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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

Program by Continuing Education Events: Thursday, May 24, 2018


 

Workshop #W1
CE Offered: BACB
Assessment and Intervention Strategies for Individuals With Autism Who Use Augmentative Alternative Communication
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom A
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joseph Novak, Ed.D.
JOSEPH NOVAK (REED Academy; Advanced Behavior/Communication Solutions, LLC)
Description: AAC is reviewed for its benefits for expressive and receptive language (Light et al, 1998). Research-based information is provided as it relates to how vocal speech development is affected by AAC (Olive et al., 2007). Communication modes and the range of communication systems (low tech to high tech) are reviewed. The importance of selecting appropriate symbol types is discussed and assessments are highlighted. Consideration of prerequisite skills is discussed as are the importance of match-to-sample and imitation skills (Gregory et al., 2009). Indicators suggestive of an appropriate AAC system/approach are discussed and the idea of learner preference is explored (Sigafoos et al., 2005). Information regarding recommended prompts/prompt-fading procedures will be shared (Feeley & Jones, 2012). Steps for initiating intervention and selecting initial vocabulary are reviewed (Rosales, Stone, & Rehfeldt, 2009). Considerations for implementing FCT as it relates to AAC are reviewed (Carr & Durand, 1985). Addressing AAC needs for learners with partial vocal speech is addressed and a sample protocol is shared. AAC modeling techniques are reviewed in detail (Harris & Reichle, 2004). Additional strategies for common challenges with AAC intervention are discussed. Specific skill acquisition programs to target skills such as communicative repair will be shared.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) accurately describe the hierarchy of symbol types, the process of symbol selection, and strategies to ensure proper assessment for an AAC system; (2) accurately describe the initial steps in implementing an AAC-based intervention as well as curricular goals to move beyond requesting; (3) accurately describe various instructional strategies including language modeling and direct prompting.
Activities: - Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, small group breakout (as appropriate). - Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided. Supplemental materials for will be provided in order to support participant learning. - The format combines lecture and small group activities.
Audience: The target audience consists of BCBAs who may only have entry-level competence in the area of augmentative and alternative communication. Because collaboration with SLPs may not always be possible, it is important that BCBAs have a more thorough understanding of assessment and intervention strategies for individuals with autism who use AAC.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): AAC, Language Modeling, Picture-Based Communication, Speech-Generating Devices
 
Workshop #W2
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Beyond Picture Cards: A Systematic Approach to Multiple Exemplar Training With Visual Stimuli When Teaching LRs, Tacts, and Matching Skills to Children With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilitie
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Methodology, M.A.
COURTNEY AGARWAL (Bierman ABA Autism Center), COURTNEY BIERMAN (Bierman ABA), CHRISTINA BAROSKY (Bierman ABA)
Description: Children with autism often struggle with discrimination and generalization when being taught using visual stimuli. Designing effective programming for learners who have difficulty learning to discriminate and generalize between and across stimuli should be done systematically to ensure all of the salient features of stimuli are taught (Tiemann & Markle, 1990). This presentation will teach staff to identify critical and variable features of visual concepts that are appropriate for teaching within language programs, as well as demonstrate how to create meaningful sets of visual materials by selecting appropriate stimuli to include each of those critical and variable features. This will ensure clients learn to discriminate and generalize from the beginning stages of instruction and prevent the development of faulty stimulus control. This method is a replacement for traditional methods of design and teaching, which often includes using randomly selected images or pre-packaged flashcards. This is an interactive workshop. Individuals attending this workshop must bring a laptop in order to participate in the learning activities.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify examples of concepts; (2) Identify the critical and variable features of a concept; (3) When given a concept, create a meaningful set of visual stimuli; (4) When given an incomplete set, identify what is extra or missing; (5) Understand how to program for generalization and discrimination from the beginning when teaching LRs, tacts, and matching skills.
Activities: - Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, individual practice including modeling and feedback for demonstration of learning objectives
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, and other individuals responsible for designing instruction for children with autism and other developmental disabilities
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): discrimination, generalization, multiple exemplars, visual stimuli
 
 
Workshop #W3
CE Offered: BACB/NASP
The Art of Social Skills Groups: An Integrative Approach Utilizing Both Indirect Methods of Peer Mediation Instruction and Intervention and Direct Methods of Behavior Skills Training
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom B
Area: AUT/CBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monica A. Fyfe, M.S.
MONICA A. FYFE (Our Village, A Social Learning Community )
Description: Peer-mediated instruction and intervention (PMII) approaches are used to teach neuro-typically developing peers ways to interact with and help children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) acquire new social skills by increasing social opportunities within natural and structured, small group environments. Within PMII, peers are carefully and systematically taught ways of engaging children with ASD in positive and extended play and social interactions in both teacher-directed and learner-initiated activities (English et al., 1997; Odom et al., 1999; Strain & Odom, 1986). The National Professional Development Center on ASD has adopted specific definitions of evidence-based practices which would include PMII as an evidence-based intervention within the early childhood and elementary age groups under the social skills domain. Clinicians can add to the positive effects of PMII programs by also integrating additional behavioral interventions such as Behavior Skills Training (BST) and Teaching Interactions (TI) to help improve the rates of acquisition of newly targeted behaviors and provide some direct skill teaching to all the members in the social skills group.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) list three evidence-based social skills interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder; (2) state the five critical elements of both behavior skills training and teaching interactions; (3) describe peer mediation interventions; (4) describe how to select and train peer models; (5) describe how to differentially prompt and reinforce peer models within the social skills group.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, discussion, video observation, guided practice, and behavioral rehearsal. Small group breakout's will target practice of the core content including adaptation of materials to case presentations, role-play in small groups, and demonstration of differential reinforcement procedures related to developmental and mastery levels. Supplemental materials to further support learning targets and vocabulary, will be provided to help attendees assess the needs of their own inclusive social communities in developing future group supports.
Audience: Basic Level including but not limited to BCaBA, BCBA, School Psychologists, Therapists, Psychologists, Special Education Teachers
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Group Support, Peer Mediation, Social Skills, Teaching Interactions
 
Workshop #W4
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Establishing Social Repertoires in Toddlers With Autism: The Nuts and Bolts of Teaching
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom E
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Rebecca P. F. MacDonald, Ph.D.
REBECCA P. F. MACDONALD (New England Center for Children), PAMELA NICHOLE PETERSON (New England Center for Children), CAROLYN WALKER (Behavioral Health Works ), BRIANNA RACHEL HOLOHAN (Behavioral Health Works)
Description: It is widely known that Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) can produce large gains in social, cognitive, and language development in children with ASD, especially when treatment begins prior to their second birthday. The nature of EIBI requires that instruction be delivered throughout the child's waking day. As a result, both therapists and caregivers should be actively involved in the delivery of behavior-analytic programming. When therapists and parents work in coordination and take advantage of the many learning opportunities that arise in the natural environment, rates of skill acquisition may increase, as well as generalization and maintenance of skills. The purpose of the present workshop is to highlight key social skills (joint attention, social referencing, and play skills) to include in EIBI and to provide strategies for coaching and training both therapists and parents on the delivery of these services. A variety of exercises will allow participants to identify learning opportunities and practice developing and implementing treatment protocols. In addition, we will present staff and parent training protocols and review data from our research on efficacy of these procedures.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the key social skills to include in an EIBI program for toddlers, children under 2 years of age; (2) describe strategies for training/coaching both therapist ands parents to provide natural behavior interventions; (3) identify opportunities for teaching in the natural environment and develop strategies for embedding instruction in these situations.
Activities: Lecture, role-play, guided practice, small group discussion
Audience: Intermediate
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): EIBI, Joint Attention, Parent Training, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W5
CE Offered: BACB
Teaching Staff to Teach Social Skills Groups for Learners With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Regatta ABC
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jill E. McGrale Maher, M.A.
JILL E. MCGRALE MAHER (Behavioral Concepts, Inc), IAN MELTON (Endicott College), BRITANY MELTON (Endicott College), COURTNEY MAHER (Michigan State University )
Description: The recent increase in the diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has rapidly inflated the demand for social skills training and instruction for children with ASD. As a result, many strategies for teaching social skills have been developed and marketed. However, it is frequently difficult for practitioners to easily locate clear and comprehensive assessments and programs that meet the needs of specific students, especially those designed to be taught in applied settings in small homogenous groups. Furthermore, available resources are often lacking in programs with strong procedural integrity; comprehensive skill assessment; instruction for the staff who will actually be implementing the programming; systematic teaching procedures; prompt fading strategies; repetitive learning opportunities; and clear, accurate data collection systems. This workshop will provide participants with a comprehensive model intended to teach a systematic method of assessment, designing, implementing, and evaluating homogenous social skills groups for children with ASD. Participants will review the process from the selection of the best social skills assessment, grouping students, writing lesson plans, skills required for running groups, designing data collections systems, and evaluating progress. Target Audience: Directors, supervisors and instructors of social skills for children with autism and related disabilities
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify assessments appropriate for target students; (2) Create guidelines for constructing homogeneous groups; (3) Write a lesson plan for a group to include selection of appropriate activities for teaching skills; (4) Review skills required to lead and support groups; (5) Review empirically based teaching techniques including prompting strategies and reinforcement systems; (6) Develop data collection systems that target up to three behaviors for individual students; (7) Promote the use of best practices and ethical standards into social skill groups.
Activities: Didactic instruction Role play Development of lesson plans Development of staff training program Development of data collection procedures
Audience: Administrators, BCBAs, Teachers, SLP's
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W6
CE Offered: BACB
Motivating Learner Participation: An Alternative to Traditional Escape Extinction Methods With The 7 Steps to Instructional Control
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom A
Area: AUT/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Robert Schramm, M.A.
ROBERT SCHRAMM (Knospe-ABA GmbH, Meridian Rehabilitation Consulting, Inc.)
Description: Whether one works in autism or not, every teacher, aide, RBT, and BCBA has had clients that challenge their ability to earn instructional control and gain motivated cooperation in learning. This workshop offers information and data on an approach to earning instructional control that works without the use of traditional escape extinction procedures. When escape extinction is undesired, impossible, or unsuccessful, using an alternative such as The 7 Steps to Earning Instructional Control is a welcome addition to the field. Content has obtained credibility, as demonstrated by the involvement of the broader practice, education, and science communities in studying or applying the findings, procedures, practices, or theoretical concepts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the procedures that are in common use as escape extinction while becoming familiar with the problems associated with their use; (2) identify three alternatives to the basic three procedures used as escape extinction; (3) discuss The 7 Steps to Earning Instructional Control as an alternative to traditional escape extinction; (4) identify advanced considerations related to using the seven steps as well as the advantages and possible weaknesses related to their use.
Activities: Workshop objectives will be met through a balanced presentation of lecture, video observation, and group discussion. Core content will be taught through lecture and video demonstrations of strategies will be provided.
Audience: This workshop would be useful for anyone (BCBAs, BCaBAs, RBTs) currently providing or receiving ABA programming that includes a heavy reliance on escape extinction and might work in environments that this is not preferred, possible or successful currently.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Cooperation, Escape Extinction, Instructional Control, Motivation
 
Workshop #W7
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Parent Training: Evidence-Based Group Intervention for Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, America's Cup A-D
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jessica R. Everett, Ph.D.
JESSICA R. EVERETT (Melmark New England), BARBARA O'MALLEY CANNON (Melmark New England)
Description: Applied behavior analytic services provided to children with autism spectrum disorders in school, home, and clinic-based settings often include a parent-training component. Parent training provides parents and caregivers with the needed skills to effectivity manage their child's behavior as well as strategies for generalizing and maintaining mastered skills. Approaches to parent training related to autism spectrum disorders vary from providing support and education to technique-focused models where parents are taught specific skills to address skill deficits or excesses. While much intervention in behavior analysis has focused on individual parent training, evidence-based intervention programs are available to provide behaviorally-focused parent training within a group format. The current workshop will present the use of an evidence-based parent intervention, The Incredible Years Parent Training Program, with groups of parents of children with autism. The Incredible Years combines parent support, education, and technique focused models of parent training. It is an evidence-based parenting program geared towards increasing children�s social and emotional functioning while decreasing behavioral problems. Review of the adaptation and modification of the Incredible Years Parenting Program for parents of young children with autism spectrum disorders will be presented. Outcome data from implementation of the Incredible Years Parenting Program will be reviewed.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the core behavioral concepts included within an evidence-based group parent training intervention; (2) Identify progress monitoring tools to ensure the fidelity of parent training intervention procedures; (3) Identify outcome measures to assess the efficacy of parent training intervention; (4) Develop treatment goals that align with parent training provided via group intervention.
Activities: Workshop activities include didactic instruction, discussion, review of case examples, and video modeling. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in small group activities that focus on collaborative problem-solving and decision making.
Audience: Individuals working with parents in home, school, or clinic-based settings such as psychologists, special education teachers, or behavior analysts. Behavioral analysts working with families funded through insurance-based services who are conducting group-based parent training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Evidence-Based, Incredible Years, Insurance, Parent Training
 
Workshop #W8
CE Offered: BACB
Now You're Talking: Teaching Simple and Complex Conversation Skills to Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom G
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training), CECILIA KNIGHT (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: For many individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), social language skills, specifically conversational skills, are one of the most difficult skill sets to develop and utilize effectively with others in the natural environment. Conversation skills are essential for individuals of all ages to engage in successful social interactions, gain general knowledge, participate in group activities, and form friendships. Such skills also lead to increased success in educational and vocational settings. As such, it is essential that clinicians are equipped to teach these skills to their clients with ASD. This workshop will examine the complex behavior of engaging in a conversation as a whole, and break down key component skills that can be individually taught through structured and naturalistic instructional activities. Practical teaching strategies will be given, to include visual supports, conversation games and activities, video modeling, and strategies to teach conversation rules. Discussion will also focus on the importance of other domain areas to facilitate conversation skill development, particularly perspective taking skills and executive function skills.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify key social language skills that contribute to engaging in successful conversations with others; (2) identify and discuss several practical instructional strategies for teaching social language skills; (3) discuss several other skill areas that should be taught in order to facilitate conversation skill development, including perspective taking and executive function skills; (4) practice designing an intervention to teach a conversation skill using one of the discussed instructional strategies.
Activities: Workshop instructional activities will include lecture, small and large group discussion, video demonstration, and practice activities.
Audience: This workshop is appropriate for BCBAs, BCaBAs, educators, speech and language pathologists, therapists, or other professionals who work with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), particularly in the areas of social skills, advanced communication skills, and social integration with others in schools and community settings.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Advanced Communication, Conversation Skills, Social Language, Social Skills
 
Workshop #W9
CE Offered: PSY/BACB — 
Ethics
Standing Up for Science: Ethical Challenges and Opportunities for Behavior Analysts in the Autism Community
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Coronado Ballroom AB
Area: AUT/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: David A. Celiberti, Ph.D.
DAVID A. CELIBERTI (Association for Science in Autism Treatment), ERIN S. LEIF (Lizard Centre)
Description: There are literally hundreds of interventions for autism, although the vast majority of these lack any scientific support. Unfortunately, approaches that are not grounded in science prevail in many schools and centers, fringe treatments are afforded widespread media coverage distracting consumers and separating individuals with autism from science-based intervention such as ABA, and the internet is filled with misinformation and unsubstantiated claims. This presents ethical challenges and opportunities for behavior analysts. Science and scientific methods are not only relevant to discussions surrounding autism treatment selection but should serve as the foundation upon which treatments should be chosen, implemented, and evaluated. This workshop will highlight the role that behavior analysts can play in helping consumers, consultees, supervisees and other colleagues choose interventions, implement those interventions with high degrees of fidelity and transparent, as well as in objectively evaluating outcomes. Strategies for promoting science and the scientific method in both practice and in communication will be discussed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify and describe red flags in autism treatment, common media misrepresentations and diverse perspectives on treatment selection and explain the ethical concerns that result; (2) demonstrate a broader conceptualization of how the tenets of applied behavior analysis can be both a model and a framework for delivering science-based educations and treatment regardless of discipline and highlight the implications conceptually and procedurally; (3) describe challenges for behavior analysts related to interdisciplinary collaboration, consumer education, and interacting with members of the media community and describe strategies for avoiding or reducing the impact of these challenges; (4) identify specific and sustainable contributions that can be made to promote science in the treatment of autism across disciplines, within interactions with the media community and consumers.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, small group exercises, and follow up feedback and discussion. Original source material from the media will be incorporated in the exercises.
Audience: The workshop level is intermediate but would be suitable for behavior analytic teaching faculty, BCBAs involved in supervision and consultation, as well as BCBAs working in inter-disciplinary teams.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W10
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Behavior Analysis for Well-Being: Applied Behavior Analysis as a Positive Psychology Intervention
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Patrick Betters, M.S.
PATRICK BETTERS (ABA Behavior Therapies and Testing )
Description: As an emerging science, Applied Behavior Analysis has primarily been utilized in the fields of Organizational Behavioral Management, Autism/ behavioral disorders and in laboratory study. However, the applications of behavior analysis and the benefits society can reap from it are limitless. We currently live in a society of abundance, however more people report feelings of depression and anxiety than in the past. Behavior Analysis methods in the form of positive psychology interventions could be a means to combat these symptoms and furthermore could aid others in taking their lives from "just getting by" to flourishing. Under the supervision of a BCBA, a person could identify behaviors they wish to improve upon that they feel would lead to a greater sense of wellbeing. Moving forward the person would learn data collection, self-management and other behavior analysis techniques that would assist them to increase the frequency of the behavior in question. As such, the increase in desired behavior could encourage the cultivation of wellbeing. It is without question that our actions affect our mental states and vice versa. Behavior Analysis then helps a person cultivate the skills they need to actively change their actions, the way they think and thus change their life.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify target behaviors based in positive psychology; (2) use self management techniques to increase desired target behavior in order to promote wellbeing.
Activities: Lecture, discussion, guided practice, small group break out
Audience: BCaBA, BCBA
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
 
 
Workshop #W11
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Children With Emotional and Behavioral Disorders: Broadening the Lens
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom C
Area: CBM/DEV; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jeannie A. Golden, Ph.D.
JEANNIE A. GOLDEN (East Carolina University)
Description: Traditional counselors view aberrant behaviors as symptoms of underlying constructs that are the reason for these behaviors, while behaviorists view these behaviors as serving an environmental function. FBA identifies the function of aberrant behaviors and acceptable replacement behaviors that serve the same function. Components that are often missing in the analysis of aberrant behaviors include: 1) motivating operations in the form of private events (thoughts and feelings); and 2) learning history with specific Sds for reinforcement or punishment. This workshop will deal with the following: disturbed attachment, callousness and lack of emotionality, oppositional and defiant behaviors, and anxiety and depression.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe the symptoms of emotional/behavioral disorders as behaviors serving an environmental function; (2) Describe the process of conducting FBAs with children with emotional/behavioral disorders; (3) Describe the role of learning history in treating with children with emotional/behavioral disorders; (4) Describe the role of motivating operations and discriminative stimuli in treating children with emotional/behavioral disorders; (5) Describe how to develop and implement function-based treatments for children with emotional/behavioral disorders.
Activities: Workshop activities will include lecture, demonstration, role-play, and discussion. Participants will be provided with copies of power point slides, DVDs, and a list of suggested readings.
Audience: Participants should include behavior analysts, psychologists, mental health professionals, social workers, counselors, administrators, teachers and direct care staff.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): behavioral disorders, emotional disorders, function-based treatments, motivating operations
 
Workshop #W12
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Competency-Based Staff Training
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Presidio 1
Area: CBM/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: David Pyles, Ph.D.
DAVID PYLES (Pyles and Associates), VICTORYA JEWETT (Pyles and Associates), ELIZABETH PEREZ (Pyles and Associates), ADRIENNE MUBAREK (Pyles and Associates)
Description: Given the number of skilled clinicians and the increasing number of clientele, doing more with less is always a challenge for today's BCBA. In the clinical setting BCBAs are often faced with the task of ensuring effective implementation of treatment plans provided by multiple people. We use behavior skills training, or BST, to teach staff using competency-based training tools. In addition, this approach, combined with a train-the-trainer model, allows a BCBA consultant to reach a maximum number of staff with minimum amount of resources.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss and implement behavior skills training to teach a skill; (2) Discuss and implement competency-based training measures; (3) Discuss and implement a train-the-trainer approach.
Activities: Workshop activities include material presentation through lecture and demonstrations, discussion, and small group activities
Audience: This workshop level is appropriate for all BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W13
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Systematically Evaluating the Comprehensiveness of a Child's (an Adult's) Treatment Plan for Addressing Problems and Building Upon the Gifts of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Rancho Santa Fe 2
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard Cook, M.D.
RICHARD COOK (Penn State University Applied Behavioral Medicine Associates)
Description: Appropriate "treatment" for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), by standards of multiple organizations representing those having or treating it, typically include "medication" and "behavior therapy," defined in various ways, yet studies of various populations often conclude that those within the cohort get cursory medication check visits (if medication is used at all) and "behavior" therapy, the topography of which varies greatly, often with little resemblance to approaches which an applied behavior analyst would recognize, again, if any behavior therapy at all. This workshop uses a combination of a medical and public health problem solving model to teach attendees how to evaluate the adequacy of an individuals treatment plan within a customizable, practical group of domains, and apply behaviorally sound principles to effect changes that will both address the problems and build upon the "gifts" associated with ADHD.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify domains of behavior relevant to each individual; (2) practice a systematic approach to applying the systematic approach taught to both problem and "gift" behaviors associated with ADHD; (3) develop their own customized guide for systematically evaluating the comprehensiveness of an ADHD treatment plan for a child or an adult.
Activities: Lecture, discussion guided notes use of pre-scripted algorithms for which attendees will practice and learn the approach to modifying for each individual's ADHD treatment plan for whom evaluation is performed
Audience: Workshop level appropriate for: clinicians who treat patients with ADHD; clinicians who have children with ADHD; clinicians who themselves have ADHD, irrespective of the attendee's academic credentials or years of clinical practice.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ADD, ADD/ADHD, ADHD, attention deficit
 
Workshop #W14
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Introduction to Acquired Brain Injury for Behavior Analysts: Clinical-Behavior Analysis in Neurorehabilitation
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom C
Area: CBM/BPN; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joseph N. Ricciardi, Psy.D.
JOSEPH N. RICCIARDI (Seven Hills Foundation; Seven Hills NeuroCare)
Description: Brain injury represents an emerging area of practice for behavior analysts (Leblanc, Heinicke, Baker, 2012). Current estimates suggest that over 3.2 million Americans will suffer a traumatic brain injury non-traumatic brain injury each year (Centers for Disease Control, 2010). Many will require long-term care and support in community-based programs. Research supports that behavior analysis has much to contribute toward the effective treatment and support of individuals with brain injuries (Heinicke, Carr, 2014). For example, the brain injury literature includes behavior analytic strategies for re-learning basic life skills, learning new compensatory skills, managing behavioral challenges, and training support staff. In order to serve this population, behavior analysts will need to integrate their specialty with the contributions of neurology, neuropsychology, rehabilitation psychology, and other disciplines. This workshop will provide an overview of functional neuroanatomy, brain-behavior relationships, the common forms of brain injuries, and strategies and recommendations for implementing behavior analytic-based practices in neurorehabilitation programs. Examples of comprehensive behavior support plans, goals selection, skills development, and outcomes monitoring with this population will be reviewed as well. This workshop provides an introduction to this emerging practice area, with guidance on increasing knowledge, competence, and further study.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define acquired brain injury and discriminate from other neurologic dysfunction; (2) discriminate traumatic and non-traumatic brain injury; (3) describe the primary and secondary injury progression in cases of traumatic brain injury; (4) describe six primary brain structures and their localized functions; (5) describe basic neuropsychological functions and their role in behavioral presentations; (6) list best practices in skill development programs for people with acquired brain injuries with application examples; (7) integrate neuropsychological findings with traditional behavior assessment; (8) describe the three core elements of a multi-component behavior support plan for individuals with acquired brain injury.
Activities: Core content will be taught through combination of lecture, exemplar programs (handouts), illustrative visuals (MRI, CT, DTI, and other neuroimages), and video demonstrations.
Audience: Intermediate. This content is intended for an audience with some familiarity with brain injury, and interested in entering a new population practice or understanding broader applications of clinical behavior analysis.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W15
CE Offered: BACB
Learn to Behave Well Using Mindfulness-Based Cognitive and Behavior Analytic Practices
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Coronado Ballroom DE
Area: CBM/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Robert Stromer, Ph.D.
ROBERT STROMER (George Brown College), ELISABETH KINNEY (Behavioral Learning and Leadership), CYNTHIA A LONG (Square One)
Description: As Skinner and Vaughan (1997) said, "To enjoy life at any age one must view each difficulty as simply a problem to be solved." Unfortunately, though, one's current problem-solving skills may not suffice. For example, to maximally manage stress and the ever changing conditions that give rise to it may require retooling one's existing repertoire. For us, this meant adding mindfulness and meditative practices to better manage life's stressors and address ongoing concerns of health and wellness. This approach resulted in improved ways of dealing with and replacing verbal behavior that often got in the way of enjoyment. So, this workshop is about supplementing one's problem-solving skills to better cope with life's challenges and to reduce the likelihood of disabling emotional states such as stress, anxiety, and depression. The supplements come from empirically supported protocols focusing on stress management and cognitive therapy. Much of the content comes from Williams and Penman's (2011; http://franticworld.com) best-selling self-help book on mindfulness meditation as its skills can be readily learned and generalized to real life. As a take-home practice, attendees learn a meditation called the breathing space. After the workshop, participants may attend weekly teleconferences designed to assist in their implementation of mindfulness practices.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state potential benefits of mindfulness meditation as a supplement to one's self-managed, problem-solving repertoire; (2) describe some of the key elements of the skill set involved in practices common to mindfulness-based therapy and other "third wave" cognitive therapies; (3) demonstrate the recommended chair-supported sitting posture used during formal practices and the kinds of self-instructions used to practice the three-minute breathing space; (4) identify exemplary digital and other resources for further mindfulness study and practice.
Activities: In a large-group format, we introduce mindfulness meditation and describe its nature and relevant background and rationales for offering a workshop on it. We also provide guided opportunities to participate in several warm-up meditations. Then, during the bulk of the workshop, methods resembling aspects of behavioral skills training and interteaching (e.g., dyadic discussion, question-and-answer, feedback) are used to inform meaningful practice opportunities in a pivotal meditation called the Three-Minute Breathing Space. Activities include the use of (a) live and video demonstrations, (b) written rationales and scripts appropriate for the two roles to be rehearsed by pairs of attendees, facilitator or teacher, and meditative student, (c) dyadic rehearsal of scripted and unscripted guidance of the Breathing Space and evaluative discussions of experiences, and (d) informative feedback while the instructors oversee dyad rehearsals. Finally, a wrap up period addresses questions and comments from the entire group and we share knowledge of several digital resources found helpful in our ongoing practices and self-study. (Content relevant to this workshop may be found at https://www.facebook.com/BehavingMindfully/.)
Audience: The workshop is designed for all certified behavior analysts, those who already practice mindfulness meditation, and those with little or no experience in such practices.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Mindfulness meditation, Self-management, Self-talk, Stress reduction
 
Workshop #W16
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP
Creating Nurturing Environments in Multiple Settings With the Use of Evidence-Based Kernels
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom G
Area: CSS/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Anthony Biglan, Ph.D.
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute), MAGNUS JOHANSSON (Oslo Metropolitan University)
Description: Nurturing Environments (Biglan, Flay, Embry & Sandler, 2012) describes key areas in evolving a healthy culture: minimizing toxic social conditions, increasing reinforcement of prosocial behaviors, limiting problem behaviors, and promoting psychological flexibility in the pursuit of one's values and goals. An evidence-based kernel is a behavior?influence procedure shown through experimental analysis to affect specific behaviors (Embry & Biglan, 2008). Kernels are indivisible in the sense that removing any of their components would render them inert. Existing evidence shows that a variety of kernels can influence behavior in context, and some evidence suggests that frequent or sufficient use of some kernels may produce longer lasting behavioral shifts, as prevention, interventions, treatments, or even for population-level public health outcomes. We will present up to 8 kernels. As a group, we will identify organizations, groups and other settings in which kernels can be implemented. We will encourage participants to adapt them for contexts relevant to their own work. We will use several of the kernels to facilitate experiential learning.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) List at least five evidence-based kernels; (2) Describe how at least three kernels can be implemented in more than one setting; (3) Create a plan for implementing and assessing the impact of at least one kernel.
Activities: Brief lecturing on available research on the kernels, and experience from using them in different settings. Experiential learning through application of several kernels throughout the workshop. Small group exercises and discussions on possible uses in settings relevant to participants.
Audience: Professionals interested in how evidence-based kernels can be useful to facilitate behavior change in multiple settings, to create nurturing environments in families, schools, workplaces and communities.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): evidence-based kernels, nurturing environments
 
Workshop #W17
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Ethics
Behavior Analysis of Seizures
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Mission Beach A-C
Area: DDA/DEV; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: John C. Neill, Ph.D.
JOHN C. NEILL (Long Island University)
Description: Up to 50% of individuals with severe developmental disabilities have epilepsy. Remarkably, behavior analysts are often unaware how epilepsy impairs their client's ability to learn and remember contingencies of reinforcement. Individuals with epilepsy often have behavior disorders which can be exacerbated by seizures. These seizures could be managed better, and important new life skills could be acquired, if their behavior analyst knew more about epilepsy. This workshop will educate behavior analysts about epilepsy with a behavioral approach. A basic review of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and molecular events responsible for seizures and seizure-induced impairments in learning and behavior will be provided. The etiology, genetics and classification of various seizure disorders will be reviewed. Behavioral research on several animal models of seizures will be related to human cases. A frequent problem for developmentally disabled clients is that they are improperly medicated for seizures. This could be avoided with EEG (electroencephalography), which is a crucial test for accurate diagnosis of epilepsy. Workshop participants will learn how to prepare a client for cooperating with the EEG, without sedation or anesthesia. Participants will learn how epileptic seizures change an individual's ability to operate on their environment. Conversely, the environment often modulates seizures. Behavior analysts will benefit their clients who have epilepsy by learning about how to describe, measure and control these relationships.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define an epileptic seizure; (2) Describe some of the developmental and neurological events responsible for epileptic seizures; (3) Recognize the importance of measuring the effects of seizures on learning and behavior; (4) Objectively describe, count and time seizures in relation to environmental conditions; (5) Recognize the importance of reviewing a client's history to determine etiology, and its particular impact on behavioral progress.; (6) Recognize the effects of the environment on epileptic seizures; (7) Know how to prepare a client for cooperating with EEG tests, without sedation or anesthesia; (8) Discriminate pseudoepileptic versus epileptic seizures; (9) Manage learning and behavior disorders effectively in clients with epilepsy; (10) Explain some recent research on epilepsy and behavior analysis; (11) Explain how the environment can decrease abnormal brain activity and seizures.
Activities: Lecture and video presentations will alternate with discussions of key topics and audience questions and experiences regarding epileptic and non-epileptic behaviors.
Audience: Applied behavior analysts, special education teachers, psychologists and therapists who write behavior plans for individuals with developmental disabilities, including epilepsy.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): autism, developmental disabilities, epilepsy, seizures
 
Workshop #W18
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
An Ethical Approach to Addressing Problem Behavior in School Settings
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom B
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Stacey M. McIntyre, M.A.
MEGAN B. BOUCHER (The Ivymount School), STACEY M. MCINTYRE (Ivymount School)
Description: Behavior modification can be effective at reducing problem behavior. However, the use of arbitrarily selected reinforcers is no longer recommended as best practice. Using functional assessments to inform behavioral intervention produces treatments that are practical, ethical, and effective. Federal mandates require school personnel to conduct Functional Behavior Assessments and write Behavior Intervention Plans when problem behaviors impede students' educational performance. Many articles written to provide practical guidelines to school personnel include recommending multiple treatment components that create complex BIPs and can impact treatment effectiveness. This workshop will highlight a resource-efficient model for addressing problem behavior using function-based and non-function based approaches and the related ethical considerations (e.g., least restrictive environment, safety, treatment effectiveness, preference and staff training). Participants will discriminate between function-based and non-function-based treatment and identify the advantages and barriers to each. Also, participants will identify the key features of each tier in a Multi-Tier System of Supports framework and determine when to move to the next tier of intervention.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the utility of a multi-tier system of supports framework within a school setting; (2) Identify universal supports that promote appropriate behavior (i.e., tier 1 intervention); (3) Identify when to move to behavioral interventions at tiers 2 and 3; (4) Discriminate between and identify advantages and barriers to: non-function based behavior intervention plan (BIP) and function-based BIP; (5) Identify and apply the ethics associated with function and non-function based treatment development.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, small group breakout
Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, BCBA-Ds, school psychologists and other behavior analytic providers working in a public or private school setting.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): function-based treatment, LRE, PBIS, staff training
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
CANCELED: ABA in Coaching: Retread into a New World!
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua K. Pritchard, Ph.D.
MALLORY J. QUINN (Applied Behavior Analysis Sports Innovations), JOSHUA K. PRITCHARD (Southern Illinois University)
Description: We will provide the behavior analyst guidance on how to use behavior analysis in the world of sports. Based on a line of research of study demonstrating the power of behavior analysis to take athletes to the next level, we will present
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the repertoire needed to begin a career in sports coaching from a behavior analytic vantage; (2) Develop a brief synopsis of behavior analytic coaching to a specific, preferred sports population; (3) Create a task list of steps needed to penetrate their specified market, based on the needs of the sport.
Activities: This workshop will combine both lecture and small group discussion in the examination of sports coaching opportunities. There will be opportunities for members of the audience to practice some behavior analytic coaching skills, and to observe and collect data from video demonstrations.
Audience: The target audience consists of behavior analysts who are skilled at their science and want to expand into areas outside of the typical behavior analytic profession. Specifically, they are eager to push the boundaries of professional behavior analysis into new and exciting areas and have some interest in sports and athletic behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): coaching, entrepreneurship, new areas
 
 
Workshop #W20
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
CANCELED: Designing Skill Training With Computers: A Practical Stimulus Approach
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Celso Socorro Oliveira, Ph.D.
CELSO SOCORRO OLIVEIRA (UNESP - Sao Paulo State University)
Description: Multiple choice e-learning techniques in typical computer programs exploring Stimulus Equivalence (SE) Knowledge will be presented to show how teaching can be more effective. Samples from ASL, Pictures and even texts combined with some new trends on SE using networks will explore how to design better lesson contents and assessments. The design of skill training will be at basic level so that can be used by any BCBA at client's home. The author is a Computer Scientist since 1997, with expertise on deaf, disabled and preparing lessons for them as well as for regular undergraduates from his university, including his doctorate in 2002. At the end of the workshop, the audience should be able to design lessons showing equivalence classes emergency in less training sessions, as well as analyze the results to accelerate the e-learning.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) design more effective training lessons in computers based on stimulus equivalence theoretical approach; (2) criticize computer programs that uses those techniques; (3) create, plan and revise new skill training lessons with computers.
Activities: The practical activity will guide thru several samples of programs that already uses those teaching techniques and shall be discussed among the participants
Audience: basic, for BCBA's and undergraduates.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): computer training, skill training, stimulus equivalence, training design
 
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Part 1: Pragmatic Supervision: Evaluate, Analyze, Change, and Repeat
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Torrey Pines 2
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Pragmatic supervisors collect frequent, accurate, sensitive measures of client progress, and when clients are not meeting their progress goals, those supervisors make changes. A pragmatic supervision process includes the following steps: 1) Evaluate client progress and staff performance. 2) Analyze causes of inadequate client progress and staff performance. 3) Change staff resources, training, and management, and 4) Repeat the process until clients achieve desired outcomes. Organizations that operate pragmatically can achieve amazing results for their clients and stakeholders, but most don’t. This is an organizational performance problem, which could be solved if organizations had the necessary resources. One such resource is ProgressCharter, a mobile and web application that will make it easier to evaluate client progress, identifying which clients are not meeting progress goals, analyze the causes of inadequate client progress, using evaluations of staff performance and resources to identify can-do, know-how, and want-problems, and recommend specific changes in staff resources, training, and management, to ensure that each client makes desired progress. Please note, this is a three-part workshop and attendees must register for all threeparts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) Define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) Perform a data based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) Design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop will provide a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and a web/mobile charting application.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, program designers, staff trainers, and directors of schools and agencies serving individuals with learning difficulties. All participants will receive a one-year subscription to ProgressCharter, an application that makes it easier to evaluate client progress, analyze causes of inadequate progress, and recommend changes so that all clients can make efficient progress. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to improve the performance of your staff so that every client can achieve success. Participants should bring their laptops and smartphones or tablets to the workshop so that they can practice using ProgressCharter. Those who pre-register will receive some materials prior to the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): celeration efficiency, organizational performance, PARSE process, pragmatic approach
 
Workshop #W22
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Feedback Fundamentals: A Behavior Analytic Approach to the Analysis and Implementation of Performance Feedback
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Adam E. Ventura, M.S.
ADAM E. VENTURA (World Evolve, Inc.), ERICA CROWLEY (BehaviorLeader, Inc.), DENNIS URIARTE (Florida Institute of Technology)
Description: Feedback is a very commonly used intervention to improve performance in a variety of different settings from for-profit corporations to institutions of higher learning. However, the form and function of feedback have been widely disputed throughout the years despite a regular propensity for its use. This workshop will begin by examining some past and current literature on feedback, propose a new operational definition for feedback from a behavior analytic perspective, and describe why it is important to use. The next portion of this workshop will include activities on how to deliver and accept performance feedback effectively and ethically.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define feedback and its components; (2) identify why providing feedback is important; (3) identify and implement procedures for effective feedback delivery; (4) identify and implement procedures for accepting feedback.
Activities: 1. Lecture 2. Discussion 3. Group & Individual Activities
Audience: 1. Board certified behavior analysts (BCBA) 2. Business owners 3. Business administrators
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Accepting feedback, Leadership, Performance feedback
 
 
Workshop #W23
CE Offered: BACB
Process Mapping to Make Your Agency More Efficient
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom D
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lori H. Ludwig, Ph.D.
LORI H. LUDWIG (Performance Blueprints, Inc.)
Description: When a process is poorly designed or managed, the effects are often felt throughout your agency as well as by your clients, families, and stakeholders. Even the smallest and simplest process can have large effects on performance, so understanding and improving your processes is critical to your agency's impact. Process mapping can help. Process mapping is a behavior systems technique to make the invisible flow of work visible helping your team view their work objectively and make improvements together (Rummler, Ramais & Rummler, 2010). A process map can be used to visualize disconnects, redundancies and inefficiencies (Malott, 2003). A process map helps you create effective and efficient tasks and serves as an invaluable management tool to assist with accountability, teamwork, efficiency, quality, safety, customer satisfaction and competitive advantage. In this workshop, you will learn how to process map through a variety of case examples. You will spend the majority of the workshop building a process map for your agency with hands-on guidance along the way. You will leave the workshop with an action plan for improving process performance and a skill set that you can use for any process improvement effort in your business.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Explain the value of process mapping; (2) Build a process map; (3) Develop a process improvement action plan.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: Lecture, discussion, case examples, and guided practice
Audience: Individuals who are responsible for any process in their organization
Content Area: Methodology
Instruction Level: Basic
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Supervising Humans: A Look at Supervision Beyond the Task List
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom F
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James A. Hoko, Ph.D.
JAMES A. HOKO (ACES), CARA M. CAPPALLI-DAVEY (ACES ), STEPHANIE ALINE REINOSO (ACES)
Description: An effective supervisor needs an understanding of how to provide training and supervision for job skills beyond what is outlined in the BACB task list. Although compliance with the task list is essential, it is important to develop an understanding of other contextual and indigenous contingencies at play for supervisees working in varied employment situations. These practical and unique challenges can be effectively addressed with an understanding of individuals' reinforcement histories and the application of evidence-based supervision protocols. This workshop will review how to identify management and leadership skills not specifically noted in the task list. It will then review strategies for the creation of performance-based goal setting for workplace success and skill remediation through performance improvement plans.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify skills critical for success in varied employment situations; (2) Determine supervisee reinforcement history and the contingencies needed to effectively supervise them; (3) Derive appropriate instructional objectives related to the critical skills; (4) Use evidence-based practices in addressing those instructional objectives.
Activities: This workshop will involve lecture, small and large group discussions, and small group break out activities.
Audience: This workshop is targeted towards BCBAs providing behavior analytic supervision to individuals seeking certification as a BCBA or BCaBA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): evidence-based protocals, leadership, management, supervision
 
Workshop #W25
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Ecocultural Dynamics of Families That Shape Sustainability and Social Validity of Treatment Outcomes
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Laura Bunda, M.S.
LAURA BUNDA (Connecticut Association for Behavior Analysis; Association of Professional Behavior Analysts), ASHLEY PIZZOFERRATO (Connecticut Association for Behavior Analysis)
Description: The maximization and sustainability of treatment outcomes has everything to do with assessment and planning that starts at home and includes the parents or primary caregivers as critical components. This workshop will reference research, and the growing practice of including parents in the assessment, the planning and the implementation of treatment. This workshop will emphasize the pivotal importance of not only assessing the child, but also assessing the culture, the resources and the daily dynamics of the family that impact the child's progress. The family's culture, ethnicity and religious values create the contextual framework within which we must develop our treatment plans. It is imperative that behavior analysts know how to collaborate and communicate with parents to program for socially valid outcomes. Moreover, when programming for treatment, we must include the parents and caregivers as integral components of our treatment package if a child's success is to be maximized and sustained across a lifespan. This workshop is based on research and practice which evidences the efficacy of defining what a child needs within the context of the family, collaboration with parents and caregivers, and the sustainability of treatment outcomes for children whose families implement evidence based interventions.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) Reference research that evidences the importance of including the family during the assessment, planning and implementation of treatment.; (2) Identify key cultural, ethnic, socioeconomic and educational factors that may impact the social validity and outcomes for treatment; (3) Identify evidence based practices that promote sustainability and maximization of outcomes by building capacity and capability within the family framework.
Activities: This workshop will include: presentations, group contributions, small group case studies and targeted reading. We may also have video recordings that provide examples for learning objectives.
Audience: The chosen workshop level is basic and is targeted for practicing behavior analysts who primarily work in homes, communities and schools with children as their primary clients.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ecocultural variables, Parent Training, social validity, sustainability
 
 
Workshop #W26
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Recognizing and Dealing With Everyday Ethical Dilemmas in the Workplace
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Presidio 2
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Richard B. Graff, Ph.D.
RICHARD B. GRAFF (May Institute)
Description: Behavior analytic practitioners encounter potential ethical dilemmas in the workplace on a regular basis. Some of these issues are fairly straightforward, and experienced BCBAs can deal with these situations fairly easily. However, on occasion, more difficult and complex ethical situations arise. Recognizing and dealing effectively with these situations is a critical skill that all behavior analysts must have. This presentation begins with a review of some common ethical dilemmas that can arise in the workplace. Then, we will review how to assess whether or not an issue rises to the level of being considered an ethical violation. We will review some strategies for evaluating the complexity of the situation, which may dictate if the behavior analyst has the ability to resolve the situation on their own, or if additional resources would be needed. We will also review the steps necessary to deal with a complex ethical dilemma. Finally, attendees will work in teams to develop potential solutions to hypothetical ethical dilemmas. Understanding how to recognize and deal with complex ethical issues will not only help you protect your clients, but will help to protect you as well.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to (1) describe at least five common ethical situations that can arise in the workplace; (2) describe one strategy for classifying the complexity of an ethical dilemma; (3) describe the steps necessary for effectively navigating a complex ethical dilemma.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, and small group breakout
Audience: This workshop is designed for behavior analyst practitioners.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W27
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Not the Same Old Ethics Talk
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom H
Area: PRA/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Cheryl J. Davis, Ph.D.
MARY ROSSWURM (LittleStar ABA Therapy), CHERYL J. DAVIS (7 Dimensions Consulting; SupervisorABA), MEGAN MILLER (Navigation Behavioral Consulting)
Description: Ethics, values and morals: these words have become synonymous and frequently overused in today's world and our profession. While most BCBAs know the code and feel they would make the correct decision in the face of an ethical dilemma, research has shown that most wouldn't if doing so would put them at a disadvantage. This workshop will distinguish the differences between ethics, values, character, morals and virtues and explore how they fit into the social contract that we all live in. We will briefly look at the teachings of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle and the roots of Western ethics and how children develop morals. We will explore how ethical decision making is a task we are faced with many times each day, but personal ethics vary so widely from person to person (think extra marital affairs, lying on personal tax forms, driving while intoxicated, just to name a few), yet many professionals are expected to follow and live by strict ethical codes in their business life. How does one balance this paradox? We will explore a doomsday theory of decision making and talk about some interesting literature on ethics from the business and leadership journals, which is very pertinent to our field. We will chat briefly about ethical dilemmas going on in the world around us and why so much attention has been given to ethics over the past seven to 10 years. This workshop takes a deep dive into ethics, explores why living by the code is so important for our field and the people we serve and shares strategies to help participants make the best decision the next time they are faced with a difficult issue. It is assumed that the attendee is already very familiar with the BACBs Professional and Ethical Compliance Code.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define and differentiate ethics, values, character, morals and virtues; (2) Work through a "doomsday" process of decision making when faced with an ethical dilemma in order to calculate as many outcomes as possible; (3) Recognize the paradox between personal and professional ethics; (4) Recall appropriate strategies to assist in making the best decision when faced with a difficult issue.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: lecture, discussion, small group breakout, and videos.Supplemental materials of concepts presented will be provided in order to support participant learning and use after workshop is over.
Audience: Basic
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): ethics, morals, The Code, values
 
Workshop #W28
CE Offered: BACB — 
Ethics
Practical and Ethical Methodologies for Assessing Function of Problematic Behaviors in the Natural Environment
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Torrey Pines 3
Area: PRA/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Paulo Guilhardi, Ph.D.
PAULO GUILHARDI (Beacon ABA Services, Inc.), ROBERT K. ROSS (Beacon ABA Services), ASHLEY DOUGLAS (Beacon ABA Services )
Description: The workshop will focus on the use of direct observation tools to generate hypothesis regarding function with direct practice on a tool that is more accurate and efficient. Following the identification of hypothesis to be tested, the workshop will focus on alternative experimental methods to test a subset of hypothesized functions and involve teaching alternative responses and do not reinforce problematic behaviors. Conclusions derived from current functional assessment practices heavily rely on indirect methods for gathering data (e.g. FAST, MAS). When a function is experimentally tested, current practices pose ethical, practical and theoretical concerns. Both approaches are problematic in that indirect data produces inaccurate and imprecise data, and experimental methods are typically not driven by a hypothesis, directly reinforce problematic behaviors, and do not involve simultaneous establishment of appropriate alternative behaviors. The workshop will conclude with an argument to support (1) direct observation of consequences be used in place of indirect data to develop hypothesis and (2) use of use of alternative experimental methods such a free-operant and trial-based functional analysis procedures. The proposed methodology provides a more ethical, conceptually systematic, and practical assessment of function.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Describe methods for raising hypothesis of function of problematic behaviors; (2) Collect data on consequences of problematic behaviors; (3) Develop functional analysis procedures to test hypothesis that do not reinforce problematic behaviors and teach functional alternative responses; (4) Conduct functional analysis; (5) Summarize functional assessment results.
Activities: Instructional strategies include: 1. Lecture 2. Discussion 3. Small group breakout- graphing and analysis activity 4. Video data collection exercise 5. Conduct of a mock functional assessment
Audience: Professionals responsible for conducting functional assessments and analysis providing services in schools, home, and community.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Direct Observation, FBA/Ethics, Free Operant, Trial Based
 
Workshop #W29
CE Offered: BACB/QABA — 
Ethics
Function-Based Restorative Justice Practices for Client Harm Reduction
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Rancho Santa Fe 3
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Worner Leland, M.S.
WORNER LELAND (Upswing Advocates), JANANI VAIDYA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
Description: When encountering a crisis situation, helping professionals may have legal and ethical responsibilities that seem to be in conflict with one another. For many helping professionals some degree of mandated reporting exists as a part of their professions'ethical guidelines, and many places of employment have crisis policies in place that involve calling the police. In the United States, an estimated one third to one half of people killed in police shootings have had physical, intellectual, or developmental disabilities (Perry & Carter-Long, 2016), and the intersections of clients'identities may heighten this danger. Punitive measures including and up to the involvement of law enforcement often do not account for behavior function and do not focus on habilitation or training functional replacement behaviors. Function based restorative justice practices can be one meaningful way to reduce harm to clients in situations of crisis. This workshop will provide an overview of restorative justice and will examine ways in which helping professionals can incorporate alternate interventions in moments of crisis to reduce risks and benefit their clients as much as possible. Empirically supported literature and data will be presented where applicable and available, and audience questions and discussion will be welcomed throughout the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) state which guidelines in the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (BACB, 2014) are applicable to restorative justice, (2) state the key components of behavior escalation and best practices for intervention, (3) describe the costs and risks of punitive crisis intervention practices, (4) state the critical components of engaging in restorative justice practices, and (5) apply strategies from restorative justice models to reduce client harm in a case study.
Activities: Activities will include: Pre/post quizzes, lecture, small group discussion, FreeWrite exercises, and worksheets.
Audience: Audience: BCBA-D, BCBA, BCaBA, RBTs, or those training to be any of these who are interested in building their competence around the topic of function based restorative justice. Teachers, therapists, and other helping professionals are also welcome to attend.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): behavior function, deescalation, restorative justice, transformative justice
 
Workshop #W30
CE Offered: BACB
Becoming an Expert on CPT Codes
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom F
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Ashley Williams, M.S.
KATHERINE A. JOHNSON (Advances Learning Center), ASHLEY WILLIAMS (ABACS), KEVIN J. SCHLICHENMEYER (TACT, LLC ), BRANDON HERSCOVITCH (ABACS, LLC), JESSICA WENIG (Advances Learning Center)
Description: This workshop provides attendees with a detailed description of the American Medical Association's CPT codes, used for billing ABA services. Attendees will understand what is billable and non-billable under the CPT codes, when to use each code and how these codes differ from the HCPCS codes. General considerations will be discussed with regard to valuing CPT and HCPCS billing code sets, considering practice expenses, and practice fee schedules, within the constraints of relevant antitrust laws. An update will also be provided on proposed revisions and amendments to the current CPT codes.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify at least one CPT code used by LBAs and BCBAs to bill for insurance-funded ABA services; (2) identify at least one similarity and one difference between CPT codes and H codes; (3) list a key element in the process of secondary billing; (4) list at least one strategy for calculating practice expenses under contracts to capture all clinical and non-clinical expenses when providing insurance-funded ABA; (5) identify at least one potential impact (inherent contingency) of untimed CPT codes upon their practice.
Activities: The workshop will include brief lecture, discussion, practice exercises in small groups, and question/answer sessions. Opportunities to provide written and oral responses will be provided. Packets with supplemental materials will be given to each participant.
Audience: The target audience for this workshop is practitioners who provide insurance-funded services.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): billing, CPT codes, HCPCS codes, insurance
 
Workshop #W31
CE Offered: PSY/BACB
Using ABA to Conceptualize Disorders in the Diagnostic Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5)
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom HI
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Monica Gilbert, M.S.
MONICA GILBERT (Carlos Albizu University)
Description: Behavior Analysts commonly implement Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) treatment to individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The benefits of ABA for individuals with ASD has been widespread and well incorporated in the community. However, it is still not a common practice for Behavior Analysts to receive referrals from other professionals for individuals that are not diagnosed with ASD but rather another diagnosis or a comorbid diagnosis from the DSM-5. To break this stigma, it is imperative to show how ABA can a be an effective strategy for individuals with other disorders. Moreover, many times, Behavior Analysts are told the client's diagnosis but have limited understanding of how the diagnosis impacts the modality of the assessment and treatment. Finally, insurance companies' approval of ABA services are based on "medical necessity guidelines" which are highly correlated with the diagnosis seen in the DSM-5. The aim of this workshop is to clearly define and conceptualize some of DSM-5's diagnosis such as; ADHD, ODD, ID, Conduct Disorder, Major Depression, Bipolar Disorder, GAD, Trichotillomania, Excoriation, Pyromania and Kleptomania, and teach relevant empirically derived facts as well as factors to consider when completing a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA).The future aim of this workshop is to stimulate further studies that will prove the effectiveness of using ABA to target DSM-5 diagnosis and further incorporate the use of ABA into clinical practice.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Assess parent's motivation based on the trans-theoretical model and using different proven measures; (2) Provide examples of effective change talk strategies to develop and build collaborative relationships with parents; (3) Describe motivation through the interaction of private events and motivating operations; (4) Identify traps that can harm clinician-parental relationships; (5) Describe key features of effective MI strategies; (6) Measure change talk vs. counter-change talk; (7) Identify key features necessary for cooperative relationships between caregivers and clinicians; (8) Learn effective communication skills that will alter private events in others.
Activities: Workshop activities will include didactic instruction, small group breakout, video modeling, guided practice and role plays.
Audience: BCaBA, BCBA, graduate students and Licensed psychologist
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): Motivation, motivational interviewing, parent training, Private events
 
Workshop #W32
CE Offered: BACB
Poser Applied: Creating Poser Animations for Applied Behavior Analysis Teaching and Demonstration Purposes
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Torrey Pines 1
Area: TBA/PCH; Domain: Theory
CE Instructor: Michael Keenan, Ph.D.
MICHAEL KEENAN (Ulster University), LEE CADIEUX (Arts and Humanities Research Institute; Ulster University)
Description: In this workshop, participants will be introduced to Poser, an application from software developer Smith Micro, for generating dynamic 3D CGI content that can be used as an enhanced and economical alternative to live-action video for teaching and demonstration purposes. Professor Keenan will outline his approach to the software and how he has used it as an alternative to live-action video to generate specific examples of behaviour for instruction and demonstration purposes in the teaching of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA). He will discuss the ethical issues surrounding the use of video recorded real-life case studies and how the use of Poser animations may avoid any such concerns. Mr. Cadieux will provide a hands-on demonstration of the software, giving participants a guided tour of the user interface, menus, libraries of content, tools and demonstrate the dynamic capabilities. As well, an overview of Classical Animation technique will be provided; showing how the Principles of Animation may be used to enhance and refine Poser animations with life-like realism.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) define how the Poser software application may be used to create an ethical alternative to real-life case study examples in teaching ABA; (2) define the expense and complexity of the production of live-action video examples for teaching ABA; (3) know how to navigate the Poser user interface, libraries, and tools; (4) know how to alter and adjust Poser animations with minimal effort to provide variations in gender, race, costume and age; (5 )know how to use Classical Animation techniques to enhance realism in Poser animations for teaching.
Activities: Instructional Strategies for this introductory level workshop will include Lecture, Demonstration and Discussion through Small Group Breakout. Workshop objectives will include elements of guided practice through Video Observation and Discussion. Tutors will apply Interview and Case Study methodologies. Supplemental materials will be distributed electronically.
Audience: Teachers of behaviour analysis
Content Area: Theory
Instruction Level: Advanced
Keyword(s): Animation, CGI, Multimedia, Poser
 
Workshop #W33
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Inter-Teaching: Lessons Learned From the Trenches
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Dawn Allison Bailey, Ph.D.
DAWN ALLISON BAILEY (Oregon Institute of Technology), MARIA LYNN KESSLER (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Description: Inter-teaching was developed by Boyce and Hineline (2002) and involves less reliance on traditional lecture and more student engagement. The general structure of inter-teaching involves: creation of a preparation guide, in-class discussion of the prep guide items among student pairs, student reflection on discussion, and clarifying lectures. One of the challenges facing instructors in making the transition from traditional lecture to inter-teaching is the creation of the Prep Guides. This workshop will provide an overview of the Inter-teaching method, some tips on how to increase the quality of student discussion in class, and facilitate development of effective Prep Guides. Participants are encouraged to identify a specific course to incorporate inter-teaching and to bring relevant course materials for reference during the workshop.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify and describe the components of inter-teaching; (2) Identify and describe the elements of an effective prep guide; (3) Critique sample prep guides according to the provided guidelines; (4) Develop a prep guide for at least one chapter or unit of instructional content; (5) Identify and describe methods to assess the effectiveness of inter-teaching.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, whole group active responding, small group discussion and activities, and individual practice of skills with instructor feedback.
Audience: Instructors of undergraduate or graduate courses in psychology, Applied Behavior Analysis, or related content
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): college teaching, inter-teaching
 
 
Workshop #W34
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Jail Hesso: Taking Effective Procedures, and the Perspective of Our Learner, into Discrete Trial Training Sessions
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jon Blann, M.S.
JON BLANN (The Human Institute), AMNA MOHAMMED AHMED (Think, Therapeutic Interventions for Kids)
Description: What if training could inspire you to continue learning long after the training has ended? What if you could learn to empathize with the frustrations and elations your learners experience in session? Technicians are trained to follow procedures, without experiencing the effects from a learner's perspective. As a result, staff maybe unable to a) empathize with the learner and b) move away from using ineffective teaching strategies. The goal for this workshop is to train practitioners to improve their ability to analyze variables responsible for effective DTT sessions. More importantly, this workshop will artfully disseminate the science of human behavior through a training that is an establishing operation for technicians to seek out ways to improve their craft. This workshop will allow you to contact, directly, the contingencies experienced by our nonverbal learners. We will also discuss procedures that are more conducive to learning and the procedures that can prevent us from breaking through to our learners. In order to adequately teach individuals with behavioral, verbal, and academic deficits it is important for behavioral technicians to, not only learn the skill of implementing clinical programs, but also develop a repertoire necessary for analyzing behavior from session to session.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discriminate between effective and ineffective teaching procedures; (2) Identify, with fluency, ineffective teaching strategies; (3) Give a behavioral definition for empathy; (4) Discriminate between procedure centric and learner centric training methods.
Activities: 1. Instructor presentation and group discussion 2. Small group DTT practice, using a variety of teaching procedures 3. Video review of DTT sessions (from Bahrain clinic)
Audience: Basic
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): DTT, Empathy, Training Procedures, Verbal Behavior
 
 
Workshop #W35
CE Offered: BACB
CANCELED: Infant ABA: Best Practices and Future Directions
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Sabrina Danielson, M.S.
LAUREN ELDER (ABA Behavior Therapies and Testing), MEGHAN CAVALLARO (ABA Behavior Therapies and Testing. ), SABRINA DANIELSON (ABA Behavior Therapies and Testing )
Description: Developmental delays and risk for autism are able to be identified as early as 6 months of age. ABA can be an effective infant intervention, but requires special consideration to avoid disrupting infant attachment. This workshop will demonstrate effective ABA strategies appropriate for infants, research support for infant ABA, and how to write developmentally appropriate learning objectives. Branded ABA-based treatment models that have been adapted for infants (Early Start Denver Model, Project Impact) will be reviewed as well as developmentally-based treatment models (JASPER) that can be integrated into ABA programs. Practical tips for working with infants and case examples will be provided.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) list the essential components of an effective infant ABA program; (2) identify treatment models that have been successfully adapted for infant intervention and explain the research support for this implementation; (3) write developmentally appropriate treatment objectives for infants.
Activities: Learning objectives will be met by lecture, small group discussion, case examples and guided practice.
Audience: Early interventionists, Practitioners
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 

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