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Association for Behavior Analysis International

The Association for Behavior Analysis International® (ABAI) is a nonprofit membership organization with the mission to contribute to the well-being of society by developing, enhancing, and supporting the growth and vitality of the science of behavior analysis through research, education, and practice.

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44th Annual Convention; San Diego, CA; 2018

CE by Content: Supervision


 

Workshop #W12
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Competancy-Based Staff Training
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: CBM/OBM; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: David Pyles, Ph.D.
DAVID PYLES (Pyles and Associates), VICTORYA JEWETT (Pyles and Associates), ELIZABETH PEREZ (Pyles and Associates)
Description: Given the number of skilled clinicians and the increasing number of clientele, doing more with less is always a challenge for today's BCBA. In the clinical setting BCBAs are often faced with the task of ensuring effective implementation of treatment plans provided by multiple people. We use behavior skills training, or BST, to teach staff using competency-based training tools. In addition, this approach, combined with a train-the-trainer model, allows a BCBA consultant to reach a maximum number of staff with minimum amount of resources.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss and implement behavior skills training to teach a skill; (2) Discuss and implement competency-based training measures; (3) Discuss and implement a train-the-trainer approach.
Activities: Workshop activities include material presentation through lecture and demonstrations, discussion, and small group activities
Audience: This workshop level is appropriate for all BCBAs
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
 
Workshop #W19
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
ABA in Coaching: Retread into a New World!
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: EDC/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Joshua K. Pritchard, Ph.D.
MALLORY J. QUINN (Applied Behavior Analysis Sports Innovations), JOSHUA K. PRITCHARD (Southern Illinois University)
Description: We will provide the behavior analyst guidance on how to use behavior analysis in the world of sports. Based on a line of research of study demonstrating the power of behavior analysis to take athletes to the next level, we will present
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Identify the repertoire needed to begin a career in sports coaching from a behavior analytic vantage; (2) Develop a brief synopsis of behavior analytic coaching to a specific, preferred sports population; (3) Create a task list of steps needed to penetrate their specified market, based on the needs of the sport.
Activities: This workshop will combine both lecture and small group discussion in the examination of sports coaching opportunities. There will be opportunities for members of the audience to practice some behavior analytic coaching skills, and to observe and collect data from video demonstrations.
Audience: The target audience consists of behavior analysts who are skilled at their science and want to expand into areas outside of the typical behavior analytic profession. Specifically, they are eager to push the boundaries of professional behavior analysis into new and exciting areas and have some interest in sports and athletic behavior.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): coaching, entrepreneurship, new areas
 
Workshop #W21
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Part 1: Pragmatic Supervision: Evaluate, Analyze, Change, and Repeat
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: OBM/AUT; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Guy S. Bruce, Ed.D.
GUY S. BRUCE (Appealing Solutions, LLC)
Description: Pragmatic supervisors collect frequent, accurate, sensitive measures of client progress, and when clients are not meeting their progress goals, those supervisors make changes. A pragmatic supervision process includes the following steps: 1) Evaluate client progress and staff performance. 2) Analyze causes of inadequate client progress and staff performance. 3) Change staff resources, training, and management, and 4) Repeat the process until clients achieve desired outcomes. Organizations that operate pragmatically can achieve amazing results for their clients and stakeholders, but most don’t. This is an organizational performance problem, which could be solved if organizations had the necessary resources. One such resource is ProgressCharter, a mobile and web application that will make it easier to evaluate client progress, identifying which clients are not meeting progress goals, analyze the causes of inadequate client progress, using evaluations of staff performance and resources to identify can-do, know-how, and want-problems, and recommend specific changes in staff resources, training, and management, to ensure that each client makes desired progress. Please note, this is a three-part workshop and attendees must register for all threeparts.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Define desired client results and necessary performance, then measure and evaluate current client results and performance, including measures of client progress called "celeration efficiency;" (2) Define desired staff performance at the system, process, and individual levels, measure and evaluate current staff performance at each level; (3) Perform a data based analysis of staff performance problems to identify their causes; (4) Recommend solutions to performance problems with the best return on investment; (5) Design and implement those solutions, which may include staff resources, training and management; (6) Evaluate the effectiveness, efficiency, and return on investment of those solutions.
Activities: This workshop will provide a variety of training aids including case studies, practice cards, practice exercises, project worksheets, job aids, and a web/mobile charting application.
Audience: This three-part workshop is for supervisors, program designers, staff trainers, and directors of schools and agencies serving individuals with learning difficulties. All participants will receive a one-year subscription to ProgressCharter, an application that makes it easier to evaluate client progress, analyze causes of inadequate progress, and recommend changes so that all clients can make efficient progress. Attend this workshop to learn the skills needed to improve the performance of your staff so that every client can achieve success. Participants should bring their laptops and smartphones or tablets to the workshop so that they can practice using ProgressCharter. Those who pre-register will receive some materials prior to the workshop.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): celeration efficiency, organizational performance, PARSE process, pragmatic approach
 
Workshop #W24
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Supervising Humans: A Look at Supervision Beyond the Task List
Thursday, May 24, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: James A. Hoko, Ph.D.
JAMES A. HOKO (ACES), CARA M. CAPPALLI-DAVEY (ACES ), STEPHANIE ALINE REINOSO (ACES)
Description: An effective supervisor needs an understanding of how to provide training and supervision for job skills beyond what is outlined in the BACB task list. Although compliance with the task list is essential, it is important to develop an understanding of other contextual and indigenous contingencies at play for supervisees working in varied employment situations. These practical and unique challenges can be effectively addressed with an understanding of individuals' reinforcement histories and the application of evidence-based supervision protocols. This workshop will review how to identify management and leadership skills not specifically noted in the task list. It will then review strategies for the creation of performance-based goal setting for workplace success and skill remediation through performance improvement plans.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify skills critical for success in varied employment situations; (2) Determine supervisee reinforcement history and the contingencies needed to effectively supervise them; (3) Derive appropriate instructional objectives related to the critical skills; (4) Use evidence-based practices in addressing those instructional objectives.
Activities: This workshop will involve lecture, small and large group discussions, and small group break out activities.
Audience: This workshop is targeted towards BCBAs providing behavior analytic supervision to individuals seeking certification as a BCBA or BCaBA.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): evidence-based protocals, leadership, management, supervision
 
Workshop #W38
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/NASP — 
Supervision
Activity-Based Model for BACB Supervision
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–11:00 AM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cheryl J. Davis, Ph.D.
CHERYL J. DAVIS (7 Dimensions Consulting; SupervisorABA), DANA R. REINECKE (Long Island University Post/SupervisorABA)
Description: BACB supervision is an ever-evolving, challenging process that is crucial to the field of behavior analysis. Task List 5 includes a section regarding personnel supervision and management, highlighting the importance of these skills for behavior analysts. This workshop reviews ethical considerations for BACB supervision, as well as literature on effective supervision practices. In addition, recent supervision publications will be reviewed to discuss current practices being utilized is BCBA supervision. This activity-based model sets project-defined benchmarks for progress through supervision, and includes specific and clear rubrics for evaluation of mastery of each project aligned to the BACB Task List. Ongoing evaluation of supervisee progress and supervisor effectiveness are components of the model. Participants will receive the activities reviewed to utilize with supervisees.
Learning Objectives: At the completion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) Discuss and implement the Compliance Code/Task List 5 Section E with regard to the use of evidence-based practices in supervision; (2) Describe the implementation and measurement of ten projects based on the 4th and 5th edition task list that can be used as benchmarks for progression through supervision; (3) Develop and implement at least one method of evaluating supervisee progress; (4) Develop and implement at least one method of evaluating supervisor effectiveness;(5) Summarize Task List 5 Section I components of supervision skills and have a plan to teach and assess these with supervisees.
Activities: Instructional strategies include lecture, discussion, whole-group demonstrations of ethics in supervision, and small-group breakouts to practice specific applications of evaluating supervisor effectiveness and supervisee progress. Objectives will be described through lecture and discussed and demonstrated with the group as a whole. Small groups will be formed based on common interests and needs, and workshop facilitators will work with each group to practice developing and using supervision strategies to meet learning objectives on an individual level.
Audience: The target audience is BACB supervisors who have completed an 8-hour supervision training.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Activity-based Supervision, BACB Supervision, Effective Supervision, Supervisory skills
 
Workshop #W56
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
BACB-Compliant Multi-Media Supervisor Training With Updated Requirements
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Karen R. Wagner, Ph.D.
KAREN R. WAGNER (Behavior Services of Brevard, Inc; TheBehaviorAnalyst.com)
Description: Hundreds of BCBAs and BCaBAs have participated in this mixed-media, BACB-Compliant Supervision Training workshop since 2013! This workshop prepares BCBAs to become BACB-approved supervisors, including new BCaBA and RBT supervision responsibilities. Offered as a six-hour live workshop with an additional 2 1/2 hours online through www.TheBehaviorAnalyst.com, participants receive almost 9 hours of content while using only 6 hours of conference time! Through live interaction, scenarios, and interesting video situations, participants will experience skill building, as well as effective documentation. Multiple populations and environments are represented, including child welfare, education and in-home. Additionally, participant-trios will participate in supervisory sessions with interesting ethical dilemmas as supervisors, supervisees, and fidelity observers. Because of varied experience, participants will be offered choices of clinical focus at key points in the live workshop. This helps keep all participants invested and engaged with the material. The online material, an additional 3 CEUs at no additional cost, includes a review of the workshop material, video scenarios, extensive coverage of the BACB Experience Standards, and opportunities to test understanding of the material. *This training program is based on the BACB Supervisor Training Curriculum Outline but is offered independent of the BACB.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) describe the purpose of supervision; (2) determine the criterion for signing supervision documentation and skill acquisition; (3) demonstrate more relevant questioning skills when Supervisees present difficult ethical or behavioral scenarios; (4) indicate how ABA services must integrate with other social services and systems, and demonstrate how to deliver performance feedback.
Activities: Participants will engage in: Didactic lecture, critiques of video supervision scenarios, and guided and directed discussions of professional and ethical responsibilities. Additionally, all participants will be divided into triads for multiple role play scenarios, taking turns as supervisor, supervisee and observer with each new scenario.
Audience: This workshop is for BCBAs who will be supervising pre-certification interns, BCaBAs, and Registered Behavior Technicians, as well as BCaBAs who will be supervising RBTs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Ethical Supervision, Ethics, Supervision, Supervisor
 
Workshop #W58
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Systematizing the Supervision Process: Using a Curriculum-Based Measurement System Through Technology to Provide Competency-Based Supervision
Friday, May 25, 2018
8:00 AM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jamie Hughes-Lika, Ph.D.
LAUREN LESA LANIER (CARE, LLC / Endicott College), JAMIE HUGHES-LIKA (Summit Autism Services), JESSICA PIAZZA (CARE LLC), KAREN E. HANS (The University of Kent), AMY LANIER (University of Texas Health Science Center- Houston )
Description: The purpose of the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) supervision experience is to improve behavior analytic, professional, and ethical repertoires of the supervisee, and monitor the performance of supervisees in the field. Effective supervision is critical to the quality of ongoing behavioral services, the professional development of the supervisee, the continued growth of the supervisor, and the overall development of our field and its practice. Additionally, supervisors have a responsibility to adhere to our specific ethical code covering supervision (Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts 5.0, Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2014). The supervision experience should be carefully programmed, with competency-based assessments conducted of the supervisee's skills. There should be a clear course of study, supervisee's behavior should be operationally defined with objective and measurable goals to determine the application of their skills, and supervisees should receive prudent guidance to establish their professional development repertoire. Additionally, supervisees should clearly demonstrate acquisition and mastery of the competencies outlined in the BACB task list, as this will increase the quality of their experience, uphold the values of the field, and ensure practice requirements are of the highest fidelity and rigor. This workshop will guide participants through a proposed scope and sequence of a curriculum-based systematic supervision process (e.g., evaluation rubrics, goal setting, the development of unrestricted indirect and direct activities, etc.), designed to provide both performance and knowledge-based competencies for individuals pursuing BACB certification. Participants will learn how create an online tracking system, e-portfolio, and evaluation system through the Google platform. Additionally, participants will learn how to use an interactive cloud-based video software to provide time-coded descriptive feedback and scoring rubrics for supervisee's performance, to exactly pinpoint areas in need of improvement. *Participants should bring laptops, smartphones, and tablets to the workshop to practice using the technology applications.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, the participant will be able to: (1) Discuss and implement the PECC with regard to the use of evidence-based practices in supervision; (2) implement the use of at least two applications of technology to the practice of effective supervision; (3) utilize methods to evaluate supervisory effectiveness and supervisee satisfaction; (4) Develop competency-based supervisee scoring rubrics; (5) Design and implement organizational strategies to track supervisee performance; (6) describe and demonstrate components of effective, efficient, and evidence-based supervision
Activities: Activities for this workshop will include lecture, discussion, guided practice, video demonstration, live whole-group demonstrations of technology, and small-group breakouts to practice specific applications of technology.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for BCBAs or BCBA-Ds providing behavior analytic supervision to students, educators, or other professionals seeking certification as a BCBA or BCaBA, as well as to individuals certified as RBTs. It would also be appropriate for those involved in the organization and arrangement of BCBA supervision.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BST, Competency-based, Supervision, Technology
 
Workshop #W70
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Effective Supervision in Center and Home-Based Settings: Maximizing Outcomes for Students and Staff
Friday, May 25, 2018
12:00 PM–3:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA/VRB; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Susan Buttigieg, Ph.D.
SUSAN BUTTIGIEG (Columbia University; Fred S. Keller School; Manhattanville College), LIN DU (Teachers College, Columbia University), CESIRA K. FARRELL (Fred S. Keller School; Manhattanville College)
Description: This workshop is geared towards professionals who hold BCBA licensure and serve in a supervisory capacity in center- or home-based settings. We are targeting the behavior-analytic, ethical, and professional repertoires of professionals in the field, and hope to arm the attendees with a variety of evidence-based tactics and materials to directly and indirectly increase learner outcomes. Effective supervisors set clear expectations for supervisees and use a variety of the tactics and principles of behavior analysis to help their supervisees achieve objectives. We will review the CABAS Teacher Performance/Rate Accuracy procedure (Ross, Singer-Dudek & Greer, 2005), the CABAS Decision Protocol (Keohane & Greer, 2005), supervision forms, and types of feedback. We will discuss different situations that arise when supervising in a variety of settings and with staff with a wide range of experience.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify the different components of a TPRA and errorlessly code five different programs using the antecedent-behavior-consequence data collection method; (2)identify how a supervisor can appropriately respond in a way that benefits the supervisee and most importantly, the learner, in a way that maintains the integrity of the position and behavior analysis in general; (3) understand the decision analysis protocol and make decisions to intervene or continue with objectives accordingly.
Activities: Instructional strategies: lecture, discussion, small group break out, videos Supplemental materials will be distributed.
Audience: Intermediate and advanced. This workshop is for newly appointed supervisors or newly licensed BCBAs.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Staff training, Supervision
 
Workshop #W108
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Keys to Success: Strategies for Providing Effective and Efficient Behavior Analytic Supervision and Mentorship
Friday, May 25, 2018
4:00 PM–7:00 PM
Room to be Announced
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Jennifer Yakos, M.A.
JENNIFER YAKOS (Institute for Behavioral Training (IBT)), CECILIA KNIGHT (Institute for Behavioral Training)
Description: Supervision and training of individuals seeking BCBA/BCaBA certification as well as the ongoing supervision of BCaBAs and RBTs has become an increasing responsibility for BCBAs over the past several years. Due to the large volume of new professionals entering the field of applied behavior analysis, our field is growing at a substantial rate. More than ever, this growth requires BCBAs to ensure proper supervision and development of new professionals in order to maintain high quality in our field and to ensure that the treatment consumers receive is appropriate. This workshop will focus on reviewing the most recent changes to the BACB supervision and experience standards as well as several key components of effective supervision to facilitate quality training and development of candidates. Specifically, practical strategies will be discussed to help BCBA supervisors utilize time effectively and efficiently while providing practical, individualized supervision and training. Topics discussed will include curriculum development, organizational tools for tracking skill competency and training topics, as well as strategies for providing effective group supervision, and the importance of Behavioral Skills Training in developing a practical skill set among supervisees.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the workshop, participants will be able to: (1) identify recent updates to experience and supervisory requirements according to current BACB guidelines; (2) identify practical strategies to facilitate effective and efficient supervision, including organizational tools, curriculum development ideas, and strategies to facilitate effective group supervision; (3) identify and review several key components of effective behavior analytic supervision, including behavioral skills training (BST) and delivering effective performance feedback.
Activities: Instructional strategies will include lecture, group discussion, and video demonstration and review.
Audience: This workshop would be appropriate for BCBAs providing behavior analytic supervision to individuals seeking BCBA/BCaBA certification, or ongoing supervision to BCaBAs and RBTs. It would also be appropriate for any therapist, educator, administrator, or professional who is supervising and managing the performance of staff, parents, instructional aides, or others.
Content Area: Practice
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): BCBA Supervision, Effective Supervision, Supervisory Practices, Training
 
Panel #24
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Work Hard, Play Harder: The Impacts of Provider Culture in the Workplace
Saturday, May 26, 2018
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom E
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Melissa Engasser, M.S.
Chair: Melissa Engasser (The Bedrock Clinic & Research Center, Inc.)
CLAUDIA MARIE MARZELLA (The Bedrock Clinic & Research Center, Inc.)
KELLY O'NEIL (The Bedrock Clinic & Research Center, Inc.)
PIERRE D. LOUIS (Bancroft)
Abstract: In the field of Applied Behavior Analysis is prone to having high-rates of burn out and staff turn over. This panel discussion attempts to discuss, what infrastructures can be embedded within an organization to sustain a healthy and productive work environment for service providers. These components will help address burn-out, staffing turn-over, and staff productivity
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: The targeted audience are BCBA's or BCBA-D's overseeing direct service provider staff , such as registered behavior technicians.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the panel discussion, the audience will be able to do exhibit the following: 1. Understand how to implement the appropriate ecological manipulations in the environment for creating a reinforcing environment 2. Effects of group contingency 3.How providing reinforcing work environments helps in decreasing staff turn-over.
Keyword(s): OBM, Culture
 
 
Panel #42
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
The Key Performance Indicators To Rapidly Scale A Human Services Business With Quality
Saturday, May 26, 2018
11:00 AM–11:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom E
Area: OBM/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Brett J. DiNovi, M.A.
Chair: Brett J. DiNovi (Brett DiNovi & Associates, LLC)
MATTHEW LINDER (Brett DiNovi & Associates, LLC)
JOSEPH KENDORSKI (Brett DiNovi & Associates, LLC)
Abstract: Pinpointing, measuring, and changing behavior that impacts key performance indicators (KPI's) to rapidly grow a human service organization is achievable through the use of behavioral science. In fact, when executed with precision, this can result in massive scaling of services to impact many lives while creating economic opportunity for many employees. This panel is comprised of practitioners that are CEO's and executives that are doing this on a daily basis and provides specific actionable leadership behaviors that achieve massive organizational growth while maintaining the utmost quality through precise measurement of KPI's. Executives on this panel have produced peak employee and organizational performance resulting in employee retention rates exceeding 97% annually and doubling in revenue each year. The principles of organizational behavior management (OBM) that drive successful KPI trends must cascade through the fabric of three levels in any organization. Those levels include the individual employee level, the departmental level, and organization-wide level. Specific KPI's discussed are employee retention, employee engagement, employee recruitment and selection mechanisms, profit & loss, stakeholder feedback, utilization of authorized service units, diversity of funding, social media metrics, staff training and competency, fluency of accounts receivable, cash flow, and adherence to regulatory body compliance standards. Behavior analytic principles run through the fabric of each system to monitor and produce peak organizational performance in all these areas are analyzed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: The target audience for this panel is business owners, C-Level leadership in human services agencies, and those with supervisory and leadership experience. Participants should have, preferably, already taken the 8-hour supervision course. BCBA's, BCaBA's, & BCBA-D's are also encouraged to attend.
Learning Objectives: 1. Participants will describe 5 key performance indicators that measure the success of an organization's performance. 2. Participants will describe 4 OBM principles that have the biggest impact on key performance indicators. 3. Participants will describe challenges business owners and leaders face when scaling a business. 4. Participants will describe and identify specific methods and tools that grow a business with quality and successful outcomes for stakeholders.
Keyword(s): KPI's, OBM, Performance management, scaling businesses
 
 
Panel #118
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
PDS: Variations in Supervision Practices: How to Best Conduct Supervision Using Different Methodologies
Saturday, May 26, 2018
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom B
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cheryl J. Davis, Ph.D.
Chair: Cheryl J. Davis (7 Dimensions Consulting; SupervisorABA)
DANA R. REINECKE (Long Island University Post; SupervisorABA)
BREANNE K. HARTLEY (Little Star Center)
VALBONA DEMIRI (Hopewell Valley Regional School District; Endicott College)
Abstract: The standards for Board Certified Behavior Analyst supervision have changed greatly over the past decade. As stated by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board, the supervisee's primary focus should be acquiring new behavior analytic skills related to the BACB Task List, with activities consistent with the dimensions of applied behavior analysis identified by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968). Providing appropriate supervision includes clinical case review, direct observation and reviewing the application of BACB Task List items. Supervising potential BCBAs may be accomplished using varied formats, including in-person meetings and observations and distance contact through both synchronous and asynchronous modes. This expert panel comprises BCBA supervisors who use various modes of supervision, including in-person, distance, university practicum, private practice, clinic-based, and more. Panelists will present best practices in providing supervision, share tracking systems, and discuss dilemmas faced when providing supervision. There will be a discussion with the audience with an emphasis on best practices, assessing supervisees skills and acquisition of new skills, as well as supervisor effectiveness.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: The target audience is BACB supervisors who have completed an 8-hour supervision training.
Learning Objectives: At the end of the panel, participants will: 1. Describe best practices to utilize in supervision 2. Identify recommended structure for supervision 3. Summarize various means to evaluate supervisee skill development 4. List ethical implications in supervision
Keyword(s): BACB supervision, Effective Supervision, Ethical supervision, Supervisory skills
 
 
Panel #139
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
A Behavior Analyst Guide to Self-Care
Saturday, May 26, 2018
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom C
Area: PRA/CSS; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Claudia Marie Marzella, M.S.
Chair: Claudia Marie Marzella (The Bedrock Clinic & Research Center, Inc.)
MELISSA ENGASSER (The Bedrock Clinic & Research Center, Inc.)
ANA ELISA ESCALANTE (BehaviorMe)
NICOLE J. POSTMA (Positive Behavior Supports Corp.)
Abstract: Self-care is a term discussed scarcely enough in psychological practice, but is rarely discussed among behavior analytic practitioners. Trauma, burnout, and compassion fatigue are widely studied in other fields similar to behavior analysis. These concepts have significant impacts on client care and therapist well-being, so why aren't we discussing this more often? This panel aims to discuss these concepts in behavior analytic practice and further the discussion on a potentially ugly but necessary truth of behavior analytic practitioners.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Our target audience are BCBA's that are seeking to learn more about the important components of self-care in our field and how to embed as part of being a practitioner and supervisor.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the panel discussion the audience should be able to : 1) Identify possible trauma in their supervisees 2) Identify possible trauma in themselves 3) Understand how to place the appropriate antecedent interventions in place to prevent burn out.
Keyword(s): self-care, ethics
 
 
Panel #264
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
The Essential Need for RBT's in Schools
Sunday, May 27, 2018
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom G
Area: EDC/DDA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Christina Whalen, Ph.D.
Chair: Christina Whalen (Rethink)
ROZ PRESCOTT (Rethink)
XIOMARA LEE (Denver Public Schools)
KATHLEEN QUAGLINO (Stamford Public Schools)
Abstract: Although many clinical practices are requiring the Registered Behavioral Technician (RBT) credential, it is still uncommon to see RBT's working in the schools. Teachers and paraprofessionals can benefit from the RBT credential to give them the basic ABA knowledge that they need to manage behavior, develop IEP goals, build skills in students, and further their own careers. Select schools in the U.S. are embracing the RBT credential and working to provide the training and supervision for their teachers and paraprofessionals. Schools face certain barriers to doing this such as professional development time (particularly for paraprofessionals), cost, and buy-in from district leadership. This panel will discuss the essential needs for RBTs in the school system, the barriers to training and supervision, and challenges in scaling district wide. The ethical considerations for schools will be discussed as well as future directions for providing schools with the education and tools that they need to give teachers and paraprofessionals the ABA training that they need. School districts from Colorado and Connecticut will present their data and procedures for RBTs in their districts, as well as how they plan to utilize RBTs with students, and expand opportunities for staff to get the credential.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Behavior analysts of all levels working within school districts or working with school districts.
Learning Objectives: 1) Participants will be able to describe the specific issues in school districts related to getting staff RBT certified. 2) Participants will be able to discuss potential solutions for providing RBT training and preparing staff for getting a credential. 3) Participants will be able to discuss potential solutions for supervision of RBT's in school districts. 4) Participants will be able to identify the benefits of the RBT credential for students, staff, school leadership, and parents.
Keyword(s): Paraprofessionals, Professional Development, RBT Credential, Teachers
 
 
Panel #295
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Effective Supervision: How to Balance Requirements of University Programs, Human Service Agencies, and Third-Party Payers
Sunday, May 27, 2018
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom B
Area: PRA/TBA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Cheryl A. Young-Pelton, Ed.D.
Chair: Anna M. Young (Montana State University, Billings)
ELLIE KAZEMI (California State University, Northridge)
REBECCA RENEE WISKIRCHEN (Western Michigan University)
TERESA CAMILLE KOLU (Cusp Emergence)
Abstract: Amidst the ever-changing landscape of updated requirements for the Behavior Analyst Certification Boards Task List(s) and Experience Standards, agency directors often face organizational challenges balancing the needs of clients and their families, resource allotment, and third-party payers. The panelists in this session will highlight specific ethical and supervisory challenges that may exist when students working under BACB Experience Standards, human service operations (e.g., services for autism spectrum disorder), and a variety of payers (e.g., insurance, waivers, school funds, etc.) collide in the pursuit of socially valid behavioral treatment. Policies, procedures, training protocols, and parent handbooks can be developed with the purpose of supporting cooperation and increasing collaboration. When requirements change from any stakeholder, others must adapt and reflect the changes in practice. Building a culture that is responsive to change in many ways benefits the whole agency. Participants in this session will gain an understanding of recent BACB supervisory changes, related challenges presented by third-party payers, and creative solutions that have been developed in order to balance collaborative efforts.
Instruction Level: Advanced
Target Audience: BACB Supervisors, Agency Directors, Billing/Insurance Managers, University Contact Faculty for BACB Practicum Programs
Learning Objectives: 1. Identify current and future BACB Experience Standards that may impact supervisee training in human service agencies (clinic, home-based, and school settings). 2. Gain an understanding of factors that may impact ethical supervision in practicum settings (e.g., requirements by third-party payers, family expectations, privacy policies). 3. Develop proactive solutions to challenges that may result from a clash between practicum supervisees, third-party payers, and agency policies.
 
 
Symposium #299
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
A Comprehensive Evaluation of a Practical Functional Assessment Model
Sunday, May 27, 2018
3:00 PM–4:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall B
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Joshua Jessel, Ph.D.
Chair: Julia Iannaccone (Queens College)
Discussant: Joanna Lomas Mevers (Marcus Autism Center)
Abstract: Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, and Hanratty (2014) developed a functional assessment format intended to be practical and efficient. The process begins with an open-ended interview, the information of which is used to inform the unique contingencies evaluated in an analysis with a single synthesized test condition and a matched control. This symposium includes a comprehensive evaluation of the reliability, validity, generality, and efficiency of the functional assessment model. Study 1 of this symposium evaluates the reliability of the open-ended interview used to design the subsequent analysis by comparing the results of multiple interviewers. In Study 2, multiple contextually relevant variables are assessed to determine the generality of the treatment procedures in natural settings informed by the functional assessment in a consecutive case series analysis. Study 3 evaluated the efficiency of the functional assessment by reanalyzing session duration to determine the extent to which analysis duration can be reduced without detriments in interpretations of functional control. Comparative validity measures of the practical functional assessment and a traditional functional analysis format were obtained in Study 4 by conducting both formats with each of the adult participants.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): functional assessment, problem behavior, reliability, validity
Target Audience: BCBAs, BCBA-Ds, BCaBAs, licensed psychologists, and other behavior analytic providers who are looking for information on how to conduct or how to teach someone to conduct a practical functional assessment and treatment model.
 
Is Functional Assessment Reliability Necessary to Produce Valid Treatment Outcomes?
ADITHYAN RAJARAMAN (Western New England University), Gregory P. Hanley (Western New England University), Holly Gover (Western New England University), Robin K. Landa (Western New England University), Kelsey Ruppel (Western New England University)
Abstract: The interview-informed synthesized contingency analysis (IISCA; Hanley, Jin, Vanselow, & Hanratty, 2014) is an efficient functional analysis that has led to the development of effective skill-based treatments for severe problem behavior (Ghaemmaghami, Hanley, & Jessel, 2016; Hanley et al., 2014; Santiago, Hanley, Jin, & Moore, 2015). The indirect assessment used in this functional assessment process takes the form of a semi-structured interview with caregivers that informs the design of a subsequent analysis. The reliability of the process of conducting an interview and designing an analysis from the interview has, however, not been assessed. This study aimed to (a) provide multiple measures of the reliability of the semi-structured interview and analysis design process and (b) assess the efficacy and generality of treatments derived from a functional assessment process on baselines established from an independent process. Results showed that reliability largely depended on the lens with which agreement was measured across two independent assessments; the assessment process was reliable on a general level but unreliable on a more specific level. The variability imposed by the unreliability of the assessment process did not negatively influence treatment utility, as the effects of the treatment designed in one context transferred to the other context.
 
Effectiveness of the IISCA and Skill-Based Treatment in a School Setting
JESSICA SLATON (Nashoba Learning Group), Jessica Lee (Nashoba Learning Group), Chelsey King (Nashoba Learning Group), Rachel Sawyer (Nashoba Learning Group), Ashley Loomer (Nashoba Learning Group), Katlyn Phillips (Nashoba Learning Group), Ceara Carroll (Nashoba Learning Group)
Abstract: Functional communication training (FCT) is recognized as the treatment of choice for problem behavior, and is more likely to be effective when a pre-treatment functional analysis (FA) is conducted first. However, practitioners report rarely conducting FAs, and there is a paucity of research on implementing FCT in natural settings (e.g., schools, homes) with relevant caregivers (e.g., teachers, parents) using contextually appropriate schedules of reinforcement and with socially validated outcomes maintained over time. Hanley et al. (2014) reported an FA and skill-based treatment (including FCT) that relied on synthesized reinforcers and was effective and socially validated. Jessel et al. (in press) obtained similar results when applying this FA and treatment model across a larger participant sample, but did not report data on long-term maintenance or generalization. The current project presents the first few data sets in an ongoing consecutive controlled case series of the IISCA and skill-based treatment in a school setting with children with autism. All sessions were conducted in the child’s typical school environments (e.g., classroom, library, gym) by multiple direct care staff, with problem behavior reduced an average of 97% from baseline. Secondary positive effects (e.g., reduction of restraint), social validity, and maintenance data will also be reported.
 
A Re-Analysis of Session Duration During Full- and Single-Test Interview-Informed Synthesized Contingency Analyses
JOSHUA JESSEL (Queens College), Rachel Metras (Western New England University), Gregory P. Hanley (Western New England University), Catherine E Wiist (University of North Texas), Einar T. Ingvarsson (Virginia Institute of Autism)
Abstract: Improving the analytic efficiency and control of functional analysis may reduce common barriers to its practical utility and increase the use of empirically-supported procedures for identifying the functions of problem behavior in clinical settings. We conducted this study to determine if the efficiency of the recently developed interview-informed, synthesized contingency analysis (IISCA) could be improved without detrimental effects on control. In Study 1 we reanalyzed IISCAs conducted for the problem behavior of 18 children. We reinterpreted rates of problem behavior during the first 5 min and 3 min of the 10-min sessions and evaluated any changes in the level of control (i.e., strong, moderate, weak). In addition, the first test-session of each full IISCA was reanalyzed at the varying session durations to determine the possibility of obtaining functional control over problem behavior in, what has been termed, the single-test IISCA. In Study 2 we conducted 8 consecutive IISCAs with 3-min sessions to validate the results of the reanalysis. We found that strong levels of control over problem behavior can be maintained when conducting IISCAs with sessions as brief as 3 min.
 
Use of the Interview-Informed Synthesized Contingency Analysis With Adults in a Day Program
SARAH WEDDLE (May Institute ), Margaret Walsh (The May Institute), Jaclyn Caporale (May Institute), Cynthia M. Anderson (May Institute)
Abstract: Interview-Informed Synthesized Contingency Analysis is increasingly recognized as a viable method for identifying operant function (Ghaemmaghami et al., 2015, 2016; Hanley et al., 2014; Santiago et al., 2016; Strohmeier et al, 2016). However, Fisher, Greer, Romani, Zangrillo, and Owen (2016) found that, for some individuals, combined contingencies can lead to false-positive results. In the current study, we extend this research to adults with autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability in a day program; a population and setting relatively unexamined via functional analysis (Beavers, Iwata, & Lerman, 2013). Following initial interview and brief observations, we conducted both standard (Iwata, et al., 1982/1994) and interview-informed synthesized (Hanley et al., 2014) functional analyses in typical adult day program environments across participants. Using the results of the synthesized and the standard functional analyses, we evaluated hypotheses about environment-behavior relations using an intervention test analysis. In the intervention test we measured the occurrence of problem behavior when the putative establishing operations were present in the natural environment, and subsequently introduced intervention components until we achieved suppression of problem behavior. Participants levels of problem behavior varied across the standard and synthesized approaches following treatment.
 
 
Invited Paper Session #350
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP — 
Supervision
Using Behavioral Science to Support Educators During Consultation
Sunday, May 27, 2018
6:00 PM–6:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom D-F
Area: EDC
Instruction Level: Basic
CE Instructor: Florence D. DiGennaro Reed, Ph.D.
Chair: Scott P. Ardoin (UGA Center for Autism and Behavioral Education Research)
FLORENCE D. DIGENNARO REED (University of Kansas)
Dr. Florence DiGennaro Reed, a board certified behavior analyst, received a doctorate in school psychology from Syracuse University. She also completed a clinical post-doctoral fellowship at the Institute for Child Development and a pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology at the May Center for Education and Neurorehabilitation and the May Center for Child Development. Presently, Florence is an Associate Professor in and Chairperson of the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas where she directs the Performance Management Laboratory. Her research examines effective and efficient staff training and performance improvement practices. She also conducts translational research in on-campus laboratory facilities. Florence has published articles and book chapters on a variety of topics including training, performance management, assessment, and intervention. She has served on the editorial boards of Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, Journal of Behavioral Education, Behavior Analysis in Practice, The Psychological Record, and School Psychology Review and is an Associate Editor for Journal of Behavioral Education and Behavior Analysis in Practice. Florence is co-editor of two books published through Springer titled Handbook of Crisis Intervention for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities and Bridging the Gap Between Science and Practice in Autism Service Delivery.
Abstract: Despite serving as effective change agents for clients, behavior analysts often struggle with motivating and supporting the educators with whom they consult. This presentation will propose a three-term model for targeting educator behavior, describe evidence-based performance management procedures, and share experimental data and case studies supporting the effectiveness of a behavior analytic approach to educator training and professional development.
Target Audience: Supervisors, consultants, educators, or staff interested in training others.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe why targeting educator performance is important; (2) identify and describe the components of behavioral skills training and an evidence-based approach to performance management of educators; (3) discuss results of studies evaluating the components of behavioral skills training.
 
 
Symposium #422
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Considerations in Maintenance and Generalization Following Behavior Skills Training for Behavior Intervention and Teaching Procedures
Monday, May 28, 2018
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall D
Area: AUT/OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Aimee Giles, Ph.D.
Chair: Aimee Giles (University of South Wales)
Discussant: Sharon A. Reeve (Caldwell University)
Abstract: Behavior skills training is an evidence-based training package for increasing the accuracy with which staff and caregivers implement behavioral interventions and teaching procedures. Behavior skills training packages typically include instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback components. The purpose of the current symposium is to further evaluate the effectiveness of behavior skills training to increase the fidelity with which staff or caregivers implement a variety of behavior-analytic interventions and teaching procedures. The first study evaluated the effectiveness of self-monitoring following behavior skills training to increase the fidelity with which caregivers implemented three-step prompting. The second study combined group-based behavior skills training with in-situ training to teach participants to implement incidental teaching. The third study used behavior skills training and multiple exemplar training to teach participants to implement mand training. The fourth study combined behavior skills training and coaching to train teachers to arrange incidental teaching opportunities to teach verbal operants. All four studies evaluated the maintenance or generalization of skills trained during behavior skills training.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Caregiver Training, Incidental Teaching, Procedural Fidelity, Three-Step Prompting
Target Audience: The target audience for this symposium is BCBAs or behavior analysts responsible for overseeing, training, and supervising staff or caregivers of behavior services.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation attendees will be able to 1) identify modifications to behavior skills training to facilitate maintenance or generalisation of learned skills, 2) identify how self-monitoring can be used in conjunction with behavior skills training, and 3) identify how behavior skills training can be used to train individuals to implement various incidental teaching procedures
 
Using Self-Monitoring to Increase Procedural Integrity of Caregiver-Implemented Three-Step Prompting
CHANNING LANGLINAIS (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Dorothea C. Lerman (University of Houston-Clear Lake), Jennifer Agnes Reece (University of Houston-Clear Lake)
Abstract: This study extends the literature on caregiver training methods by assessing self-monitoring as a method for increasing caregivers' procedural integrity when implementing three-step prompting with a family member. Experimenters used a behavior skills training package and procedural integrity training to train two caregivers how to implement a three-step prompting procedure and evaluate procedural integrity. Following training, caregivers implemented the procedures with their family member and monitored their own implementation of the procedures. For one caregiver, self-monitoring was effective at increasing overall procedural integrity above mastery levels and effects maintained when self-monitoring was removed and the procedures where implemented with new instructions. The caregiver who did not master the procedures when self-evaluation was the only form of feedback received performance feedback, additional behavioral skills training, and post-session performance feedback. Results obtained from this study provide useful information about the effectiveness of self-monitoring as a method of performance feedback for caregivers and demonstrates that the way procedural integrity is evaluated may influence the perceived effectiveness of an intervention.
 
Increasing Active Engagement Using Behavioral Skills Training and In-Situ Feedback
John Falligant (Auburn University), SACHA T. PENCE (Drake University), Nadratu Nuhu (Auburn University)
Abstract: Active engagement broadly refers to the delivery of reinforcers and use of incidental teaching to promote skill acquisition and language development. In school settings, incidental teaching is vital to promoting learning and positive behavioral outcomes. However, training staff to actively engage with children can be difficult and resource intensive. We used a multiple-baseline across-participants design to evaluate the use of group-based behavior skills training and in-situ training with seven trainees to increase their implementation of incidental teaching procedures to preschool children with developmental disabilities within an integrated classroom. The group-based behavior skills training consisted of the trainer delivering a presentation describing procedures, modeling the skills, and providing feedback after role-plays. During in-situ teaching, the trainer delivered feedback as participants implemented incidental teaching. The group-based behavior skills training increased incidental teaching with six participants; however, only one participant met mastery levels. In-situ training was necessary to increase levels of incidental teaching to mastery with six participants. Incidental teaching skills maintained for 1 to 20 weeks.
 
Using Behavior Skills Training and Multiple Exemplar Training to Teach Novice Therapists to Implement Mand Training
AIMEE GILES (University of South Wales), Mary Bain (University of South Wales), Olga Moran (University of South Wales), Amy Owens (University of South Wales)
Abstract: The present study investigated the use of a training package including behavior skills training and multiple exemplar training to teach novice behavioral therapists to implement mand training procedures using a delayed multiple baseline design. Three therapists and three children with autism participated. Following a written instructions baseline, a behavior skills training package including instructions, video modeling, rehearsal, and feedback was used to train therapists to conduct mand training. Therapists were trained to arrange the child’s environment to occasion mands in three ways: baited environment, giving a little, and missing piece. Each exemplar was trained in isolation and in sequential order. Post-training sessions were conducted following mastery of each exemplar to assess generalization to untrained exemplars. Behavior skills training increased the integrity with which therapists implemented mand training. However, participants required direct training in each exemplar of environmental arrangement. Independent mands increased for two out of three child participants following behavior skills training.
 
Training School Personnel to Use Incidental Teaching to Target Verbal Behavior
Sacha T. Pence (Drake University), Kimberlee Danielle Krubinski (The Arc of Jefferson County), Brian Joseph Toner (Glenwood Behavioral Health), DORIS ADAMS HILL (Auburn University Center for Disability Research and Service)
Abstract: Children with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities typically have delays in their communication skills. It is important for teachers and other school personnel to have an understanding of the different verbal operants and how to use incidental teaching to teach children to emit mands, tacts, and intraverbal responses. The purpose of the study was to use a multiple-baseline across-participants design to evaluate behavior skills training with classroom coaching to train school personnel to use incidental teaching to teach verbal behavior. Six females who were currently enrolled in a practicum to become bachelors level or Masters level Special Education teachers participated. Trainees were provided with instructions on each verbal operant and observed the experimenter modeling how to use incidental teaching to arrange opportunities to teach a child with autism spectrum disorder the targeted verbal operant (mand, tact, or intraverbal). Following the model, the trainee worked with the child while the experimenter provided coaching in the form of in-situ feedback and feedback following each session. Behavior skills training and coaching was effective to increase participants use of incidental teaching to teach mands, tacts, and intraverbals.
 
 
Symposium #495
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Breaking Away From Basic: Practical Approaches to Staff Training
Monday, May 28, 2018
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom E
Area: OBM/AUT
CE Instructor: Meghan Herron, M.S.
Chair: Heidi Eilers (Easter Seals Southern California)
Discussant: Heidi Eilers (Easter Seals Southern California)
Abstract: In-situ staff training often involves verbal feedback, which tends to be delayed and may be distracting to staff. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an auditory clicker sound as a conditioned reinforcer to train behavior interventionists relevant clinical skills during in-situ training. A multiple-baseline across behaviors design indicated that the intervention was effective in increasing all target behaviors for all three participants. For two of the participants, we conducted maintenance probes one to five weeks after the final training session and performance continued to occur at a high level. Although the participants ranked the contingent clicker presentation as less disruptive and fairer than typical feedback methods, they ranked it as slightly less helpful, slightly less worthwhile, and slightly less pleasant than typical feedback methods. Two of the three participants asked for this procedure to be used for other clinical skills outside the scope of the study. Findings of this study can offer a different and perhaps more practical approach to in-situ staff training.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Conditioned Reinforcer, Group Contingency, Staff Supervision, Staff Training
Target Audience: Behavior Analysts, Behavior Analysts in training, para-professionals, ABA masters students
Learning Objectives: 1. To become familiar with established methods of ABA staff supervision and training 2. To explore the efficacy of novel application of supervision strategies derived from the principles of Behavior Analysis 3. To discuss the practical application of novel staff supervision and training methods.
 
The Use of a Conditioned Reinforcer to Increase Accuracy of Clinical Skills
(Applied Research)
MEGHAN HERRON (Easter Seals Southern California), Amin Duff Lotfizadeh (Easterseals Southern California), Alan D. Poling (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: In-situ staff training often involves verbal feedback, which tends to be delayed and may be distracting to staff. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of an auditory clicker sound as a conditioned reinforcer to train behavior interventionists’ relevant clinical skills during in-situ training. A multiple-baseline across behaviors design indicated that the intervention was effective in increasing all target behaviors for all three participants. For two of the participants, we conducted maintenance probes one to five weeks after the final training session and performance continued to occur at a high level. Although the participants ranked the contingent clicker presentation as less disruptive and fairer than typical feedback methods, they ranked it as slightly less helpful, slightly less worthwhile, and slightly less pleasant than typical feedback methods. Two of the three participants asked for this procedure to be used for other clinical skills outside the scope of the study. Findings of this study can offer a different and perhaps more practical approach to in-situ staff training.
 
Effects of Lottery-Based Incentive Versus Feedback on Submission of Daily Session Data on Web-Based Data System
(Applied Research)
AGUSTIN JIMENEZ (TOTAL Programs), Joshua Trevino (TOTAL Programs)
Abstract: Successful intervention requires ongoing evaluation in the form of objective data to determine the effects of treatment. The importance of ongoing data collection with the ability to make changes to treatment plans based on immediate information is essential to the treatment of individuals requiring behavioral interventions. However, if those implementing behavior intervention fail to submit this information, data-based decisions cannot be made. Support for the effectiveness of Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) procedures for improving and or maintaining staff performance in the human services field has been well documented. The use of group contingencies have been used in an organizational setting to decrease staff problem behavior and a variation of a group contingency has used to decrease staff absenteeism. However, previous studies have not determined the most effective components to Group Oriented Contingency based procedures to change staff behavior. A group multiple baseline will be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a single intervention (e.g., lottery-based group contingency) procedure with the addition of the remaining intervention (e.g., performance feedback) across 4 groupings of staff providing behavior intervention services.
 
 
Symposium #516
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
Research on Organizational Behavior Management in Human Service Settings
Monday, May 28, 2018
4:00 PM–4:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom E
Area: OBM; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Kristin M. Albert, M.Ed.
Chair: Kristin M. Albert (Florida Institute of Technology; The Scott Center for Autism Treatment)
Abstract: The need for Organizational Behavior Management (OBM) applications in human service settings has become more and more apparent. The first paper in this symposium will present a quantitative literature review of research on OBM in human service settings, discussing trends, strengths, and opportunities, including the need to conduct more preintervention assessments before implementing OBM interventions. This second paper will highlight survey research that demonstrates the need for clinical behavior analysts to obtain training in OBM and compares clinicians' concerns with the current research trends highlighted in the first paper. The last paper will describe an OBM intervention in an early intervention center, where the effects of scorecards on typically high and typically low performers was evaluated.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): human-service settings, OBM applications, performance management, scorecards
Target Audience: Supervising behavior analysts working in human service settings that serve clinical populations; supervisors can be at a manager or director level
Learning Objectives: 1. Describe whey OBM research should incorporate increased used of pre-intervention assessments. 2. List the most commonly faced OBM-related challenges for clinical supervisors in human service settings. 3. Describe the differences scorecards can have upon high versus low performers.
 
Literature Review: The Use of OBM Interventions to Improve Staff Performance in Human Service Settings
Nicole Gravina (Florida Institute of Technology), Jamie Villacorta (Florida Institute of Technology), KRISTIN M. ALBERT (Florida Institute of Technology; The Scott Center for Autism Treatment), Scott Michael Curry (Florida Institute of Technology ), Ronald Joseph Clark (Florida Institute of Technology), David A. Wilder (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: One approach that can be used to improve effectiveness and efficiency in human service settings (HSS) is organizational behavior management (OBM). However, OBM has not been widely adopted in HSS and more research is needed to improve organization-wide adoption and application. In addition, although several quantitative reviews of various aspects of OBM have been conducted, none to date has specifically looked at the role of OBM specific to HSS. Thus, the present review was conducted to look at the literature on OBM in HSS that was published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior Management (JOBM), the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA), and Behavior Analysis in Practice (BAP) from 1990 2016. Trends across client populations served, settings for conducting research, employee populations targeted, the use of pre-intervention assessments, the specific dependent variables measured, and the types of independent variables used will be described. Recommendations for future research will also be provided.
 
Organizational Behavior Management in Human Service Settings: A Survey of Clinical Behavior Analysts
Kristin M. Albert (The Scott Center for Autism Treatment, Florida Institute of Technology), Nicole Gravina (Florida Institute of Technology), Daniel B. Sundberg (ABA Technologies), SCOTT MICHAEL CURRY (Florida Institute of Technology ), Noell Jankowski (Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Applied behavior analysts working in human service settings (HSS) train and supervise staff, design systems, and do other tasks related to organizational behavior management (OBM). Consistent with these practices, the Fifth Edition Task List from the Behavior Analyst Certification Board has placed additional emphasis on the need for supervision and OBM training for all clinical behavior analysts. To better understand the role of OBM in HSS, we created a survey for clinical behavior analysts. Respondents were 164 individuals who worked in clinical or human service settings as behavior analysts and who supervised at least one other person. We also coded ten director-level and ten manager-level job descriptions for behavior analysts in HSS to see what kinds of OBM training employers ask for and what kind of OBM job duties employers advertise. Data obtained are discussed in terms of how they can illuminate the links between what clinical behavior analysts are trained to do, what companies advertise they want their clinicians to do, and what those clinicians actually do once they enter the workforce.
 
The Effect of Performance Scorecards in an Early Intervention Clinic
DANIEL J. CYMBAL (Florida Institute of Technology), Nicole Gravina (Florida Institute of Technology), Kavita Ramsahai (Florida Institute of Technology; JKP Analysts), Joshua K. Pritchard (Southern Illinois University; JKP Analysts)
Abstract: The present study evaluated the impact of scorecards on behavior technicians performance in an early intervention center. Eight technicians participated in the study, each receiving a weekly scorecard. Baseline measures determined the performance level of participants, with four of the highest performers and four of the lowest performers being selected as the participants for this study. The scorecards included measures drawn from an employee survey which sought to identify essential job duties. From the survey results, four measures were selected that corresponded with pre-existing data collection methods. These included: timeliness, programs ran, data entry, and provision of feedback. Initially, there was a modest increase in performance for four of the technicians when scorecard delivery was introduced. Scorecard dimensions were further altered to assess the impact of the modifications on typically high and low performers. Implications and areas of future research will be discussed.
 
 
Symposium #529
CE Offered: BACB — 
Supervision
An Experimental Analysis of Effective Supervision: How to Increase Instructional Accuracy and Feedback During Teacher Training and Supervision
Monday, May 28, 2018
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom G
Area: EDC
CE Instructor: Len Levin, Ph.D.
Chair: Lynn Yuan (Verbal Behavior Associates)
Discussant: Len Levin (Coyne & Associates)
Abstract: As behavior analysts, we have the responsibility of training other individuals (parents, educators, or Registered Behavior Technicians) to deliver service or accurate instruction directly to our clients. Much research has demonstrated that instructor accuracy (i.e., errorless instructional delivery) is critical for learner outcomes. There is a significant quantity of behavior analytic literature that discusses evidenced-based methods for improving teacher training and supervision. In this symposium, we present an experimental analysis of the necessary components that constitute effective and efficient supervision and identify tactics to increase supervision by clinical management. In summary, this experimental study established the following: 1) supervisor accuracy in presentation of instructional trials across student programming is a required prerequisite for training and supervising others, 2) observing others deliver instruction via video training, Powerpoint presentations, or role playing are ineffective methods of increasing teacher accuracy, 3) the controlling variable for how teacher accuracy is achieved is through the use of direct, objective measurement of instruction using the Teacher Performance Rate Accuracy Scale (TPRAS) provided during in situ supervision, and 4) self-monitoring ones own instructional delivery through conducting TPRAS on oneself is another effective way to increase teacher accuracy.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: BCBAs, BCaBAs, and any individuals who are responsible for training and supervising RBTs, paraprofessionals, and/or school aides in direct instruction with learners.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to 1) Identify ineffective methods for RBT/teacher training 2) Identify effective components of RBT/teacher training 3) Identify prerequisite supervisor repertoires necessary to be effective as supervisors 4) List tactics to increase the amount of direct/objective feedback during supervision by clinical supervisors.
 
The Effects of Observing Others Versus Self-Observation on Teacher Accuracy in Presenting Learn Unit Instruction
(Applied Research)
ELIZABETH HOWARTH (Verbal Behavior Associates), R. Douglas Greer (Columbia University Teachers College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences)
Abstract: In Experiment I, I tested the effects of learning by observing others on teacher learn unit accuracy. I measured learn unit accuracy prior to and following a training where the teachers measured the accuracy of other individual’s learn unit instruction, via TPRA observations on a set of standardized training videos. Additionally, I measured the numbers of post-intervention in-situ TPRA’s with feedback required by each teacher to achieve mastery criteria for presenting learn units. Results showed that all teachers still required in-situ TPRA’s with feedback in order to achieve mastery criteria for delivering instruction. In Experiment II, I tested the effects of learning by observing oneself on teacher learn unit accuracy. I measured learn unit accuracy prior to and following a training where the teachers measured the accuracy of their own learn unit instruction, via TPRA observations on a set of pre-recorded videos of themselves delivering learn units. Additionally, I measured the numbers of post-intervention in-situ TPRA’s with feedback required by each teacher to achieve mastery criteria for presenting instruction. Results showed that all three teachers demonstrated mastery criteria for delivering learn units following the self-observation intervention (the skill was in repertoire, none of the teachers required in-situ TPRA’s with feedback).
 
The Effects of a Group Yoked-Contingency Intervention on Increasing the Amount of Teacher Performance Rate and Accuracy Scale Feedback From Clinical Managers During Direct Supervision Sessions
(Applied Research)
Matthew C. Howarth (Verbal Behavior Associates), Crystal Lo (Verbal Behavior Associates), CATHERINE E. POPE (Verbal Behavior Associates)
Abstract: Supervision of Registered Behavior Technicians (RBT) in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis is a key quality indicator to providing the best outcomes for consumers. Previous research has demonstrated that the Teacher Performance Rate and Accuracy Scale (TPRA) measure is the most effective tool used to increase instructional accuracy of instructors in the field by providing immediate and objective feedback. In contrast, the frequency of which a Clinical BCBA Managers implement the TPRA measure with RBTs is to be considered. The purpose of this study is to analyze the effects of a yoked-contingency tactic to increase the implementation of TPRAs with a group of 3 BCBA managers who delivered very few TPRAs during RBT supervision sessions, using a delayed multiple probe design across groups of participants. The dependent variable is the number of TPRAs each BCBA manager completed per day. The independent variable is the implementation of a yoked- contingency tactic, in which individuals in a group must work together to access reinforcement (Greer & Ross, 2008). This study is on-going, however, current results indicate that a yoked-contingency intervention is overall an effective tactic to increase TPRAs delivered by current BCBA manager participants during sessions.
 

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