proud to be the ABAI affiliated chapter for Louisiana and an affiliate organization of APBA.
Keyword(s): Business Meeting
 
 
Business Meeting #7
Oregon Association for Behavior Analysis (ORABA) Business Meeting
Friday, May 25, 2018
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom C
Chair: Melissa J. Gard (Building Bridges / ORABA)
The Oregon Association for Behavior Analysis (ORABA) is an affiliated chapter of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), an affiliate of the Association for Professional Behavior Analysts (APBA), and an approved CEU provider by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). ORABA encourages the understanding of all aspects of behavior analysis and serve as a professional resource group for those who embrace and practice behavior analytic interventions. We support the design and implementation of evidence based practice to improve the lives of Oregonians. During this business meeting we hope to collaborate with members and interested parties to improve how our chapter meets the diverse needs of our members.
Keyword(s): affiliated chapter, business meeting
 
 
Business Meeting #8
Rehabilitation and Independent Living Special Interest Group
Friday, May 25, 2018
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Presidio 2
Chair: Chris Persel (Centre for Neuro Skills)
The Rehabilitation and Independent Living (R.A.I.L.) Special Interest Group has continued to support the need for expanding the impact of behavior analysis in the field of rehabilitation, neurorehabilitation, and related areas. Through presentations at the ABAI conference and SIG business meeting, the R.A.I.L. SIG helps to maintain dissemination, communication, and collaboration of information that has proven to be of interest to its members. Visit the page to check it out and join/like, the URL is http://www.facebook.com/pages/ABA-Rehab-Special-Interest-Group/118243448217580. Rehabilitation, and specifically neurorehabilitation professionals face unique behavior challenges with the population they serve. When individuals have experienced a disruption in neurological function whether from a traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, stroke or other neuro condition, it is not uncommon for difficult behaviors to emerge. Most allied health professionals, including physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, occupational therapists and nurses, do not focus on behavior remediation however in collaboration with behavior analysts can have a significant role in positive behavior change. Issues related to training, student development and research have been and will be reviewed at the SIG meeting. We welcome participants from all treatment disciplines and behavior analysts that currently work in the field of rehabilitation or have interests in populations outside of autism.
 
 
Special Event #9
Student Welcome Event
Friday, May 25, 2018
7:00 PM–8:30 PM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom G
Chair: Lorraine A Becerra (Utah State University)
The ABAI Student Committee will be hosting a special welcome event for current and future student members. During this session, Student Committee members will review useful information and distribute materials to help you make the best of your convention experience. From tips about how to put your best foot forward, to an overview of must-attend events, your Student Committee has you covered. Additionally, ABAI 2018 Student Survival Kits will be available to attendees on a first come first serve basis so don't be late!
 
 
Special Event #10
ABAI Student Trivia Night
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:30 PM–10:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom G
Chair: Kathryn M. Roose (University of Nevada, Reno)
Grab your friends and join the Student Committee for a fun night of trivia! Drop in at any time and join one of the 6 rounds hosted by leading researchers and academics in the field of behavior analysis. Test your knowledge about the ABAI organization, the field of behavior analysis, and the city of San Diego. Questions will range from easy to difficult and prizes will be delivered for winners of each team. Come mingle with other students and faculty and kick off the conference with a friendly game of trivia!
 
 
Special Event #11
International Reception
Friday, May 25, 2018
9:00 PM–10:30 PM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom DE
Chair: Per Holth (Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences)
All registrants are welcome to join us in celebrating the diversity of our membership and the world-wide dissemination of the science and practice of behavior analysis. A short presentation about international development in the field and ABAI global efforts will be followed by ample time to socialize with friends and colleagues from around the world.
 

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